Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry maintains pedagogical and research strengths in organic, inorganic, theoretical and experimental physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, chemical biology and nanochemistry. Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students collaboratively pursue interdisciplinary research within the department, enhanced by the partnerships with colleagues in the medicine, biology, geology, physics and engineering.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/chemistry/

Course usage information

CHEM 0080A. First Year Seminar- Energy.

An introductory study of the scientific foundation of energy, fundamental physical, chemical, and thermodynamic aspects of common (fossil, nuclear) as well as novel (fuel cells, solar, wind, etc.) energy sources. Concentrates on scientific principles, but includes discussion on resources and reserves, environmental impact, current usage, and future needs. For students of all disciplines who are interested in obtaining an understanding of scientific principles of energy. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS LILE

Course usage information

CHEM 0080B. Molecular Structures in Chemistry and Biology.

This course will consist of a survey of historical developments and concepts of three dimensional structures of molecules. The course will conclude with a survey of the current state of the art of structure determination and 3D structure motifs for small molecules, nanomaterials and biological macromolecules. This freshman only seminar will be strictly limited to a maximum of 20 students. FYS

Course usage information

CHEM 0080C. Drug Discoveries in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

A Freshman seminar that provides a survey of past and current approaches that enable the discovery and development of therapeutic agents. Topics ranging from target validation to the development of therapeutics (small molecules, biologics, and stem cells) will be discussed. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

Course usage information

CHEM 0080D. Chemical Ecology: Pheromones, Poisons and Chemical Messages.

This first year seminar will explore how plants and animals use chemicals to send and receive information about mating, identify potential hosts, defend themselves, and establish social networks. We will focus on the chemistry and biochemistry of these signals, with some examples of the behavioral and ecological consequences of chemical signaling. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

Course usage information

CHEM 0080E. Exploration of the Chemistry of Renewable Energy.

The various types of renewable energy sources will be explored through classroom discussions, activities, and laboratories. Students will learn about the various types of renewable energy sources and the chemistry associated with each. The course will include short laboratories to illustrate the application of the energy sources. Renewable energy will be discussed in relationship to environmental factors and social impact. Active learning strategies will be used throughout the course. For students of all disciplines who are interested in obtaining an understanding of renewable energy. FYS LILE WRIT

Fall CHEM0080E S01 16882 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (K. Hess)
Course usage information

CHEM 0080F. Kitchen Chemistry.

Have you ever wondered why olive oil is a liquid but butter is solid? Or why bread and cookies rise when baked? This Kitchen Chemistry course is an experimental approach to chemistry, as seen in cooking. We will examine topics such as trans fats, baking soda as a leavening agent in baking, ripening of fruit, artificial sweeteners, GMOs, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning of foods. Edible experiments will be used to discuss the science behind recipes. Enrollment limited to 14 first year students. Instructor permission is required. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

CHEM 0090. Kitchen Chemistry.

Kitchen Chemistry is a course that highlights the chemistry underlying food and cooking. We will examine topics such as trans fats, baking soda as a leavening agent in baking, chemical basis for ripening of fruit, pectin as a cellular glue, artificial sweeteners, GMOs, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning of foods. In-class demonstrations and edible experiments will be used to discuss the science behind cooking. Content will be discussed using a variety of contexts including primary scientific literature, public policy reports, mainstream media, and food blogs. This class is appropriate for all students interested in chemistry. LILE

Fall CHEM0090 S01 16895 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (S. Delaney)
Course usage information

CHEM 0100. Introductory Chemistry.

Explores stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, solutions, gases, chemical reactions, equilibria, thermochemistry. Three hours of lecture, one conference per week, no laboratory section. S/NC.

Fall CHEM0100 S01 15491 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (V. Colvin)
Fall CHEM0100 C01 15492 M 1:00-2:15 (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Fall CHEM0100 C02 15493 M 2:30-3:45 (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Fall CHEM0100 C03 15494 W 9:00-10:15 (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Fall CHEM0100 C04 15495 W 10:30-11:45 (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Fall CHEM0100 C05 15496 T 1:00-2:15 (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Fall CHEM0100 C06 15497 T 2:30-3:45 (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Course usage information

CHEM 0120. Chemistry of the Environment.

Focuses on understanding a number of environmental questions from the underlying laws and concepts of chemistry and physics. While some knowledge of math, physics and chemistry are useful, none is assumed. Concepts of chemistry and physics will be developed as needed. LILE

Course usage information

CHEM 0190. Chemical Ecology: Pheromones, Poisons, and Chemical Messages.

Plants and animals use chemicals to send and receive information about mating, identify potential hosts, defend themselves against enemies and pathogens and establish social networks. We will focus on the chemistry and biochemistry of these signals, with some examples of the behavioral and ecological consequences of chemical signaling. FYS

Course usage information

CHEM 0330. Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure.

Explores the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, thermodynamics, solution equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and reaction mechanisms. Course includes lecture and laboratory sections. Laboratory cannot be taken without the lecture. Students who previously passed 0330 lab may be excused from repeating the lab portion of the course. Required background: CHEM 0100 or AP Chemistry 4 or CHEM Placement Test 8 or IBC Chemistry.

Fall CHEM0330 M01 15142 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Fall CHEM0330 S01 15140 MWF 10:00-10:50(15) (R. Stratt)
Fall CHEM0330 S02 15141 TTh 10:30-11:50(15) (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330 C01 15143 M 12:00-12:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330 C02 15144 T 12:00-12:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330 C03 15145 W 12:00-12:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330 M01 24215 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330 S01 24212 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (C. Rose-Petruck)
Spr CHEM0330 C01 24213 M 12:00-12:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330 C02 24214 T 12:00-12:50 (L. Wang)
Course usage information

CHEM 0330L. Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure Lab.

Please see course description for CHEM 0330.

Fall CHEM0330L L01 16394 M 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L02 16397 M 2:00-5:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L03 16400 T 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L04 16402 T 2:30-6:20 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L05 16404 W 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L06 16405 W 2:00-5:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L07 16419 Th 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L08 16424 Th 2:30-6:20 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L09 16428 F 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L10 16430 F 2:00-5:50 (L. Wang)
Fall CHEM0330L L11 16431 Arranged (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L01 25282 M 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L02 25283 M 2:00-5:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L03 25284 T 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L04 25285 T 2:30-6:20 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L05 25286 W 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L06 25287 W 2:00-5:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L07 25288 Th 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L08 25289 Th 2:30-6:20 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0330L L11 25292 Arranged (L. Wang)
Course usage information

CHEM 0332. Equilibrium, Rate and Structure - Tutorial.

The CHEM 0332 tutorial program offers students a second opportunity to develop mastery of the chemistry concepts taught in the fall semester CHEM 0330: Equilibrium, Rate and Structure course. Students not performing at a passing level in the fall CHEM 0330 course may apply to join the tutorial program. Students accepted into the tutorial program begin by reviewing compound and reaction stoichiometry toward the end of the fall semester. Tutorial students enroll in CHEM 0332 during the spring semester to complete their studies of equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, thermodynamics, atomic and molecular structure and kinetics. There are no lectures in CHEM 0332 . Students in the CHEM 0332 tutorial program complete weekly reading reflection assignments, online homework, and weekly problem sets during the fall and spring semesters and participate in two mandatory , regularly scheduled problem sessions during each week of the spring semester. The tutorial program has three midterms and one comprehensive final exam. The first exam is on the same day as the final exam of CHEM 0330 in the fall semester.
Admission to the CHEM 0332 tutorial program requires an application and an interview with Prof. Russo-Rodriguez no later than November 20th. To qualify for consideration, a student’s performance on Fall CHEM 0330 exams must be below the passing level AND the student must be on track to pass the laboratory. Accepted students receive a grade of incomplete for the Fall CHEM 0330 course. Upon successful completion of the CHEM 0332 tutorial program in the spring semester, the incomplete in Fall CHEM 330 is replaced by the student’s tutorial program grade.
Permission by Prof. Russo-Rodriguez and an override by Ms. Sheila Quigley are both required.

Spr CHEM0332 S01 24216 Arranged (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Spr CHEM0332 S02 24217 Arranged (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Spr CHEM0332 S03 24218 Arranged (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Spr CHEM0332 S04 24219 Arranged (S. Russo-Rodriguez)
Course usage information

CHEM 0350. Organic Chemistry.

Sequel to CHEM 0330. Investigates the constitution and properties of the different classes of organic compounds, with considerable attention to reaction mechanisms. The laboratory work involves an introduction to microscale preparative and analytical techniques of organic chemistry and the preparation of representative organic compounds. Three hours of lecture and five hours of prelaboratory and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 0330.
Students MUST register for a common meeting, a lecture section, a lab and a conference.
If you previously completed CHEM 0350 laboratory but received a grade of no credit in the course, please register for lab section 11.

Spr CHEM0350 M01 24225 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350 S01 24220 MWF 9:00-9:50(18) (S. Delaney)
Spr CHEM0350 S02 24221 TTh 9:00-10:20(18) (C. Seto)
Spr CHEM0350 C01 24222 M 12:00-12:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350 C02 24223 T 12:00-12:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350 C03 24224 W 12:00-12:50 (K. Hess)
Course usage information

CHEM 0350L. Organic Chemistry Lab.

Please see course description for CHEM 0350.

Spr CHEM0350L L01 25302 M 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L02 25306 M 2:00-5:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L03 25309 T 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L04 25310 T 2:30-6:20 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L05 25311 W 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L06 25312 W 2:00-5:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L07 25313 Th 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L08 25314 Th 2:30-6:20 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0350L L11 25317 Arranged (K. Hess)
Course usage information

CHEM 0360. Organic Chemistry.

Sequel to CHEM 0350. Investigates the constitution and properties of organic compounds at a fundamental level with an introduction to physical organic, bioorganic, and synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory work is concerned with the identification and characterization of organic compounds, including modern instrumental methods. Three hours of lecture and five hours of prelaboratory and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 0350.
Students MUST register for a lecture section, a lab and a conference.
If you previously completed CHEM 0360 laboratory but received a grade of no credit in the course, please register for lab section 11.

Fall CHEM0360 M01 15486 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Fall CHEM0360 S01 15484 MWF 9:00-9:50(18) (C. Seto)
Fall CHEM0360 S02 15485 TTh 9:00-10:20(18) (C. Morton)
Fall CHEM0360 C01 15487 T 12:00-12:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360 C02 15488 W 12:00-12:50 (K. Hess)
Course usage information

CHEM 0360L. Organic Chemistry Lab.

Please see course description for CHEM 0360.

Fall CHEM0360L L01 16432 M 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L02 16433 M 2:00-5:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L03 16434 T 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L04 16435 T 2:30-6:20 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L05 16436 W 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L06 16437 W 2:00-5:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L07 16438 Th 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L08 16439 Th 2:30-6:20 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L09 16440 F 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L10 16441 F 2:00-5:50 (K. Hess)
Fall CHEM0360L L11 16442 Arranged (K. Hess)
Course usage information

CHEM 0400. Biophysical and Bioinorganic Chemistry.

Examines aspects of physical and inorganic chemistry relevant to biochemistry: thermodynamics of hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, electrically charged membranes, coordination chemistry, active and passive transport, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, metal-based drugs, and physical methods. Three hours of lecture and five hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 0360 and MATH 0100 or 0170. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 0040 or 0060.
Students MUST register for a lecture section and a lab.

Spr CHEM0400 S01 24227 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (E. Kim)
Spr CHEM0400 L01 24228 W 1:00-4:50 (L. Wang)
Spr CHEM0400 L02 24229 Th 2:30-6:20 (L. Wang)
Course usage information

CHEM 0500. Inorganic Chemistry.

Examines the chemistry of main group and transition metal elements with treatment of covalent bonding and molecular structure along with the methods of studying inorganic compounds and reactions. Three hours of lecture and five hours of prelaboratory and laboratory attendance. Prerequisite: CHEM 0360.
Students MUST register for a lecture section and a lab.

Spr CHEM0500 S01 24231 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (O. Chen)
Spr CHEM0500 L02 24233 W 1:00-4:50 (K. Hess)
Spr CHEM0500 L03 24234 Th 2:30-6:20 (K. Hess)
Course usage information

CHEM 0970. Undergraduate Research.

Prerequisite: permission of the staff. Permission should be requested before the end of the preceding semester. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

CHEM 0980. Undergraduate Research.

See Undergraduate Research (CHEM 0970) for course description. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

CHEM 1060. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

Covers the physical and chemical properties of transition metal compounds as well as current research topics in inorganic chemistry. Laboratory is designed for the practice of modern inorganic chemistry through the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of air-sensitive transition metal compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 0500.

Fall CHEM1060 S01 15482 MWF 9:00-9:50(01) (O. Chen)
Fall CHEM1060 L01 15483 W 1:00-5:50 (E. Victor)
Course usage information

CHEM 1140. Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry.

An introduction to the quantum theory of chemical systems. Elements of quantum mechanics; electronic structure of atoms and molecules; study of molecular structure and behavior by spectroscopy; chemical bonding are all explored. Prerequisites: CHEM 0330, MATH 0180 or equivalent, PHYS 0030 and PHYS 0040 or PHYS 0050 and PHYS 0060 or PHYS 0070 and PHYS 0470 or ENGN 0030 and ENGN 0040.

Fall CHEM1140 S01 15481 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (J. Geiser)
Course usage information

CHEM 1150. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.

Examines the question: Where does chemical equilibrium come from? Focuses on macroscopic perspectives on chemical systems and the molecular origins of macroscopic behavior along with elements of statistical mechanics, the laws of thermodynamics, and the relationships between the two. Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or written permission of the instructor.

Spr CHEM1150 S01 24235 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (L. Wang)
Course usage information

CHEM 1160. Physical Chemistry Laboratory.

An introduction to modern instrumentation and experimental techniques as applied to physical chemistry. Experiments will emphasize application of the ideas of spectroscopy, kinetics, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics to systems of chemical and biochemical interest. Required course for concentrators in chemistry. One to two afternoons of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1140 or permission of the instructor.

Spr CHEM1160 S01 24236 MW 1:00-5:50(06) (G. Diebold)
Course usage information

CHEM 1170. Environmental Chemistry.

A laboratory course using analytical methods to help in the study and description of several realistic environmental problems. Illustrates scientific methodology and measurement techniques as they apply to these important problems. A problem-solving course employing a kind of environmental chemical detective work. Two laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: MATH 0100 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 8. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

CHEM 1220. Computational Tools in Biochemistry and Chemical Biology.

Introduction to computational tools used to analyze protein sequences and structures, DNA sequence analysis, RNA structure, biochemical pathways and the analysis of microarray data. Extensive use of programs such as AMBER, BLAST, PSIBLAST and a discussion of their limitations.

Course usage information

CHEM 1230. Chemical Biology.

This course covers topics at the interface of chemistry and biology and, specifically, the use of chemical tools to probe biological systems. Using examples from the recent literature, we will discuss using the central methods of chemistry, namely the ability to design and synthesize compounds with a particular set of properties, to analyze biological problems. Specific topics include molecular recognition of DNA, artificial enzymes, small molecule sensors, and in vivo imaging of proteins, nucleic acids, and cell-surface carbohydrates. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360 and BIOL 0280. If enrollment exceeds the limit, permission to enroll will be allotted in the order: 1) first year graduate students, 2) senior concentrators in Chemistry or Biochemistry 3) junior concentrators 4) other students. Students who have registered or have permission to enroll must attend the first three classes or risk losing their places to someone on the waiting list.

Fall CHEM1230 S01 15480 MW 8:30-9:50(01) (J. Sello)
Course usage information

CHEM 1240. Biochemistry.

Examines the chemical, mechanistic, and structural basis for enzymatic catalysis. Uses examples from the recent literature to examine how the experimental and conceptual tools of chemical synthesis, isotopic labeling, stereochemistry, enzymology, kinetics, and protein structure can be brought to bear to unravel the chemical and physical principles underlying the enormous catalytic acceleration and exquisite structural specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Prerequisites: Strong background in organic chemistry (CHEM 0360, A or B performance preferable) plus at least one semester of Biochemistry (BIOL 0280). Enrollment limited to: 25 students, written permission required.

Spr CHEM1240 S01 24237 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (J. Sello)
Course usage information

CHEM 1450. Advanced Organic Chemistry.

Lectures cover topics of current interest in organic reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and structure determination. Laboratory emphasizes spectroscopic and separation techniques and modern synthetic methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 0360. Students MUST register for a lecture section, conference and a lab. WRIT

Spr CHEM1450 S01 24238 MW 8:30-9:50(02) (A. Basu)
Spr CHEM1450 C01 25560 F 9:00-9:50 (A. Basu)
Spr CHEM1450 L01 24239 M 1:00-5:00 (E. Victor)
Course usage information

CHEM 1560A. Molecular Modeling.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560B. Techniques in Inorganic Chemistry.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560C. Advanced Spectroscopy.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560D. Chemistry and Biology of Naturally Occurring Antibiotics.

Small molecules produced by organisms for chemical defense have long been exploited in medicine, biotechnology, and biological research. 1560D will examine the origins, uses, modes of action, and preparations of some of the most important and useful of these "antibiotic" molecules. Given the inter-disciplinary nature of this topic, this course is open to students with backgrounds in the biological and/or physical sciences. Familiarity with concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry will be assumed.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560E. Biological Mass Spectrometry.

This seminar course will survey the instrumentation, methods, and applications of modern biological mass spectrometry. Through lecture and interactive discussions, we will explore the fundamentals of mass spectrometry. We will then proceed to cover a series of topics relevant to protein and peptides analysis. The seminar will conclude with an exploration of recent developments in instrumentation or applications of particular interest to the participants. Recommended pre-requisites: CHEM 0360, BIOL 0280, PHYS 0040. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560F. Organic Structure Analysis.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560G. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

These special topics courses cover the basics of modern NMR spectroscopy. Topics to be included are as follows: modern Fourier transform methodology, modern NMR instrumentation, and a comprehensive discussion of one and two dimensional experiments that are routinely performed. Topics such as coherence transfer and pulsed field gradients will also be included. Experimental methods covered in detail include COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOSEY, ROSEY, EXSY and DOSY methodology. This course will not focus on structure determination or spectral interpretation but rather on experimental methodology.

Spr CHEM1560G S01 24964 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (E. Victor)
Course usage information

CHEM 1560H. Chemical Glycobiology.

This course examines the chemistry and biology of carbohydrates in living systems. Topics to be covered may include - principles of carbohydrate recognition, enzymes involved in synthesis and modification of carbohydrates, carbohydrates in bacterial/viral and other cellular interactions, glycomics, carbohydrate synthesis. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360 and BIOL 0280. Instructor permission required. Attendance at the first class meeting is required for enrollment.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560I. DNA Damage and Repair.

This course analyzes the chemistry of DNA damaging agents and the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and DNA repair. We will also analyze the mutagenic and toxic consequences of modifications to DNA structure. Specific topics include the reactions of alkylating agents, ultraviolet radiation, and oxidizing radicals with DNA; additionally, chemotherapeutics that modify DNA will be discussed. Multiple cellular repair pathways will be covered including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and direct reversal. Prerequisites: CHEM 0350, CHEM 0360, BIOL 0280, BIOL 1270, or by permission.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560J. Topics in Bioinorganic Chemistry.

Covers current topics of bioinorganic chemistry with review of fundamental inorganic and biological chemistry. Topics include metal ion transport and storage, oxygen metabolism, electron transfer, respiration and photosynthesis, metal ion receptors and signaling, hydrolytic chemistry, metallo-neurochemistry, and medicinal bioinorganic chemistry. Students are strongly urged to complete both CHEM 0500 and CHEM 0360 prior to this special topics course.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560K. Computational Chemistry.

Introduction to computational tools for studying the structure of molecules, chemical bonding and chemical reactions. A survey of computational approaches for calculating electron distribution such as molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and ab initio methods (Hartree-Fock, configuration interaction, perturbation theory and density functional theory) will be given. Methods for calculating dynamics of atoms in molecular vibration and chemical reactions will be covered. The course is intended for seniors and graduate students in all subdivisions of chemistry. The goal is to make students capable of using research level tools and carry out simple calculations related to their research interests.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560L. Modern Natural Product Biosynthesis.

This course will cover the biosynthesis of the major classes of natural products - polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, including beta-lactam antibiotics, terpenes, alkaloids and vitamins. The readings from original literature will cover the chemical logic and mechanisms of biosynthetic pathways and individual reactions, including isotopic labeling for whole-cell feeding experiments, stable isotopic NMR analysis, and mass spectrometry. Modern topics include genomics of natural product biosynthesis, genome mining, and pathway engineering. Prerequisites: CHEM 0350 and 0360. Recommended: CHEM 1230, 1240, or 1450. Enrollment limited to 25 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

CHEM 1560M. Applied Materials Chemistry.

Materials chemistry is the study of the synthesis, structure, properties, and application of solid materials. Our technology-driven world is fueled by advances in materials chemistry with examples of application in areas such as microelectronics, polymers, and energy technology. This course will explain the application of materials chemistry through the materials properties and characterization, detailing how the crystalline and molecular structure of materials can be related to electronic, optical, thermal, and mechanical properties. WRIT

Course usage information

CHEM 1620A. Photoacoustics.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or equivalent.

Course usage information

CHEM 1620B. Spectroscopy.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or equivalent.

Course usage information

CHEM 1620C. Topics in Modern Physical Chemistry.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 1660. Instrumental Analysis with Environmental Applications.

This course covers the principles and practical applications of important analytical chemistry tools used to study environmental problems, including discussions of method selection and statistical treatment of data. Students will strategize and implement a study of a field site. Includes lab sessions with hands-on experience of instrumental analysis using atomic and molecular spectroscopic techniques, separations by gas and liquid chromatography, and electrochemical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 0330 or GEOL 1370. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

CHEM 1700. Nanoscale Materials: Synthesis and Applications.

Focuses on synthesis, properties, and applications of nanoscale materials. It begins with the introduction to size-dependent properties and to general characterization methods of nanomaterials. It then outlines the synthesis, surface chemistry and self-assembly of nanomaterials. It further reviews catalytic, optical and magnetic properties of nanomateirals. Finally, the course highlights the applications of nanomaterials in information storage, energy conversion, and biomedicine. Prerequisites : CHEM0350, PHYS 0030 or 0050, BIOL0280 recommended.

Fall CHEM1700 S01 15479 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (S. Sun)
Course usage information

CHEM 2010. Advanced Thermodynamics.

Fundamental principles of macroscopic equilibrium thermodynamics. The three laws of thermodynamics, the thermodynamic potentials, temperature scales, heat engines and refrigerators, entropy, kinetic theory, and transport phenomena. Applications to solids, fluids, and magnetic systems; Gibbs relations, first and second order phase traditions, thermal radiation, gas expansions.

Fall CHEM2010 S01 15478 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (B. Rubenstein)
Course usage information

CHEM 2020. Statistical Mechanics.

Introduction to modern equilibrium statistical mechanics, including the classical and quantum descriptions of ideal gases, the molecular basis of thermodynamics, the concepts of ensembles and fluctuations, and the implications of quantum mechanical indistinguishability. Applications include chemical and phase equilibria, the transition-state theory of chemical reaction rates, and the theory of liquids.

Spr CHEM2020 S01 24240 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (R. Stratt)
Course usage information

CHEM 2210. Chemical Crystallography.

Introduces the principles of crystallography (plane groups, point groups, space groups, Bravais lattice, crystal classes), crystallographic methods (single-crystal, powder XRD, macromolecular), strategies for data collection, methods for data reduction, and structure interpretation; reviews modern crystal structure databases (CSD, ICSD) and search engines; reviews the historical development of crystallography and the scope, potential and application of X-ray analysis.

Course usage information

CHEM 2310. Organometallic Chemistry.

This course intends to help students understand structures and reactions of transition metal complexes with common organic ligands: 18-electron rule; the structure and properties of transition metal complexes with carbonyl and other common organic ligands: chemical reactions initiated by metal-organic bonding interactions; and organometallic catalysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360, CHEM 0500, CHEM 1060.

Fall CHEM2310 S01 15477 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (J. Robinson)
Course usage information

CHEM 2320. Solid State Chemistry.

This course focuses on descriptive understanding of structures and properties of inorganic materials. It covers symmetry operations in crystals, crystal structure, physical properties of inorganic materials, materials phase diagram and preparation, and solid state electrochemistry for battery, fuel cell and supercapacitor applications. Prerequisites: CHEM 0500 and 1060 or equivalents or written permission. Recommended for seniors and first-year graduate students.

Spr CHEM2320 S01 24241 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (S. Sun)
Course usage information

CHEM 2410. Physical Organic Chemistry.

Detailed examination of organic reaction mechanisms, reactive intermediates, and the methods employed for their characterization (e.g., kinetics, free energy relationships, isotope effects, molecular orbital theory, spectroscopy, and product distributions). Topics may include concerted, free radical, elimination, and photochemical reactions, and the chemistry of radicals, carbocations, carbanions, and carbenes.

Fall CHEM2410 S01 15476 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (E. Victor)
Course usage information

CHEM 2420. Organic Reactions.

Study of organic reactions and reaction mechanisms. Discussion and analysis of organic transformations. Topics can include arrow pushing strategies and synthetic methods.

Fall CHEM2420 S01 15475 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (P. Williard)
Course usage information

CHEM 2430. Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

Methods, strategies, and mechanisms. Topics may include the chemistry of anions, cations, and radicals, concerted reactions, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

Spr CHEM2430 S01 24243 F 1:00-3:00(06) (A. Basu)
Spr CHEM2430 S01 24243 M 11:00-11:50(06) (A. Basu)
Course usage information

CHEM 2770. Quantum Mechanics.

Semester I: Time independent quantum mechanics and its application to atomic and molecular problems. Discussions of modern theories of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and molecular spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or equivalent.

Fall CHEM2770 S01 15474 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (G. Diebold)
Course usage information

CHEM 2780. Quantum Mechanics.

Semester II: Lectures consider the theory and application of time-dependent quantum mechanical methods in chemical physics. Both few and many-body methods are described and discussions include the correlation function formulation of chemical dynamics. Numerical path integral methods for equilibrium and dynamical problems are introduced. Prerequisite: CHEM 2770.

Spr CHEM2780 S01 24244 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (J. Doll)
Course usage information

CHEM 2810. Departmental Seminars.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2820. Departmental Seminars.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2870. Departmental Colloquia.

No description available. Open to graduate students only.

Fall CHEM2870 S01 15472 F 4:00-5:50(11) 'To Be Arranged'
Fall CHEM2870 C01 15473 F 2:00-3:50 (S. Delaney)
Course usage information

CHEM 2880. Departmental Colloquia.

No description available. Open to graduate students only.

Spr CHEM2880 S01 24245 F 4:00-5:50(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHEM 2920A. Chemistry and Physics of Amorphous Materials.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2920B. Organic Spectroscopic Methods.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2920C. Topics in Modern Spectroscopy.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2970. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.

Fall CHEM2970 S01 14709 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM2970 S01 23806 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHEM 2980. Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

CHEM 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Fall CHEM2990 S01 14710 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM2990 S01 23807 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHEM XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students wishing to Study Chemistry.

Chair

Paul Gregory Williard

Professor

James C. Baird
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

David E. Cane
Vernon K. Krieble Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry

Vicki L. Colvin
Vernon K. Krieble Professor of Chemistry and Engineering

Gerald J. Diebold
Professor of Chemistry

Jimmie D. Doll
Jesse H. and Louisa D. Sharp Metcalf Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Ronald G. Lawler
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

G. Tayhas R. Palmore
Professor of Engineering; Professor of Chemistry

Wolfgang Peti
Professor of Medical Science; Professor of Chemistry

William M. Risen Jr
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Christoph Rose-Petruck
Professor of Chemistry

Richard Mark Stratt
Newport Rogers Professor of Chemistry

J. William Suggs
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Shouheng Sun
Vernon K. Krieble Professor of Chemistry

Lai-Sheng Wang
Jesse H. and Louisa D. Sharp Metcalf Professor of Chemistry

Harold R. Ward
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Environmental Studies

Peter M. Weber
Professor of Chemistry

Paul Gregory Williard
Professor of Chemistry; Chair in Chemistry

Aaron Wold
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Matthew B. Zimmt
Professor of Chemistry

Associate Professor

Amit Basu
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Sarah Delaney
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Eunsuk Kim
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Arthur R. Salomon
Associate Professor of Biology; Associate Professor of Chemistry

Jason K. Sello
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Christopher Takakazu Seto
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Visiting Associate Professor

Vlastimil Fidler
Visiting Associate Professor of Chemistry

Assistant Professor

Ou Chen
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Jerome R. Robinson
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Brenda M. Rubenstein
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Senior Lecturer

Kathleen M. Hess
Senior Lecturer in Chemistry

Li-Qiong Wang
Senior Lecturer in Chemistry

Lecturer

Sandra Russo-Rodriguez
Lecturer in Chemistry

Adjunct Professor

Hannes Jonsson
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry

Markus Meuwly
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry

Adjunct Associate Professor

Wesley H. Bernskoetter
Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemistry

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Kristie J. Koski
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Fedor M. Rudakov
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Visiting Scholar

Anne L. Rieger
Visiting Scholar in Chemistry

Visiting Scientist

Dilek A. Boga
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Yan Gao
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Xiangling Meng
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Francisco Schunk
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Ziyao Tang
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Chao Yu
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Senior Research Associate

Joseph D. Geiser
Senior Research Associate in Chemistry

Chemistry

The Chemistry concentration offers courses and research opportunities that range from fundamental studies involving the characterization and preparation of synthetic and naturally occurring molecules, to interdisciplinary studies at the interfaces of chemistry with biology, medicine, physics, engineering, and nanoscience. As early as their first year, undergraduates are able to work one-on-one or in small groups with faculty members on cutting edge research projects. The Sc.B. degree provides a thorough foundation for further graduate study or for entry-level technical positions in each area. Students seeking the Sc.B. may either pursue the standard Chemistry concentration or one of the two optional tracks: Chemical Biology or Materials Chemistry. Students may also pursue the A.B. degree in Chemistry, which provides a core education in the discipline.

Standard program for the A.B. degree

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry 11
CHEM 1150Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 11
CHEM 1160Physical Chemistry Laboratory 11
Two advanced science/math electives. 22
Total Credits9
1

Note that the physical chemistry courses (CHEM 1140, CHEM 1150, CHEM 1160) have mathematics and physics prerequisites.

2

 At least one must be a chemistry course. BIOL 0280 is credited as an elective for the chemistry concentration.

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

The Chemistry Department offers three tracks for the Sc.B. Chemistry Concentration – a Chemistry track, a Chemical Biology track and a Materials Chemistry track. These tracks are not separate concentrations – your degree will still be an Sc.B. in Chemistry. The Chemical Biology track is designed for students who have a strong interest in the interface of chemistry with biology. The Materials Chemistry track is designed for students who have a strong interest in the interface of chemistry with nanoscience and materials science.  The expectation is that courses required for the concentration will be taken for a letter grade.

Concentrating in Chemistry – Three tracks
The required/recommended courses for the three tracks are given below.

Chemistry Track:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 0970Undergraduate Research1
CHEM 0980Undergraduate Research1
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
CHEM 1150Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics1
CHEM 1160Physical Chemistry Laboratory1
MATH 0180 or equivalent 31
Two Physics courses2
Seven electives (at least three must be in Chemistry) 17
Total Credits19

Chemical Biology Track:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0400Biophysical and Bioinorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 0970Undergraduate Research1
CHEM 0980Undergraduate Research1
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
CHEM 1230Chemical Biology1
CHEM 1240Biochemistry1
BIOL 0280Introductory Biochemistry1
MATH 0180 or equivalent 31
Two Physics courses2
Select three of the following: 43
Genetics
Cell and Molecular Biology
Introductory Microbiology
Principles of Immunology
Principles of Physiology
Principles of Neurobiology
Three other electives 13
Total Credits19

Materials Chemistry Track:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 0970Undergraduate Research1
CHEM 0980Undergraduate Research1
CHEM 1060Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 21
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
CHEM 1150Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 21
CHEM 1700Nanoscale Materials: Synthesis and Applications1
MATH 0180 or equivalent 31
Two Physics courses 22
BIOL 1090Polymer Science for Biomaterials1
Five electives, at least two must be chemistry courses. 15
Total Credits19
1

BIOL 0280 is credited as an elective for the chemistry concentration.

2

For students with a more Engineering bent, the following substitutions can be made - ENGN 0030/ENGN 0040 can be substituted for PHYS; ENGN 0410 can be substituted for CHEM 1060; ENGN 0720 for CHEM 1150.

3

 NOTE: MATH 0180 has additional prerequisites.

4

 NOTE: Many of the BIOL courses have BIOL 0200 as a prerequisite.

In each of these cases, CHEM 0970/CHEM 0980 should be carried out with a faculty member with an appointment in the Chemistry Department. Research with faculty advisors outside Chemistry may be allowed in some special cases. In this event, the student should a) prepare a proposal for the research to be carried out and b) identify a faculty member in the Chemistry Department who will serve as a second advisor and the second reader for the thesis.

Honors Requirements for Chemistry

All ScB Chemistry concentrators, and any AB concentrator who completes the following requirements, are candidates for Honors; no separate application is necessary.

The requirements for Honors in Chemistry are:

* A strong grade record in concentration courses. This means a grade point average for the concentration that is higher than 3.50.

* Two semesters of Independent Study (CHEM 0970, CHEM 0980 or equivalent. Guidelines and requirements associated with Independent Study are in the Undergraduate Concentration Handbook which can be found at the department website.

* A Thesis in a form approved by the research advisor, and recommended by the research advisor.  Additional information about thesis guidelines will be provided by the Concentration Advisor in the first half of the fall semester.

* A Poster presentation at the chemistry department's spring undergraduate poster session.

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

How does life work at the molecular level? This question is at the core of the concentration program Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In earlier years of this discipline, the focus was on structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates and small molecules such as vitamins. Today the logical approach and tools of biochemical science are being expanded to new areas in neuroscience, developmental biology, immunology, pharmacology and synthetic biology (the design of analogs of biological systems). Training in biochemistry begins with a foundation in mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. Some courses offered in other departments, including engineering, geology and computer science, are also useful. A key component of this program is the year of hands-on research carried out in collaboration with a faculty member here at Brown. Faculty sponsors are drawn from both the Chemistry Department and the Division of Biology and Medicine, and include basic science and clinical faculty.

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

Students must take twenty courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, including the following core requirements, some of these may be fulfilled with AP credits. Students are expected to take courses that will count toward the concentration ABC/NC.  Students should discuss the S/NC option with their concentration advisor if circumstances warrant consideration.  Students should not register S/NC for a concentration course without advisor pre-approval.

Three courses in mathematics, statistics and/or computer science, typically including MATH 0090, MATH 0100, or equivalent) 13
Two courses in physics, typically: 12
Basic Physics
Foundations of Mechanics
Introduction to Engineering
Basic Physics
Foundations of Electromagnetism and Modern Physics
Dynamics and Vibrations
Three courses in physical and organic chemistry:3
Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure
Organic Chemistry
One course in biophysical or related chemistry:1
Biophysical and Bioinorganic Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Instrumental Analysis with Environmental Applications
-or-
Instrumental Analysis with Environmental Applications
Three courses in biochemistry:3
Introductory Biochemistry
Advanced Biochemistry
Chemical Biology
Biochemistry
Select two semester courses of independent research approved by a concentration advisor:2
Directed Research/Independent Study
-or-
Undergraduate Research
Suggested Elective Courses:
Students are required to take six (6) elective courses: four (4) taken from the chart below and two (2) from any science or mathematics course relevant to biochemistry, cell and molecular biology from the suggested courses below:4
Biology Electives:
The Foundation of Living Systems
Genetics
Cell and Molecular Biology
Principles of Immunology
Principles of Physiology
Biology of the Eukaryotic Cell
Polymer Science for Biomaterials
Cell Physiology and Biophysics
Topics in Signal Transduction
Protein Biophysics and Structure
Stem Cell Engineering
Physiological Pharmacology
Cancer Biology
Molecular Genetics
Virology
Neuroscience Electives: 2
Principles of Neurobiology
Neuropharmacology and Synaptic Transmission
Chemistry Electives:
Inorganic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry
Computational Tools in Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
Chemical Biology
Biochemistry
Advanced Organic Chemistry
Quantitative Science or Mathematics Electives:2
Select two electives from any quantitative science or mathematics course relevant to biochemistry (including courses on the preceding list) and approved by a concentration advisor.
Total Credits20
1

Note that the mathematics and physics requirements may be satisfied by Advanced Placement credit.

2

or any NEUR course in Cell, Genetics, Molecular Biology, or Development.

Honors Requirements for Biochemistry

All ScB Biochemistry concentrators are candidates for Honors; no separate application is necessary.

The requirements for Honors in Biochemistry are:

* A strong grade record in concentration courses. This means a grade point average for the concentration that is higher than 3.25.

* Two semesters of Independent Study (CHEM 0970, CHEM 0980 or equivalent. Guidelines and requirements associated with Independent Study are in the Undergraduate Concentration Handbook which can be found at the department website.

* A Thesis in a form approved by the research advisor, and recommended by the research advisor.  Additional information about thesis guidelines will be provided by the Concentration Advisor in the first half of the fall semester.

Chemical Physics

Chemical Physics is an interdisciplinary field at the crossroads of chemistry and physics and is administered jointly by the two departments. The concentration provides students with a broad-based understanding in fundamental molecular sciences, as well as a background for graduate studies in physical chemistry, chemical physics, or molecular engineering. Concentrators are required to take twenty courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics, although approved courses in applied mathematics, biology, computer science, geological sciences, or engineering may be substitutes. Chemical Physics concentrators are also advised to take at least six courses in the humanities and social sciences. Chemical Physics concentrators at all levels (first-year through seniors) are actively involved in research with faculty members in both departments.

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

Twenty-one semester courses1 in chemistry, physics, and mathematics, with a minimum of four semester courses in mathematics.  The expectation is that courses required for a concentration in Chemical Physics will be taken for a letter grade.   Core courses are:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
PHYS 0070Analytical Mechanics1
PHYS 0160Introduction to Relativity and Quantum Physics1
PHYS 0470Electricity and Magnetism1
Select one of the following laboratory courses:1
Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Experiments in Modern Physics
Modern Physics Laboratory
Select one course in statistical mechanics:1
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
MATH 0190Advanced Placement Calculus (Physics/Engineering)1
MATH 0200Intermediate Calculus (Physics/Engineering)1
MATH 0520Linear Algebra1
Seven courses, primarily at the 1000 or 2000 level, in chemistry or physics.7
Select two semesters of independent study:2
Undergraduate Research
Senior Conference Course
Total Credits21
1

Other approved courses in applied mathematics, biology, computer science, geological sciences, or engineering may be substituted for some of the twenty-one.

Students are advised to take at least six courses in the humanities and social sciences.

Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts (A.M.); the Master of Science (Sc.M.); a the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree.

Research in Chemistry stretches from the exploration of physical phenomena of individual molecules, to the creation of new molecules, to material science, and indeed to the foundations of life.  The Department of Chemistry reflects this profound importance and diversity by offering excellent research opportunities in areas including organic and inorganic chemistry, chemical biology, analytical chemistry, nanochemistry and theoretical and experimental physical chemistry.  In addition, graduate students have the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary research in molecular biology, chemical engineering and the Institute for Molecular and Nanoscale Innovation.  The faculty student ratio is approximately 3:1 with most research groups numbering no more than six graduate students. 

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following websites:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/chemistry