East Asian Studies

The 21st century has turned to Asia as a center of international trade, culture, and critical inquiry. The Department of East Asian Studies offers Brown students a window onto this vitally important corner of the world, whose civilizations reach back several millennia and whose cultural and economic ties extend throughout the globe. A vibrant community of teachers and undergraduates who work closely together in the spirit of free inquiry, the Department of East Asian Studies embodies Brown’s unique mission “to serve the community, the nation and the world.”

The Department offers several tiers of instruction in ChineseJapanese and Korean, with courses designed to accommodate students ranging from those who have never taken a class in the language before, to those hoping to hone their abilities at the highest levels. East Asian Studies also offers Brown students the opportunity to explore the visual, textual and religious cultures of East Asia through introductory and advanced courses on literature, film,  pilgrimage and translation, among others.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/east-asian-studies/

Course usage information

CHIN 0100. Basic Chinese.

A year-long introduction to Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. Five classroom meetings weekly. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade submitted at the end of course work in CHIN 0200 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters.

Fall CHIN0100 S01 15433 MWF 9:00-9:50(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S01 15433 TTh 9:00-10:20(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S02 15434 MWF 10:00-10:50(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S02 15434 TTh 10:30-11:50(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S03 15448 MWF 1:00-1:50(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S03 15448 TTh 1:00-2:20(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S04 15454 MWF 2:00-2:50(15) (Y. Wang)
Fall CHIN0100 S04 15454 TTh 2:30-3:50(15) (Y. Wang)
Course usage information

CHIN 0150. Advanced Beginning Chinese.

A year-long intensive course designed for students with some prior knowledge of Chinese. Designed to enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Five classroom meetings weekly. Placement interview required. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade submitted at the end of the course work in CHIN 0250 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters.

Course usage information

CHIN 0200. Basic Chinese.

A year-long introduction to Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. Five classroom meetings weekly. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken CHIN 0100 to receive credit for this course. The final grade for this course will become the final grade for CHIN 0100. If CHIN 0100 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing.

Spr CHIN0200 S01 24160 MWF 9:00-9:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S01 24160 TTh 9:00-10:20(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S02 24161 MWF 10:00-10:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S02 24161 TTh 10:30-11:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S03 24175 MWF 1:00-1:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S03 24175 TTh 1:00-2:20(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S04 24181 MWF 2:00-2:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0200 S04 24181 TTh 2:30-3:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHIN 0250. Advanced Beginning Chinese.

A year-long intensive course designed for students with some prior knowledge of Chinese. Designed to enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Five classroom meetings weekly. Placement interview required. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken CHIN 0150 to receive credit for this course. The final grade for this course will become the final grade for CHIN 0150. If CHIN 0150 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing.

Course usage information

CHIN 0300. Intermediate Chinese.

An intermediate course in Standard Chinese designed to further communicative competence and to develop reading and writing skills. Five classroom meetings weekly. Prerequisite: CHIN 0200 or permission of instructor.

Fall CHIN0300 S01 15442 MWF 12:00-12:50(04) (J. Huang Hsieh)
Fall CHIN0300 S01 15442 TTh 12:00-12:50(04) (J. Huang Hsieh)
Fall CHIN0300 S02 15449 MWF 1:00-1:50(04) (J. Huang Hsieh)
Fall CHIN0300 S02 15449 TTh 1:00-2:20(04) (J. Huang Hsieh)
Fall CHIN0300 S03 15455 MWF 2:00-2:50(04) (J. Huang Hsieh)
Fall CHIN0300 S03 15455 TTh 2:30-3:50(04) (J. Huang Hsieh)
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CHIN 0350. Elementary to Intermediate Chinese for Advanced Beginners.

This course is designed to enhance listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills for Chinese heritage students who have some prior knowledge of Chinese. Five classroom meetings weekly. Placement interview required.

Spr CHIN0350 S01 26052 MTWThF 12:00-12:50(05) (W. Chen)
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CHIN 0400. Intermediate Chinese.

An intermediate course in Standard Chinese designed to further communicative competence and to develop reading and writing skills. Five classroom meetings weekly. Prerequisite: CHIN 0300 or permission of instructor.

Spr CHIN0400 S01 24171 MWF 12:00-12:50(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0400 S01 24171 TTh 12:00-12:50(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0400 S02 24176 MWF 1:00-1:50(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0400 S02 24176 TTh 1:00-2:20(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0400 S03 24182 MWF 2:00-2:50(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0400 S03 24182 TTh 2:30-3:50(15) 'To Be Arranged'
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CHIN 0500. Advanced Modern Chinese I.

An advanced course designed to enable students to read authentic materials. Students enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills; improve their narrative and descriptive abilities; and learn to express abstract ideas both orally and in writing. Five classroom meetings weekly. Prerequisite: CHIN 0250 or CHIN 0400 or permission of instructor.

Fall CHIN0500 S01 15420 MWF 9:00-9:50(18) (W. Chen)
Fall CHIN0500 S01 15420 TTh 9:00-10:20(18) (W. Chen)
Fall CHIN0500 S02 15438 TTh 10:30-11:50(18) (W. Chen)
Fall CHIN0500 S02 15438 MWF 11:00-11:50(18) (W. Chen)
Fall CHIN0500 S03 15445 MWF 12:00-12:50(18) (W. Chen)
Fall CHIN0500 S03 15445 TTh 2:30-3:50(18) (W. Chen)
Course usage information

CHIN 0600. Advanced Modern Chinese I.

An advanced course designed to enable students to read authentic materials. Students enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills; improve their narrative and descriptive abilities; and learn to express abstract ideas both orally and in writing. Five classroom meetings weekly. Prerequisite: CHIN 0500 or permission of instructor.

Spr CHIN0600 S01 24157 MWF 9:00-9:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0600 S01 24157 TTh 9:00-10:20(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0600 S02 24165 TTh 10:30-11:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0600 S02 24165 MWF 11:00-11:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0600 S03 24172 MWF 12:00-12:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHIN0600 S03 24172 TTh 2:30-3:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
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CHIN 0700. Advanced Modern Chinese II.

This course is designed to enhance the Chinese proficiency of those who have taken Advanced Modern Chinese I (CHIN 0600) or the equivalent. All four language skills are emphasized through selected authentic materials. At the end of the year, students should be able to express their ideas with sophistication and nuance. Drills on complex sentence patterns will be conducted when necessary. Prerequisite: CHIN 0600 or permission of instructor.

Fall CHIN0700 S01 15435 MWF 10:00-10:50(15) (L. Hu)
Fall CHIN0700 S01 15435 TTh 10:30-11:50(15) (L. Hu)
Fall CHIN0700 S02 15441 MWF 12:00-12:50(15) (L. Hu)
Fall CHIN0700 S02 15441 TTh 12:00-12:50(15) (L. Hu)
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CHIN 0800. Advanced Modern Chinese II.

See Advanced Modern Chinese II (CHIN 0700) for course description. Prerequisite: CHIN 0700 or permission of instructor.

Spr CHIN0800 S01 24162 MWF 10:00-10:50(16) (L. Hu)
Spr CHIN0800 S01 24162 TTh 10:30-11:50(16) (L. Hu)
Spr CHIN0800 S02 24169 MWF 12:00-12:50(16) (L. Hu)
Spr CHIN0800 S02 24169 TTh 12:00-12:50(16) (L. Hu)
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CHIN 0910A. Academic Chinese I.

This course trains students to read texts in order to improve language skills and acquire the ability to do research in academic fields. Through reading and discussing literature, newspaper and magazine articles, and academic writings, students will gain a better understanding of traditional and modern China. Prerequisite: CHIN 0800 or permission of the instructor.

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CHIN 0910B. Introduction to Classical Chinese.

This course aims to build on basic knowledge of reading Classical Chinese grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, and to catch a glimpse of ancient Chinese wisdom. The class will use modern Chinese (Mandarin) to discuss classical texts. Readings are original works of prose and poetry dating from the 2nd to 12th century. Prerequisite: CHIN 600. Instructor permission required.

Fall CHIN0910B S01 16843 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (W. Chen)
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CHIN 0910C. Introduction to Modern Chinese Prose.

Students will pursue their ability to appreciate and use various Chinese writing styles by reading and analyzing modern Chinese prose classics. Classes include lecture, discussion and group or individual presentations. By the end of the semester, students will be familiar with the development of modern Chinese prose, understand the language and meaning of each text, be comfortable with different writing styles and techniques, and have a deeper understanding of Chinese thought, society, and culture via the writers and their masterpieces. Conducted in Mandarin Chinese; designed for students with advanced language skills. Prerequisites: CHIN 0800 or the equivalent.

Spr CHIN0910C S01 24191 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) 'To Be Arranged'
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CHIN 0920A. Advanced Reading and Writing in Chinese.

This course trains students to read texts in order to improve language skills and acquire the ability to do research in academic fields. Masterpieces by statesmen, economists, historians, scientists, literary critics, and sociologists will be analyzed and discussed. Focus will be on the training of both analytical ability and writing skills. Prerequisite: CHIN 0800 or permission of the instructor.

Course usage information

CHIN 0920B. Classical Chinese.

This course aims to build on basic knowledge of reading Classical Chinese grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. The class will use modern Chinese (Mandarin) to discuss classical texts. Readings are original works of prose and poetry dating from the 2nd to 12th century CE. Prerequisite: CHIN 0910B. Instructor permission required.

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CHIN 0920C. The Changing Face of China: Advanced Reading in Chinese Media.

This course is designed to help students develop advanced reading proficiency and formal oral and writing communication skills. Students will listen and read up-to-date news, reports and commentaries from various Chinese media sources, such as TV broadcasts, newspapers, magazines, and websites. Through reading and discussion, students will gain a better understanding of a wide range of current issues in a rapidly changing China, including economics, politics, education and popular culture. Class format varies from lecture, discussion, debate, and group and/or individual presentations. Prerequisites: CHIN0800 or the equivalent.

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CHIN 0920D. Business Chinese.

Business Chinese focuses on practical language skills that are most useful in business interactions in Chinese-speaking communities. Classroom activities are largely based on authentic documents and correspondence as well as a textbook. Through intensive practice in the listening, speaking, reading and writing of the Chinese language for business purposes, this course aims at enhancing students' linguistic knowledge in a business context. Classes are conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 0800 or instructor permission. Enrollment limited to 18.

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CHIN 0920E. Two Sides of the Coin: Advanced Chinese Conversation.

Many of us know about the trolley scenario- would you kill one to save five? What do you think about organ trade- is it immoral for wealthy people to buy organs from the poor in order to save their lives or those of their loved ones? Who are really responsible for the atrocious organ harvesting in China? What is your stance on the Affirmative Action? Did you know China has an affirmative action as well? The goal of this course is to develop students’ communication skills in Chinese, with an emphasis on their listening and speaking skills, through in-depth discussions on controversial issues and moral dilemmas. Class materials will cover a broad range of topics and will not be limited to those unique to China. The majority of primary sources will be in Chinese. Prerequisite is CHIN0800 or equivalent.

Fall CHIN0920E S01 16536 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (L. Hu)
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CHIN 1040. Modern Chinese Literature.

Introduces students to the most representative writers in 20th century China. Emphasizes textual and historical analyses. Major issues include Westernization, nationalism, revolution, class, gender, and literary innovations. Designated primarily as a literature course, rather than language class, and conducted entirely in Mandarin Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 0800. Instructor permission required.

Fall CHIN1040 S01 15261 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (L. Wang)
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CHIN 1910. Independent Study.

Reading materials for research in Chinese. Sections numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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CHIN 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall CHIN2450 S01 14711 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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EAST 0040. Foundations of Chinese Religions (RELS 0040).

Interested students must register for RELS 0040.

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EAST 0100. Introduction to Buddhism (RELS 0100).

Interested students must register for RELS 0100.

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EAST 0160. Buried History, Hidden Wonders: Discovering East Asian Archaeology (ARCH 0160).

Interested students must register for ARCH 0160.

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EAST 0180. Japan: Nature, Ritual, and the Arts.

This course is an introduction to Japanese culture and aesthetics as represented in pre-modern literature, drama, tea practices, landscape and the fine arts. Recurring themes include Japanese attitudes toward the natural world; traditional conceptions of beauty; and the function of ritual in artistic cultivation. The course is designed for students who have no previous exposure to Japanese studies at the college level; no prerequisites.

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EAST 0290E. Engaged Buddhism (RELS 0290E).

Interested students must register for RELS 0290E.

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EAST 0410. Introduction to East Asian Civilization: China (HIST 0410).

Interested students must register for HIST 0410.

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EAST 0500. Childhood and Culture in Japan.

This seminar offers students an interdisciplinary look at how children became central to social life in modern Japan. What set of historical and philosophical conditions made childhood newly visible in the late 19th century? In what ways has the relationship between the marketplace and childhood evolved over the past hundred years? How have class, gender, ethnicity and sexuality inflected the ways childhood has been experienced in Japan? Students will analyze different texts for and about children (early fairy tales, comic books, propaganda, animation) in relation to critical essays drawn from the disciplines of literature, history, anthropology, film, and social development. SOPH DPLL LILE WRIT

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EAST 0610A. The Far Side of the Old World: Perspectives on Chinese Culture (COLT 0610A).

Interested students must register for COLT 0610A.

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EAST 0710U. Leaves of Words: A Survey of Japanese Literature (COLT 0710U).

Interested students must register for COLT 0710U.

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EAST 0910D. Two Virgins in the Attic: Advanced Japanese Readings in Canonical and Popular Literature (JAPN0910D).

Interested students must register for JAPN 0910D.

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EAST 0950A. Turning Japanese: Constructing Nation, Race and Culture in Modern Japan.

This first year seminar focuses on Japan's experiences with historical processes and concepts which have transformed the modern world. These include the creation of the nation as the fundamental structure for social and political organization, as well as the evolution and implications of beliefs and practices associated with race, culture and tradition. Participants will work with primary sources and scholarly analysis from diverse disciplinary perspectives. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

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EAST 0950B. The Floating World.

An exploration of selected literary, artistic, and religious works with an eye to understanding Japanese culture and thought of the early modern period (1600-1868). Materials include merchant tracts, samurai codes, Buddhist sermons, Confucian disquisitions, woodblock prints, drama, and fiction. No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

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EAST 0950C. Reading China: Texts and Contexts.

An introduction to Chinese lit., focusing on its translation and circulation outside of China from the 17th c. to the present. A variety of texts are examined, considering the various ways translation shapes Western conceptions of China. Begins by discussing how Chinese lit. has been construed as particularly difficult to translate, explores ways in which the translation and circulation of early Chinese classics was animated by interests in ancient Chinese wisdom, and considers the recent emergence of a global notion of Chinese literature and culture. Concludes by comparing histories: translations of Chinese drama into European languages and their adaptation within China. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

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EAST 1010. From Basho to Banana: Four Centuries of Japanese Literature.

This course explores classic writers of Japanese literature written between 1600 and 2000. We will focus on both the specificity of Japanese genre as well as the historical, social relations that have shaped them--Edo merchant culture, modernism, the avant-garde, mass culture and postmoderism, among others. Writers covered will include Ihara Saikaku, Jippensha Ikku, Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, Akutagawa Ryunosuke, Tanizaki Junichiro and Yoshimoto Banana. No prerequisites.

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EAST 1012. Expanding the Canon: A Survey of 20th Century Japanese Literature.

An introduction to major and minor works of Japanese literature produced during the Japanese Empire as well as in post-WWII Japan. Covered writers include canonical novelists such as Tanizaki Junichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, and Oe Kenzaburo, as well as writers lesser known outside of Japan today, including women, queers, revolutionaries and colonial/resident Koreans. DPLL LILE

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EAST 1030. Words on Things: Literature and Material Culture in Early Modern China.

This course examines Chinese literary representation of artifacts written between 1000 to 1900 CE. Our discussion will highlight international trade and the transforming science and technology in early modern China. The course aims to guide students to conduct inter-artistic analysis as a means to decipher the political, religious, gendered, and technical significance embedded in literary representation of material objects. To emphasize a comparative perspective, we will also draw on scholarship outside of the field of Chinese literature. We will explore artifacts in the following categories: illustration, painting and calligraphy, seals, ceramics, furniture, and textile. DPLL

Fall EAST1030 S01 16346 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (K. Chen)
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EAST 1050. The Chinese Novel.

The purpose of this course is to help us see how the Chinese novel took shape from popular sources, such as storytelling and drama, how the novel drew on history as well as legend, and how its authors and editors express a distinct world view. The class will cover the "masterworks" of the Chinese novel. Through intensive reading, students can explore notions of the hero and heroism, moral action and, more broadly, history and literature from a comparative perspective. All readings are in English translation. Limited to 20 freshmen and sophomores, or by instructor permission.

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EAST 1060. Manly Men, Womanly Women, and Other Variations: The Quest for Becoming in Pre-Modern Chinese Lit.

In this, we will study representative works of Chinese poetry, historical narrative, fiction, and drama, translated into English, in order to understand how Chinese people through the ages approached the task of defining what it means to be human— what constitutes an ideal person, how the ideal changes with the person’s sex, and the degree to which individuals shape and are shaped by the collective they live in. We will read these texts as works of art while also using them to compose a picture of Chinese society as it evolved from the earliest times to the end of the Imperial era. DPLL

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EAST 1070. China Modern: An Introduction to the Literature of Twentieth-Century China.

A general introduction to modern and contemporary Chinese literature from the May Fourth Movement to contemporary Taiwan and the People's Republic of China. Emphasizes reading of literary works in relation to topics such as cultural tradition, modernity, nationalism, revolution, class, gender, region, cultural commodification, and literary innovations. Readings in English. No previous knowledge of Chinese required. LILE

Fall EAST1070 S01 15241 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (L. Wang)
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EAST 1100. Korean Culture and Film.

This course aims to introduce and explore various aspects of Korean history, culture and society. Students are expected to develop a comprehensive understanding of Korean culture by examining contemporary films that pertain to issues such as national identity, history, international relations, religion, Korean life style, and family life. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EAST 1120K. Skeptical Traditions East and West (CLAS 1120K).

Interested students must register for CLAS 1120K.

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EAST 1170. Women's Literature in Japan and Korea.

This course focuses on Japanese and Korean women's literature from the modern period, giving particular attention to the historical issues and the narrative strategies that play out in celebrated works of women's fiction. The goal of the class is to deepen our understanding of the universal and particular aspects of women's writing in Japan and Korea and at the same time to learn an idiom with which to talk about literary form. Previous coursework in East Asian Studies or Literary Studies is suggested but not required. Instructor permission required.

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EAST 1190. Literature and Science in Early Modern China.

This course explores the relations between Chinese literature and the studies of nature and technological know-how from 1368 to 1911. Introducing recent insight in the history of science and technology, the course challenges students to re-define science in the context of the changing Confucian curriculum, the booming market economy, and the multiethnic empire. The course investigates the ways in which the form and content of poetry, novel, and essays transformed because of their appropriation of knowledge about medicine, handicraft, and foreign lands. Topics include: encyclopedia for merchants, carpenters’ spell, autofiction of Confucian engineers, novel medicine, and so on. DPLL

Spr EAST1190 S01 25915 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (K. Chen)
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EAST 1200. Pop, Political and Patrician: Culture in Japan and the Koreas.

This course introduces students to the modern cultures of Japan and Korea through an examination of events, artifacts, and cultural practices. The over-arching goal of the class is two-fold: to create an alternative narrative to the dominant Orientalized vision of East Asian culture and to deepen our knowledge of the overlapping cultural histories of Japan and Korea. With a broad understanding of culture as a general process of artistic and intellectual development, as a body of material artifacts, and as a social practice of ordinary life, we shall focus our attention on the implications of studying culture in relation to popular media and political activism in particular. Topics covered will include: colonial fiction, the re-creation of tradition, art and atrocity, the proletarian arts, postwar children's culture, the globalization of popular music, myth in the DPRK, shoji print culture, and East Asian activism.

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EAST 1202E. Extreme Asian Cinema: Contemporary Genre Cinemas in an East Asian Context (MCM 1202E).

Interested students must register for MCM 1202E.

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EAST 1210. Imagining Modern China.

This course introduces students to the literary and cultural milestones in twentieth-century China, highlighting the capacity of literature as a form of historical engagement and ethical reasoning. Featuring masterpieces by mainland Chinese as well as Sinophone and ethnic minority writers, and translation works and critically acclaimed films, the course unpacks the multivalence of Chinese literary and cultural modernity as well as that of the very term “China.” Issues for discussion include translation and intercultural encounters, nationalism, tradition, gender, the revolutionary legacy, cultural identity, diaspora, and literary citizenship. All readings and discussions are in English. DPLL

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EAST 1230. Edo Woodblock Printing.

This course provides an introduction to Japanese art and cultural history through a survey of woodblock print media from its emergence in the mid-17th century to the end of the early modern era. Topics for consideration include East Asian pictorial traditions, the publishing industry, censorship, social identity, and specialist print communities. The course will track the development of Japanese woodblock printing from its origins in printed books and monochrome prints, and the transition to hand-coloring and multi-colored printing that facilitated a highly nuanced media form, via the publishing industry’s shifting relationship with the authorities, and influences from China and the West. DPLL

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EAST 1270. China Through the Lens: History, Cinema, and Critical Discourse.

This is a critical introduction to the history of mainland Chinese film. It focuses on three dimensions of cinematic practice: the historical context of film productions, the specific context/form of each film, and the critical reception of Chinese films in film studies. Important themes such as nation, visual modernity, cinematic narrative, and commercialism will be studied across the three dimensions.

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EAST 1280. Introduction to Japanese Cinema.

This course examines the cinema of Japan, from the 1930s to the present. Students will learn to “read” film as a visual text through a study of the basics of film editing and shot composition and will gain an understanding of cinema as art form, commercial product, and ideological tool through selected articles on film theory and published analyses of the assigned films. In addition, we will place the films within their specific context through a study of Japanese history, religious thought, and cultural trends. DPLL

Fall EAST1280 S01 17366 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Cullen)
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EAST 1370. Performances in the Asias (TAPS 1270).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1270.

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EAST 1400. The Floating World: Early Modern Japanese Culture.

This course treats major trends in Japanese thought and culture of the Tokugawa period (1600-1868), including debates among Confucian scholars; merchant culture; samurai ethics; the popularization of Buddhism; and the rise of nativism in the late period. Emphasis is on reading and analysis of primary texts in translation. Required: a course in East Asian culture or religion. Recommended but not required: RELS 0120. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EAST 1410N. Lost in Translation: The Adaptation of Literature to Film in Japan (COLT 1410N).

Interested students must register for COLT 1410N.

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EAST 1415A. Classical Daoist Thought (RELS 1415A).

Interested students must register for RELS 1415A.

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EAST 1420. The Confucian Mind.

This course explores the Neo-Confucian tradition, a pervasive influence in the intellectual, educational, and political life of China, Korea, and Japan from late medieval through early modern times. Emphasis is on conceptions of the mind and their implications for moral cultivation and social action; the legacy of Confucian values in modern East Asia may also be considered. Readings are primary texts in translation and selected secondary works; the format is primarily discussion. Recommended prerequisite: RELS 0040. Not open to first year students. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EAST 1430. Classics of East Asian Buddhism (RELS 1430).

Interested students must register for RELS 1430.

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EAST 1430C. Classical Japanese Poetry (COLT 1430C).

Interested students must register for COLT 1430C.

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EAST 1430T. Leaves of Words: Japanese Poetry and Poetics (COLT 1430T).

Interested students must register for COLT 1430T.

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EAST 1440. Themes in Japanese Buddhism: Original Enlightenment (RELS 1440).

Interested students must register for RELS 1440.

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EAST 1500. Returnees in China's Modernization.

This course examines the impact on contemporary China of returnees, people who having left China to study abroad have now returned home and become reintegrated into society.  Focusing on a series of in-depth studies of returnees who have carved out professional identities in the commercial world, the state, and civil society. The returnee experience will be examined from 2 angles:  the manner by which contemporary returnees negotiate Chinese tradition and Western learning, and the differences between this cohort's experience and that of previous generations of returnees in China’s now century and a half long period of modernization.

Spr EAST1500 S01 24189 T 4:00-6:30(16) (Z. Li)
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EAST 1510. Chinese: A History of the Language.

This course traces the historical evolution of modern Chinese, commonly known as Mandarin. We will examine the uniqueness of Chinese characters, and explore their relationship to other features of the language, including word formation, phonology, grammar, and dialects. The goal will be to understand the manner by which the written script has become so central to the development of Chinese civilization.

Fall EAST1510 S01 15234 T 4:00-6:30(09) (Z. Li)
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EAST 1510A. China's Late Empires (HIST 1510A).

Interested students must register for HIST 1510A.

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EAST 1530. Modern Korea (HIST 1530).

Interested students must register for HIST 1530.

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EAST 1540. Power, Profit, and Pillage: The Rise and Fall of Trading Kingdoms in Asia (ANTH 1540).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1540.

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EAST 1700. Global Korea: Modernity, Nation, and Belonging.

In this course we will explore important issues in the study of contemporary Korean society and ask how those themes can help us to better understand processes of globalization in East Asia and beyond. Although the Koreas are relatively small countries in Asia, their history of colonialism, the Korean War, coming of age in the Cold War, and struggling to rise to the top of the global stage makes them a productive region of the world for thinking about themes such as globalization, nationalism, belonging and modernity. We will look at issues such as the Korean diaspora, immigration, plastic surgery, and the “Korean Wave” of film, TV and music.

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EAST 1701. Transnational Koreas: Gender, Family, and Sexuality.

From an economic basket case in 1963 to a successful producer of global cultural products such as Samsung phones and the “Korean Wave,” South Korea has become the envy of many developing nations. What are the gender and sexual politics that undergird this neoliberal success story? Utilizing the analytical lens of “gender,” “sexuality,” and “family,” this course will confront and interrogate the hypermasculine Korean state and its hetero-gendering of Korean citizenship by examining issues ranging from the cosmetic surgery boom for women and military conscription for men to the ongoing controversy around "comfort women" (military sex slaves for the Japanese imperial army).

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EAST 1810X. Mirror for the Romantic: The Tale of the Gengi and The Story of the Stone (COLT 1810X).

Interested students must register for COLT 1810X.

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EAST 1811L. Travel and Tourism through the Ages (COLT 1811L).

Interested students must register for COLT 1811L.

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EAST 1880A. Lao Tzu and Huai-nan Tzu.

This seminar will approach early Taoist thought through the study of important essays from the Han dynasty compendium, the Huai-nan Tzu and will discuss the historical and philosophical origins of Lao Tzu's Tao te ching, heretofore acknowledged as the foundational text of the Taosit tradition.

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EAST 1880C. Zen Meditation in China, Korea, and Japan.

An intensive study of the origin and development of Zen Meditation in China, Korea and Japan featuring historical origins in Indian Mahayana Buddhism and Chinese Daoism. Historical and social contextualization will be balanced by first-person investigations. Both kôan and silent illumination styles will be studied in depth. Weekly seminars will study representative texts in translation; labs will experiment with meditation techniques directly drawn from the readings. Students MUST register for the lecture section and a lab. Prerequisites: RELS 0100, RELS 0500, UNIV 0540; or instructor's permission.

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EAST 1880D. Early Daoist Syncretism: Zhuang Zi and Huainan Zi.

The final phase of the classical Daoist tradition has been called "syncretist" by Graham, "Huang-Lao" by Lin. It is the version of Daoism carried into the Han dynasty and the one that transmitted the tradition's earlier works. Casting a broad net we will examine a variety of works from this critical phase including the "Techniques of the Mind" texts in the Guarzi collection, the so-called "Huang-Lao" silk manuscripts from the Han tomb at Mawangdui, certain chapters of the Lushi chunqin, and selections from the Zhuangzi and Huainanzi. We will examine the ways in which cosmology, self-cultivation, and political thought coalesce in these works.

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EAST 1910. Independent Study.

Sections numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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EAST 1930. Reading and Writing of the Honors Thesis.

Prior admission to honors candidacy required. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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EAST 1940. Reading and Writing of the Honors Thesis.

Prior admission to honors candidacy required. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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EAST 1950B. Chinese Women, Gender and Feminism from Historical and Transnational Perspectives.

This seminar course is designed to critically re-evaluate (re)presentations of Chinese women, gender, and feminism in historical, literary, and academic discourses. It examines a diverse body of texts produced through different historical periods and in different geopolitical locations. It emphasizes gender as both a historical construct(s) among competing discourses and as a material process of individual embodiment and disembodiment. The goal of the course is to help advanced students understand Chinese history from a distinctly gendered perspective, to recognize women's roles in history and writing, and to develop a reflective, cross-cultural approach to gender, politics, and the self.

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EAST 1950G. Market Economy, Popular Culture, and Mass Media in Contemporary China.

Course focuses on mainland Chinese cultural and media production since the mid 1980's, when China began transforming itself culturally and economically into a capitalist society with socialist characteristics. Traditional values, socialist legacy, commercial forces, and globalization have all played significant roles in the ongoing transformation. The goal of the course is to examine the complex interactions among diverse historical forces in a rapidly changing China. Course taught in Mandarin Chinese.

Spr EAST1950G S01 25813 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (L. Wang)
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EAST 1950H. Translating Japanese: Short Fiction, Poetry, Film and Manga.

This seminar/workshop discusses a broad range of narrative arts produced over the past 100 years in Japan, and practices the art of translating them. Drawing rigor from the field of linguistics and translation theory, we shall make central to our effort of analyzing Japanese cultural productions an attentiveness to the historicity of language and a self-consciousness of our roles as cultural interpreters. While the course will focus on mid-20th century Japanese short fiction, we will also work on poetry, music, manga, animation, and film, depending on the interests of enrolled students. Pre-requisites: JAPN 0600 or equivalent. Instructor permission required.

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EAST 1950I. Revolution and Culture, East Asia and Beyond.

This seminar investigates cultural practices enacted with the aim of social change. Topics include the Soviet avant-garde, race and the American cultural front, gender and proletarian literature in Japan and colonial Korea, as well as issues of propaganda and struggle in the DPRK and China. Instructor permission required.

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EAST 1950J. The Chinese Story, Its Authors and Readers.

A study of the Chinese story in its social and historical context. The seminar will survey the broad story stereotypes and consider their earlier sources in the classical tale, storytelling, drama, and ritual. All readings are in English translation.

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EAST 1950M. Critical Approaches to China.

This co-taught seminar introduces students to some of the basic interdisciplinary research tools and methodologies for the study of China. Core texts will be drawn from the ancient through contemporary periods, organized around broad themes (e.g., Classics, gender, globalization). Students from all disciplines are welcome. Some knowledge of modern or classical Chinese desirable. LILE

Spr EAST1950M S01 24817 W 3:00-5:30(14) (L. Wang)
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EAST 1950N. The Love Letter, Fiction and Desire.

A study of the art of the love letter in China of the 16th to 18th centuries. The circulation of letter-writing manuals fueled the rise of letter fiction in China, as it did in Europe in the same period. The seminar will explore how desire serves as a motive for writing to someone far away, an element of the plot, and an end in itself, in comparative and theoritical perspectives. All readings are in English. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EAST 1950O. The Art of Dissent.

This seminar investigates the relationship between activism and art in early modern and 20th century Japan and Korea. Historical topics to be discussed in relation to works of fiction, biography, poetry, film and graphic art include the Freedom and People's Rights Movement, Japanese anarchism, pre-WWI communism, feminism, the Kwangju Uprising and the Minjung Munhak Movement.

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EAST 1950P. Attachment to Objects in Chinese Literature.

A seminar investigating interactions between objects and literary composition in China of the 12th to 16th century, exploring 3 core issues: 1st, what do writers about objects reveal about notions of literary art and artifice? 2nd, in what ways are material artifacts endowed with aesthetic and personal meaning? 3rd, what literary and extra-literary factors shaped exchanges of poetry and gift-giving as linked forms of social intercourse? Readings in English translation. Instructor permission required.

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EAST 1950Q. Early Chinese Poetry.

A survey of the evolution of major forms of Chinese lyric poetry beginning with the Shijing (Book of Songs), the breakthrough to 5-character verse in the Han Dynasty, landscape (shanshui) and field and garden (tianyuan) poetry of the 6 Dynasties, and the flowering of the shi form during the Tang Dynasty. Readings will be in Chinese, discussions in English. Previous study of classical Chinese or permission of the instructor required.

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EAST 1950U. South Korean Cinema: From Golden Age to Korean Wave.

This seminar explores the cinema of South Korea, proceeding chronologically and thematically, interrogating the key problematics of gender and genre. We will think about cinema's role—as a medium for visual storytelling and as a site for producing cultural norms and values—in assessing the consequences of historical events and in helping to construct official histories. Across films from Korean cinema's "golden age" (1950's and 60') to post-authoritarian realist cinema to the contemporary era of globalized, transnational genre films, we will map the questions, themes, and debates on the formation and effects of South Korea's cinematic imaginary of nation. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

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EAST 1950V. Contemporary Film and Media Cultures in East Asia.

This course visits postwar film and television cultures in East Asia as a part of a larger narrative of contemporary media production and consumption. How can thinking about films’ relationship with other media enhance our understanding of contemporary popular culture? How does it help us re-imagine narrative issues such as textuality, production, and representation? How does understanding the rich contexts of audience interaction with media affect our approaches to reading and meaning- making? To explore these questions, we will consider postwar Chinese and Japanese films, popular fiction, literature, television dramas, as well as manga/anime.

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EAST 1950W. Translating Korean: Fiction, Poetry, Film and K-Pop.

This course explores the theory and practice of translation in the context of Korean cultural production. Each week we shall grapple with a particular issue in translation studies in dialogue with a Korean-language text. By the end of this course students should be able to locate the tools necessary to carry out translations from Korean to English, to demonstrate an understanding of translation as a craft with its own standards, responsibilities, and complexities, and to have completed a significant translation project themselves. Advanced learners of the Korean language as well as native speakers of Korean are welcome. DPLL

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EAST 1950X. Queer Japan: Culture, History and Sexuality.

This seminar investigates cultural practices enacted by Japanese gays and lesbians, or otherwise related to same-sex attraction. How have sexual identities traditionally been constructed in Japan, and how has the modern period transformed them? How has same-sex sexuality become figured in the Japanese art, literature and popular culture of the 20th century; and how have the forces of a global LGBT culture interacted with the specific experiences of a same-sex community in Japan? This class explores questions about queer history, writing and cultural practice by looking at particular moments in the Japanese past and present.

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EAST 1950Y. The Many Faces of Chinese Opera.

“Chinese opera” denotes several hundred regional variations of a performance art form that comprises sung arias with musical accompaniment, spoken dialogue, stylized movements, and elaborate costumes and make-up. Originating in the elite leisure spaces of early modern China, the best known versions of this art form are Peking opera and Kun opera. We will examine drama texts from the Yuan dynasty to the present, learn about the aesthetics and politics of these textual and performance traditions, and consider theater culture within its social, economic, and historical contexts. Prerequisite: Previous study of literature or theater at the college level. WRIT

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EAST 1951A. Prose of the World: Understanding Late Imperial China through Fiction and Belles-Lettres.

This course introduces the culture and society of late imperial China through fiction and prose written between 1368 and 1911. The course aims to analyze literary work as the interface of social development and cultural renovation. A chronological exposure to various geographical regions is structured under three conceptual frameworks: cultural belatedness as abundant historical reference; early modernity as commercialization; and pre-modern China encountering the world. The balanced selection of readings in four major literary genres, written by male and female authors, cover topics including: social uprising, the imperial court, civil examination, diplomacy, urban market, travel, religious cult, and courtesan culture. Prerequisites: None. DPLL

Fall EAST1951A S01 16344 W 3:00-5:30(17) (K. Chen)
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EAST 1951B. From Desktop to Stage: Drama and Performance in Late Imperial China.

This course examines the multiple social and aesthetic functions of late imperial Chinese theatre between 1368 and 1840: theatre as lyrical self-expression, political action, ideological propaganda, and/or religious ritual. Close examination of translated plays and their sociohistoric contexts are combined with multimedial approaches that explore woodblock illustration, stage adaptation, and film related to the selected plays. The course covers topics that range from literati masterpieces, theatrical training, props and costumes, regional theatres, to women’s ballads. Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Chinese history is preferred but not mandated. DPLL

Spr EAST1951B S01 25916 M 3:00-5:30(13) (K. Chen)
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EAST 1990. Senior Reading and Research: Selected Topics.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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EAST 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

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EAST XLIST. Courses of Interest to Concentrators.

Fall 2016
East Asian Studies is a highly interdisciplinary concentration. The following courses in other departments can be taken for concentration credit. Please check the listing of the appropriate department for the time and location of each course.

Comparative Literature
COLT 0610T Chinese Literature and Empire
Spring 2017
East Asian Studies is a highly interdisciplinary concentration. The following courses in other departments can be taken for concentration credit. Please check the listing of the appropriate department for the time and location of each course.

History
HIST 0577A The Chinese Diaspora: A History of Globalization
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JAPN 0100. Basic Japanese.

Introduction to Japanese language. Emphasizes the attainment of good spoken control of Japanese and develops a foundation of literacy. No prerequisites. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade submitted at the end of the course work in JAPN 0200 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters. The East Asian Studies department wishes to provide language instruction to all interested students. If you are unable to register for this course due to enrollment limits but are dedicated to learning Japanese, please contact the instructor via email.

Fall JAPN0100 S01 15423 MWF 9:00-9:50(15) (Y. Jackson)
Fall JAPN0100 S01 15423 TTh 9:00-10:20(15) (Y. Jackson)
Fall JAPN0100 S02 15436 MWF 10:00-10:50(15) (Y. Jackson)
Fall JAPN0100 S02 15436 TTh 10:30-11:50(15) (Y. Jackson)
Fall JAPN0100 S03 15451 MWF 1:00-1:50(15) (Y. Jackson)
Fall JAPN0100 S03 15451 TTh 1:00-2:20(15) (Y. Jackson)
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JAPN 0150. Advanced Beginning Japanese.

Designed for those who have had high-school Japanese or other Japanese language experience. An opportunity to organize previous knowledge of Japanese and develop a firm basis of spoken and written Japanese. Prerequisite: Reading and writing knowledge of Hiragana, Katakana, and some Kanji. Placement test required. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade submitted at the end of the course work in JAPN 0250 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters. The East Asian Studies department wishes to provide language instruction to all interested students. If you are unable to register for this course due to enrollment limits but are dedicated to learning Japanese, please contact the instructor via email.

Fall JAPN0150 S01 15450 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (K. Yamashita)
Fall JAPN0150 S01 15450 TTh 9:00-10:20(02) (K. Yamashita)
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JAPN 0200. Basic Japanese.

Introduction to Japanese language. Emphasizes the attainment of good spoken control of Japanese and develops a foundation of literacy. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken JAPN 0100 to receive credit for this course. The final grade for this course will become the final grade for JAPN 0100. If JAPN 0100 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. The East Asian Studies department wishes to provide language instruction to all interested students. If you are unable to register for this course due to enrollment limits but are dedicated to learning Japanese, please contact the instructor via email.

Spr JAPN0200 S01 24158 MWF 9:00-9:50(18) (Y. Jackson)
Spr JAPN0200 S01 24158 TTh 9:00-10:20(18) (Y. Jackson)
Spr JAPN0200 S02 24163 MWF 10:00-10:50(18) (Y. Jackson)
Spr JAPN0200 S02 24163 TTh 10:30-11:50(18) (Y. Jackson)
Spr JAPN0200 S03 24177 MWF 1:00-1:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr JAPN0200 S03 24177 TTh 1:00-2:20(18) 'To Be Arranged'
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JAPN 0250. Advanced Beginning Japanese.

Designed for those who have had high-school Japanese or other Japanese language experience. An opportunity to organize previous knowledge of Japanese and develop a firm basis of spoken and written Japanese. Prerequisite: Reading and writing knowledge of Hiragana, Katakana and some Kanji. Placement test required. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken JAPN 0150 to receive credit for this course. The final grade for this course will become the final grade for JAPN 0150. If JAPN 0150 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. The East Asian Studies department wishes to provide language instruction to all interested students. If you are unable to register for this course due to enrollment limits but are dedicated to learning Japanese, please contact the instructor via email.

Spr JAPN0250 S01 24168 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (K. Yamashita)
Spr JAPN0250 S01 24168 TTh 9:00-10:20(04) (K. Yamashita)
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JAPN 0300. Intermediate Japanese.

Further practice of patterns and structures of the language. Readings are introduced on aspects of Japanese culture and society to develop reading and writing skills, enhance vocabulary, and provide points of departure for conversation in Japanese. Prerequisite: JAPN 0200 or equivalent. The East Asian Studies department wishes to provide language instruction to all interested students. If you are unable to register for this course due to enrollment limits but are dedicated to learning Japanese, please contact the instructor via email.

Fall JAPN0300 S01 15439 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (H. Tajima)
Fall JAPN0300 S01 15439 TTh 2:30-3:50(04) (H. Tajima)
Fall JAPN0300 S02 15446 MWF 12:00-12:50(04) (H. Tajima)
Fall JAPN0300 S02 15446 TTh 12:00-12:50(04) (H. Tajima)
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JAPN 0400. Intermediate Japanese.

See Intermediate Japanese (JAPN 0300) for course description. Prerequisite: JAPN 0300 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 18.

Spr JAPN0400 S01 24166 TTh 8:00-8:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr JAPN0400 S01 24166 MWF 9:00-9:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr JAPN0400 S02 24173 MWF 12:00-12:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr JAPN0400 S02 24173 TTh 12:00-12:50(17) 'To Be Arranged'
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JAPN 0500. Advanced Japanese I.

Continued practice in reading, writing, and speaking. Emphasizes the development of reading proficiency and speaking in cultural contexts. Students read actual articles and selections from Japanese newspapers. Course includes translation, with writing and discussion in Japanese. Films and video tapes are shown as supplementary materials. Prerequisite: JAPN 0400 or equivalent.

Fall JAPN0500 S01 15437 TTh 12:00-12:50(14) (Y. Jackson)
Fall JAPN0500 S01 15437 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (Y. Jackson)
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JAPN 0600. Advanced Japanese I.

See Advanced Japanese I (JAPN 0500) for course description.

Spr JAPN0600 S01 24164 TTh 12:00-12:50(03) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr JAPN0600 S01 24164 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) 'To Be Arranged'
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JAPN 0700. Advanced Japanese II.

Reading of articles from Japan's press with discussion in Japanese. Focuses on explanations and drills on the fine points in grammar and vocabulary as well as on the practice of writing in various styles. Movies and video tapes are used as supplementary materials. Prerequisite: JAPN 0600 or equivalent.

Fall JAPN0700 S01 15456 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (H. Tajima)
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JAPN 0800. Advanced Japanese II.

See Advanced Japanese II (JAPN 0700) for course description.

Spr JAPN0800 S01 24183 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (H. Tajima)
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JAPN 0910A. Classical Japanese.

This is an introductory course to pre-modern Japanese. It will explore the lifestyle and philosophy of samurai in 17th century Japan through reading the book, Gorin no Sho. The book comprises Miyamoto Musashi's thoughts on swordplay, winning, and mind training. The course includes reading background information in English and viewing films and dramas. Enrollment limited to 20.

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JAPN 0910B. Japanese Cities: Tokyo and Kyoto.

The goal of this course is to develop the ability to use Japanese source materials for research in social sciences. Course covers lifestyles in two contrasting cities, Tokyo and Kyoto. Topics include topography, environmental issues, houses, urban life-styles, and natural habitation. We will ask questions: why houses are so compact in cities; why crows and boars pick on garbage, etc. Information sources are films, videos, and websites in addition to textbooks. Prerequisite: JAPN 0600 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.

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JAPN 0910C. Japanese Linguistics.

This course will provide a structural overview of the Japanese language. Students will learn how to develop skills for analyzing the language through looking at sounds, meaning, and grammar. Topics include linguistic analysis of various sentence structures that students often find difficult to use, learning to choose words and sentences in appropriate situations, looking at the relation between language and culture.

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JAPN 0910D. Two Virgins in the Attic: Advanced Japanese Readings in Canonical and Popular Literature.

A traditional Japanese readings course with content both canonical and unconventional. It allows students with three years of Japanese to read from a diverse selection of 20th century Japanese novels, short stories and graphic novels. Our main focus will be on understanding the original Japanese, but some translation into English will be involved as well. In addition to selections from well-known modernists such as Natsume Soseki, Tanizaki Jun'ichi and Mishima Yukio, readings may also include works by Edogawa Rampo, Inagaki Taruho, Yoshiya Nobuko, Yamaji Ebine, Hoshi Shin'ichi, Murakami Ryu, and others to be determined by student interest. All readings in Japanese. Prerequisite: JAPN 0600 or instructor permission.

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JAPN 0910E. Advanced Reading for Research.

This is an advanced reading course. Class activities include reading and translation of scholarly articles in the fields of students’ interests, and of selected writings in humanities and social sciences in general or in broad perspectives. Readings include literary essays, fiction and short stories, articles from major newspapers, weekly and monthly journals/magazines. Prerequisite JAPN0600 Advanced Japanese II. WRIT, LILE

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JAPN 0920A. Business Japanese.

Designed to teach post-advanced level Japanese language, with the focus on effective oral and written communication in business situations, this course emphasizes vocabulary building in the areas of business and economics, use of formal expressions, business writing, and conversation and presentation skills, as well as familiarizing students with Japanese corporate culture, protocol, and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite: JAPN 0700 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.

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JAPN 0920B. Modern Japanese Poetry.

This course is an introduction to modern Japanese poetry, which includes pre-war and post-war poetic forms. We will explore issues of modernity and identity as well as poetics through a close examination of several poems each week. We will work on translations of the poems as part of the exercise of reading. The course includes reading background information in English. No prerequisites required.

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JAPN 1010. Readings in Contemporary Japanese Fiction.

Introduces contemporary short stories and novellas by award winning writers published after 2000. Authors include Yoko Ogawa, Natsuo Kirino, Jiro Asada, Bin Konno. We will analyze why the great many readers are drawn into these literary works through socio cultural background of urban communities. Prerequisites: JAPN0700 or instructor permission.

Spr JAPN1010 S01 24184 M 3:00-5:30(13) (K. Yamashita)
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JAPN 1310. Japanese Linguistics: Communication and Understanding Utterances.

Introduces a linguistic analysis of Japanese language to attain an overview of structure and a foundation for understanding how grammar relates to various modes of communication. Topics include discourse analysis, pragmatics, communicative intention, communication strategies, and intercultural communication gaps. Linguistic data is drawn from films and fiction. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of Japanese grammar, vocabulary, and linguistics. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Fall JAPN1310 S01 15233 M 3:00-5:30(15) (K. Yamashita)
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JAPN 1910. Independent Study.

Reading materials for research in Japanese. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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KREA 0100. Korean.

Begins with an introduction to the Korean writing system (Hangul) and focuses on building communicative competence in modern Korean in the four language modalities (listening, speaking, reading, writing). Provides a foundation for later work in spoken and written Korean. Six classroom hours per week. No prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 18. This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade submitted at the end of the course work in KREA 0200 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters.

Fall KREA0100 S01 15432 MWF 9:00-9:50(15) (H. Ha)
Fall KREA0100 S01 15432 TTh 9:00-10:20(15) (H. Ha)
Fall KREA0100 S02 15447 MWF 12:00-12:50(15) (H. Ha)
Fall KREA0100 S02 15447 TTh 12:00-12:50(15) (H. Ha)
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KREA 0200. Korean.

Begins with an introduction to the Korean writing system (Hangul) and focuses on building communicative competence in modern Korean in the four language modalities (listening, speaking, reading, writing). Provides a foundation for later work in spoken and written Korean. Six classroom hours per week. Enrollment limited to 18. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken KREA 0100 to receive credit for this course. The final grade for this course will become the final grade for KREA 0100. If KREA 0100 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing.

Spr KREA0200 S01 24159 MWF 9:00-9:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr KREA0200 S01 24159 TTh 9:00-10:20(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr KREA0200 S02 24174 MWF 12:00-12:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr KREA0200 S02 24174 TTh 12:00-12:50(18) 'To Be Arranged'
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KREA 0300. Intermediate Korean.

An intermediate course in Korean designed to further communicative competence in spoken Korean and to provide additional reading practice in stylistically higher level materials that are progressively integrated into the given dialogues. Discussions on various aspects of Korean culture and society. Four classroom hours per week. Prerequisite: KREA 0200 or instructor permission.

Fall KREA0300 S01 15440 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (H. Ha)
Fall KREA0300 S01 15440 TTh 10:30-11:50(02) (H. Ha)
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KREA 0400. Intermediate Korean.

See Intermediate Korean (KREA 0300) for course description. Prerequisite: KREA 0100-0200 or equivalent.

Spr KREA0400 S01 24167 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr KREA0400 S01 24167 TTh 10:30-11:50(04) 'To Be Arranged'
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KREA 0500. Advanced Korean.

Aims to help students develop an advanced level of communicative competence, with special focus on enhancing their reading comprehension, essay writing, and discourse (discussion and presentation) skills. Authentic reading materials from a variety of sources will be used to introduce various topics and issues pertaining to Korean society and culture, thus students' cultural understanding will also be enhanced. Prerequisite: KREA 0400 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Fall KREA0500 S01 15452 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (H. Lee)
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KREA 0600. Advanced Korean.

See Advanced Korean (KREA 0500) for course description. Prerequisite: KREA 0500 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Spr KREA0600 S01 24178 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) 'To Be Arranged'
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KREA 0910B. Media Korean.

Develop linguistic competence and deepen cultural understanding through exposure to a variety of media sources. Built on the Content-based Instruction model and Genre-based Approach. Discuss current Korean affairs and core issues of culture based on assigned materials. Develop reading and listening comprehension skills through pre-class activities, oral proficiency through in-class discussion and presentation, and writing proficiency through assigned essays writings, in addition to various integrative tasks. Tuesday classes will focus on comprehending the text and source materials, Thursday classes will focus on related tasks and activities. Enrollment limited to 20. Conducted entirely in Korean.

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KREA 0920A. Korean Culture and Society.

Develops oral proficiency in Korean language through a variety of readings on Korean culture and society. By reading about and discussing important aspects and core issues of Korea, students enhance their speaking competence and cultural understanding. Prerequisites: KREA 0300 and 0400 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to: 15.

Spr KREA0920A S01 24193 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (H. Wang)
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KREA 0920B. Business Korean.

For students who are interested in Korean culture in general and business culture in particular, and in improving their Korean language skills in a business context. The course not only focuses on business and economy-related words and expressions, but also on developing learners' confidence in business writing, conversation and presentations in Korean. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: KREA 0400 or instructor's permission.

Course usage information

KREA 0920D. The Korean Vision: A Debate.

The contemporary Korean society has undergone significant transformation in the past few decades, not only on the personal level, such as changes in personal life style and family structure, but also on the public level, such as economic development and political affairs. Various issues due to these changes have sparked a much heated debate within Korean society. This course will look into some of these major controversial issues with texts and media materials. Through this content-oriented advanced level language course, students will be able to improve their Korean language proficiency, as well as deepen their understanding of Korean culture and society. Prerequisite: KREA 0600. Enrollment limit to 18. Will replace current KREA 0900 course in schedule for Fall 2016.

Fall KREA0920D S01 16575 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (H. Wang)
Course usage information

KREA 1910. Independent Study.

Reading materials for research in Korean. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

KREA 1950W. Translating Korean: Fiction, Poetry, Film and K-Pop (EAST 1950W).

Interested students must register for EAST 1950W.

Chair

Hye-Sook Wang

Professor

Jerome B. Grieder
Professor Emeritus of East Asian Studies and History

David Lattimore
Professor Emeritus of East Asian Studies

Dore J. Levy
Professor of Comparative Literature; Professor of East Asian Studies

Steve Rabson
Professor Emeritus of East Asian Studies

Harold D. Roth
Professor of Religious Studies and East Asian Studies

Janine T. Anderson Sawada
Professor of Religious Studies and East Asian Studies

James J. Wrenn
Professor Emeritus of East Asian Studies

Associate Professor

Samuel E. Perry
Associate Professor of East Asian Studies

Meera Sushila Viswanathan
Associate Professor Emerita of East Asian Studies

Hye-Sook Wang
Associate Professor of East Asian Studies

Lingzhen Wang
Associate Professor of East Asian Studies

Kikuko Yamashita
Associate Professor of East Asian Studies

Assistant Professor

Kaijun Chen
Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Senior Lecturer

Lung-Hua Hu
Senior Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Yuko I. Jackson
Senior Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Yang Wang
Senior Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Lecturer

Hiroshi Tajima
Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Hsin-I Tseng
Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Adjunct Associate Professor

Zhuqing Li
Adjunct Associate Professor of East Asian Studies

Visiting Lecturer

Wenyi Chu
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Hyun Ju Ha
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Sachiko Hiramatsu
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Saori Hoshi
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Jia-Lin Huang Hsieh
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Hye Seung Lee
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Yangzi Ye
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Huijie Zhu
Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

East Asian Studies

East Asian Studies is a multidisciplinary concentration designed for students wishing to attain reasonable fluency in Chinese,  Japanese, or Korean with specialized exposure to selected East Asian subjects. It serves students with two types of interests: those who aim to pursue active professional careers related to the East Asian region; and those who want to pursue graduate study in the humanities or social sciences with particular emphasis on China, Japan or Korea. Students in East Asian Studies will gain language proficiency and familiarity with East Asia through advanced courses in a variety of disciplines. Concentrators are strongly encouraged, but not required, to study in East Asia for one or two semesters. The concentration requires students to demonstrate a basic proficiency in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean.

The Language Requirement

The concentration requires students to demonstrate a basic proficiency in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean. For the purposes of the concentration, proficiency is determined to be consistent with successful completion of the Department’s third-year course sequence in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean (0500-0600), or its equivalent. Native speakers of these languages may, for example, demonstrate competency such that language courses may be unnecessary. Department language instructors may also determine that course work completed at one of the language-intensive study abroad programs attended by our undergraduates is comparable to courses offered at Brown. Up to three upper level (700-999) may count as electives for concentration credit.

Note that we do not equate completion of third-year Chinese, Japanese, or Korean with fluency in these languages. Rather, we believe that students who have demonstrated the skills associated with third-year Chinese, Japanese, or Korean have acquired a foundational understanding of the languages’ grammar, vocabularies, and conversational patterns, such that they are able to make themselves understood in everyday situations, and to understand both spoken and written communication.
For the purposes of the concentration, language courses through the third-year are treated as an accompanying requirement.

Language Prerequisites (demonstrating proficiency through the third-year or 0600 level in one of the three languages below)
Chinese
Basic Chinese
and Basic Chinese
Intermediate Chinese
and Intermediate Chinese
Advanced Modern Chinese I
and Advanced Modern Chinese I
Japanese
Basic Japanese
and Basic Japanese
Advanced Beginning Japanese
and Advanced Beginning Japanese
Intermediate Japanese
and Intermediate Japanese
Advanced Japanese I
and Advanced Japanese I
Korean
Korean
and Korean
Intermediate Korean
and Intermediate Korean
Advanced Korean
and Advanced Korean
Language Electives (language courses that may be counted for concentration credit)
Chinese
Advanced Modern Chinese II
and Advanced Modern Chinese II (either course may be taken for one semester)
Introduction to Classical Chinese
Introduction to Modern Chinese Prose
The Changing Face of China: Advanced Reading in Chinese Media
Business Chinese
Modern Chinese Literature
Japanese
Advanced Japanese II
and Advanced Japanese II (either course may be taken for one semester)
Classical Japanese
Japanese Cities: Tokyo and Kyoto
Japanese Linguistics
Business Japanese
Two Virgins in the Attic: Advanced Japanese Readings in Canonical and Popular Literature
Advanced Reading for Research
Readings in Contemporary Japanese Fiction
Japanese Linguistics: Communication and Understanding Utterances
Korean
Media Korean
Translating Korean: Fiction, Poetry, Film and K-Pop (EAST 1950W)

Electives

The concentration requires that students complete a total of eight electives tied to their course of study, which may be defined in linguistic, chronological, thematic, or cultural terms.   Students should choose their courses with the following three requirements in mind.

  • EAST Requirement: At least three of the eight electives must be East Asian Studies (EAST) courses; Chinese (CHIN), Japanese (JAPN), or Korean (KREA) courses at the 1000-level and above may also count toward this requirement.
  • Breadth Requirement: At least one of the eight electives must focus on an East Asian country or culture other than those associated with the language the student is using to satisfy the concentration's language requirement.  A concentrator studying Chinese, for example, must choose at least one course that focuses on Korea and/or Japan.
  • Senior Seminar Requirement: At least one of the eight elective courses must be an advanced research seminar, taken in the senior year.

As is common for interdisciplinary concentrations, a wide range of courses, including many taught by faculty in other departments, may be counted toward the concentration. These include courses offered by East Asian Studies faculty, faculty with courtesy appointments in the Department, and courses with a significant focus on East Asia offered in such disciplines as American Studies, Art History, Economics, International Relations, and many others.

Sample Electives offered by East Asian Studies
EAST 0500Childhood and Culture in Japan1
EAST 1010From Basho to Banana: Four Centuries of Japanese Literature 21
EAST 1030Words on Things: Literature and Material Culture in Early Modern China 11
EAST 1070China Modern: An Introduction to the Literature of Twentieth-Century China 11
EAST 1100Korean Culture and Film 31
EAST 1200Pop, Political and Patrician: Culture in Japan and the Koreas 41
EAST 1270China Through the Lens: History, Cinema, and Critical Discourse 11
For additional elective choices, visit http://brown.edu/academics/east-asian-studies/courses/more-course-offerings.
1

 China-centric

2

 Japan-centric

3

 Korea-centric

4

 East Asia-centric

Advanced Research Seminars

At least one of the eight elective courses must be an advanced research seminar, taken in the senior year. The research seminar will normally provide students with the opportunity to develop a project or paper focusing on one or more of their areas of inquiry within the concentration. Students are strongly encouraged to find ways to incorporate the use of Chinese, Japanese or Korean language materials in their research and learning in these courses. Courses falling into this category include the East Asian Studies 1950 series as well as designated seminars offered by faculty in such departments as History, Religious Studies, and Comparative Literature among others.  The Department will provide a list of pre-approved advanced seminars every semester. Students wishing to add courses to that list must submit their requests in writing to the Director of Undergraduate Studies at the start of the semester.

Sample advanced seminars offered by East Asian Studies
EAST 1950GMarket Economy, Popular Culture, and Mass Media in Contemporary China1
EAST 1950XQueer Japan: Culture, History and Sexuality1
EAST 1950WTranslating Korean: Fiction, Poetry, Film and K-Pop1
EAST 1951AProse of the World: Understanding Late Imperial China through Fiction and Belles-Lettres1

Honors

East Asian Studies offers qualified students, in their senior year, the opportunity to undertake a sustained research and writing project that, ideally, will result not merely in a long term paper, but in a piece of original scholarship. To enroll in the Honors Program, the student must be a senior East Asian Studies concentrator, with at least a high B average in concentration courses. Candidates for Honors are required to have developed a competence in an East Asian language sufficient to allow them to use East Asian language materials in carrying out their research. Students must also successfully obtain the support of at least two faculty members who will agree to serve as primary and secondary advisors for the thesis. Prospective writers submit a thesis prospectus, brief bibliography, and completed application forms (with signatures), ordinarily late in the student’s six semester, to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, who provides the final permission to proceed. Synopses of successful thesis proposals will be distributed to Department faculty.

Thesis writers enroll in advisor-specific sections of the thesis-writing course EAST 1930 (Fall) and EAST 1940 (Spring), meet regularly with their advisors over the course of both semesters, and submit final versions of their theses to the Department in mid-April. Advisors and students are required to provide updates of their progress to the Director of Undergraduate Studies at regular intervals.

The completed thesis is evaluated for Honors by the thesis director and by a second reader. In case of a difference of judgment between the two readers, a third opinion may be sought. The awarding of Honors in East Asian Studies will occur only if the Honors Thesis receives a final grade of A. If an A is not received, the student will still receive academic credit for EAST 1930-1940. Students are notified in mid-May whether the Department has recommended the awarding of Honors. Copies of readers’ comments are provided to the student. 

All graduating concentrators will present the results of their senior theses in the department’s Senior Project Forum. The Forum will usually take place at the end of the spring semester, but may also occur at the end of the fall semester to accommodate mid-year graduates.

Double Concentrations

Students who are interested in developing a double concentration, including East Asian Studies as one of the two concentrations, should bear in mind that normally no more than two courses may be double-counted toward satisfying the course requirements of either of the two concentration programs involved. 

Study Abroad

Concentrators are strongly encouraged, but not required, to study in East Asia for one or two semesters during their undergraduate years. Course credits earned abroad are generally transferable to Brown. However, a maximum of three courses taken abroad, of genuine intellectual substance and significantly related to East Asian Studies, may be considered for concentration credit.

Summary of requirements:

  • Language study through the level of 0600 or the equivalent of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean
  • Eight elective courses
    • At least three of the eight must be East Asian Studies (EAST) courses; Chinese (CHIN), Japanese (JAPN), or Korean (KREA) courses at the 1000-level and above may also count toward this requirement
    • At least one of the eight electives must focus on  an East Asian country or culture other than those associated with the language the student is using to satisfy the concentration's language requirement.  A concentrator studying China, for example, would choose at least one course that focuses on Korea and/or Japan. 
    • At least one of the eight must be an advanced research seminar, taken in the senior year.
  • EAST 1930 (Senior Thesis, Semester 1)- EAST 1940 ( Senior Thesis, Semester 2) for Honors candidates only