Development Studies

Development Studies is an interdisciplinary concentration whose main mission is to provide students with the knowledge, critical perspectives and skills they need to engage  with the issues of economic and social development, especially as they relate to the  Global South. The concentration is grounded in the social sciences – anthropology,  sociology, political science, and economics – but it also heavily draws from history, art,  and other disciplines in the humanities. The requirements are designed with three goals  in mind: first, provide concentrators a solid foundation in the question of development;  second, allow concentrators to develop expertise in a specific region that is of interest  to them; third, give concentrators access to a wide range of courses in a large number of  disciplines of interest to them. Concentrators are encouraged to do their own original  field research. During the senior year, concentrators complete a capstone experience  tailored to their interests in some aspect of international development. Towards this end,  they benefit from extensive faculty and peer support.

For additional information, please visit the program's website: http://brown.edu/academics/development-studies/

Course usage information

DEVL 0500. Development and the International Economy (ECON 0510).

Interested students must register for ECON 0510.

Course usage information

DEVL 1000. Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development (SOC 1871D).

Interested students must register for SOC 1871D.

Course usage information

DEVL 1020. Comparative Development (SOC 1600).

Interested students must register for SOC 1600.

Course usage information

DEVL 1100. Globalization and Social Conflict (SOC 1620).

Interested students must register for SOC 1620.

Course usage information

DEVL 1120. Economic Development (ECON 1510).

Interested students must register for ECON 1510.

Course usage information

DEVL 1130. Explaining China's Rise: Development and Accumulation in Contemporary China (SOC 1870P).

Interested students must register for SOC 1870P.

Course usage information

DEVL 1500. Methods in Development Research.

An introduction to the various techniques of research in Development Studies, with a focus on qualitative and field methods. Open to all Development Studies concentrators.

Course usage information

DEVL 1550. The Political Economy of African Development.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to introduce contemporary development issues in Africa. Drawing on literatures from political sciences, economics, sociology, it explores the challenges of development in the continent since independence. It investigates the influences of governance, institutions, conflicts and external forces in African development trajectories. This is an applied course that uses theoretical and policy analytical approaches to examine the political and socioeconomic dynamism in contemporary Africa.

Course usage information

DEVL 1600. Tools for Development: From Theory to Practice.

Course gives students a platform to define their roles in the field of development, through hands-on skills building, case studies, and conversations with development practitioners and guest lecturers. This course will prepare students to volunteer for small, grassroots development organizations abroad or in the U.S. in a summer experience following the course. Throughout the semester, students will prepare for their summer experiences by working with their host organizations to design their role descriptions, planning their summer travel and living arrangements, gaining appropriate cultural competency, etc. Prerequisite: DEVL 1000 or SOC 1871D (may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 15 Development Studies concentrators. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

DEVL 1650. Urbanization in China: Megacities, Mass Migration, and Citizenship Struggles.

With a focus on the post-1978 reform period, we will examine what features of China’s urbanization are in line with historical patterns, as well as the things that make the country’s experience unique. Additionally, the course will consider the relationship between development, broadly conceived, and urbanization. While urbanization has played an important role in poverty alleviation and improving livelihoods, Chinese cities are also engines of massive inequality, political discontent, and ecological destruction. Considering possibilities for a more equitable, just and sustainable Chinese city will be a central concern of the course.

Course usage information

DEVL 1700. Beyond Sun, Sea and Sand: Exploring the Contemporary Caribbean.

For many people, their image of the Caribbean is the tourist brochure and television advertisement representation of sun, sea and sand. This course challenges that through a broad introduction to the real society, economy and politics of the Caribbean region. Using literature, film and traditional texts, it captures the cultural and linguistic complexity of the region through the exploration of a range of central themes such as ethnicity, color, class, politics, as well as more specific, targeted areas including economic inequality, migration, and tourism. FYS DPLL

Fall DEVL1700 S01 16968 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (P. Lewis)
Course usage information

DEVL 1801. Participatory Development.

This core Development Studies seminar will provide students with the opportunity to think critically about power relations within various contexts of development; more specifically, in relation to the condition of how development projects work in practice. The course will take a multilevel approach to the analysis of developmental interactions. We’ll look at the power relations between the global south and the global north. We will examine crucial issues having to do with local communities, gender, the state/citizen paradigm and interaction between NGOs and communities. We will connect PD to other concepts, such as empowerment, civic engagement and inequality. WRIT LILE

Course usage information

DEVL 1802. The Politics of Food Security (POLS 1822R).

Interested students must register for POLS 1822R.

Course usage information

DEVL 1802R. The History and Politics of Development in the Middle East.

This course examines from a critical perspective the impact and legacies of development projects in the Middle East. After considering the historical emergence of development as a concept and some general critiques, we will explore its more specific deployment in the context of the Middle East. Readings will address its discursive frameworks as well as the economic, political, environmental, and social dynamics it has shaped through its definition of instrumental categories, objects, and spaces. We will also consider how these dynamics have contributed to the recent uprisings in the region. Priority given to DS seniors. WRIT

Fall DEVL1802R S01 16951 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (E. Williams)
Course usage information

DEVL 1802S. Human Security and Humanitarian Response: Increasing Effectiveness and Accountability.

Disasters, natural and anthropogenic, pose significant threats to human security. Effective humanitarian action is important for both short and long-term responses to complex emergencies. The array of factors contributing to the economic and human losses experienced in both natural disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies are vast and complicated, and the strategies employed to mitigate and heal the damage caused by these disturbances must be equal to the task. This course covers diverse topics including the role of NGOs, UN agencies, local governments, peacekeepers and military in humanitarian response; economic impact of humanitarian aid; the evidence base for humanitarian interventions.

Spr DEVL1802S S01 26079 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (A. Levine)
Course usage information

DEVL 1802T. Migration and Development in Theory and Practice.

The primary theme of this course rests on a query standing at the center of a growing debate: in what ways are migrants linked to development? This course examines several theoretical debates and policies and programs focused on the migration-development nexus. Students examine scholarly interpretations of how migration is linked to development. They also employ a transnational lens to further explore what development means and how it is carried out in an increasingly mobile and connected world. The class examines how grassroots organizations have engaged in community development, and the roles states and non-governmental agencies are playing in on-the-ground interventions. WRIT

Course usage information

DEVL 1810. Information Technology and Governance.

The use of information and technology in governance is a vexed subject. Civil society clamors for release of information about the state (openness) while the State wants more information about its citizens (surveillance). Technology plays a role in amplifying these respective intentions resulting in an unprecedented gathering and release of information, thereby bringing the issue of information, technology and its role in governance to sharp focus. This course provides an intensive introduction to the field of information technology and global development. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to DS juniors and Seniors. WRIT

Course usage information

DEVL 1980. Thesis Writing in Development Studies.

An integrative seminar designed for concentrators working on senior theses. Others with comparable backgrounds may enroll with written permission. Begins with a review of theoretical and methodological literature on development studies. Written and oral presentations of thesis research will be the central focus of the latter part of the course. Reserved for Development Studies seniors. WRIT

Fall DEVL1980 S01 16930 W 3:00-5:30(17) (K. Brown)
Course usage information

DEVL 1990. Senior Thesis Preparation.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Reserved for Development Studies seniors.

Course usage information

DEVL 2000. Theory and Research in Development I.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development, evaluate both the differences and complementarities in disciplinary perspectives and develop a toolkit of interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions.

Fall DEVL2000 S01 16871 W 1:00-3:30(06) (N. Chorev)
Course usage information

DEVL 2008. The Political Economy of Public Finance Reform in the Developing World.

This course will introduce students to the fundamental political, institutional, and technical issues associated with public finance reform and sub-national governance in the developing world. The course requires no prior experience with fiscal issues or with intergovernmental finance. The course aims to lay the foundations for a better understanding of how politics and policy shape the way national and subnational governments provide, finance, manage, and regulate public services.

Course usage information

DEVL 2010. Theory and Research in Development II.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development, evaluate both the differences and complementarities in disciplinary perspectives and develop a toolkit of interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions.

Course usage information

DEVL 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Fall DEVL2990 S01 14721 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr DEVL2990 S01 23816 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

DEVL XLIST. Courses of Interest to Concentrators in Development Studies.

Chair

Nitsan Chorev

Professor

Nitsan Chorev
Harmon Family Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Patrick G. Heller
Lyn Crost Professor of Social Sciences

Jose Itzigsohn
Professor of Sociology

Andrew M. Schrank
Olive C. Watson Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Assistant Professor

Anja Sautmann
Assistant Professor of Economics

Development Studies

Development Studies is an interdisciplinary concentration whose main mission is to provide students with the knowledge, critical perspectives and skills they need to engage with the issues of economic and social development, especially as they relate to the Global South. The concentration is grounded in the social sciences – anthropology, sociology, political science, and economics – but it also heavily draws from history, art, and other disciplines in the humanities. The requirements are designed with three goals in mind: first, provide concentrators a solid foundation in the question of development; second, allow concentrators to develop expertise in a specific region that is of interest to them; third, give concentrators access to a wide range of courses in a large number of disciplines of interest to them. Concentrators are encouraged to do their own original field research. During the senior year, concentrators complete a capstone experience tailored to their interests in some aspect of international development. Towards this end, they benefit from extensive faculty and peer support.

Requirements

10 Courses + Language + Capstone

CORE
All core courses must be taken prior to senior year
Choose TWO from the following:2
Globalization and Social Conflict
Politics, Markets and States in Developing Countries
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Seminar in Sociology of Development1
Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development (SOC 1871D) (Pre-requisites: sophomore or junior standing, and completion of SOC 1620, POLS 1240, or ANTH 0110)
Development Economics - Choose ONE of the following: (ECON 0510 for students with little to no Econ background, ECON 1510 for students with strong Econ backgrounds or double-concentrating in Econ)1
Development and the International Economy (Prerequisite: ECON 0110 , or AP Microeconomics 4 and AP Macroeconomics 4, or IB HL Economics 6)
Economic Development (Prerequisite: ECON 1110 or ECON 1130; and APMA 1650 or ECON 1620 or ECON 1630)
Research Methods and Design1
Methods in Development Research (junior year)
Regional Courses2
Two courses that focus on the same region of the developing world. Should complement the student's foreign language.
Elective Courses3
Three courses chosen from a list of pre-approved electives or by special approval.
Foreign Language
Equivalent of three full years of university study or above.
Senior Capstone
a. Thesis option: DEVL 1980 (fall senior year) and DEVL 1990 (spring senior year), or
b. Capstone seminar option: approved senior seminar in Development Studies, with seminar-length paper requirement.

 See the Development Studies website for the list of pre-approved elective courses.