English

Our department fosters the open understanding of the study of British, American, and Anglophone literature. We promote original work on new questions of criticism, theory, and analysis. We invite practices of reading and writing that challenge the ongoing creation of knowledge in our fields. English is a large concentration at Brown, and graduates of our Ph.D. program are recognized for their scholarship across the globe. Our nonfiction writing program includes a broad range of genres, styles and modes of writing.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/english/

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ENGL 0100A. How To Read A Poem.

It is difficult/ to get the news from poems/ yet men die miserably every day/ for lack/ of what is found there. William Carlos Williams’s words begin to articulate this course’s focus on the power of poetic language to represent and to give shape to human experience. Designed for concentrators and non-concentrators, the semester’s work consists of both conceptual and practical matters conducive to understanding, analyzing, and writing about poems. The reading draws freely on texts from across historical and geographical boundaries, including works by Spenser, Shakespeare, Lanyer, Donne, Keats, Dickinson, Frost, Auden, Whitman, Eliot, cummings, Bishop, and Heaney. LILE

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ENGL 0100B. Literature, Trauma, and War.

This course surveys many genres and periods in order to consider and think about two traditional kinds of literary responses to war--glorifying it, and representing its horrors. We'll examine texts by Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Byron, Whitman, Hardy, Crane, Freud, Levi, Pynchon, and Sebald, among others; we may also screen one or two films. Limited to undergraduates. Students should register for ENGL 0100B S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0100C. Altered States.

A course about ecstasy, rapture, transport, travel, mysticism, metamorphosis, and magic in pre- and early modern verse, drama, and prose, including: Ovid (Metamorphoses), Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream; Othello), Marlowe (Dr. Faustus), Mandeville's Travels; the writings of the medieval female mystics Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe; the ecstatic verse of Crashaw, and the erotic, at times pornographic, verse of Donne, Herrick, Carew, Rochester, and Behn.

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ENGL 0100D. Matters of Romance.

Narratives (1100-1500) of men, women, and elves seeking identity on the road, in bed, and at court. Readings (in modern English) include Arthurian romances, Havelok, lais by Marie de France, and Chaucer's "Wife of Bath's Tale." Primarily for freshmen and sophomores. Students should register for ENGL 0100D S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

Spr ENGL0100D S01 24643 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (E. Bryan)
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ENGL 0100E. Catastrophic Communities.

What becomes of communities and individuals in a catastrophe? This course considers the different literary, social and ethical formations that arise or are destroyed in disaster, and examines what it means to be both an individual and part of a collective in times of unprecedented upheaval. Readings by Blanchot, Camus, Sebald, Duras, Freud, Arendt, Jaspers, Orwell, and Eggers. WRIT

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ENGL 0100F. Devils, Demons, and Do Gooders.

Who hasn't struggled with the problem of good and evil? Who hasn't wondered what lurks in the dark recesses of the soul? We will investigate how Milton, Mary Shelley, Melville, Poe, and Hawthorne, among others, grapple with these fundamental questions of judgment.

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ENGL 0100G. The Literature of Identity.

This course will explore various conceptions of personal identity, with an emphasis on Romanticism. We'll read Anglo-American philosophical and literary texts (mostly poetry) from the Renaissance through the 19th century, taking some excursions into contemporary theory (queer, feminist, post-structuralist). Writers may include Shakespeare, Montaigne, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Keats, Emerson, Browning, and Wilde. DPLL LILE

Spr ENGL0100G S01 24588 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (J. Khalip)
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ENGL 0100H. Fictions and Frauds: Literature and the Historical Imagination.

How does fiction reinvent history? What makes autobiography "true"? Readings focus on the slave narrative, Hawthorne, historical novels, and Jack Kerouac’s "On the Road." Limited to undergraduates.

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ENGL 0100I. American Fiction and the Sea.

This class examines one of the most distinctive of literary genres: the sea tale. These narratives are interested not only in how we know what we know, but in the ways we imagine what we don’t know. Novels and films to be discussed will include Moby-Dick; Lord Jim; Aguirre, the Wrath of God; Apocalypse Now; The Witness.

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ENGL 0100J. Cultures and Countercultures: The American Novel after World War II.

A study of the postwar American novel in the context of the intellectual history of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. We will read the postwar novel in relation to the affluent society, the vital center, the lonely crowd, the power elite, the one-dimensional man, the post-industrial society. Authors to be considered include Baldwin, Bellow, Ellison, Highsmith, McCarthy, O'Connor, Petry, Pynchon, and Roth. Two lectures and one discussion meeting weekly. Students should register for ENGL 0100J S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0100K. The Dead and the Living.

Explores ethical, historical, and personal dilemmas in modernism through the relation between the dead and the living. What claims do the dead have on the living? How do the living shape the lives of the dead? Readings in literature, psychoanalysis, and philosophy, including Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, James Joyce, W. G. Sebald, and Julian Barnes. Students should register for ENGL 0100K S01 and may be assigned to a conference section by the instructor during the first week of class. LILE

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ENGL 0100L. What Was Postmodern Literature?.

How compatible is the idea of the postmodern with the idea of a historical period? This course looks at recent British and American literature through the optic of postmodern theory, discussing how the theoretical problematization of both history and politics has an impact upon the very possibility of fiction. Readings include Doctorow, Pynchon, Amis, Jameson, Lyotard, Baudrillard. Students may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0100M. Writing War.

Examines the challenges that war poses to representation, and particularly to language and literary expression in the modern era. We will focus primarily on the First and Second World Wars, exploring the specific pressures war puts on novels and poetry, as well as on history, psychology, and ethics. Works by Sassoon, Owen, Hemingway, Woolf, Rebecca West, Graham Greene, Pat Barker, Tim O'Brien, Georges Perec. Students should register for ENGL 0100M S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0100N. City Novels.

This course examines 20th and 21st century novels to consider how these narratives envision the city, its possibilities and limits. How does the city shape how we think, wander, grow up, see and know each other? How does the city divide people? How does the novel imagine ways to bridge those divisions? Readings by Woolf, Chandler, Wright, Cisneros, Smith, Calvino, Adiga, Whitehead.

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ENGL 0100P. Love Stories.

What do we talk about when we talk about love? We will see how writers have addressed this question from Shakespeare's day to the present. Writers may include Shakespeare, Austen, Eliot, Flaubert, Graham Greene, Marilynne Robinson, and/or others. Students should register for ENGL 0100P S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. LILE WRIT

Fall ENGL0100P S01 16443 WF 10:00-10:50(14) (J. Kuzner)
Fall ENGL0100P S01 16443 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (J. Kuzner)
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ENGL 0100R. American Histories, American Novels.

How do novels make readers experience such traumatic American historical events as war, slavery, and race riots? What kind of political or ethical perspective on such divisive and violent events do literary narratives encourage their readers to take? This course explores these questions by examining a number of influential post-1945 works that offer powerful examples of how novels make us think and feel in particularly resonant ways about the histories they depict. The reading list will include works by such authors as: William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, Jeffery Eugenides, Chang-rae Lee, Mohsin Hamid and Junot Diaz. DPLL LILE WRIT

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ENGL 0100S. Being Romantic.

"Romantic literature" and "Romantic art" are familiar concepts in the history of culture. But what does "Romantic" actually mean? Were Coleridge and Keats especially dedicated to writing about erotic love? Why would "Romantic" literature emerge during the period of the French Revolution and Industrial Revolution? What does early 19th-century "Romanticism" have to do with the meaning and status of the "Romantic" in our culture today? Readings in British and American writing from Blake and Mary Shelley to Ani DiFranco and Rage Against the Machine.

Fall ENGL0100S S01 15712 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (W. Keach)
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ENGL 0100T. The Simple Art of Murder.

A survey of the history of criminal enterprise in American literature. Authors to be considered include Poe, Melville, Hawthorne, Twain, Chandler, Wright, Petry, Highsmith, Millar, Harris, and Mosley. Students who have taken ENGL 0560D may not register for this course. Students should register for ENGL 0100T S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0100U. Serial Fictions.

A study of serial and serialized fictional narratives from the nineteenth century the present-- dime novels, serial genre fictions, literary novels comprised of chapters initially published as short stories, radio and film serials, television programs old (The Naked City, Hawaii-Five 0), newer (The Wire, Sex in the City), and new (Americans), podcasts, and video games (Legend of Zelda).

Fall ENGL0100U S01 15714 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (D. Nabers)
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ENGL 0100V. Inventing Asian American Literature.

What insights can literature provide into the complicated workings of race in America? What role can the invention of a literary tradition play in illuminating and rectifying past and present injustices? We explore these questions by examining how the idea of an Asian American literary tradition came into being and by reading influential works that have become part of its canon. Students should register for ENGL 0100V S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. DPLL LILE WRIT

Fall ENGL0100V S01 16547 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (D. Kim)
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ENGL 0150A. Elizabeth I: The Queen and the Poets.

Queen Elizabeth I, a poet herself, adorned her aging body as the symbolic object of desire for a circle of ambitious male poets. Considers the poetic means by which Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare overcome the obvious obstacles to desire presented by her uncertain health and imperious temperament and court their Virgin Queen. FYS

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ENGL 0150B. Objects of Beauty in Renaissance Culture.

What made a poem or a play as beautiful in 16th-century England as a hat or the right pair of shoes? Literary history and aesthetics from Wyatt, Surrey, and More, through Sidney, Shakespeare, Jonson, and Donne. FYS

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ENGL 0150C. The Medieval King Arthur.

Where did stories of King Arthur come from and how did they develop in the Middle Ages? We will read the earliest narratives of King Arthur and his companions, in histories and romances from Celtic, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English sources, to examine Arthur's varying personas of warrior, king, lover, thief. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS WRIT

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ENGL 0150D. Shakespeare's Present Tense.

Shakespeare in Love suggests how Shakespeare was clued in to elite and popular cultures. Current adaptations like O and 10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU demonstrate how Shakespeare provides anachronistic clues to issues of the present. This course will trace such clues by examining the cultural origins and ongoing adaptations of Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Henry V, and the sonnets. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

Fall ENGL0150D S01 15737 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (S. Foley)
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ENGL 0150E. Love and Friendship.

What do we talk about when we talk about love? This course poses this question in various ways. How, for instance, can we tell the difference between love's various forms—between love that is friendly and love that is romantic? How do the different forms of love differently shape people? How does love work when it involves sex, or marriage, or children, or divinity? And what must love involve to be called “good”? Why? Materials will range from Plato and St. Augustine to Leo Bersani and Allen Bloom and will also include popular filmic representations of love. Limited to 20. FYS

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ENGL 0150F. Hawthorne and James.

An introduction to a pair of writers whose work continues to shape our understanding of American literature and American identity. Focusing on much of their most important work, our aim will be to understand how their conceptions of the relationship between writing and history both complicate and complement each other. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS LILE WRIT

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ENGL 0150G. Lincoln, Whitman, and The Civil War.

An introduction to the literature of the American Civil War: Whitman, Lincoln, Melville, Stowe, and other autobiographical and military narratives. FYS

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ENGL 0150H. Literature of The American South.

The South is as much a state of mind as a place on the map, and some of the major figures in American literature have contributed to the making of what we think of when we think of "the South." Explores the sometimes contradictory but always important meanings of the American South. Authors include Poe, Douglass, and Faulkner. FYS

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ENGL 0150I. The Simple Art of Murder.

This course surveys the history of criminal enterprise in twentieth-century American culture. Drawing from a broad range of sources ("literary" novels and pulp fiction, B-movies and auteurist features), we will assess the role of crime as object of aesthetic attention and attend to the questions that can arise about the idea of the criminal when one takes it up outside of its usual home in courts. Authors: Poe, Hammett, Fitzgerald, Chandler, Wright, Petry, Hughes, Butler. Directors: Hitchcock, Wilder, Huston, Truffaut, Pakula, Lupino. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

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ENGL 0150J. Inventing America.

One of the distinguishing features of American literature may be its seemingly constant struggle with the idea of America itself. For what, these authors wonder, does/should America stand? We will examine the rhetorical battles waged in some major works over the meaning and/or meanings of America’s national identity. Authors may include Franklin, Hawthorne, and Fitzgerald. Limited to 20 first-year students. Instructor permission required. FYS LILE WRIT

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ENGL 0150K. The Transatlantic American Novel.

This course reads American literature across national boundaries, focusing on the novel genre and the question of "American" identity as a problem in itself. The course takes up this problem in a wide array of novels spanning the period between the late eighteenth and twentieth centuries. Writers include Crevecoeur, Susanna Rowson, Poe, Melville, Twain, and Nella Larsen. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

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ENGL 0150L. The Sensational and the Real in Victorian Fiction.

This course will explore two modes through which Victorian novels engaged the turbulent experience of their time: realism and sensation. We will examine how these different genres tackled issues of gender, sexuality, class, and personal and community identity. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

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ENGL 0150M. "Model Minority" Writers: Cold War Fictions of Race and Ethnicity.

Explores the construction of race and ethnicity in U.S. writings of the 50s, paying particular attention to how literary texts negotiate the ideological demands of Cold War anti-communism. Writers studied may include Saul Bellow, Carlos Bulosan, Ralph Ellison, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, John Okada, and Jade Snow Wong. FYS

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ENGL 0150N. Black Atlantic Narratives of Africa.

We will study fiction, drama, and autobiography by black writers who have used the motif of a literal or symbolic journey to Africa to explore in powerful ways issues of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Africa as land and concept, individual and collective memory. Writers will include Maryse Condé, Charles Johnson, George Lamming, Paule Marshall, Toni Morrison, and Derek Walcott. FYS

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ENGL 0150O. Englishness and Britishness in Contemporary Fiction.

How have writers of fiction responded to recent developments in British political culture? How has the category of Englishness changed during that period? This course offers an overview of some of the most important British writers of the last twenty years and an introduction to theories of culture and ideology. Readings include Ishiguro, Kelman, Caryl Phillips, Zadie Smith. FYS

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ENGL 0150P. Is There a Theory of the Short Story?.

This course considers the question in the title by looking at works of short fiction by Melville, Conrad, Bierce, Joyce, Lawrence, Kafka, Wicomb, Paley, O'Connor, Beckett, White, and literary theories by figures such as Lukacs, Bakhtin and Deleuze. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. FYS

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ENGL 0150Q. Realism and Modernism.

The novel as a genre has been closely identified with the act of representation. What it means to represent "reality," however, has varied widely. This seminar will explore how the representation of reality changes as modern fiction questions the assumptions about knowing, language, and society that defined the great tradition of realism. English and American novels will be the primary focus of our attention, but influential French, German, and Russian works will be studied as well. Limited to 20 first-year students. Banner registration after classes begin requires instructor approval. FYS LILE

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ENGL 0150R. The Problem of Women's Writing.

Combines a survey of British and American women writers with an interrogation of the concept of women's writing. Authors will include Austen and Bronte, Walker and Viramontes; theoretical topics will include the figure of the author, subjectivity and ideology, the concept of a separate women's canon or tradition, and the complex differences within "feminine" writing and "feminist" reading. FYS

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ENGL 0150S. The Roaring Twenties.

The 1920s helped solidify much of what we consider modern in 20th-century U.S. culture. This course reads literature of the decade in the context of a broader culture, including film and advertising, to think about the period's important topics: the rise of mass culture and of public relations, changes in women's position, consumerism, nativism and race relations. Writers include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Larsen, Toomer, Parker. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. Instructor permission required. FYS

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ENGL 0150T. Arms and the Man.

"Mother Green and her killing machine!" So enthuses a grunt in Full Metal Jacket about the Marine Corps. This seminar explores the romance of man and machine: the individual man's body as a machine and group relations with each man as a cog in a larger body/machine. We'll also consider other sites—including the gym—infiltrated, at least figuratively, by militarism. Texts: Crane, The Red Badge; Herr, Dispatches; Swofford, Jarhead; Paul Fussell, The Great War and Modern Memory; Samuel Fussell, Muscle. Films: Full Metal Jacket; The Hurt Locker; GI Jane; Three Kings; Pumping Iron. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. FYS

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ENGL 0150U. The Terrible Century.

Although the term "terrorism" was coined in the 18th century, and although its contemporary resonance has reached an unprecedented pitch, the truly terrible century was arguably the 20th. This course introduces 20th century literature in English through a historical and philosophical examination of terror and terrorism. We will focus on several historical contexts, including: British colonialism in Ireland and Africa, South African apartheid, and the post 9/11 world. Readings include Conrad, Bowen, Farrell, Gordimer, Coetzee, Foulds, Walters, Hamid. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

Fall ENGL0150U S01 15738 W 3:00-5:30(17) (T. Bewes)
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ENGL 0150V. James and Wharton.

Friends, rivals, fellow ex-pats, and close correspondents for 15 years, Henry James and Edith Wharton had much in common. Their names are often coupled together in much the manner as Hemingway and Fitzgerald, since their fiction has often thought to deal with the same set of concerns: the societal and emotional ups and downs of well-to-do people in London, Paris, and New York. This class will read James and Wharton side by side in order not only to see in what ways they shed light on each other, but in what ways they differ. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS.

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ENGL 0150W. Literature and the Visual Arts.

How do words and images represent? Are the processes by which literature and the visual arts render the world similar or different? Is reading a novel or a poem more like or unlike viewing a painting, a sculpture, or a film? This seminar will analyze important theoretical statements about these questions as well as selected literary and visual examples. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

Fall ENGL0150W S01 15739 F 3:00-5:30(11) (P. Armstrong)
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ENGL 0150X. The Claims of Fiction.

This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of novels and shorter fiction, in English or in translation. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will likely include Baldwin, Brontë, Condé, Conrad, Faulkner, Greene, Ishiguro, Lessing, Morrison, Naipaul, Salih. Limited to 20 first-year students. DPLL FYS

Spr ENGL0150X S01 24589 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (O. George)
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ENGL 0150Y. Brontës and Brontëism.

The novels of Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë alongside works (fiction and film) influenced by or continuing their powerful (and competing) authorial visions: Wide Sargasso Sea (Rhys), Rebecca (Hitchcock), The Piano (Campion), and Suspiria (Argento). Among other questions, we will discuss the role of Romanticism, feminism, the bodily imaginary, colonialism, and genre. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS

Spr ENGL0150Y S01 25654 W 3:00-5:30(14) (B. Parker)
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ENGL 0200A. All Eyes On You: Voyeurism and Surveillance Culture.

Can one both fear and delight in the knowledge of being watched? How is desire produced in voyeurism or exhibitionism? This course will explore the importance, danger and seduction of voyeuristic observation and surveillance culture through the lens of several 20th century American novels and films. Authors include Nobokov, James and Pychon. Films include "Lolita," "Rear Window" and "Brokeback Mountain." Enrollment limited to 17.

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ENGL 0200B. Queer and Feminist Poetics: Hybrid Forms, 1969 to Present.

How do queer and feminist text engage formal experiment? This course will explore the political, conceptual, and rhetorical uses of queer and feminist discourses in contemporary hybrid-genre writing. William S. Burroughs, Kathy Acker, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, Gloria Anzaldúa, Jack Spicer, Alice Notley, CAConrad, Christian Hawkey, and Ronaldo Wilson. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200C. The Art of Catastrophe: Crisis and Collapse in the American Literary Landscape.

How have contemporary thinkers grappled with great crises -- environmental, economic, spiritual, terroristic -- in the 20th century? From catastrophic events like 9/11 to volatile conflicts involving race and gender, this course assesses contemporary literary and cinematic representations of crisis by probing their political and aesthetic significance. Authors may include: West, Ward, DeLillo, Hamid, Ozeki; Films include Soylent Green, Dawn of the Dead, The Reluctant Fundamentalist. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200D. Intimate Horrors: Encountering the Uncanny in Literature and Film.

The horrifying is often times uncomfortably close, even familiar. Alongside theoretical discussions of Gothic literature, psychoanalysis, media, and genre, this course examines the unsettling effects and affects of what makes our skin crawl. We will discuss crazed limbs, possessed voices, evil mothers, creaking houses, ghostly doubles, and creepy children. Works by: Freud, Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Wilde, Lovecraft, Cronenberg, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Lynch. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200E. Fictional Brains: Reading Artificial Intelligence and Cognition.

Reading high and popular literature (e.g. detective fiction and science fiction), this course investigates how we think about and construct fictional characters. This course will introduce students to applying classical and recent philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific research to the study of literary texts. Possible authors/works: Poe, Melville, Kafka, Asimov, Blade Runner, and Sherlock. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200F. The Spectacle of War in 20th-Century American Literature and Film.

This course examines the mediated experience of war from Vietnam forward in light of traditional representations beginning with the Civil War. We will consider the ways in which war is made visible (or invisible), and the position of the reader/spectator as voyeur, consumer, and citizen. Authors: Crane, Herr, O’Brien, Huong, Iraq War veterans, Guantanamo detainees. Directors: Griffith, Kubrick, Coppola, Scott. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200H. Writing the Black Diaspora: Speaking Truth to Power.

What can slave narratives tell us about speech, power, and truth? What are the relationships between self-expression, genre, and questions of truth under conditions of disempowerment? This course introduces contemporary thinking about race and colonial encounters alongside fiction and life-writing by African-American, Canadian, and Caribbean authors from a range of historical periods. Authors: Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Dionne Brand, Lawrence Hill. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200J. Violence and Secrecy in Victorian Fiction.

How is violence actually depicted in Victorian fiction? Often these novels are oriented around violence but are structured by the figure of the secret, a figure that invites and refuses knowledge. This course examines the relation between violence and secrecy in Victorian fiction and its afterlife. Authors: Brontë, Stevenson, Dickens, Collins, Wilde. Films: The Prestige, Psycho, A History of Violence. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200K. Race, Dystopia, and Contemporary Fiction.

What happens to race after the end of the world as we know it? We will study dystopian literature written by black and Asian North American authors to investigate how they (re)imagine race in relation to questions of the human, citizenship, and state violence. Authors include Colson Whitehead, Chang-rae Lee, Octavia Butler, Karen Tei Yamashita, Nalo Hopkinson, and Larissa Lai. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200L. Trial and Error: Law in American Literature and Film.

What does our cultural fascination with law suggest about the limits of justice in America? From crime to capital punishment, this course investigates law's fragile relation to personhood and citizenship, examining tensions between the human body and the terms by which it is legislated and disciplined. Authors: Capote, Eggers, Faulkner, Lee, Morrison, Twain. Film/TV: Dead Man Walking, Milk, The Wire. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200M. A Brief History of Technophobia.

From the printing press to CGI, novels and films depend upon machines for their existence. So why do they often depict technology as something sinister? From Mary Shelley to Terminator, we’ll explore the anxiety aroused by technology: considered as machinery, a mode of thought, and a principle of social organization. Marx, Dickens, Melville, Orwell, Kafka, Coetzee, Chaplin, Kubrick, Kathryn Bigelow. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Spr ENGL0200M S01 25618 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (D. Byrne)
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ENGL 0200N. Obscenity.

The term “obscene” describes the extreme, the offensive, but also gestures toward that which is “offstage.” How can something offend if it takes place out of sight? Courting potential discomfort, we will tarry with obscenity in various guises and try to cope with its effects. Texts by Catullus, Shakespeare, Sade, Baudelaire, Henry Miller, Beckett, Delany, Jelinek. Films by Fassbinder, Breillat. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Spr ENGL0200N S01 25616 MWF 12:00-12:50(05) (J. Casey)
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ENGL 0200P. Monsters in America.

Monsters reveal our deepest fears and our greatest insecurities, and every society creates the monsters that it needs. Probing the shifting terrains of sexual, racial, and cultural otherness that monsters represent, this course examines depictions of monstrosity in 19th- and 20th-century American literature and film. Possible authors/films include: Hawthorne, Lovecraft, Stephen Crane, Octavia Butler, Asimov, The Elephant Man, and Alien. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Fall ENGL0200P S01 16691 MWF 12:00-12:50(12) (N. Fung)
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ENGL 0200Q. Opting Out: Social Withdrawal and the Reclusive Life.

Why do some people pursue lives of seclusion? What is lost or gained by withdrawing from society? This course considers literary approaches to the question of asocial behavior. We will also discuss several related topics, such as solitude, social anxiety, hikikomori, social media, monasticism, and shyness. Authors may include: Hawthorne, Thoreau, Shirley Jackson, Robinson, Krakauer, Doctorow. 1-2 films. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Spr ENGL0200Q S01 25619 MWF 12:00-12:50(05) (M. Gastiger)
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ENGL 0200R. Reading With Feeling.

How do we feel with our bodies? Starting from the Enlightenment and moving to romanticism this course examines various literary and philosophical accounts of sympathy and sentimentality as modes that complicate the self and its relation to society. Authors include: Adam Smith, Goldsmith, Sterne, Austen, Wordsworth, Joanna Baillie, Keats. Films include Bridget Jones’s Diary and Atonement. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0200S. Fresh Off the Boat: Immigration and Border-Crossings in American Empire.

How do borders, migration, and naturalization figure into 20th century media? Through several waves of US immigration, this course explores themes of border-crossing in European, Asian and Latina/o migration. Authors: Kafka, Willa Cather, Junot Diaz, Jhumpa Lahiri, Tao Lin. Films/TV: Fresh Off the Boat, El Norte. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Fall ENGL0200S S01 16793 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (C. Lee)
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ENGL 0200T. To Be Young, Gifted, and Black.

This course will consider various expressions of African-American childhood and adolescence across literature and film. We will contemplate notions of joy, sorrow, love, shame, and pride and strive to better understand the influence of these feelings on modes of representation, perception, and experience. Authors/filmmakers will include: Wright, Baldwin, Morrison, Spike Lee, and Antoine Fisher. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Spr ENGL0200T S01 25617 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (C. Morgan)
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ENGL 0200U. Avengers, Vigilantes and Detectives: Revenge in Fiction.

From Hamlet to Batman, the figure of the “avenger” has gripped the public imagination. Why does the desire for revenge speak to us across time? What parallels can we see between vigilantes and detectives, and what is their role in state and society? Works by: William Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, Emily Brontë, Gaston Leroux, Agatha Christie, Alan Moore and Quentin Tarantino. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Spr ENGL0200U S01 25621 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (C. Yates)
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ENGL 0200V. Shakespeare Rewrites Shakespeare.

How did Shakespeare's drama develop thematically, rhetorically, and historically over the span of his literary career? This course offers students a representative introduction to Shakespeare's work, paying particular attention to how later plays reinvent linguistic, historical, and theatrical materials worked out in earlier plays. Plays include Othello and The Winter's Tale; Romeo and Juliet and Two Gentlemen of Verona; and Titus Andronicus and Hamlet. Requirements include critical essays, an in-class presentation,and a final examination.

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ENGL 0201B. Rebels with a Cause: The Figure of the Rebel from Marlowe to Milton.

Examines representations of the rebel in early modern literature as a figure who is fundamental to definitions of social order. To what extent is the rebel integral to the social, political, and sexual structures s/he challenges? What do God and Satan, king and traitor, Puritan and sodomite have in common? Readings include Marlowe, Kyd, Shakespeare, Middleton, Webster, Marvell, Hobbes, and Milton. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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ENGL 0201C. Birds, Beasts, and Bots: American Literature between the Wild and the Wired.

19th-and-20th-century American writers have often contemplated the relation of human beings to nature and machinery. This course examines the diverse ways American writers of this period have represented human interactions with natural elements (animals, wilderness) and artificial components (robots, factories, cities). We will focus especially on the question of whether human life is characterized in these texts as increasingly natural or programmed. Readings include works by Thoreau, Dickinson, Crane, London, Sinclair, Stevens, Eliot, Bradbury, Dick, and Dillard. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT

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ENGL 0201D. Feeling Queerly.

Explores "queerness" in all of its connotations in American and European literature from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Analyzes the ways that a range of embodied feelings and emotional states (like shame, disgust, envy, embarrassment, and passivity) shapes formal aspects of literary works and effectively hinders speech, action, and self-expression. Authors include Melville, Woolf, Stein, Beckett, Baldwin, Crane, Genet. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT

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ENGL 0201E. World Wide: Globalization from Shakespeare to Rushdie.

Explores the idea of globalization and its resonances with 17th and 18th century conceptions of a global network. How did early modern authors treat the ideas of cosmopolitanism, competing loyalties between home and the world, conflicts between self and other? How do contemporary authors take up or respond to these issues? Readings include Shakespeare, Milton, Dryden, Swift, Kant, Amitav Ghosh, and Salman Rushdie. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT

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ENGL 0201F. Ravishing Verse: The Lyric and Spiritual Crisis.

This seminar explores the tension between the language of the spiritual and the language of the sensual in lyric poetry. How does a poet's inner struggle over questions of belief engage the individual with the larger community; how does this struggle confront the lyric tradition? Poetry and prose readings will include Spenser, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Hopkins, Mahon, and Longley. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT

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ENGL 0201G. Killing them Softly: Satire and Stereotype in African-American Literature.

Examines the possibilities and limitations of satire within the field of 20th-century African-American literature. We will consider the ways in which the satirical form is deployed by writers seeking to examine questions of authenticity, community, and stereotypical representation. Authors include Schuyler, Ellison, Killens, Reed, Beatty, and Everett. Screenings of works by Spike Lee and Dave Chappelle. Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT DPLL

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ENGL 0201H. Green Shakespeare: Literature, Ecology, and the Nonhuman.

How did Renaissance writers conceive of nature, human autonomy, and the nonhuman agencies of the environment? What ecological futures might they invite us to imagine? This course seeks to address these and other questions by exploring the strange and paradoxical writings of some of English literature’s earliest ecological thinkers. Readings will include a variety of materials from plays (The Tempest, Titus Andronicus, The Winter’s Tale) to poetry (Donne, Milton, Marvell), history, and theory (eco-criticism, animal studies, science studies). Enrollment limited to 17 undergraduate students. WRIT

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ENGL 0201J. Shakespeare's Secret Agents.

Whether it's women playing men or kings playing paupers, Shakespeare's characters frequently use the art of disguise to right wrongs and wield authority in critical situations. But how far is "too far" for a disguised maiden pursuing her true love's hand in marriage, or for an undercover ruler seeking to unify his fractured country? When do their well-intentioned deceptions blur into reality, and at what personal and political cost? Using a combination of historical and critical approaches, this course will explore how secret identities test the boundaries between public good and private deception across Shakespeare's dramatic genres.

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ENGL 0201K. Mad in America.

Examines the figure of madness in nineteenth and twentieth century American literature. Mad characters and mad writers raise questions about the vexed relation between self and society, desire and excess, form and disorder, and liberty and the institution. Authors include Poe, Brown, Melville, Gilman, Nabokov, Kesey, Plath, and films by Forman, Kubrick. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201L. Literary Resistance: The Politics of the American Novel.

An examination of novels and other works of literary prose from American protest novels concerned with the struggle of groups defined in terms of race or class to postmodern narratives characterized by formalist attempts to transcend the unbridgeable gap between politics and writing. Authors may include Stowe, Sinclair, Hammett, Agee, Ellison, Pynchon, and Reed. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201M. No Futures: Extinction and the Nation in American Literature.

American literature often narrates the achievement of national identity as an organic process that will be realized in the future. Yet many authors obsess over broken blood lineages, atavism, lost property, and various forms of extinction. This course examines this tension, and asks why the disruption of "futurity" provokes such persistent aesthetic reflections. Readings include Whitman, Hawthorne, Cather, Faulkner, McCarthy. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201N. Reading Against the Grain in Nineteenth-Century Literature.

Examines literature that leads the reader to identify and empathize with what the text says, yet also to be suspicious and distrustful about what the text leaves unsaid. How do we reconcile these two conflicting ways of reading? We will explore how nineteenth-century works use this tension to express anxieties of industrial modernity. Works include Coleridge, James, Hardy, Dickens, Melville, Freud, Hitchcock. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201O. Kids on the Run: Literary Outcasts and Outsiders.

How do we grow, and when do we "grow up"? This seminar focuses on uneasy transitions from childhood into adulthood in literature. From paupers to punks, we will rethink alienation, gender and normalcy through changing conceptions of adolescence across two centuries. Authors will include Dickens, Bellow, Nabokov, Welsh, Clowes, Haddon and Aira. Screenings of The 400 Blows, Ratcatcher and Dogtooth. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201P. Disabling Desire: The Erotics of Impairment in Literature and Film.

By alternately demonizing, sentimentalizing, and fetishizing the disabled body throughout modern history, has Western society misrepresented the erotic desires of the physically impaired? Could these desires, if represented, in turn disable "normal" desire? Authors include Milton, Shakespeare, Tennessee Williams, and Ursula LeGuin. Screenings include John Cameron Mitchell's Hedwig and the Angry Inch and Mark and Michael Polish's Twin Falls Idaho. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201Q. American Hybrids: Poetry After Modernism.

What formal possibilities were available to poets working after the experimental period of High Modernism? How do their departures from the Modernist definition of the lyric encourage us to re-think the idea of "the poetic?" This course will examine late modern texts that blur the lines between poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Texts include Berryman, Plath, Merrill, Ashbery, Howe, contemporary writers. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201R. Weird Sisters and Fairy Queens: Women in Shakespearean Drama.

How does Shakespeare write women? To what extent do his plays destabilize or reify conventional assumptions about gender? And how do modern productions and adaptations interpret (or even re-write) his female characters? Texts will include Taming, Midsummer, Hamlet, Macbeth, and several modern adaptations. Film screenings likely to include Hamlet 2000, Midsummer Nights Dream, 10 Things I Hate About You. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201S. Dragon Ladies, Curry and Kung Fu: Readings in Asian American Film and Literature.

Tracing the contours of Asian America through literature, slam poetry, and pop culture, we will examine how racism has defined East and South Asian American bodies, sexualities, and identities in terms of invisibility, illegitimacy, homelessness, and exoticism—and how artists have responded. Readings include Kingston, Lahiri, Kogawa, Hwang, Fanon, Said, and the films, Better Luck Tomorrow and The Namesake. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201T. Strangers in a Strange Land: traveling bodies, traveling tales.

What role does the traveler play in the western imagination? How do the encounters and experiences of the traveling body map onto the larger body politic or its colonial projects? In answering these questions, this course examines hybridity, conversion, identity constructions—racial, religious, and national—and the politics of place. Authors include Shakespeare, Fletcher, Milton, Behn, Defoe, Swift, Melville, Achebe and Coetzee. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201U. Songs of the Self: Poetry as a Way of Life.

How does poetry create the self? In this course, we shall engage this vast question by encountering the past, present, and future of poetic expression on and off the page. Using the resources of poetry as a creative and critical tool for academic writing and beyond, we will engage poetry from antiquity to the contemporary as well as the poetry in/of popular music, film, and television. Responding to poetic language, we rethink the language we use (and misuse) all the time. Self-making is full-time business. However, this class will be more than mere work, will be an inspiration and a delight.

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ENGL 0201V. Queering Modernism.

What role does modernist literature play in queer history? How might queer sexuality inflect modes of poetic and narrative expression? Reading American and Western European literature from the 1920s on, this course explores the literary shifts that we have come to call "the modernist turn" and mines poems and novels for bodies, identities and emotions that push against the forms that contain them. Along the way, we will complicate and challenge the descriptive capacity of the terms "queer" and "modern." Enrollment limited to 18.

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ENGL 0201W. Criminal Elements: The Detective Novel and American Literature, 1920-2000.

For American authors, the crime novel has provided a critique of capitalism, a vision of queer desire, a record of racial violence and an experiment in modernist form. This course uses the detective genre to examine major movements in American literary and political history, ranging from prohibition to postmodernity. Authors: Hammett, Chandler, Highsmith, Himes, Nabokov, Auster. Films: Rear Window, Chinatown. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201Y. The Great American Campus Novel.

Attracting some of the finest authors of 20th-century American literature, the "campus novel" presents a vision of university life, by turns comic and tragic, that also critiques society beyond its walls. The course explores how the genre is bound up with questions posed by liberalism, the Cold War, and popular culture. Authors include Fitzgerald, Nabokov, DeLillo, Roth, Bellow, Chabon, and Eugenides. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

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ENGL 0201Z. Dark Matter: Black Literature in the 20th Century.

We live in the "afterlife of slavery," an age in which Black lives remain terrorized by slavery's specter. Reading works by Cornelius Eady, Dionne Brand, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, and others, this course examines how 20th century African-American writing and thinking about blackness struggle within and against a world haunted by the afterlife of slavery. Enrollment limited to 17. DPLL WRIT

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ENGL 0202A. Poetry and Things: From Romanticism to the Contemporary.

Poetry often deals with the private human self, but it also depicts inanimate objects that spring to life in the background. We will study poetic backdrops from the Romantic lyric to the contemporary avant-garde, exploring the aesthetic, social, and ecological modes through which poets have envisioned the nonhuman world. Authors include Wordsworth, Keats, Byron, Poe, Thoreau, Dickinson, Stein, and Beckett. Enrollment limited to 17. LILE WRIT

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ENGL 0300B. The Romance of Travel.

Considers the role of the strange, new, and fantastic in travel accounts of the Medieval period and Renaissance. If travel writers offered their stories as "windows to the world," we will treat them as representations that expose, reinforce, and subvert the author's cultural, political, and social attitudes. Works by Marco Polo, Chaucer, Columbus, Ralegh, Shakespeare, Defoe, and Swift. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0300C. English Drama 1350-1700.

This course presents great plays not written by Shakespeare, from the mystery plays of the late Middle Ages through Restoration drama. We will address these questions: What kinds of plays spoke to what kinds of audiences? How do changes in theatrical style relate to social change? How do genre, convention, staging, and acting style shape a dramatic text? Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0300E. Three Great Poets: Shakespeare, Donne, Milton.

We will study these premier Renaissance poets from all angles possible, to understand the historical situations and political issues that shaped their writing, the authors and ideas that influenced them, the traditional forms they appropriated for new purposes. Most of all, we will study them to appreciate the power of poetry as a source of knowledge and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0300F. Beowulf to Aphra Behn: The Earliest British Literatures.

Major texts and a few surprises from literatures composed in Old English, Old Irish, Anglo-Norman, Middle English, and Early Modern English. We will read texts in their historical and cultural contexts. Texts include anonymously authored narratives like Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, selected Canterbury Tales by Chaucer, and texts by Sir Thomas Malory, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Aphra Behn. Enrollment limited to 30.

Fall ENGL0300F S01 15741 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (E. Bryan)
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ENGL 0300G. Angels and Demons, Heavens and Hells: The Otherworld from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Era.

Wonder about what happens after death is among the most fascinating and gripping subjects of human inquiry. We will explore concepts of heaven, hell, purgatory, Satan, angels, ghosts, the soul, virtue and vice, the poetry of salvation, and the power of melancholy. Texts will include Old and Middle English Otherworld narratives, and writings by Dante, Milton, Browne, Marlowe, and others. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0300H. New Selves, New Worlds.

How did pre-modern and early modern writers imagine the self? How were these notions of the self transformed when individuals traveled to unfamiliar places? How do these new selves imagine certain fundamental questions, such as the power one has to control one's emotions, social environment, and ultimate fate. Authors may include Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Enrollment limited to 50.

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ENGL 0300I. The Arrival of English: Medieval, Renaissance, Early Modern.

In these literary periods, something arrives in England, whether it is the Anglo Saxon invaders, Christianity, French medieval romance, or the continental example of renaissance. Readings include Beowulf, Wanderer, Dream of the Rood, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Spenser's Shepheards Calendar and Faerie Queene, and Milton's Paradise Lost. Enrollment limited to 30. LILE WRIT

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ENGL 0310A. Shakespeare.

We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s plays with attention to both formal and historical questions. Issues to be addressed may include genre, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, consciousness, status and degree, politics and nation. Written work may include a mid-term and two short papers. Students should register for ENGL 0310A S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. LILE WRIT

Spr ENGL0310A S01 24591 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (J. Kuzner)
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ENGL 0310D. Violence, Sacrifice, and Medieval Narrative.

This course will introduce students to medieval prose and poetry that centralize the problematic nature of violent conflict and its attendant horrors. We will study literature from medieval England, Wales, Ireland, and Iceland, including Beowulf, two Old Icelandic sagas and Eddic poetry, Irish and Welsh texts, and part of Malory's Morte Darthur. Topics will include sacrifice, religion, chivalry, horror, and contemporary critical approaches. Open to undergraduates only.

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ENGL 0310E. Shakespeare: The Screenplays.

It's been said that if Shakespeare were alive today he'd be working in Hollywood. We will read five or six plays (including at least one representative of each of Shakespeare's genres: comedy, history, tragedy, romance) and then study film adaptations of them. The course is especially concerned with various approaches to the Shakespeare film: not just the straightforward adaptation, but also the Shakespeare spin-off ("10 Things"; "My Own Private Idaho"), the Shakespeare film as a star-turn (Helen Mirren as "Prospera" in Taymor's "Tempest"), and the Shakespeare film as an auteur-turn (Orson Welles's "Chimes at Midnight"; Polanski's "Macbeth").

Fall ENGL0310E S01 16444 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (R. Rambuss)
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ENGL 0310F. Prose Sagas of the Medieval North.

In this course, we will read long prose fiction from medieval Iceland, Ireland, and Wales, considering how it is similar to and different from the modern novel. We will consider plot, characterization, and style in each linguistic tradition. Texts may include The Cattle Raid of Cooley, The Mabinogi, Njal’s Saga, Egil’s Saga, Grettir’s Saga, and Gisli’s Saga.

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ENGL 0310G. Gender and Genre in Medieval Celtic Literatures.

This course traces images of masculinity and femininity in Welsh, Cornish, Breton, and Irish narratives within and around early medieval Britain. You will be introduced to the genres of saga, romance, and the short poetic lai as you consider how the nature and gender of the hero changes in specific cultural and linguistic moments.

Fall ENGL0310G S01 17056 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (L. Jacobs)
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ENGL 0500A. Literature and the Fantastic.

Considers the changing ways Renaissance, Romantic, Victorian, and late-nineteenth-century authors incorporate non-realistic and fantastic themes and elements in literature. Special attention to the relationship between realism and fantasy in different genres. Readings include stories (gothic, ghost, and adventure), fairy tales, short novels, plays, and poems. Shakespeare, Swift, Brothers Grimm, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Tennyson, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Stoker, Lewis Carroll, Dickens, Henry James. Enrollment limited to 30. LILE

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ENGL 0500B. Introduction to British and American Romanticism.

An exploration of "Romanticism" in literature written and read on both sides of the Atlantic between 1775 and 1865. Poetry, fiction, and essays by writers such as Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, Thoreau, Emerson, Fuller, Hawthorne. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0500C. Inventing America.

Even before there was a United States, American authors argued over just what distinguished "America" from other communities. For what, they wondered, did or should America stand? Examines the rhetorical battles waged in some key pre-Civil War American literary texts over the meaning and/or meanings of America. Authors studied may include Bradstreet, Franklin, Douglass, and Melville. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0500E. Foundations of the Novel.

Introduces students to the first stages of novel writing in England and to historical and theoretical issues relating to the novel's "rise" to the dominant genre of the modern era. Eighteenth-century works of fiction are long; however, texts selected for this course are less long. They include Defoe's Moll Flanders, Richardson's Pamela and Fielding's Joseph Andrews. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0500G. Literature and Revolutions, 1640-1840.

Key developments in British and American literature understood in relation to the historical and cultural forces that produced the English Revolution, the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution. Readings in major writers such as Milton, Paine, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Emerson, Barrett Browning, and Dickens, and in some of their non-canonical contemporaries. Focus on the emergence of a transatlantic literary culture. Enrollment limited to 30. WRIT

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ENGL 0500H. Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways: American Fiction and the Romance of the Sea.

Examines one of the most distinctive of literary genres: the sea novel. Ostensibly stories of mystery and adventure, these texts are also meticulous accounts of working life at sea. Reads a number of well-known and lesser known American tales of the sea, including Poe's The Adventures of A. Gordon Pym, Melville's Moby-Dick, London's The Sea-Wolf, and Crane's "The Open Boat." Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0500I. The Literature and Politics of Friendship.

Considers changing concepts of friendship as a key to major developments in British and American literature from the Renaissance through the 19th century. Special attention given to the ways the literary history of friendship intersects with leading political questions of the day. Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Defoe, Wordsworth, Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Dickens, Poe, Melville, and Henry James. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0500K. The Transatlantic Novel: Robinson Crusoe to Connecticut Yankee.

How does the "American" novel change if we read it across national borders? This course reads novels written in/about America with this question in mind, focusing on such topics as slavery, exploration, seduction, and cosmopolitan ideals. Readings range from Aphra Behn to Mark Twain. Enrollment limited to 30. Students should register for ENGL0500K S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0500L. Literature, Trauma, and War.

This course surveys many genres and periods in order to consider and think about two traditional kinds of literary responses to war--glorifying it, and representing its horrors. We'll examine texts by Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Byron, Whitman, Hardy, Crane, Freud, Levi, Pynchon, and Sebald, among others; we may also screen one or two films. Enrollment limited to 30. Open to undergraduates only.

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ENGL 0510A. Literature and Print Culture.

The cultural impact of widely circulating printed material -- books of poetry, essays, and fiction but also newspapers, stock certificates, and advertisements -- makes the period 1660-1740 the first technologically enabled information age. The production and consumption of published texts changed the world for the restored monarch and his licentious court, for the rising bourgeoisie, and for the newly literate classes. We will follow several controversies, experiments, and innovations of the print revolution in works as apparently diverse as Milton's epic poetry, Manley's erotic secret histories, and the ads in The Spectator. Other canonical and non-canonical writers include Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Swift, Manley, Haywood, and Defoe.

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ENGL 0510B. The Gothic.

The course will investigate the origins and development of Gothic literature from its invention during the eighteenth century to its postmodern forms. We will consider conventional figures (monsters, distressed heroines, moldering castles), common themes (fear, horror, the supernatural, the irrational, the transgressive), and the cultural work they do. Readings include Walpole, Lewis, Radcliffe, Shelley, James, and King.

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ENGL 0510C. The Victorian Novel.

Considers the Victorian novel with an emphasis on its many forms, including the social-problem novel, bildungsroman, sensation novel, detective novel, and multiplot novel. Topics covered include the nature of realism, serial publication, empire, the "new woman," industrialization, the "condition of England," science and technology, and the role of the artist. Novels by Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Wilkie Collins, Thomas Hardy, Anthony Trollope. Students should register for ENGL 0510C S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.

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ENGL 0510D. Mark Twain's America.

A course for all kinds of readers of Twain and his contemporaries. Close readings of fiction and essays that focus on race, slavery, capitalism, and the development of "modern" literature. Works include Puddinhead Wilson, Huck Finn, and Connecticut Yankee.

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ENGL 0510H. Victorian Self and Society.

This multi-genre course is an introduction to literature and culture of the Victorian period, looking at the changing ideas of society and the individual's place within that larger community in an age of empire, industrialization, urbanization, class conflict, and religious crisis. Topics include conceptions of the role of art and culture in society, the railway mania of the 1840s, the "great stink" of London, women's suffrage and the condition of women, and the Great Exhibition of 1851. Readings will include Carlyle, Charlotte Brontë, Ruskin, Robert Browning, Dickens, Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, and Lewis Carroll.

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ENGL 0510M. Madness and Enlightenment: Literature 1660-1800.

The term "enlightenment" has been used to emphasize the power of reason in the development of intellectual freedom, democracy, capitalism, class mobility, and other aspects of 18th-century experience. However, the period's major writers were fascinated by unreason, by aberrant states of mind from love melancholy to outright madness. Readings include Swift's Tale of a Tub, Pope's Dunciad, Johnson's Rasselas, Sterne's Tristram Shandy, Boswell's Hypochondriack, and Godwin's Caleb Williams.

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ENGL 0510N. Victorian Modernity: Literature 1880-1900.

"Modernity" in the fin-de-siècle period meant progress, the "march of the intellect," technological innovation, urban growth, female emancipation, but it also meant fears of degeneration, moral decline, the rise of the crowd, and the degradation of the individual. This course considers how these contradictions come to a climax in the literature, art, and culture of the 1880s and 1890s. Authors include G. B. Shaw, Oscar Wilde, Thomas Hardy, Charles Algernon Swinburne, H. G. Wells, Olive Schreiner, George Egerton.

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ENGL 0510P. Fiction from Dickens to James.

An introduction to nineteenth-century fiction in English by eight major authors--four British and four American. Emphasis will be placed on the careful reading and interpretation of the novels and short stories in historical context. Issues to be addressed include the rise of the mass media, transatlantic literary relations, literature and ethics, and aestheticism. Works by Dickens, Poe, Eliot, Melville, Stevenson, Twain, Wilde, and James. Students should register for ENGL 0510P S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0510Q. Unstable Subjects: Race and Meaning in Contemporary (African) American Literature.

What are the stakes involved in defining (African) American literature through a racialized authorial framework? Should we adhere to this prescribed and contentious categorization when considering writers who only incidentally identify as “black,” and whose works challenge any critical or aesthetic alignment based upon racial affiliation? More broadly, this course seeks to question the lingering persistence of race as an ontological marker within the literary arts. Writers include but are not limited to Fran Ross, Darryl Pinckney, Andrea Lee, David Henry Hwang, Maurice Manning, and Colson Whitehead. DPLL

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ENGL 0510S. Good, Evil, and Inbetween.

Are humans born naturally good, evil, neither, or all of the above? Does evil lurk deep within the heart of all that is good, or can the forces of good eradicate those of evil? Is evil an inextricable part of what it means to be human in the first place? We'll examine these and related questions by reading some especially provocative literature, including Frankenstein, Jekyll and Hyde, and works by Hawthorne, Poe, and Fitzgerald. We'll also view several relevant movies, including Young Frankenstein.

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ENGL 0510W. Coupling: The Literature of Courtship.

This course examines the courtship plot in the Anglo-American literary tradition, concentrating on novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but extending forward to twentieth-century and contemporary novels, and explores how these fictions have constructed and challenged normative narratives of gender and sexuality.

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ENGL 0510Y. Nineteenth-Century British Fiction.

This course focuses on the fiction of nineteenth-century Britain, with particular attention to its exploration of gender and sexuality, class, national and imperial cultures, the familiar and the strange. Readings will include novels and short stories by Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Emily Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Thomas Hardy.

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ENGL 0510Z. Worldly Victorians: Victorian Literature at Home and Abroad.

This course explores how Victorian literature engaged questions animated by Britain’s experience of conflict and triumphalism at home, and imperial power and anxiety on the global stage. Authors we read will include Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Charlotte Brontë; Elizabeth Gaskell; Rider Haggard; Olive Schreiner; and Bram Stoker.

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ENGL 0511A. Dickens: The Novel and Society.

This course rehabilitates Charles Dickens from his reputation as a mainstream writer paid by the word, most famous as the author of sentimental, implausible works for children, such as A Christmas Carol. We will be looking at Dickens’s social novels as a formally innovative response to the urban and industrial capitalism of his time. Issues will include: realism, the relation of his fiction to his journalism, serial form, and representations of work, the city, and bureaucracy.

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ENGL 0511B. The Nineteenth-Century British Novel.

A study of major novelists of the period, through the question: How did the novel develop as a form of social understanding? We will be looking at novels as bearers of social values, especially around questions of property, class, marriage, work, bureaucracy and the state, and selfhood. Authors studied: Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and Thomas Hardy.

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ENGL 0511C. Fantastic Places, Unhuman Humans.

What can the grotesque, monstrous, and even alien creatures found lurking in an extraordinary range of literature across many centuries reveal about the different ways humans have imagined what it means to be human in the first place? Is the human a unified, single category of being at all? Authors may include Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, and Poe. DPLL LILE WRIT

Spr ENGL0511C S01 25663 Arranged (J. Egan)
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ENGL 0511D. Austen, Eliot, James.

A survey of the three English novelists who turned the novel into a vehicle for analysis, representation of consciousness, social judgment, and ethical questioning. Major works to be read: Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Daniel Deronda, and The Portrait of a Lady. Particular attention to be paid to questions of voice and the self-reflective capacities of the novel form.

Fall ENGL0511D S01 16796 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (B. Parker)
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ENGL 0700A. Introduction to African American Literature, 1742-1920.

Surveys African American writing from the beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance, reading both poetry and prose (primarily slave narratives, speeches, essays, and fiction). Attention to how African American authors have shaped a literature out of available cultural and aesthetic resources. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0700B. Introduction to African American Literature, 1920-Present.

All genres of literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, tracing the development of an African American literary tradition. Enrollment limited to 30. DPLL

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ENGL 0700C. Twentieth-Century American Fiction.

Through detailed readings of a variety of novels from almost every decade, this class explores the various ways fiction responded to what has been called the American century. Our main emphasis will be on the relationship between aesthetic and national representation. Writers to include Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Ellison, Kingston, and DeLillo. Enrollment limited to 30. Students will be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0700D. Inventing Asian American Literature.

Through a focus on works by Asian Americans, this course examines how the concept of literature has evolved across the twentieth century. We address how different genres and literary modes shape the way readers view experiences depicted in literary works, paying attention to how works "theorize" their own interpretation. We also take up the issue of how canons get formed. Enrollment limited to 30. DPLL LILE WRIT

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ENGL 0700E. Postcolonial Literature.

Examines fiction, drama, poetry, travel writing, and cultural theory by contemporary writers from former colonies of the British Empire. We study works by Anglophone African, Caribbean, and South Asian writers. Issues include: nationalism and globalization; cultural identity and diaspora; individual interiority and collective aspirations; literary form and the very idea of "postcolonial" literature. Authors include: J. M. Coetzee, Amitav Ghosh, V. S. Naipaul, Michael Ondaatje, Caryl Phillips, Derek Walcott, Zoë Wicomb. Enrollment limited to 30. DPLL

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ENGL 0700F. Introduction to Modernism: Past, Future, Exile, Home.

An introduction to European Modernism with an emphasis on British Literature. We will address ideas of personal and national history through literary and aesthetic innovations of the first half of the 20th century, as well as the relationship--literary, cultural, historical and psychological--between constructions of home and abroad. Texts include James, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Proust, Woolf, Faulkner, Waugh, and Freud, as well as films by Sergei Eisenstein and Fritz Lang. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0700G. American Fiction and Mass Culture.

How have American fiction writers responded to the growing national influence of mass culture industries such as recorded music, film, and television? This course will consider this question by assessing both how writers have imagined the impact of mass culture on American life and how the style of literary writing has evolved in relation to popular media. Authors include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and Don Delillo. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0700J. Contemporary British Fiction.

This course is an introduction to the study of 20th century literature in English. We consider central terms of and approaches to literary criticism by reading some of the most important British writers of the last fifty years. We will also take into account theories of culture, ideology and nationhood, and attempt to bring into focus a Britain defined as much by its ways of looking as by historical and geopolitical situation. Readings include Kingsley Amis, Greene, McEwan, Zadie Smith, Spark, Kelman, Banville, Naipaul and Sebald. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0700K. 20th-Century Literatures in English.

This course offers a broad introduction to a range of literatures written in English, tracing shifts in the formal conventions of fiction and poetry. We examine ongoing debates about what literature is and what social role it plays. We consider how these debates respond to historical changes such as industrialization, the collapse of global empires, and movements for social equality. Writers include Dreiser, Woolf, Eliot, Hughes, Toomer, Cather, Morrison, Hwang, Rushdie. Enrollment limited to 30. Students should register for ENGL 0700K S01 and will be assigned to conference sections by the instructors during the first week of class. DPLL LILE

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ENGL 0700L. Make It New: American Literature 1900-1945.

Introductory survey of a major—perhaps the major—period of American literature. Genres include poems, plays, short stories, and novels, as well as film. Writers include Willa Cather, Raymond Chandler, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Robert Frost, Ernest Hemingway, Eugene O'Neill, Gertrude Stein, and Wallace Stevens; filmmakers include Charlie Chaplin and Orson Welles. Enrollment limited to 30.

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ENGL 0700P. Reading Practices: An Introduction to Literary Theory.

What is it to read? This course is an introduction to theories of reading that have shaped literary interpretation and definitions of literature from the early twentieth century to the present, with particular attention to the relation between “literary theory” as a discipline and the broader reading practices it engenders and from which it emerges. We will read the New Criticism, structuralism, post-structuralism, and new historicism, critical race theory and feminist critiques, and recent work in aesthetics. Topics include literariness and textuality, the reader and subjectivity, narrative, rhetoric, and the problem of representation, and "new formalism." Enrollment limited to thirty.

Spr ENGL0700P S01 24594 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (E. Rooney)
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ENGL 0700Q. Poetic Cosmologies.

This course will examine how various traditions within modern and contemporary poetry have addressed the question of materiality. Readings will range from poetic explorations of the archaeologies of place by William Carlos Williams and Charles Olson, to the investigations of non-human materialities of crystals, clouds and bacteria by writers such as Clark Coolidge, Christian Bök and Lisa Robertson. Enrollment limited to 30.

Fall ENGL0700Q S01 16556 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (A. Smailbegovic)
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ENGL 0700R. Modernist Cities.

In the early twentieth century, modernist writers headed for New York, Paris, London and other cities, and based their literary experiments on forms of metropolitan life. We will discuss chance encounters, cosmopolitan and underground nightlife, solitary wandering, and bohemian communities. Writers may include Barnes, Dos Passos, Eliot, Hemingway, Hughes, Larsen, Joyce, McKay, Rhys, Woolf. Enrollment limited to 30.

Fall ENGL0700R S01 16320 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (T. Katz)
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ENGL 0700S. American Literature and Political Radicalism.

This class examines American literature in relation to key radical social movements in the twentieth century. The interplay between American authors and Socialism, the New Left, and Black Power nationalism will be at the forefront of the course. The class will focus on works by both committed activists and writers less directly involved in these social movements. Authors include John Steinbeck, Richard Wright, E.L. Doctorow, and Huey Newton. Enrollment limited to 30.

Spr ENGL0700S S01 24564 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (R. Murray)
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ENGL 0700T. American Literature and the Cold War.

A study of American literature in the decades following World War II, with a view toward specifying the role of culture in the United States' ongoing conflict with the Soviet Union from the 1940s through the 1980s. Authors to be considered include Hersey, Ellison, Wright, Morrison, Bellow, O'Connor, Reed, Pynchon, Updike, Roth, and Didion. Enrollment limited to 30.

Spr ENGL0700T S01 24566 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (D. Nabers)
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ENGL 0710B. African American Literature and the Legacy of Slavery.

Traces the relationship between the African American literary tradition and slavery from the antebellum slave narrative to the flowering of historical novels about slavery at the end of the twentieth century. Positions these texts within specific literary, historical, and political frameworks. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison. DPLL

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ENGL 0710E. Postcolonial Tales of Transition.

This course focuses on postcolonial British, Caribbean, and Southern-African works that exemplify, complicate, or refashion the category of the bildungsroman, the "novel of education." Issues to be considered include the ways the texts rework archetypal tropes of initiation, rebellion, development, and the interplay of contradictory passions. We will also think about ways in which issues of race, gender, and sexuality emerge in the texts, and the connections or disjunctions between literature and "the real world." Writers will likely include Dangarembga, CLR James, Ghosh, Ishiguro, Joyce, Kincaid, Lamming, Naipaul, Rhys, Wicomb. DPLL

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ENGL 0710F. Being There: Bearing Witness in Modern Times.

What is the significance of one who says, "I was there"? This course explores the ethical, literary and historical dimensions of witnessing in an era when traumatic events are increasingly relayed secondhand or recorded in sound and image. Texts include Forster, Woolf, Camus, Freud, Celan, Coetzee; films by Hitchcock and Kurosawa; and readings in law and psychology. WRIT

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ENGL 0710I. Global South Asia.

This course provides an introduction to contemporary fiction by South Asia and its diaspora. We will read novels written in North America, the Caribbean, Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, and of course South Asia, paying particular attention to issues of identity, ethnicity, and transnational circulation. Authors include Adiga, Hanif, Lahiri, Meeran, Mistry, Naipaul, Roy, Rushdie, Selvadurai, and Sinha. DPLL

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ENGL 0710J. Introduction to Asian American Literature.

This course is intended to familiarize students with key issues that have shaped the study of Asian American writings and to provide a sense of the historical conditions out of which those works have emerged. As a literature course, it will focus on textual analysis--on how particular texts give representational shape to the social, historical and psychological experiences they depict. Readings consist primarily of works that have a canonical status within Asian American literary studies but also include newer works that suggest new directions in the field. It also strives to provide some coverage of the major ethnic groups. DPLL

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ENGL 0710L. Ishiguro, Amongst Others.

Kazuo Ishiguro is one of the most distinctive and enigmatic voices in contemporary fiction. He has few obvious precursors, and there is little consensus among literary critics about the meanings of his works. This course will try to establish principles for reading Ishiguro's works by seeking alliances for his writing in works of philosophy, literature and cinema. Such interlocutors will include Ozu, Kiarostami, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Hadžihalilovič, Dostoevsky, Pasolini.

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ENGL 0710M. Impressionism, Consciousness, and Modernism.

This course explores the role of the "literary impressionists" (Crane, James, Conrad, and Ford) in the transformation of the novel from realism to modernism (especially the "post-impressionists" Stein, Joyce, and Woolf). "Impressionism" is defined by its focus on consciousness, the inner life, and the ambiguities of perception. What happens to the novel when writers worry about whether the way they tell their stories is an accurate reflection of how we know the world? Attention will also be paid to how the literary experiments of impressionist and post-impressionist writers relate to simultaneously occurring innovations in the visual arts.

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ENGL 0710Q. American Literature in the Era of Segregation.

This course examines how American literature intersects with the legal, ethical, and racial discourses that defined the system of racial segregation. The class will assess literary works in relation to the discourses employed historically to rationalize segregation. In addition the course will explore the ways that literary style and genre became inseparable from the culture of segregation. Authors include Mark Twain, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, and Ralph Ellison. DPLL

Fall ENGL0710Q S01 15716 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (R. Murray)
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ENGL 0710S. The Eighties: Earnestness to Irony.

From "White Noise" to "Working Girl," Duran Duran to Public Enemy, this course explores the culture, rhetoric, and politics of the 1980s through literature, film, music, and television. What kind of counterculture, if any, emerges from a decade of conservatism, greed and the AIDS epidemic? What, in short, made the 80s unique—and what is the decade's afterimage? Students should register for ENGL 0710S S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 0710T. Reading New York.

How have people imagined New York City from the early 20th century to the present? We will discuss immigration, mobility, nightlife and the neighborhood, downtown, underground and gentrified spaces, 9/11. May include work by John Dos Passos, Nella Larsen, E.B. White, Frank O’Hara, Patti Smith, Nan Goldin, Ernesto Quinones, Jonathan Safran Foer.

Spr ENGL0710T S01 25189 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (T. Katz)
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ENGL 0900. Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay.

An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL0900 S01 15688 MW 8:30-9:50(01) (R. Ward)
Fall ENGL0900 S02 15689 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (K. Schapira)
Fall ENGL0900 S03 15690 MWF 9:00-9:50(01) (C. DeBoer-Langworthy)
Fall ENGL0900 S04 15691 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (J. Readey)
Fall ENGL0900 S05 15692 MW 8:30-9:50(01) (A. Golaski)
Fall ENGL0900 S06 15693 TTh 1:00-2:20(14) (M. Nezam-Mafi)
Fall ENGL0900 S08 15695 MWF 12:00-12:50(12) (C. Morgan)
Fall ENGL0900 S09 15696 MWF 12:00-12:50(12) (C. Yates)
Fall ENGL0900 S10 15697 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (M. Gastiger)
Fall ENGL0900 S11 15698 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (D. Byrne)
Fall ENGL0900 S12 15699 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (J. Casey)
Spr ENGL0900 S01 24549 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (C. Lee)
Spr ENGL0900 S02 24550 MWF 12:00-12:50(05) (Z. Heine)
Spr ENGL0900 S03 24551 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (N. Fung)
Spr ENGL0900 S04 24552 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (R. Ward)
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ENGL 0930. Introduction to Creative Nonfiction.

Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL0930 S01 15701 MWF 9:00-9:50(01) (L. Stanley)
Fall ENGL0930 S02 15702 MWF 12:00-12:50(12) (M. Arnold)
Fall ENGL0930 S03 15703 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (E. Hardy)
Fall ENGL0930 S04 15704 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (K. Adrian)
Fall ENGL0930 S05 15705 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (M. Arnold)
Fall ENGL0930 S05 15705 WF 2:00-2:50(07) (M. Arnold)
Spr ENGL0930 S01 24554 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (K. Schapira)
Spr ENGL0930 S02 24555 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (E. Hardy)
Spr ENGL0930 S03 24556 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (A. Golaski)
Spr ENGL0930 S05 24558 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (M. Stewart)
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ENGL 1030A. The Thoughtful Generalist.

This *ONLINE* section of “ENGL1030: Critical Reading and Writing II: Research” will prepare you for academic and real-world discourse. In Canvas, you will discuss essays demonstrating deep research distilled into engaging intellectual journey. You will research and revise four explanatory, analytical, persuasive essays, using varied sources to explore subjects or issues of your choice. Mandatory peer reviews and conferences ONLINE and in person. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1030A S01 16696 Arranged (E. Taylor)
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ENGL 1030C. Writing Science.

This course explores how science, as an academic way of thinking and a method, affects our critical thinking and expression of culture. Readings examine the various dialects of scientific discourse. Students write three major research essays on self-selected scientific topics from both within and outside their fields of study. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1030C S01 25570 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (C. DeBoer-Langworthy)
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ENGL 1030D. Myth + Modern Essay.

A writing and research focused course, in which students read a small selection of ancient texts (including The Epic of Gilgamesh and Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and use the myths retold to illuminate the contemporary world and to inform the essays they write. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1030D S01 24602 MWF 12:00-12:50(05) (A. Golaski)
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ENGL 1030E. Testaments of War.

Discovery is at the heart of research. In this course, we will discover how and why literary texts reflect and illuminate the intellectual and social worlds around them. We will use a variety of primary and theoretical sources and research tools, identify powerful research problems, and craft questions and sophisticated thesis statements. The course will also enable you to refine a critically sensitive, informed, and persuasive writing style that will be key to the success of your scholarly work. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1030E S01 24604 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (R. Ward)
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ENGL 1030F. The Artist in the Archives.

While artists can benefit greatly from archival work, they are not typically given the tools to make use of these institutions. This writing intensive course takes a two pronged approach to the problem: embedding students in archives both at Brown and RISD to produce creative, lyrical, and multi-media essays; and exploring how artists have used these institutions for information and inspiration. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1030F S01 15706 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (M. Stewart)
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ENGL 1050A. Narrative.

This course offers a broad exploration of the many kinds of essays you can write in creative nonfiction. We will be looking at how authors structure their pieces and the range of narrative techniques they often use. You can expect workshops, in-class prompts and readings by Jamaica Kincaid, John McPhee, David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, David Sedaris and others. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1050A S01 24605 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (E. Hardy)
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ENGL 1050B. True Stories.

This class will allow confident writers to explore and develop their creative nonfiction writing. We'll focus on two structures--nonfiction narratives and essays--with occasional forays into other forms. Students will work simultaneously on several small assignments and two larger, self-directed pieces. Readings will include cultural reportage, lyric memoir, science and nature writing, standard and hybrid essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1050B S01 24606 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (K. Schapira)
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ENGL 1050C. Creative Nonfiction: Practice and Criticism.

What is Creative Nonfiction? It has a long history and recently writers have flocked to it; scholars have questioned it: Academic enough? Harm the truth? Narrative with too much “I” and too little “Eye”? Literary? Significant? By reading historical and contemporary examples along with critics, we will explore persistent questions about form, method, ethics, and significance. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1050C S01 25569 M 3:00-5:30(13) (E. Taylor)
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ENGL 1050D. Lifewriting.

We explore writing's various forms—memoir, diary, essay, graphic narrative, film, and autobiography—while crafting personal narrative. Students read sample texts, view films, and keep an electronic diary. Projects include a memoir, personal critical essay, and final autobiography, as well as shorter assignments.This is a writing workshop, so students read & critique each others work. Individual conferences with the instructor also provide feedback. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1050D S01 16445 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (C. DeBoer-Langworthy)
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ENGL 1050E. Sportswriting.

This course introduces students to the practice of sportswriting, including writing sports news, features, and columns. Readings will include works by Rick Reilly, Bill Simmons, Frank Deford, Karen Russell, Allison Glock, Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, W.C. Heinz, and others. Students will develop skills in analyzing, researching, writing, revising, and workshopping in the genre. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1050E S01 25568 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (J. Readey)
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ENGL 1050G. Journalistic Writing.

This course, taught by a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop in-depth interviewing techniques, use public records to report stories and become better observers of everyday life. The first half of the semester focuses on hard news and investigative reporting -- crime, government and court news. The second half is devoted to feature writing -- profiles and the art of narrative storytelling. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1050G S01 15755 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (T. Breton)
Fall ENGL1050G S02 15756 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (T. Breton)
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ENGL 1050H. Journalistic Writing.

This course teaches students how to report and write hard news and feature stories for newspapers and online. Students learn to gather and organize material, develop interviewing techniques, and hone their writing skills – all while facing the deadlines of journalism. The first half of the semester focuses on “hard" news: issues, crime, government, and courts. The second half is devoted to features, profiles, and narrative story telling. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed in first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1050H S01 24607 MW 8:30-9:50(02) 'To Be Arranged'
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ENGL 1050J. Multimedia Nonfiction.

In this class students will write and explore essays that focus on the meaningful integration of images, videos, and web tools with traditional nonfiction subgenres. No previous digital experience is necessary. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1050J S01 16549 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (M. Stewart)
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ENGL 1050M. Music Writing.

Music writing asks that we take readers across a space not entirely tangible. To listen—with care—and then articulate, with words written, what was heard and what was experienced. Music writing is a big genre, encompassing journalism (especially criticism), memoir (by listeners and by direct participants), long-form essay, and lyric forms. This course will touch upon these categories. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1050M S01 16548 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (A. Golaski)
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ENGL 1140A. The Literary Scholar.

“Literary detective work” aptly describes English literature scholarship. We pick up clues and chase down leads to meet the demands of scholarly yet personally engaged interpretation. We will develop methods of reading sufficiently diverse to read, credibly and richly, a range of literary texts from Susan Howe to Beowulf. Theoretical interpretation will be informed by cognitive poetics. Writing centered. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1140A S01 24608 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (L. Stanley)
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ENGL 1140B. The Public Intellectual.

This course offers advanced writers an opportunity to practice sophisticated, engaged critical writing in academic, personal, and civic modes. Emphasis will be on writing "public" essays (general audience essays that do intellectual work or academic essays that address public topics), ideally in fluid, "hybrid," audience-appropriate forms. Areas of investigation will include (but are not limited to) the review essay, the cultural analysis essay, literary documentary, and the extended persuasive/analytic essay. It will include some brief "touchstone" investigations into rhetorical theory, with the aim of helping to broaden our concepts of audience, analyze the constitutive and imaginative effects of language, increase the real-world effectiveness of our own language practices, and situate our writing within current political, cultural, aesthetic and intellectual debates. Students must have sophomore standing or higher in order to be admitted to the class. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930, 1030, or 1050. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1140B S01 24609 W 3:00-5:30(14) (C. Imbriglio)
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ENGL 1160A. Advanced Feature Writing.

For the advanced writer. Nothing provides people with more pleasure than a “good read.” This journalism seminar helps students develop the skills to spin feature stories that newspaper and magazine readers will stay with from beginning to end, both for print and on-line publications. Students will spend substantial time off-campus conducting in-depth interviews and sharpening their investigative reporting skills. The art of narrative storytelling will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ENGL1050G or 1050H, or published clips submitted before the first week of classes. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1160A S01 24560 T 4:00-6:30(16) (T. Breton)
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ENGL 1160B. Editors/Producers.

On-site workshop for editors/producers of campus or local journalism that aspires to professional standards. Students must be chosen by peers to edit a campus publication such as the BDH, or to produce a radio show at WBSR or WBRU; or they must have an internship at a local newspaper, radio or TV station. Required: Minimum 20 hours a week editing/producing; participation in skill-building workshops for staff. All issues/shows evaluated. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.

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ENGL 1160C. Radio Nonfiction.

For advanced writers only. Introduction to radio writing and producing. Students find and research stories, interview, draft, edit and fine-tune for radio presentation. Genres include news, profile, feature and personal narratives, editorial and review. Weekly labs focus on recording equipment, digital editing and mixing, and music use. Final project: half-hour radio feature ready for broadcast. Preference given to students who have taken ENGL0160, advanced nonfiction writing courses, English concentrators, or students who have worked at WBSR or WBRU. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1160D. The Common Critic.

For the advanced writer. Aimed at the cultivated consumer of books, magazines and newspapers-- what has traditionally been called the common reader. Students will attend films, plays, art shows, concerts or dance performances and write weekly reviews based on these experiences. Readings include Orwell, Woolf, Shaw, Kael, Tynan, Clive James, Zbigniew Herbert, and current reviews. Writing sample submitted at first class; also a previous sample, if possible, submitted at the same time. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1160E. Advanced Journalism: Investigative and Online Reporting.

The goal of this class is to rigorously test and improve the reporting and nonfiction writing abilities of students seriously considering a career in journalism. By reading award-winning articles; reporting and writing five nonfiction pieces on campus or in Providence; and rigorously critiquing each other's writing, students will gain a sense of the promise and perils of journalism. Prerequisite: ENGL 0160. Enrollment limited to 17.

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ENGL 1160F. Reporting Crime and Justice.

Crime and justice stories are people stories. The drama of everyday life is played out every day in courtrooms. This advanced journalism course will get students into the courtrooms, case files and archives of Rhode Island's judicial system and into committee hearings at the State House where they will report on stories that incorporate drama, tension, and narrative storytelling. Prerequisite: ENGL1050G, ENGL1050H or ENGL1160A (Advanced Feature Writing). Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1160G. Literary Journalism: Writing about Politics and Culture.

Students are introduced to procedures and techniques of cultural journalism through reading and discussing work of notable practitioners and writing their own reviews, profiles, and reportage. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisites: ENGL0900, ENGL0930, or any intermediate or advanced nonfiction course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1160H. Social Justice Journalism.

Students will investigate perceived injustices and write carefully crafted nonfiction pieces that present complex stories in a fair, balanced, and accurate way. Students will complete several short pieces and a full-length article suitable for publication. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Prerequisites: ENGL0930 or any 1000 level nonfiction writing course. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1160J. Advanced Journalistic Nonfiction.

For experienced writers. We will study and emulate the works of journalists who write across genres. We will focus on observational skills, narrative arc, the capturing of critical detail, scene setting, character, anecdote, thematic development, precision with words, and voice. Because all such writing is dependent upon quality reporting, we will explore the relationship between fidelity to fact and creativity. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Prerequisites: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1160J S01 16447 T 4:00-6:30(09) (T. Gup)
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ENGL 1180A. Crime Writing.

This course offers students the opportunity to study crime reportage. We will read and analyze excerpts from classics in the genre, magazine articles, and newspaper accounts. Students will develop semester-long individual writing projects covering a particular crime, and can work either with Providence and Brown University police on a local incident, or research a case through secondary source material.

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ENGL 1180B. Digital Nonfiction.

Digital Nonfiction is an opportunity to explore the fundamental differences between print and digital narratives. Focusing on three short assignments and one longer project, this class encourages students to learn by doing. Additionally, students develop their digital fluency by exploring a variety of platforms and readings. Digital Nonfiction is an advanced creative nonfiction class that requires ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1180B S01 24610 M 3:00-5:30(13) (M. Stewart)
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ENGL 1180C. Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Writing with Food.

This course examines writing about food and how writing affects food and food culture. We shall explore the relationship of food to the pen through reading classic texts, writing in and out of class, guest lectures, and touring culinary archives. The goal is to polish personal voice in menus, recipes, memoir, history, reportage, and the lyric essay. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1180C S01 24611 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (C. DeBoer-Langworthy)
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ENGL 1180D. Concealing and Revealing: Writing the Unsaid.

We'll read and write works that voice what often goes unvoiced, challenge taboos or build silence into their structures. Creative and critical writing assignments, class discussions reading responses and in-class writing will allow us to enter and question these texts, their motives, and their methods. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180E. Lifewriting.

Features theoretical and practical study of lifewriting's various forms--memoir, diary, essay, and autobiography-- and the crafting of personal narrative. Students read books, view films, and keep an electronic diary and paper notebook. Requirements include a personal critical essay and autobiography.
Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180F. Literary Journalism.

Focusing on the craft of literary techniques in a range of journalistic modes, we will read John McPhee, Diane Ackerman, Ian Frazier, Susan Orlean and Tracy Kidder, among others. Workshops and conferences on student work, which can include personal essays, immersion journalism, researched argumentative essays and magazine-style feature articles. Complete and polish several shorter pieces and one longer feature-length article.

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ENGL 1180G. Lyricism and Lucidity.

For the advanced writer. This course will explore two subsets of the personal essay that blur or cross boundary lines--the lyric essay and the photographic essay-- in both traditional and experimental formats. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1180G S01 24613 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (C. Imbriglio)
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ENGL 1180H. Satire and Humor Writing.

For the advanced writer. This course will introduce students to the practice of writing satire and humorous essays. Readings will include works by Jonathan Swift, Mark Twain, Garrison Keillor, Bill Bryson, David Foster Wallace, David Sedaris, and others, and students will develop skills in analyzing, writing, and workshopping in the genre. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180I. Writing Medical Narrative.

This class will examine the recent turn toward the use of narrative in medicine and the recent trend of published medical narrative. We'll look at literary and cultural narratives of sickness and health and how they shape perceptions and treatments, while keeping the science and politics of health care—and its public discourse—in view. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0900, ENGL0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1180I S01 15757 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (K. Schapira)
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ENGL 1180J. Tales of the Real World.

For the advanced writer, this section offers a chance to practice the pleasures and challenges of nonfiction story-telling in the forms of literary journalism, personal essay, and audio narrative. Inspirations include Gay Talese, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, and This American Life. Intensive practice in researching, interviewing, revising, and audio editing. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, 1050, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180K. The Art of Literary Nonfiction.

For the advanced writer. Based on Roland Barthes' notion of the fragment, this workshop features an incremental, literary approach to writing nonfiction, in both traditional and experimental formats. In response to daily assignments, students will produce numerous short pieces and three extended "essays," to be gathered into a chapbook at the end of the course. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1180K S01 15759 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (C. Imbriglio)
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ENGL 1180L. Travel Writing: In the Domain of the Other.

For the advanced writer. Huck Finn's intention "to light out for the Territory" reflects a pervasive desire to be somewhere else. Restless curiosity about the Other affects travel, writing about travel, and reading about travel. Will concentrate on contemporary travel writers (Heat-Moon, Didion, Chatwin, numerous others) and experiment with various types of narrative structures.
Writing sample required. Prerequisite: EL 13, 16, 18, 114, 116, 118, or 119 (ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190). Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180M. Special Delivery: Letters and Diaries.

For the advanced writer. While letters and diaries are constrained by "dailiness"--the writer's informal situation in time--they often form the basis of more formal communications, including the novel. We will keep diaries as self-conscious intellectual enterprises and write letters to address their roles in various literary modes. The final project will be an epistolary essay incorporating structures and motifs from both sub-genres. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180, or instructor permission. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor permission.

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ENGL 1180N. The Longer Literary Essay.

We will focus on reflective essays and researched investigations for the non-scholarly reader, like those in The New Yorker, Science Times, and Harper's. Students learn to develop lengthier pieces, translate technical information, and sustain reader interest. Class consists of discussion of readings, workshops, and occasional visits by professional writers.
Writing sample required. Prerequisite: EL 13, 16, 18, 114, 116, 118, or 119 (ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190). Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180P. Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction.

For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0180 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1180P S01 15761 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (E. Hardy)
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ENGL 1180Q. Narrating History.

For the advanced writer: the protocols of historical narrative and essay for a general audience. Using the archives of Brown, the Rhode Island Historical Society, and the student's family (if feasible), each writer will research primary and secondary sources, use interviews and oral histories, to help shape three engaging, instructive true stories of the past. Intensive library work, revisions, and peer editing.

Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during first week of classes. Preference given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1180R. Travel Writing: Personal and Cultural Narratives.

For the advanced writer. Helps students build skills in the growing genre of travel writing, including techniques for reading, composing, and revising travel pieces. Students will read the best contemporary travel writing in order to develop their own writing in areas like narrative, setting, characters, and voice. The course will feature interactive discussions, instructor conferences, and workshops. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1180R S01 24665 F 3:00-5:30(15) (J. Readey)
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ENGL 1180S. Memoir, the Modern Novel.

Memoir is an ancient form (Augustine, Rousseau) and an American literary standby (Thoreau, Henry Adams) which has exploded in popularity in the past twenty years. We will study its political implications and experiment with this controversial form whose dimensions have barely been explored. We will write new kinds of memoir, stretching our stories towards biography, fiction and historical narrative. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180. Writing sample required. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. S/NC

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ENGL 1180T. A Slice of Life: Writing the Full Length Memoir.

This course, intended for advanced nonfiction writers, will focus on reading and writing successful book-length memoirs. By studying masters of the form, students will develop a sense of what makes a compelling memoir work and how to approach their own. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190A. "The Arrangement of Words": Liberating Fiction(s).

We read fiction because we enjoy stories. As critical or astute readers, we are often drawn into something more than the story itself: into the way it is told, into the inflections and constructions of language. Concentrating on American fiction writers 1918-1945 (Hemingway, Faulkner, Welty, O'Connor, others), we will examine their fiction and non-fictional prose to see what they do and how and why. Writing will range from critical exposition to annotated fictional experiments. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190B. Real Language: Poetics, Romantics, Writing.

For the advanced writer. Concentrates on the first generation Romantics (Wordsworth and Coleridge) and their poetic/aesthetic experiments to correlate "the real language of men" with poetic perception. Along with primary sources (prose and poetry), we read scholarly, critical, and theoretical texts to construct ways of reading English Romantic poetry and then work on different kinds of writing that derive from those readings. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180, or instructor permission. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor permission. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190C. Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Biography.

Biography, one of the oldest forms of creative nonfiction, tells the life story of a person, idea, place, or thing. We consider old and new forms of biography, experiment with those forms, and practice them as a method of inquiry as well as presentation of self. We also explore biography’s connection to journalism, autobiography, memoir, and history. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190D. Writing About Sports in America.

For the advanced writer. Writing about any sport involves one in complex cultural issues that transcend the sport itself. We'll examine work by such authors as Bissinger, Halberstam and Maraniss for voice, craft, and research methods. Students will be required to produce their own pieces of sports writing that explore, through critical research and analysis, the place of sports within the larger culture. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Prerequisite: EL 13, 16, 18, 114, 116, 118, or 119 (ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190). S/NC.

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ENGL 1190F. My So-Called Life: The Art of the Literary Memoir.

The literary memoir offers students inspiration and warning as to the possibilities and limits of using their own experience as text. We study personal essays, narratives, and prose poems by a variety of writers. Advanced writers only. Writing sample required on first day of class.

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ENGL 1190G. Science as Writing, Scientists as Writers.

For the advanced writer. Investigates the ways science, scientists, and science-related issues have been represented in fiction and nonfiction written for general audiences. Writing assignments include an informal online journal, literary/cultural analyses, fiction or personal essay, and scientific journalism. Readings from literary, journalistic, and scientific writers. A background in science is useful but not required. Science and humanities students welcome. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor permission. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190H. Writing Science, Writing the Sacred.

Explores the relationships between two dominant intellectual paradigms-science and religion-and asks students to respond by writing their own "sacred" and science-related texts. Genres to read and write will be poetry and critical/literary nonfiction.
Writing sample required. Prerequisite: EL 13, 16, 18, 114, 116, 118, or 119 (ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190). Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190I. Writing the Southeast Asian War.

It was the Vietnam War, the American War, the Southeast Asian diaspora. By reading varied genres responding to the experience of the war in Southeast Asia and its aftermath, we will study how any experience is multitudinous and how genres manipulate experience in different ways. Analysis and practice of memoir, fiction, poetry, and oral history.
Writing sample required. Prerequisite: EL 13, 16, 18, 114, 116, 118, or 119 (ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190). Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190J. Narrative Poetics.

A study of literary language from the writer's perspective that draws on Chomsky's universalist linguistics to refashion structuralist poetics and narratology. Small written experiments with literary word choice and literary sentence structure prepare for a final experiment with narrative structure. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Prerequisite: EL 13, 16, 18, 114, 118, or 119 (ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190). S/NC.

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ENGL 1190K. Literary Biography.

For the advanced writer. How does one narrate the twists and turns of a life while simultaneously doing justice to whatever literature the subject managed to produce as he or she plodded through each day? We will examine examples of literary biographies for, among other things, voice, form, and research methods. Students will be required to produce their own pieces of literary biography. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor permission. Enrollment limited. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190L. Creative Nonfiction: Practice and Criticism.

For advanced writers. What is Creative Nonfiction? Writers have flocked to it; scholars have questioned it. Does it harm the truth? Is it narrative with too much "I" and too little "Eye"? What makes it significant? To help us explore persistent questions about form, point of view, method, and ethics, readings will include historical examples, recent practitioners, editors, and critics. Intensive reading responses, research, drafting, and revision. Two critical essays; one piece of creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190M. The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program.

For students accepted as Writing Fellows, this course offers the study of literary essays and composition theory to help develop their own writing with a critical awareness of the elements of an essay. Students will write essays throughout the semester and will confer with each other for every paper, thereby gaining experience in peer tutoring and becoming better writers through the help of an informed peer. They will also respond to the writing of a cohort of students in another designated Writing Fellows class. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1190M S01 15762 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (S. Kastner)
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ENGL 1190N. Brown: Writing the Archive.

The archives at and around Brown are primary sources for discovering stories--institutional, historical, personal--of our life across time through local history, personal memory, biography, and cultural critique, combining scholarship, media, and the arts. What opportunities for new writing lie behind doors to be opened across the street? Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190P. The Art of Memoir in Theory and Practice.

The course introduces students to the historical and theoretical nuances of memoir. You will critically engage with a variety of readings and develop an appreciation of your creative role as a memoirist. In the process of crafting a portfolio of work you will explore the complexities of remembering and experiment with the style of narrative voice and structure. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190Q. The Essay.

This course offers a feel for the essay and its versatile range, from the informative to the personal to the philosophical. We will study tone and style, meaning, beginnings and endings, and use of historical and personal information. Our focus will be on the craft of writing rather than on literary criticism. Readings include essays by two dozen accomplished writers. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0110, 0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC

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ENGL 1190S. Poetics of Narrative.

Narratives are everywhere, simply there, like life itself, Roland Barthes says; we structure our experiences with narratives that we either infer or create. We will read different literary genres to see how narratives work and what makes them poetic and read theoretical texts to understand narrative function and performance. We will write experimentally to experience how stories are constructed. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0900, 0930, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. S/NC.

Spr ENGL1190S S01 25567 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (L. Stanley)
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ENGL 1190T. Writing the Mythic Life: The Use of Traditional Narrative.

This course explores the theory and practice of traditional narrative structures such as fairy-tale, myth, and legend in creating stories about ourselves. We will read fiction and nonfiction by Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, A.S. Byatt, and others, engaging critically with the texts as well as creating new ones modeled on them. Writing assignments will include several short papers and a longer end-of-term project. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0900, 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes.Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

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ENGL 1190U. Nature Writing.

This course seeks to develop your skills as a senstive reader and writer of the natural world. You will build a portfolio of revised work through a process of workshops, tutorials, and conferences, and engage in discussion of a range of written and visual narratives with reference to their personal, political, and ecological contexts. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0930 or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.

Fall ENGL1190U S01 16448 M 3:00-5:30(15) (R. Ward)
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ENGL 1200. Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing.

Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.

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ENGL 1310A. Firing the Canon: Early Modern Women's Writing.

Rediscovery and reconsideration of works by early modern women have changed the literary canon; these once-neglected works are becoming mainstream, and they are changing the way we read 'traditional' texts. The reading in this course includes poetry, letters, drama, essays, fiction, and life-writing by authors including Lanyer, Wroth, Cavendish, Behn, Manley, Haywood, Scott, and Montagu.

Fall ENGL1310A S01 15720 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (M. Rabb)
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ENGL 1310B. American Degenerates.

Colonial British-Americans were called, among other names, monstrous, wild, impotent, and grotesque. They could not, it was said, produce writing worth reading. We will explore the ways in which American writers embraced and/or challenged these charges of cultural and bodily degeneracy. In the process, we will examine the development of modern notions of literature and identity. Students should register for ENGL 1310B S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of classes. WRIT

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ENGL 1310C. Arguments of Form in Renaissance Poetry.

In the literatures of the European Renaissance, stylistic innovation is a marker of cultural change. The production of sonnets, of neoclassical epigrams, and of poems aspiring to be Ovidian or Vergilian opens up a theoretical space for arguments about faith, thought, words, the self, and society. Readings from Wyatt, Surrey, Gascoigne, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Milton, and others.

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ENGL 1310D. Between Gods and Beasts: The Renaissance Ovid.

Ovid's Metamorphoses, an epic compendium of classical myths, narrates with wit and pathos the transformations of body and mind wrought by sexual passion. Central to Renaissance conceptions of the human, it inspired drama, poetry, and narrative. Readings: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Spenser, Milton.

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ENGL 1310E. Border Crossings in Renaissance Drama.

Investigates how distant peoples and places, from Ireland to the West Indies, from East to West, are constructed for the English stage. We will read Marlowe's Tamburlaine, Fletcher's Island Princess, Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, the anonymous Stukeley play, Shakespeare's Othello, and Daborne's A Christian Turned Turk to observe what dangers and freedoms these plays ascribe to specific geographies.

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ENGL 1310F. Early Modern Utopias.

Why does the early modern period witness a flourishing of utopias from More to Milton? We will explore this question, in reading a range of utopias by writers such as Montaigne, More, Ralegh, Bacon, Hall, and Cavendish, engaging them not just as visions of ideal societies, but as efforts at reform of England and Englishness.

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ENGL 1310H. The Origins of American Literature.

Where does American literature begin? Can it be said to have a single point of origin? Can writings by people who did not consider themselves American be the source of our national literary tradition? Does such a tradition even exist and, if so, what are its main characteristics? How does one understand the various diverse traditions that constitute American literature, including African-American, Native American, and many others, into a single object of study--or does one even need to? Authors may include de Vaca, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, and Phillis Wheatley. WRIT

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ENGL 1310J. Imagining the Individual in Renaissance England.

How did the men and women of 16th- and 17th- century England apprehend themselves as individual human subjects? In relation to the law and the state? As creatures of God? As humanists interrogating the texts of the past? Readings include works by More, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Wyatt, Erasmus, Luther, Tyndale, Askew, Hooker, Hebert, Donne, Browne, de Montaigne, Ascham, Jonson, and Herrick.

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ENGL 1310N. Renaissance Drama.

An introduction to the great classics and some less-known gems of a stellar period in English drama. Plays by Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Middleton, and Ford, in the context of urban culture, English nationhood, gender and sexuality, playhouses and playing companies, and forms of theatricality.

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ENGL 1310O. Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature.

A survey of writing and cultural history in England between 1660 and 1750, emphasizing innovation and experimentation in drama, satire, poetry, and fiction. Readings include work by Behn, Rochester, Swift, and Defoe.

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ENGL 1310S. Women and the Book in the Middle Ages.

We will read texts authored by medieval women such as Marie de France, Marjorie Kempe, Julian of Norwich, and Christine de Pizan, and we will explore other textual roles of women, including book ownership and patronage, translation and scribal transmission. The result? A complex picture of mediated and mediating female participants in manuscript culture. Some readings in Middle English.

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ENGL 1310T. Chaucer.

Texts in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer including the romance Troilus and Criseyde; dream vision poems Book of the Duchess, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls; Chaucer's translation of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy; his shorter poems; and two Canterbury Tales. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.

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ENGL 1310U. Monsters, Giants, and Fantastic Landscapes in Early American Literature.

Monsters, giants, "exotic natives," and unknown continents fill the pages of early American writing. Examines how the well-known and obscure writers of early America used the strange and the fabulous to suggest new ways of being normal.

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ENGL 1310V. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Middle English narratives by Geoffrey Chaucer's band of fictional pilgrims, read in their 14th-century historical and literary contexts. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.

Fall ENGL1310V S01 15743 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (E. Bryan)
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ENGL 1310W. English Poetry and the Renaissance.

The names of Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Milton, and other poets inscribe a golden age of poetry in the cultural mythography of English-language literature. Who are these poets and what stories are told about them? In their time? During the long eighteenth century? By Wordsworth and Browning? By Eliot, the high modernists, and postmoderns?

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ENGL 1310Y. Besides Paradise Lost: Milton's Other Poems.

A study of Milton's lyric and dramatic poetry, including the sonnets, Latin poems, L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, the Nativity Ode, Lycidas, Comus, the verse epistles and Samson Agonistes.

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ENGL 1310Z. Three Great Poets: Shakespeare, Donne, Milton.

We will study these premier Renaissance poets from all angles possible, to understand the historical situations and political issues that shaped their writing, the authors and ideas that influenced them, the traditional forms they appropriated for new purposes. Most of all, we will study them to appreciate the power of poetry as a source of knowledge and inspiration. It is recommended that students should have already taken a course in reading poetry, such as ENGL0910A How to Read a Poem or ENGL0400A Introduction to Shakespeare. Students who have taken ENGL0210E may not register for this course. LILE

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ENGL 1311A. Milton's Paradise Lost: Poetry and Belief.

Milton, Blake wrote, was of the devil's party without knowing it, and this course offers close reading of the language of Paradise Lost as poetry of belief: how does the poetry of Milton's major poem embody belief and doubt for him, in history, and for his readers?

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ENGL 1311B. Medieval Zoographies and the Origins of the Human.

This course engages with medieval texts and contemporary theory to attempt to understand the shifting boundaries between humans and animals, as we examine the premodern roots of the discussion over what it has historically meant to be human, and what might come next. Topics will include beast fables and epics, nature and artifice, emotions, the soul, simulacra, sacrifice, and hunting.

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ENGL 1311C. Milton.

A close examination of the poetry and prose of John Milton, from the early lyrics to the polemical prose writings of the 1640s and 50s, to the masterpieces Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. Not open to first-year students.

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ENGL 1311E. History of the English Language.

Provides an introduction to the study of the English language from a historical, linguistic, and philological perspective, and an overview of the study of the "Englishes" that populate our globe. While providing students with the ability to identify and explain language change through historical periods, also examines language as a social and political phenomenon.

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ENGL 1311H. Sagas Without Borders: Multilingual Literatures of Early England.

This course traces evolutions of the hero in Old English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish narratives within and around early medieval England. Introduction to genres of saga, romance, and the short poetic lai, as students consider how the nature of the hero changes in specific cultural and linguistic moments. Texts in modern English translation. Essays will focus on close textual readings. Not open to first-year students. LILE

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ENGL 1311L. From Mead-Hall to Mordor: The Celtic and Germanic Roots of Tolkien’s Fiction.

This course traces the sources used by J.R.R. Tolkien in writing The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, which include tales drawn from Old English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish literature. You will be introduced to different medieval genres as you consider how the nature and gender of the hero changes in specific cultural and linguistic moments.

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ENGL 1360A. The Stage as Globe in Renaissance Drama.

Investigates how distant peoples and places, from Ireland to the West Indies, from East to West, are constructed for the English stage. We will read Marlowe's Tamburlaine, Fletcher's Island Princess, Heywood's Fair Maid of the West, the anonymous Stukeley play, Shakespeare's Othello, and Daborne's A Christian Turned Turk to observe what dangers and freedoms these plays ascribe to specific geographies. Enrollment limited. LILE

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ENGL 1360B. Inventing Britain.

Focuses on the internal colonization of the British Isles as represented by chronicle histories, drama, masques, and epic and lyric poetry: How do the English define themselves as a center striving to incorporate the British periphery? Authors may include Spenser, Shakespeare, King James I, Bacon, Jonson, Milton, and Marvel.

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ENGL 1360C. Language and Form in Shakespearean Studies.

Shakespeare's poems and plays are a working dictionary of early modern English and an inventory of the possibilities of formal invention in early modern culture. How can we reach a historically informed awareness of form and formality in Shakespeare? What is the history of formalism in Shakespearean studies? What new modes of inquiry issue from questions of form?

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ENGL 1360D. Medieval Manuscript Studies: Paleography, Codicology, and Interpretation.

How to read a medieval manuscript. Students will learn to transcribe and date 5th- through 16th-century scripts in Old and Middle English and some Latin texts, and will learn about interpretive methods. Prior course work in Middle English recommended, and acquaintance with Latin and/or Old English and/or Old French and/or medieval Spanish helpful.

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ENGL 1360F. Quest, Vision, Diaspora: Medieval Journey Narratives.

Medieval texts explored ideas of self, love, rite-of-passage, spirituality, and group identity through narratives of travel, both imagined and real. We will read romance quests that foray to fairylands and wastelands, visionary journeys to hell, pilgrimages of self discovery, an epic exodus that founds King Arthur's nation, and a 14th-century round-the-world travelogue. Chaucer, Malory, Kempe, Mandeville, Layamon, Anonymous. Middle English readings. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited.

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ENGL 1360H. Introduction to the Old English Language.

This course offers a thorough introduction to the earliest period of English language and literature. We begin with an extensive coverage of grammar and syntax before reading short texts and a few Old English poems, including The Battle of Brunanburh and Judith. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1360J. Middle English Literature.

In the age of Chaucer, literature in Middle English ranged from lyrics to romance narratives to mystery plays and medieval genres like dream visions and debate poems. This course will introduce students to reading texts like Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Owl and the Nightingale in their original Middle English. No prerequisites. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

Spr ENGL1360J S01 24568 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (E. Bryan)
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ENGL 1360K. Shakespeare and Company.

Shakespeare belonged to a community of actors and playwrights who competed for audiences in a fledgling entertainment industry. How do his plays compare to those of Marlowe or Jonson, Middleton or Webster? Reading Shakespeare in tandem with his contemporaries, we will consider the genres, sources, styles and conventions they shared, the issues that concerned them, and their differing artistic perspectives. Prerequisite: ENGL 0310A or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT LILE

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ENGL 1360M. Spenser, Milton, and the Politics of the English Epic.

We will read the literary and political writings of England's two major authors of epic -- Spenser and Milton -- assessing their investment in contemporary debates about nation and conquest, rule and liberty, and sexuality and selfhood. Along with the major poems, we will read these authors' shorter literary and political writings.

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ENGL 1360N. Shakespeare and European Culture.

How do Shakespeare's works embody and transform the cultures of Europe? What is his relationship to ancient Greece and Rome? To the moral and political philosophies of the sixteenth century? To contemporary literary fashion?

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ENGL 1360O. The Ties that Bind: Renaissance Revenge Plays.

From revenge plays to domestic tragedies, family is a value to kill and die for in Renaissance drama. This course considers the cultural pressures such violence responds to, the contaminations it guards against, and explores the political life of these violent domestic affairs. Works by Kyd, Shakespeare, Heywood, Webster, and Middleton. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1360P. Shakespearean Tragedy.

We will read in depth early, middle and late tragedies by Shakespeare, attending to the genre as understood in the Renaissance and as Shakespeare developed it, along with critical readings that explore tragic form. Oral presentations, short papers, and a final research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 0310A or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT LILE

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ENGL 1360R. Modernism and the Early Modern: 17th-Century.

Did human nature become modern in the seventeenth century or did modern people just think so? This course will study style, science, politics and cultural transactions in this period of revolution and restoration, examining such texts as Donne's satires and epistles and Eliot's high modernist essays on the division of human nature in this period. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1360S. Between Gods and Beasts: The Renaissance Ovid.

Ovid's Metamorphoses, an epic compendium of classical myths, narrates with wit and pathos the transformations of body and mind wrought by sexual passion. Central to Renaissance conceptions of the human, it inspired drama, poetry, and narrative. Readings: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Spenser, Milton. Students who have taken ENGL 1310D may not register for this course. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT

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ENGL 1360T. Eco-Shakespeare.

Do Shakespeare's plays register and respond to the ecological crises of his day, including deforestation, land enclosure, climate change, and animal exploitation? Or, are they complicit in the ideologies that instated these practices? What kind of relation do Shakespeare's plays envision as underpinning the natural and the cultural realms and how does this differ from modern conceptions? We will seek answers to such questions by considering the plays' use of pastoral tropes and green worlds, but also by analyzing the inter-animating dynamics they stage between subject and environment. Enrollment limited to 23. Not open to first-year students. LILE

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ENGL 1360U. Europe in the Vernacular.

Why did a few early medieval European authors write not in Latin or Arabic but in vernacular languages like Castilian, Early Middle English, Old Icelandic, or Old French? We will read primary texts by Layamon, Alfonso X, Dante, troubadours and anonymous others, and assess previous claims about the "rise of the individual" and various proto-nationalisms as we rewrite the story of how, why, and for whom multilingual vernacular writings came to be. Readings in modern English supplemented by medieval languages. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Not open to first-year students. Sophomores require instructor permission to register.

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ENGL 1360Z. Shakespeare and Embodiment.

Consideration of a number of Shakespearean texts including the erotic narrative poem “Venus and Adonis,” the early revenge drama Titus Andronicus, the history Henry IV, pt. 1, the tragedy of Othello, among others, and their various representations of the body: as subject to violence, gender and desire, sovereignty and history. Attention to Shakespeare’s rewriting of Ovid, novelle, and chronicle history. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students.

Fall ENGL1360Z S01 16449 T 1:00-3:30(10) (K. Newman)
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ENGL 1361A. Fantasies of Milton.

Paradise Lost has served as the basis for numerous fantasy novels. Even Comus has become a (supposedly inappropriate) children's story. How can a seventeenth-century poet's treatment of temptation, disobedience, reason and self-regard come to seem relevant in the present? What do contemporary writers feel compelled to preserve and to change? How might we reimagine Milton? Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

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ENGL 1361D. Women's Voices in Medieval Literature.

This course explores literary works from the early medieval period, both literature by women and literature that represents women’s voices and desires. Traditions examined will include the Old and Middle English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish. The course provides insight into the construction of premodern sexualities as well as into the cultural and social histories of multiple national traditions.

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ENGL 1361F. Spenser and Shakespeare.

A comparative study of theme, form, and genre based upon pairings of major works: Shakespeare’s Sonnets/Amoretti; Faerie Queene I/King Lear; Faerie Queene III/Twelfth Night and Winter's Tale; Shepheardes Calendar/As You Like It. Weekly short interpretative exercises; final essay—3000 words. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

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ENGL 1361G. Tolkien and the Renaissance.

This course explores the work of J.R.R. Tolkien alongside Renaissance forbears such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Milton and others. Topics to include love and friendship, good and evil, violence and nonviolence, and how literature offers distinctive forms of life. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

Spr ENGL1361G S01 24570 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (J. Kuzner)
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ENGL 1361J. Seminar in Old Norse-Icelandic Language and Literature.

This course offers a thorough introduction to a language both closely related to Old English and in which survives one of the richest medieval literatures. We will start with an extensive coverage of grammar and syntax before reading short excerpts from sagas including Egil’s Saga and Grettir’s Saga. Enrollment limited to 20; knowledge of Old English, Latin, or German advised.

Fall ENGL1361J S01 17057 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (L. Jacobs)
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ENGL 1380. Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures.

Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.

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ENGL 1510A. Jane Austen and Her Predecessors: The Other History of the Novel.

This course focuses on the novels of Jane Austen — from Sense and Sensibility to Persuasion. The course first establishes some familiarity with the earlier women writers of narrative fiction, in order to gain a deeper understanding of the development of the novel and of Austen's place in that rich tradition. Additional readings include work by Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Lennox, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

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ENGL 1510B. Liberalism and American Culture.

A course in the relationship between the rise of liberalism and American literary history. Writings from Franklin, Jefferson, Emerson, Fuller, Rowson, Twain, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. LILE

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ENGL 1510D. The Literature of the American South.

The South is as much a state of mind as a place on the map, and some of the major figures in American literature have contributed to the making of what we think of when we think of "the South." Explores sometimes contradictory but always important meanings of the American South. Authors include Poe, Douglass, and Twain.

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ENGL 1510E. American Renaissance.

An intensive reading in American literature between 1820 and 1860, with special attention to Romanticism, race and slavery, and the historical novel.

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ENGL 1510H. Why the Novel Happened.

Readings in "early " novels of 18th-century England and in more recent explanations of the novel's rise to dominance as a popular modern genre. How have changing ideas of truth, virtue, gender, money, politics, history, or the human subject interacted with the practices of narrative fiction? Writers to be considered include Behn, Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Lewis, Watt, Lukacs, McKeon, and Bakhtin.

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ENGL 1510I. The Novel from Defoe to Austen.

How and why did the novel become the dominant literary mode? This course considers the "rise" of the novel during the "long" eighteenth century. Beginning with Behn and Defoe, readings include works by Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, Lewis, and Godwin.

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ENGL 1510J. Eighteenth-Century Women Writers.

Rediscovery and reconsideration of works by women during the eighteenth century are changing the literary canon: works by women are becoming mainstream, and they are changing the way we read 'traditional' texts. This course includes poetry, drama, fiction, letters, diaries, and essays by writers including Manley, Haywood, Centlivre, Scott, Fielding, Montagu, Sheridan, Burney, Radcliffe, and Wollstonecraft.

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ENGL 1510L. Fiction and Mass Media in Nineteenth-Century England and America.

Explores critiques of the mass media from Carlyle and Arnold to Benjamin and McLuhan by way of a reading of important works of popular Anglo-American fiction of the 19th century. Criticism includes essays by Carlyle, Arnold, Benjamin, and McLuhan; literature includes fiction by Poe, Dickens, Melville, Stevenson, and James.

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ENGL 1510M. From Melville to Modernism: The American Novel 1851-1909.

A survey of American fiction in the latter half of the nineteenth century. We will examine the ways narrative form helped shape modern America's increasingly fractured sense of identity, focusing specifically on questions of imitation and authenticity, race and nationalism. Writers will include Twain, Stein, Wharton, Crane, Chopin, and Chesnutt.

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ENGL 1510O. Inventing Race in America.

What is "race"? Where does it come from? This course argues that categories of racial difference-far from being fixed or natural-have emerged from within writing. We trace the emergence of "race" in America from the late 16th century to the present day by reading 17th-century British colonial writing, 18th-century racial scientists, Jefferson, Crevecoeur, Melville, Faulkner, Mukherjee, and Silko.

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ENGL 1510R. Location and Dislocation in the Late Nineteenth-Century American Novel.

Focuses on the two dominant literary modes of the late 19th century: realism and naturalism. We try to generate working definitions of these two methods in order to understand the ways narrative form shaped Americans' increasingly fractured sense of identity. Writers include Twain, James, Crane, Cahan, Jewett, Chopin, and Chesnutt.

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ENGL 1510S. Pre-Raphaelites, Aesthetes, and Decadents.

Looks at both Pre-Raphaelite literature and painting, and the reading includes Browning, the Rossettis, Morris, and Swinburne. The painters include both early hard-edge photographic Pre-Raphaelites and the erotic medievalism of Rossetti, Burne-Jones, and the followers. The course will focus on the tensions in Pre-Raphaelitism between realism and fantasy, fact and symbol, body and spirit.

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ENGL 1510T. Swift and His Contemporaries.

Swift's works are central to this course's investigation of literature, politics, and society, Anglo-Irish relations, and the great outpouring of satire in English in the early 18th century. Irony, parody, and mock-heroics inventively transform genres while challenging "abuses" of learning, government, religion, colonialism, and even love. Other writers include Congreve, Manley, Addison, Steele, Montagu, Pope, and Gay.

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ENGL 1510V. Civil Rights and American Literature.

An examination of the relations between legal theory and practice and literature, with a particular emphasis on the nature and significance of those relations in the historical development of American discourses of civil rights. Readings include Thoreau, Douglass, Wright, and Perry, and legal theorists such as Dworkin, Unger, Cardozo, and Fish.

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ENGL 1510W. George Eliot.

The course will study George Eliot's major works, including Adam Bede, Middlemarch, and Daniel Deronda, as well as examples of her essays and criticism. We will consider her experiments with literary realism, which helped secure for the novel form a position as high art. Giving attention to George Eliot's emphasis on conflicting ethical systems, from sympathy, utilitarian economics, and theology, to theories of physiological necessity, we will also examine the question of choice--including personal, women¿s social, professional, and marriage choices--that lies at the heart of many of her novels.

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ENGL 1510X. The Early American Novel.

A reading of diverse genres of the early American novel, between 1790 and 1860, including the seduction novel, frontier romance, historical fiction, and the antislavery novel. What was the novel's cultural role? Writers include Susanna Rowson, Brockden Brown, Hawthorne, Stowe, and William Wells Brown.

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ENGL 1510Z. The Realist Age: American Literature at the Turn of the Century.

What do we mean when we call a novel realistic? When did the term first start being used, and why? This class attempts to answer these questions by studying the emergence of realism as the dominant American literary form at the turn of the century. Writers will include Mark Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, and Charles Chesnutt.

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ENGL 1511A. American Literature of The Civil War.

An examination of the way the Civil War is represented in American literature from Reconstruction to the present. Authors to be considered include Grant, Twain, Dixon, Chesnutt, DuBois, Faulkner, Morrison, Ellison.

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ENGL 1511B. The Victorian Novel.

Challenges the notion of a Great Tradition or mainstream Victorian novel by looking at the proliferation of subgenres-e.g., sensation fiction, crime fiction, thug fiction, colonial adventures stories-for which the period is known. Includes novels by Mary Shelley, the Brontës, Dickens, Mrs. Henry Wood, Eliot, Hardy, Stevenson, Haggard, Stoker, and Wilde.

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ENGL 1511C. Lincoln, Whitman, and The Civil War.

A literary and cultural history of the Civil War with special emphasis on Whitman's poetry and Lincoln's addresses and letters. It focuses on issues of race, democracy, and modernity.

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ENGL 1511E. Monsters, Giants, and Fantastic Landscapes.

Monsters, giants, and exotic landscapes fill the pages of much writing in English before 1900. We will examine the ways in which a number of writers before 1900 use the strange and the fabulous to suggest new ways of understanding what it means to be normal. Authors may include Columbus, Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, and Poe. WRIT

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ENGL 1511G. Dickens and Others.

An introduction to the novels of Charles Dickens (1812-1870) that considers these works in relation to other important intellectual, historical, and literary developments of mid-19th-century England. Special attention given to the political, social, and philosophical significance of "others" in Dickens's writing and in related works from the period. In addition to a set of Dickens's novels, readings include selections from Mill, Arnold, Marx, Tennyson, Eliot, and others. LILE

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ENGL 1511H. Literature of the American Renaissance.

A survey of the major figures of mid-19th-century American literature, with a particular emphasis on how the writers of the period engaged the political and legal issues informing the sectional conflict on the eve of the Civil War. Authors to be considered include Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson, Stowe, Douglass, Brown, Jacobs, and Whitman. Students who have taken ENGL 0600F may not register for this course. LILE

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ENGL 1511I. Culture and Anarchy.

This course will trace the development of the concept of culture from its origin in conflict generated by the universalizing mission of the Enlightenment into a variety of literary and philosophical writings in 19th-century British literature. Readings from Rousseau, Kant, Herder, Burke, Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, Carlyle, Thoreau, Emerson, Tennyson, Arnold, and George Eliot.

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ENGL 1511J. The Rise of American Realism.

Realist fiction is traditionally associated with France (Honoré Balzac, Émile Zola) and England (Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot). We will read a number of important American realist writers (including Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Henry James, and Theodore Dreiser) in order to understand what might be distinctive about American realism and what it might owe to its European forerunner.

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ENGL 1511K. Gothic Novels and Romantic Poems.

The difference between "high Romantic" poetry and Gothic popular fiction blurs when we look closely at these haunted and haunting texts. This seminar will examine some major Romantic poems by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron in tandem with Gothic novels by Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Jane Austen, and Mary Shelley.

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ENGL 1511L. On Being Bored.

This course explores texts/films that represent and formally express states of non-productivity or non-desire. Beginning with the Enlightenment and romantic periods, we will reflect on narratives with neither progress nor plot, characters that resist characterization, and poems that deny assertion and revelation. Authors include: Kleist, Kant, Rousseau, Coleridge, de Quincey, Keats, Blanchot, Levinas, Beckett, Ashbery, Schuyler.

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ENGL 1511M. Victorian Self and Society.

This multi-genre course studies literature and culture of the Victorian period, looking at the changing ideas of society and the individual's place within that larger community in an age of empire, industrialization, urbanization, class conflict, and religious crisis. Topics include conceptions of the role of art and culture in society, the railway mania of the 1840s, women’s suffrage and the condition of women, and the Great Exhibition of 1851. Readings (essays, poems, stories, plays, and novels) by Carlyle, Charlotte Brontë, Ruskin, Robert Browning, Dickens, Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, and Lewis Carroll.

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ENGL 1511N. Liberalism, Empire, and the American Novel.

An historical consideration of how the novel in the United States addresses the relations between American liberalism and the projection of US sovereign authority into international contexts. Topics to be considered include: Manifest Destiny and the frontier; Reconstruction and the rise of imperial America; World War II and the Cold War; and the United States at the end of History.

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ENGL 1511O. American Poetry I: Puritans through the Nineteenth Century.

Survey of the invention and development of American poetic traditions. Readings include Bradstreet, Taylor, Wheatley, Freneau, Bryant, Emerson, Poe, Whitman, Melville, Dickinson, and Frost.

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ENGL 1511R. Scandalous Victorians.

This course examines the literature and culture of Victorian Britain through the lens of scandal. Particular attention will be paid to questions of gender, sexuality, class and social mobility, and national and imperial identity, as well as to the dynamics of scandal and the processes of social change.

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ENGL 1511S. The Victorian Novel and/as the History of Sexuality.

Might the modern hetero- and homosexual be Victorian constructions that have really "stuck"? We will explore how the Victorian novel contributed to the cultural labor of joining sexuality to a sense of the self, and then pitched in on the effort to meld romance, love, and sexuality into marital relationships. Domesticity, obsession, heterophobia, the Malthusian unconsciousness, and erotic versus romantic friendship will be some of the issues discussed. We will also branch out into issues of pleasure and desire more broadly in Victorian culture. Authors will include Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Charlotte Yonge, and Wilde.

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ENGL 1511T. Victorian Inequality.

From “Dickensian” workhouses to shady financiers, Victorian literature has provided touchstones for discussions of inequality today. This course will investigate how writers responded to the experience of inequality in Victorian Britain. Considering multiple axes of inequality, we will explore topics such as poverty and class conflict, social mobility, urbanization, gender, education, Empire, and labor.

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ENGL 1511U. Melville, Poe, and American Modernity.

The class will be guided by the premise that the writings of Poe and Melville reflect mid-19th century modernity.To support this claim we will look into their experimentation with narrative structure and ask whether the absence of clearly delineated characters in their stories is related to the emergence of urban crowds, practices of dehumanization employed in New York and Philadelphia prisons and hospitals.

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ENGL 1511V. Nature and the Self in Victorian Poetry.

The major works of Victorian poetry, spanning from the end of the Romantic period to the beginnings of Modernist poetry: roughly 1840 to 1890. We will be reading Matthew Arnold, Robert Browning, Thomas Hardy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Alfred Tennyson in detail, as well as critical writing and political poetry from the period.

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ENGL 1511W. Darwin and Other Crises of Faith: Victorian Prose, Poetry, and Fiction.

A survey of Victorian literature through the lens of religion, science, and the emerging faith in "culture." The basic question is, why did the Victorians take the emergence of secular consciousness so personally? We will be reading scientific texts, criticism, and autobiography alongside novels and poems. Authors will include: Darwin, Eliot, Arnold, Tennyson, Browning, Newman, Hardy, and Mill.

Spr ENGL1511W S01 25642 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (B. Parker)
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ENGL 1560A. Jane Austen and George Eliot.

A survey of the major novels of Austen and Eliot. Readings will also include contemporary reviews and responses, letters, and Eliot's critical prose, as well as literary theory and criticism addressing questions such as novelistic form, realism and narrativity, the problem of the subject, the politics of aesthetics, and the changing status of the woman writer in the 19th century. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. Instructor permission required. LILE

Fall ENGL1560A S01 15745 M 3:00-5:30(15) (E. Rooney)
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ENGL 1560B. Melville.

A seminar looking closely at the relation between the life and literary work of Herman Melville, with an extended reading of his masterpiece, Moby-Dick. The course will look at the history of writing and publishing during Melville's era and consider some of his contemporaries like Hawthorne and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1560E. The Modern Self and Its Others.

How do eighteenth-century representations of personal and public identity mark the emergence of the modern 'subject' as defined by gender, race, nation, language, and the body? Readings will include selections by Swift, Pope, Montague, Stern, Johnson, and Berney.

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ENGL 1560F. Nineteenth-Century American Imperialism.

Examines a number of different types of texts-novels, essays, journalism, oral narratives-in order to trace the connections between the internal colonialism of America in the nineteenth century and U.S. colonial ventures in the Caribbean, Asia, and Latin America. Writers to include Melville, Twain, Marti, Black Elk, Crane, Du Bois, and Roosevelt.

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ENGL 1560G. Romantic Orientalism.

Representations of "the East" in British writing and visual art from 1775 to 1825. Historical and theoretical accounts of "orientalism" and analysis of the political and ideological sources and consequences of "orientalist" representation. Readings in Wordsworth, Coleridge, Owenson, DeQuincey, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.

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ENGL 1560H. The Victorian Novel.

What specific historical conditions can be seen to have led to the emergence of the novel as a leading literary form in the Victorian era? What cultural work was it called upon to perform? How does it address broader philosophical, economic, political and social questions of the Victorian era? Authors include Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Stevenson, and Conrad.

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ENGL 1560M. Orientalism and the Place of Literature.

Literary representations of "the East" from the Enlightenment through Modernism and their relation to changing conceptions of the meaning and value of "literature" itself. Thinking about "place" in representational, geopolitical, and institutional terms. Readings from the "Arabian Nights," Mary Wortley Montagu, Oliver Goldsmith, Coleridge, Byron, De Quincey, Kipling, Michael Ondaatje, and others; theoretical and historical perspectives from Said, Williams, Eagleton, and others.

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ENGL 1560N. Eighteenth-Century Novel.

The 18th century marks the beginning of the novel as we know it. This course considers the "rise" of fiction during the "long" eighteenth century. Beginning with Behn, Haywood and Defoe, readings include works by Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, Lewis, and Godwin.

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ENGL 1560O. Slavery and American Literature.

This course examines the ways in which slavery is represented in 19th-century American literature. We will consider efforts to delineate the social practices and effects of chattel slavery and deployments of slavery as a form of political rhetoric. Readings include works by Douglass, Jacobs, Stowe, Melville, Howells, Twain, and DuBois.

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ENGL 1560Q. The Poetry of Politics: Baudelaire, Arnold, Whitman.

Explores the special challenge to the traditional form of lyric poetry posed by the post-industrial modern city of the mid-19th century. We will study the poetry and prose of Charles Baudelaire, Matthew Arnold, and Walt Whitman as responses to the urban conditions represented by mid-19th-century Paris, London, and New York. Motifs to be considered include modernity, commodification, and crowds. Priority will be given to junior and senior concentrators in English, Comparative Literature, Modern Culture and Media, and French Studies. First-year students and sophomores may request permission by email to take the course.

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ENGL 1560R. From Frankenstein to Einstein: Literature and Science from 1800 to 1950.

Science and literature as interrelated ways of knowing and learning, focusing on questions of language, observation, interpretation, and value. Themes include utopias and dystopias, evolution and degeneration, man and machine, entropy and chaos, and the relationship between literary imagination and scientific creativity. Readings include poems, plays, novels, and essays (Shelley, Arnold, Doyle, Poe, Wells, Kafka, Stoppard) alongside a range of scientific writing (Darwin, Huxley, Freud, Gould, James Watson) and philosophy of science (Popper, Feyerabend, Kuhn). Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. LILE

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ENGL 1560S. Forms of American Realism, 1865-1945.

An inquiry into the nature of realism and an examination of its various historical manifestations-literary, legal, political, and aesthetic-between the Civil War and World War II. Authors to be considered include DeForest, Chesnutt, Twain, Howells, Norris, Gilman, Wharton, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Hurston, and Wright. Enrollment limited.

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ENGL 1560T. Literature, Religion, and "Culture Wars" in America.

This course examines important moments where religious and literary histories converge. It reads "classic" American literary works in context of ongoing conflicts between evangelical and secular forces in American life, and it thinks about literature as an arena where these very categories are contested and revised. Major readings will include works by John Winthrop, Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Beecher Stowe, African American women preachers, Emerson, Mark Twain, and Flannery O'Connor. Enrollment restricted.

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ENGL 1560U. Radicals and Conservatives: the later 18th Century.

The relationship between literature and society is demonstrated by conservatives like "Dictionary" Johnson as well as by radicals like visionary Blake. Readings include works by Johnson, Boswell, Burke, Gibbon, Sterne, Burney, Wollstonecraft, Godwin, and Blake. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1560V. The Lives of a Text.

Books are composed not merely of concepts. They are material objects whose forms, functions, and value can vary widely. We will make use of rare editions at the John Hay Library to help us explore both the literary content of works and their production and dissemination in various formats and for various audiences. Authors may include Shakespeare, Poe, and Fitzgerald. Enrollment limited to 15. Not open to first year students.

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ENGL 1560W. Getting Emotional: Passionate Theories.

This course examines connections between emotion, feeling, and affect in several key texts from 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century literatures. We will ask how and why affect becomes a central concept for writers and thinkers in the Enlightenment, and chart the ways in which affect productively opens up onto contemporary theorizations of identity, gender, sexuality, and race. Possible authors include: Wordsworth, Austen, Blake, Equiano, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Wilde, Pater, Kant, Melville, Hofmansthal, Hume. Films by Todd Haynes, McQueen, Campion, Frampton. Theoretical readings by Berlant, Ellison, Terada, Deleuze, Stewart. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. LILE

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ENGL 1560X. Transatlantic America.

What was "transatlantic" culture in colonial and 19th-century America? How did American writers continue to engage and respond to English culture? Franklin, Emerson, Sedgwick, Paine, Addison and Steele, Carlyle, and others. Enrollment limited.

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ENGL 1560Y. The Ethics of Romanticism.

An exploration of the intersections of moral philosophy and Romantic literature and culture. Writers studied may include Smith, Hume, Bentham, Hazlitt, Hegel, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Byron, Godwin, Equiano, Austen. We will consider how writings of the Enlightenment and Romantic period differently reflect upon problems of knowledge, otherness, identity, community, and aesthetics, and how these reflections are related to the ethical imagination. We will also juxtapose our selections with several recent theoretical debates. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

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ENGL 1560Z. Time and Narrative.

This course studies fiction that experiments with the representation of time alongside philosophical and critical texts on the theory of time. We will consider how engagements with the question of time shape the structures, language, characters, plots, themes, and goals of narrative, looking at topics such as time and language, story and narration, memory and history. We will also consider the impact of technological and social developments on the sense of time (the wristwatch, the telegraph, railway timetables). Authors include St. Augustine, Laurence Sterne, John Locke, David Hume, Ambrose Bierce, Charles Dickens, H.G. Wells, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Virginia Woolf. Enrollment limited. LILE

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ENGL 1561C. Swift and His Contemporaries.

Jonathan Swift's works are central to this course's investigation of early 18th-century literature and culture. The reading focuses on the period as an "information age" energized by issues not unlike those of our own time: partisan politics, money, proliferation of new forms of textuality, globalization, changing views on gender and sexuality, love, religion, and war. The emphasis will be on irony, parody, and satire. Other writers include Congreve, Defoe, Manley, Pope, Gay, Montagu, Addison, and Steele. Students who have taken ENGL 1510T may not register for this course. Not open to first-year students or students who have taken ENGL1510T. Enrollment limited.

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ENGL 1561D. Writing and the Ruins of Empire.

An exploration of literary representations of "empire" and "imperialism" from the 18th century to the present. Readings in Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volney's Ruins of Empire, and a wide range of 19th- and 20th-century texts. Some consideration of theories of imperialism and of visual representations of cultures of empire. Enrollment limited to 20. Prior coursework in 18th- and 19th-century literature advised. WRIT

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ENGL 1561E. The Western.

An examination of the formula Western in American fiction, art, and cinema, with a view toward situating the genre within urban middle-class culture in the late 19th- and 20th-century United States. Authors to be considered include Twain, Harte, Crane, Austin, Cather, Doctorow, Reed, Leonard, and L'Amour. Films: Destry Rides Again, Stagecoach, Rio Bravo, The Seven Samurai, Fistful of Dollars, Dirty Harry, The Man from Laramie, Paint your Wagon, Act of Violence, among others. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1561F. Sacred Readings: The Bible, Biblical Interpretation, and Victorian Literature.

Bible reading in terms of apocalyptic and other prophecies permeates Victorian literature, coloring ideas of politics, gender, character, and the arts in ways that seem a secret code. The course therefore reads works by Charlotte Brontë, the Brownings, Carlyle, Hopkins, Newman, the Rossettis, Ruskin, and Swinburne in light of once common ideas of typology, prophecy, and apocalypse. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT

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ENGL 1561G. Swift, Pope, Johnson.

The course provides in-depth study of three major writers of the eighteenth century and will include cultural contexts. Readings include Gulliver's Travels, The Rape of the Lock, and Rasselas. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

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ENGL 1561H. The Brain and the Book: Thinking and Reading in the Victorian Novel.

Considers two nineteenth-century novels in light of theories of cognition, both nineteenth-century and contemporary. This course proposes to study how some of the foundational questions of literary study—the nature of language, the location of meaning, the experience of reading, the power of metaphor, and the sources of creative thought—can also be studied from the perspective of mental science. We will read two Victorian novels in serial installments simultaneously, alongside shorter readings. Limited to juniors and seniors only. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

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ENGL 1561I. Gender, Narrative, and the 19th-Century Novel.

Like Freud, Victorian novelists tell stories of desire that often center on a female character. This seminar examines some of the contexts, conventions, and tensions that go into the making of a "portrait of a lady" in this novelistic tradition. Texts to be studied include Freud's case history Dora, and novels by Brontë, Collins, Eliot, and James. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1561J. The Poetics of Confession.

This course explores the theoretical structures and models of confession in various literary and cinematic sources, with a special emphasis on work from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Authors might include: St. Augustine, Rousseau, De Quincey, Foucault, Wordsworth, Bronte, Wilde. LILE

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ENGL 1561K. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama.

After almost two decades of closure, public theaters re-opened in 1660. This new beginning occasioned new plays, new kinds of performance and production, and new intersections between the stage and society. We will study works by Etherege, Wycherly, Congreve, Dryden, Behn, Gay, Lillo, Sheridan, and others. Not open to first-year students.

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ENGL 1561L. Revolution, War, Poetry: Wordsworth in the 1790s.

William Wordsworth's poetic experiments during the 1790s are often said to have invented modern poetry as the poetry of consciousness; they are also efforts to find language adequate to a time of revolution, war, and modernity. This seminar examines texts by various writers of the revolutionary era, but focuses on Wordsworth's poetry from the early 1790s to the 1805 Prelude. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students.

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ENGL 1561M. American Literature and the Corporation.

A study of the development of the American novel from the Civil War to the present in light of the emergence of the corporation as the principal unit of economic enterprise in the United States. We will survey corporate theory from Lippmann to Collins, and use it to frame the novel's development from realism through modernism into postmodernism. Corporate theorists to be considered: Lippmann, Dewey, Berle, Drucker, Mayo, Demming, Friedman, Coase. Novelists to be considered: Twain, Dreiser, Wharton, Stein, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wright, Ellison, McCullers, Reed, Gaddis, Morrison. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1561S. Gender and Sexuality in Victorian Literature.

This seminar explores the constructions and the highly charged cultural significance of gender and sexuality in the literature of Victorian Britain. Readings include a selection of fiction, poetry, and prose writing by authors such as Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Emily Brontë; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Mary Elizabeth Braddon; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; Robert Louis Stevenson; and Thomas Hardy. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1561T. The Sensational and the Real In Victorian Fiction.

This course will focus on the Victorian novel, which has been called the period’s greatest artistic achievement. In particular we will explore two modes through which novels engaged the turbulent experience of their time: realism and sensation. We will examine how these different novelistic modes tackled the issues of gender, sexuality, class, and personal and community identity. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1561U. Oedipus in Myth, Tragedy, and Theory.

This course is an intensive study of Oedipus Rex, as well as an introduction to the debates and responses it has occasioned. It spans several disciplines, from the classics to philosophy to psychoanalysis to literary theory, following the trajectory of this single figure. Readings: Sophocles, Aristotle, Hegel, Rancière, Girard, Foucault, Freud, and Bernard Williams. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1561V. Literature of the American Renaissance.

A study of American literature in the decades surrounding the Civil War, with a view toward registering the ways in which formal literary innovations interacted with a climate of political upheaval and Constitutional crisis. Authors to be considered include: Douglass, Wilson, Lincoln, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Crafts, Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Alcott, Twain, Stowe, Delaney, and Dickinson. Enrollment limited to 20.

Fall ENGL1561V S01 15721 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (D. Nabers)
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ENGL 1561W. On Being Bored.

This course will explore how and why certain texts and films represent states of non-productivity or non-desire. Beginning with writings from the Enlightenment and Romantic periods, we will move into contemporary theoretical and aesthetic reflections on the links between art and worklessness: narratives with neither progress nor plot, characters that resist characterization, as well as poems and films that resist emphatic assertion and revelation. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL LILE

Spr ENGL1561W S01 24571 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (J. Khalip)
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ENGL 1561X. Dickens.

Charles Dickens is one of the greatest novelists of the nineteenth century and his writings provide a rich resource for understanding both Victorian society and the history of the novel. Novels to be read include Oliver Twist, Little Dorrit, Great Expectations, and Our Mutual Friend. Topics to be explored include comedy, narrative, sexuality and gender roles, capitalism and modernity. Enrollment limited to 20.

Spr ENGL1561X S01 24573 F 3:00-5:30(15) (M. Redfield)
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ENGL 1580. Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures.

Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.

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ENGL 1710A. "Extravagant" Texts: Advanced Studies in Asian American Literatures.

Examines Asian American writings that are difficult, complex, and/or experimental-that are, in Kingston's phrase, "extravagant." Explores the issue of what is at stake-politically and aesthetically-in writing that explicitly challenges the generic conventions with which much Asian American literature is linked: autobiography, the Bildungsroman, ethnography, realism, and sentimentalism.

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ENGL 1710B. American Vertigo: How the World Sees the U.S..

Why does America exercise such an extraordinary attraction for foreign writers? And why, moreover, is the America that appears in those writings so often unrecognizable? This class examines the representation of American life from DeTocqueville to Henry-Levy, looking at work by Amis, Antonioni, Adorno, Nabokov, Kincaid, and others. Two lectures and one discussion meeting weekly. Students will be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 1710C. Race and Nation in American Literture.

From the heyday of literary realism through the rise of modernism, race definitively shaped the national literature of the U.S. This course will consider representations of racial identities in relation to key historical and aesthetic developments within these two periods. Authors include Mark Twain, Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, William Faulkner, and John Fante.

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ENGL 1710D. Anglo-American Nonfiction: Sages, Satirists,and New Journalists.

After examining the relations between fiction and nonfiction, the class will consider the work of Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, and others within contexts created by essayists (Montaigne), satirists (Swift), and Nineteenth-century sages ( Carlyle, Thoreau, Nightingale, and Ruskin). The class will become acquainted with various nonfictional forms including prose satire, the meditative essay, sage-writing, autobiography, and travel literature. WRIT

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ENGL 1710E. Reading Race in Black + Yellow:Comparative Studies in 20th-C African American + Asian American Fictn.

Focusing on pairs of African American and Asian American works that address parallel concerns, we explore the continuities and discontinuities between these literary traditions. Authors we examine may include: James Weldon Johnson and Winnifred Eaton, Richard Wright and Carlos Bulosan, Chang-rae Lee and Toni Morrison, Karen Tei Yamashita and Caryl Phillips.

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ENGL 1710F. Tribe, Nation, and Race in African Fiction.

How do major African novelists represent the interplay of tribe, nation, and race in African societies? This course will introduce students to key themes and contexts of African literature in English. We will read the work of the writers for the historical sources and conceptual implications of these categories in modern Africa. Writers include Achebe, Emecheta, Farah, Ngugi, and Vera. DPLL

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ENGL 1710G. Faulkner.

In examining Faulkner's major works from the early stream-of-consciousness novels through the history-driven and race-inflected texts of the 30s and 40s, this course will evaluate Faulkner's practice as a writer working both in and against Southern culture, and as Modernist writing within an international context. Issues include narrative experimentation, race, class, gender, and the evolution of Faulkner's work. Students should register for ENGL 1710G S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 1710H. Black Internationalism and African American Literature.

The notion that African Americans are an extension of a global racial community has been a fixture of black politics and culture for more than a century. In this course, we will consider how the concept of global racial alliance has shaped black political resistance, literary practice, and critical theory. Likely writers include DuBois, Hughes, McKay, and Wideman. DPLL

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ENGL 1710I. Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture.

The Harlem Renaissance was a remarkable flowering of culture in post-war New York as well as a social movement that advanced political agendas for the nation. This course takes up the relationship between literature and politics by exploring such matters as the urbanization of black America, the representation of the black poor, the influence of white patronage, and the rise of primitivism. Writers may include Hughes, Hurston, Larsen, Fisher, Locke, and McKay. DPLL

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ENGL 1710J. Modern African Literature.

This course considers themes, antecedents, and contexts of modern African literature and related forms. Our readings will include fiction in English or in translation, traditional oral forms like panegyric and festival poetry, and some films. We will examine how these diverse materials explore the interplay of ethnicity, nationality, and race. We will also address the issue of "tradition" in contexts where nationalisms of various stripes are becoming stronger, even as the world becomes more interconnected through trade, immigration, and digital technology. Authors include Achebe, Cole, Dangarembga, Farah, Gordimer, Ngugi, Salih, Soyinka, Wicomb. Films by Blomkamp, Loreau, Sembène. DPLL

Spr ENGL1710J S01 24596 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (O. George)
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ENGL 1710K. Literature and the Problem of Poverty.

Explores poverty as a political and aesthetic problem for the American novelist. Examines the ways that writers have imagined the poor as dangerous others, agents of urban decay, bearers of folk culture, and engines of class revolt. Also considers these literary texts in relation to historical debates about economic inequality. Writers may include Crane, Faulkner, Wright, Steinbeck, and Hurston.

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ENGL 1710M. Nationalizing Narratives: Race, Nationalism, and the 20th-C. American Novel.

An advanced survey that examines how 20th-century American novels construct the nation as "imagined community" and as "fictive ethnicity." We focus on the central role that conceptions of race--as well as those of gender and sexuality--play in the novelistic visions of America projected by such authors as Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner, Jessica Hagedorn, and Chang-rae Lee. Not open to first year students. DPLL WRIT

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ENGL 1710N. Photography and the American Novel.

Traces the impact made by the emerging medium of photography on American fiction from its very beginnings until the present. Our focus will be on the varying strategies adopted by novelists in response to the representational challenges posed by photography. Writers include Hawthorne, Nabokov, Faulkner, Hurston, Citron, Eugenides, and Barthes. Students should register for ENGL 1710N S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 1710O. The Dead and the Living.

Readings in literature, theory, psychoanalysis, philosophy and law examine how the relation between the dead and the living shapes the concerns of modernist narrative and thought. Topics include "Living with the Dead," " Haunting and Knowing," "Writing Lives," "Dreaming and Waking," and "Picturing the Dead." Readings include Joyce, Conrad, Woolf, Forster, and Greene as well as Freud, Lacan, Benjamin, and Barthes.

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ENGL 1710P. The Literature and Culture of Black Power Reconsidered.

This course reexamines the Black Power movement as a signal development in American literature and culture. We will read classics from the period with a view toward reassessing the nuances and complexities of their form and politics. At the same time, we will recover less familiar texts that complicate conventional understandings of what defines this movement. Authors include Malcolm X, Huey P. Newton, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver, John Edgar Wideman, Ernest Gaines, and Amiri Baraka. DPLL

Fall ENGL1710P S01 15746 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (R. Murray)
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ENGL 1710Q. Bloomsbury and Modernism.

The contribution of the avant-garde “Bloomsbury Group” to the development of literary modernism. The focus will be on the central literary figures (Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, and T. S. Eliot), but attention will also be paid to the visual arts (Roger Fry, Vanessa Bell, and Post-Impressionism) and to social criticism (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, and John Maynard Keynes).

Fall ENGL1710Q S01 16322 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (P. Armstrong)
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ENGL 1710R. Recent Experiments in American Fiction.

The premise of this course is that 21st-century American literature is undergoing a renaissance, the unifying quality of which is its exploration of a conceptual space located "on the very edge of fiction," as one writer puts it. We will discuss how and way the ideological threads that once served to connect the practice of literature to the world seem to be fraying. Writers discussed include Ball, Cole, Kushner, Lerner, Lin, Nelson, Robinson. Not open to first-year students.

Spr ENGL1710R S01 24578 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (T. Bewes)
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ENGL 1710S. Writing War.

Examines the challenges that war poses to representation, and particularly to language and literary expression in the modern era. We will focus primarily on the First and Second World Wars, exploring the specific pressures war puts on novels and poetry, as well as on history, psychology, and ethics. Works by Sassoon, Owen, Barbusse, Brittain, Woolf, Rebecca West, Graham Greene, Pat Barker, Marc Bloch.

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ENGL 1710W. Literary Impressionism.

An examination of the role of "literary impressionism" in the transformation of the novel from realism to modernism. Writers studied include Henry James, Joseph Conrad, Stephen Crane, Ford Madox Ford, and Virginia Woolf. Close analysis of their narrative methods for dramatizing consciousness, with attention to the political and ethical implications of impressionism’s focus on the inner life.

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ENGL 1710Y. American Literature and the Cold War.

A study of American literature in the context of the broad intellectual culture--strategic, ideological, philosophical, aesthetic, and economic--engendered by the conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union from 1945 to 1991. We will assess the role of the bomb, McCarthyism, game theory, the military industrial complex, and strategic doctrines of containment and deterrence in the rise of postmodernism in American literature. Authors to be considered include Bellow, Highsmith, Millar, Ellison, McCarthy, Mailer, Pynchon, Wideman, Coover, Delillo. Students should register for ENGL 1710Y S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 1711A. American Poetry II: Modernism.

Study of modernist American poetry. Readings include Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, H.D., Moore, Hughes, and others.

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ENGL 1711B. Modernist Fiction.

Readings in British and American fiction and culture in the early 20th century, with particular attention to the relationships between modernist literary experiment and contemporary questions about empire, race, the changing status of women, and the grounds of literary authority. Writers may include Conrad, H.D., Joyce, Larsen, Lawrence, Rhys, Toomer, Woolf. Two lectures and one discussion meeting weekly. Students will be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.

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ENGL 1711C. Modernist Henry James.

How consciousness knows the world was a topic of endless fascination to Henry James. By dramatizing the workings of consciousness, James transformed the novel and led the way to modernism. In addition to the aesthetic significance of his experiments with point of view, the course will also analyze the ethical consequences of his insistence on life’s ambiguities.

Spr ENGL1711C S01 25573 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (P. Armstrong)
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ENGL 1711E. African American Literature After 1975.

This course examines major authors and currents in African American literary writing from 1975 through the present. The class positions these works in relation to historical developments such as the rise of black nationalism, the evolution of a distinctive black feminist tradition, and the growing social divisions within the African American community. Authors include Toni Morrison, Jamaica Kincaid, Colson Whitehead, and John Wideman. DPLL

Spr ENGL1711E S01 25571 TTh 10:30-11:50(10) (R. Murray)
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ENGL 1711G. Refiguring Expression: The Feeling of Voice in Modern and Contemporary Poetry.

This course will examine how various traditions within modern and contemporary poetry have figured the relationship between poetic voice, affect, and expression and how these considerations of subjectivity have been inflected by procedural or conceptual constraints. Readings will include Dickinson, Stein, Olson, Zukofsky, Niedecker, Hejinian, Carson, Howe, Mayer, Cage, Berssenbrugge, Lin, Rankine, Moten, Dworkin, Acconci, Sedgwick, Ngai and Deleuze. Not open to first-year or sophomore students.

Spr ENGL1711G S01 24575 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (A. Smailbegovic)
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ENGL 1760A. Joyce and Woolf.

Intensive study of two of the most innovative and influential modern British novelists, with an emphasis on the relation between their formal experiments and their political engagements. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1760B. Contemporary African American Literature and the End(s) of Identity.

African American writers and intellectuals have begun to question the wisdom of defining black identity in terms that overemphasize the shared racial and cultural heritage of black people. Course assesses a range of literary and scholarly writing that engages these concerns. Explores such topics as the growing class division among African Americans, the effects of integration, the decline of nationalism, and the visibility of sexual minorities. Likely authors include Johnson, Morrison, Wideman, Beatty, and Senna. Enrollment limited. DPLL LILE

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ENGL 1760C. Body and Event in Contemporary Fiction.

Discusses the recent turn to the body and mortality in contemporary fiction, and considers the proposition that episodes of dismemberment in contemporary fiction stand in for the dismantlement of the literary text itself. Readings include Selby, Ellis, Cooper, Acker, Frame, Deleuze, Butler, Blanchot. Enrollment limited to seniors, juniors, and sophomores. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.

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ENGL 1760D. Race and Detection: American Crime Narratives.

We examine American crime narratives, focusing on their representations of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Writers studied may include James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner, Sue Grafton, Chester Himes, Walter Mosley, and Mark Twain.

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ENGL 1760E. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?.

We will read novels, essays, diaries, and letters by Woolf in order to ask how and why Virginia Woolf haunts our culture and to consider her status as a cultural icon. The seminar will explore her work in the contexts of history, modernism, and literary influences, and it will examine the dimensions of Woolf's afterlife--a posthumous dynamic that shapes issues in art, politics, and gender. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. LILE

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ENGL 1760F. City, Culture, and Literature in the Early Twentieth Century.

How did changes in the city shape early 20th-century literature? How does the literature of this period--whether avant-garde or documentary, progressive or conservative--shape the way we imagine the city? Topics may include urban spectacle, mobility and segregation, the neighborhood and the crowd. Authors include Dos Passos, Eliot, Larsen, Orwell, Woolf, Wright. Prerequisite: two previous literature courses. Priority to English and Urban Studies concentrators.

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ENGL 1760G. American and British Poetry Since 1945.

Study of poetry after 1945. Readings include Bishop, Plath, Ashbery, Merrill, O'Hara, Heaney, Larkin, Walcott, Rich, Dove. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

Spr ENGL1760G S01 25555 F 3:00-5:30(15) (M. Blasing)
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ENGL 1760I. "Terrible Beauty": Literature and the Terrorist Imaginary.

Why does terrorism fascinate literary writers in the modern period? Is terrorism the figure of something that is unrepresentable in fiction, or is it a type of direct political action that fiction writers aspire to? Can literature's humanistic role of allaying terror survive an age of spectacular politics? How susceptible is terrorism to "aestheticization"? Texts will include works by Conrad, Flannery O'Connor, Naipaul, Dennis Cooper, Frantz Fanon, and Ngugiwa Thiong'o. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors, juniors, and sophomores. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. LILE

Spr ENGL1760I S01 24598 M 3:00-5:30(13) (T. Bewes)
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ENGL 1760J. Pynchon and His Precursors.

A study not of how Thomas Pynchon's work has influenced American literature, but of how his novels have influenced the way we read writers who came before him. We will read V and Gravity's Rainbow, as well as work by Borges, Highsmith, Ellison, Nabokov, Fitzgerald, Kafka, and Rilke. Limited to 20 senior and junior concentrators in English and Comparative Literature. Others admitted by permission only.

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ENGL 1760K. Reading New York.

We will explore narratives of New York City, both fictional and nonfictional, from the early 20th century to the present. Topics to be addressed include immigration, segregation and mobility, cosmopolitanism and the neighborhood, celebrity and postmodernism. Authors may include John Dos Passos, Ann Petry, E.B. White, Jane Jacobs, Rem Koolhaas. Registration limited to English and Urban Studies concentrators. Students from other concentrations should attend class on the first day and will be admitted if space is available. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite: two previous literature classes.

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ENGL 1760L. Bloomsbury and Modernism.

This course will explore the contribution of the so-called "Bloomsbury Group" to the development of modernism in Britain. The focus will be on the central literary figures (Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, T. S. Eliot), but attention will also be paid to the visual arts (especially Roger Fry and Post-Impressionism) and social criticism (Lytton Strachey, Leonard Woolf, and John Maynard Keynes). A major question will be how the controversies swirling around Bloomsbury exemplify important debates about modernism. Enrollment limited. Not open to first-year students. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.

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ENGL 1760N. Henry James.

James is a pivotal figure in the history of the novel. His explorations of the workings of consciousness and conventions in representation transformed realism and announced the preoccupation of modernism with interpretation, signs, and narrative experimentation. An intensive study of his most important novels from Daisy Miller to The Golden Bowl.

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ENGL 1760O. American Orientalism.

Examines Orientalism as central motif and thematic concern for American writers from Emerson to DuBois to Kingston. Issues to be addressed include the distinctions between U.S., European, and Afro-Orientalisms; how intra-Asian differences (i.e., China-Japan, East/South Asia) shape conceptions of the Orient; how whiteness and blackness are constructed via a vis yellowness; the relationship between Orientalism and racism; how "nativist" Asian American literary texts, on the one hand, and diasporic texts, on the other, negotiate the legacy of Orientalism. Enrollment limited. DPLL

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ENGL 1760P. "Extravagant" Texts: Experiments in Asian American Writing.

We examine Asian American writings that are difficult, complex, and/or experimental: texts that are, in Maxine Hong Kingston's phrase, "extravagant." By looking at works that explicitly challenge the generic conventions with which much Asian American literature is usually linked--autobiography, the Bildungsroman, ethnography, realism, and sentimentalism--we try to arrive at a more expansive sense of what the ends of Asian American cultural politics might be. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students. DPLL WRIT

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ENGL 1760Q. James Joyce and the Modern Novel.

One measure of James Joyce's achievement as a writer is his influence (as an inspiration, an antagonist, or a competitor) on novelists who came after him. Our primary concern will be with Joyce's formal innovations: How did his audacious narrative experiments transform the novel as a genre? Do his stylistic games break with the realistic tradition or expose its linguistic and epistemological workings? In addition to Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist, and Ulysses, we will read novels by Woolf, Faulkner, Beckett, and Nabokov. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students. Instructor permission required.

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ENGL 1760R. The Roaring Twenties.

The 1920s crystallized much of what we consider modern in 20th-century U. S. culture. This course reads literature of the decade in the context of a broader culture, including film and advertising, to analyze the period's central features: the rise of mass culture and of public relations, changes in women's position, consumerism, car culture, nativism and race relations. Writers include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Larsen, Toomer, Parker. First-year students and students who have taken ENGL 0650K may not register for this course. Enrollment limited.

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ENGL 1760S. Law and Literature: From Response to Responsibility.

Explores modernism as it is shaped by the normative and ethical concerns of a rapidly changing world through literary works, legal writing, and legal opinions. Examines the conceptual, psychological and rhetorical connections between literature and law, and considers how both disciplines shape the imagination but also aim to elicit response and responsibility. Authors include Walter Benjamin, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, Chinua Achebe; legal texts include Blackstone, Holmes, Bentham, Cover and a number of legal opinions. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

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ENGL 1760T. The Texts of Africa.

This seminar considers the various ways in which “Africa” has been depicted in fictional and non-fictional writing from the nineteenth-century on. We begin with classic travel writing by European missionaries (Park, Livingstone, Moffat), and their African and black diasporic counterparts (Crowther, Freeman, Sims, Soga). We then turn to twentieth-century literature and non-fiction (Abrahams, Conrad, Dinesen, Greene, Ndebele, Wright), closely following the rhetorical devices used to evoke the continent as geographical or subjective reality. We will pay particular attention to questions of history, linguistic representation, and the vagaries of intercultural encounter. DPLL

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ENGL 1760V. Lying, Cheating, and Stealing.

Explores literature's treatment of transgressions large and small, with particular attention to the way in which modernist narratives expose, obstruct, condone, or condemn acts of wrongdoing. What is the relationship between a misdeed and its retelling? Does writing right the story of a wrong? Readings from Rousseau, Graham Greene, Oscar Wilde, Lauren Slater, Nietzsche, Freud, as well as film, television, and select readings from law. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. LILE

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ENGL 1760X. The Men's Film, c. 2011.

It’s been said that there’s no such thing as “the men’s film,” only cinema and the subgenre of “the women’s film” (or “weepy”). This seminar reopens that question by focusing on genres (gross-out, bromance, coming of age, war) addressed to male audiences and concerned with men in unusual, even extreme circumstances. Films: The Hangover (1-2); Bridesmaids (female gross-out); Far From Heaven; Magic Mike; The D-Train; Boyhood; American Sniper. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENGL1760X S01 15723 W 3:00-5:30(17) (R. Rambuss)
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ENGL 1761A. Nationalizing Narratives: Advanced Studies in the Twentieth-Century U.S. Novel.

Focuses on the complex relationship between the genre of the novel and nationalist rhetorics in the modern U.S. Gives particular attention to how literary discourses of nationalism articulate with those of race, gender, and sexuality.

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ENGL 1761C. Race, Writing, Manhood:Rhetorics of the "Authentic" in 20th-Cent African + Asian American Literature.

Explores the interrelatedness of racial, sexual, and literary identity in works by U.S. black and Asian male writers. Particular interest given to how the issue of homosocial desire frames literary accounts of racial authenticity. Writers and theorists studied may include James Baldwin, Frank Chin, Ralph Ellison, Frantz Fanon, David Henry Hwang.

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ENGL 1761L. Reading the Black Masses in Literature and Critical Practice.

African American literary and critical practice in the twentieth century was definitively shaped by claims about the linkages between literature and mass politics. We will unpack the continuities and divides that constituted such assertions. Historical nodal points in our investigations will include racial uplift, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Power Movement, and the post-identity debates.

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ENGL 1761M. Asian American Travel Narratives.

Examines mobility and movement as key motifs in Asian American fiction. The course will focus on Asian American literary texts that are structured around travel, both in relation to the United States and to Asia. Our approach will draw from Americanist and Asian Americanist cultural theories about narratives of mobility and from postcolonial theories about travel writing. Enrollment limited. DPLL

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ENGL 1761N. Natural and Supernatural: Issues in the Study of Science and Religion.

Religion has been studied in a number of fields (anthropology, classics, history, philosophy, psychology, sociology) as a complex of human/cultural phenomena to be examined and explained naturalistically or, as it is said, "scientifically." The course focuses on a set of key classic and contemporary texts in this tradition and on the issues they raise for current understandings of science, religion and the relations--historical, intellectual, cultural and political--between them. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. LILE

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ENGL 1761O. "Everything that is must be destroyed": American Modernism.

This class will attempt to discover whether there is such a thing as American modernism, examining the connections between works and movements as different as Gertrude Stein's highly experimental Three Lives, the Harlem Renaissance (Larsen, Hurston), American Gothic (Anderson, Faulkner), social realism (Wharton, Wright), the cosmopolitan fiction of Fitzgerald and Hemingway, and the proto-postmodern work of Barnes and West. Enrollment limited.

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ENGL 1761P. Yeats, Pound, Eliot.

Readings in the poetry and selected prose of Yeats, Pound, and Eliot. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE

Fall ENGL1761P S01 16740 F 3:00-5:30(11) (M. Blasing)
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ENGL 1761Q. W. G. Sebald and Some Interlocutors.

The works of W. G. Sebald have received a huge amount of critical attention since his death in 2001, particularly from critics interested in the question of the ethics of literature after Auschwitz. But what is Sebald’s literary heritage, and who are his interlocutors? What internal and external connections do his works establish? Besides Sebald’s works, readings will include Stendhal, Kafka, Walser, Borges, Bergson, Resnais, Lanzmann. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students.

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ENGL 1761R. The Non-Fiction of "Race" in 20th-Century US Culture.

This course examines influential autobiographies and other non-fictional literary works about the meaning of race in America across the 20th century. Writers we examine may include W.E.B. DuBois, Sui Sin Far, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Momaday, Richard Rodriguez, Maxine Hong Kingston, Richard Rodriguez, and Malcom X. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL LILE WRIT

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ENGL 1761S. The Fifties in Color: Race, Empire, and the U.S. Cold War Culture.

In this seminar, we examine a range of cultural texts of the 1950s that provide some productive points of entry into the study of U.S. culture in the early part of the Cold War. We give particular attention to issues of race and ethnicity as they were shaped both by domestic and foreign policy concerns. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL LILE

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ENGL 1761T. Conrad and Naipaul: The Supremacy of the Visible?.

The reception of Conrad's works turns on a critical quandary: are his commitments primarily sensory, celebratory and imperialist, or conceptual, subdued and self-critical? This course will examine Conrad's works in detail, and the critical and literary responses to them: most notably, the work of his most direct successor, the British-Caribbean novelist V. S. Naipaul. Other readings include Said, Achebe, Jameson, Badiou, Rancière, Deleuze. Enrollment limited. Not open to first-year students. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. LILE

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ENGL 1761V. The Korean War in Color.

We examine US and South Korean representations of the Korean War. We look at how this event was depicted in US films of the 1950s with a focus on how it occasioned a transformation of American understandings of race, both domestically and transnationally. We then look at how this event has been memorialized by contemporary American authors as well as in South Korean literature and film. Authors we read include: Susan Choi, Ha Jin, Chang-rae Lee, Toni Morrison, Jayne Anne Phillips and Hwang Sok-Yong. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students. DPLL LILE WRIT

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ENGL 1761W. Modern South Asia: Literature and Theory.

This seminar provides an overview of 20th and 21st century writing from and about South Asia. It will serve, in addition, as an introduction to postcolonial studies. Theoretical readings will focus on issues of diaspora; transnational cultural circulation; and subaltern historiography. Fiction will be primarily Anglophone (Anand, Du Bois, Forster, Naipaul, Rushdie, etc.), with some vernacular texts in translation (Chugtai, Limbale, Premchand, Tagore). Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL

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ENGL 1761Y. Issues in World Literature.

What is world literature? How does it relate to fields like comparative literature and postcolonial studies? We will read fiction and drama usually featured in this canon, including works by Achebe, Coetzee, Homer, Kafka, Rushdie, Shikibu, and Walcott. We will also attend to the critical paradigms that constitute the field, from Goethe's Weltliteratur to more recent theorizations by Casanova, Damrosch, Deleuze, Moretti, Spivak, etc. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students. DPLL

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ENGL 1762A. Perverse Cinema.

A seminar on movies that pursue and spectacularize the perverse, as well as on how viewing movies is itself a perverse pleasure. We will study film genres that traffic in what's sensational, excessive, uncanny, and transgressive, such as the detective film, thriller, melodrama, sex film, horror, and sci-fi. Special emphasis on the movies of Hitchcock, Kubrick, Lynch, and Cronenberg. Enrollment limited to 20 concentrators in English, Comparative Literature, MCM, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Theatre and Performance Studies. Not open to first year students.

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ENGL 1762B. The Ekphrastic Mode in Contemporary Literature.

Ekphrasis – the extended description of a visual work of art in a work of literature – is as old as Homer and as modern as McEwan; however, in contemporary literary criticism the concept has been eclipsed by terms such as "self-reflexivity" and "metafiction." This course proposes a rediscovery of ekphrasis as a key feature of contemporary works of literature and film. Includes texts by Sebald, Alan Bennett, Godard, Starnone, Panahi, McEwan. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students.

Fall ENGL1762B S01 15748 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (T. Bewes)
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ENGL 1780. Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures.

Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.

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ENGL 1900A. "Literature" and the Ideology of the Aesthetic.

Theoretical and historical analysis of the idea of "literature" as writing that has the status of art, in relation to the emergence and elaboration of discourses of the "aesthetic." Readings in 18th- and 19th-century German and British sources (Kant, Schiller, Hegel, Nietzsche; Coleridge, Shelley, Arnold, Wilde) and in 20th-century literary and aesthetic theory (Benjamin, Adorno, Barthes, Foucault, Derrida, Williams, Eagleton). Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to English concentrators. All other students must obtain instructor's permission.

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ENGL 1900D. Literature and Politics.

Literature as a changing historical formation that often represents and is always shaped by the practices of organizing, asserting, and controlling power in society. Sustained focus on writings by Raymond Williams, Leon Trotsky, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Terry Eagleton, and on literary texts read from the perspectives of these six theorists (possibly Shakespeare, Milton, Marvell, Swift, Dickens, Gaskell, the Brontës, Victor Serge, Anna Akhmatova). Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT

Fall ENGL1900D S01 15749 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (W. Keach)
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ENGL 1900E. Aesthetics and Politics.

Considers the shifting relationship between art and politics beginning with the formation of aesthetics in the Enlightenment and continuing through such 20th-century historical moments as Naziism, modernism, impressionism, socialist realism, postmodernism, and such thinkers as Kant, Hegel, Marx, Adorno, Lyotard, Cixous, Deleuze. LILE

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ENGL 1900F. Interpretation.

This course will introduce students to the central issues in the theory of interpretation and their implications for critical practice. Topics will include the causes and consequences of interpretive conflict, the availability of tests for validity, the roles of the author and the reader, and the historical, social, and political dimensions of understanding. Readings will include major theoretical statements as well as critical essays and background materials related to three controversial novels.

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ENGL 1900I. Critical Methodologies: Contemporary Literary Theory.

A survey of theories of literature from the early 20th century to the present, with particular attention to relations between "literary theory" and the broader phenomena of cultural studies and Critical Theory writ large. We will examine the New Critics; structuralism, post-structuralism and new historicism; cultural theory, including psychoanalysis, marxism, and aesthetic theory. Topics will include literariness and textuality, the reader and subjectivity, narrative and mimesis, and the reemergence of form in contemporary literary studies. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year or graduate students.

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ENGL 1900J. Zoopoetics.

This course will explore the intersections between the depictions of plants and animals in twentieth and twenty-first century poetry and the theoretical conversations about non-human worlds unfolding in emerging fields, such as animal studies and the environmental humanities. Readings will range from poetic texts by Francis Ponge and Marianne Moore to theoretical texts by figures such as Donna Haraway. There will be periodic mandatory film screenings.

Spr ENGL1900J S01 24659 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (A. Smailbegovic)
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ENGL 1900L. The Problem of American Literature.

Considers questions such as: what are the distinctive qualities (if any) of American literature, and how do the various writers from diverse cultural settings fit into a single literary tradition called "American" (or do they fit in)? In order to examine the assumptions and implications of studying literature as a national phenomenon, focuses reading on various critical and theoretical texts.

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ENGL 1900M. Twentieth-Century Reconceptions of Knowledge and Science.

Significant critiques of classic and prevailing (rationalist, realist, positivist) ideas of scientific truth, method, objectivity, and progress and the development of alternative (constructivist, pragmatist, historicist, sociological) accounts; the dynamics of knowledge; the relation between scientific and other cultural practices. Readings include works by Fleck, Popper, Kuhn, Foucault, Rorty, and Latour. Prerequisite: UC 49 (An Introduction to Science Studies) or college-level work in critical theory, science, or philosophy.

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ENGL 1900O. Contemporary Feminist Literary Theory.

An advanced survey of 20th-century feminist literary theory with an emphasis on U.S., British, and French traditions. Topics include canon formation, "resisting readers," and the category of "women's writing," as well as the relation of feminist criticism to problematics such as critical race theory, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, and postcolonialism.

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ENGL 1900P. History of Criticism from Plato to Postmodernism.

A survey of the major theorists of literature in the western tradition, from the Greeks to the contemporary period. Recurrent issues will include the definition of literary value, the distinctiveness of the aesthetic experience, and the moral and social uses of literature. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.

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ENGL 1900Q. Women In/And the Novel.

An introduction to the novel through feminist theory, considering social and historical reasons why women read, wrote, and figured in novels, from the 18th century to the 20th. Novels by Defoe, Austen, George Eliot, Rhys, Woolf; readings in feminist theory and criticism. Priority will be given to concentrators in English and Gender Studies. Others will be admitted only with permission of the instructor.

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ENGL 1900R. Queer Relations: Aesthetics and Sexuality.

A study of the relationship between aesthetic thought and sexuality in a variety of literary and cinematic works. We will supplement our readings with ventures into queer theory, emphasizing how art is related to identity, community, race, gender, and ethics. Authors include Wilde, Pater, James, Winterson, Cole, Guibert, Foucault, Bersani, Edelman. Films by Julien and Jarman. DPLL

Fall ENGL1900R S01 15750 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (J. Khalip)
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ENGL 1900T. The Postcolonial and the Postmodern.

Explores the contexts and conceptual implications of theories of postmodernism and postcolonialism. Particular attention to intersections and disjunctions between both concepts as attempts to grapple with the challenges of modernity from the vantage point of the late-20th century. Course will end with two novels that address related issues with the tools of fictional narrative: Coetzee's Foe and Rushdie's Midnight's Children. Readings include: Butler, Hall, Jameson, Laclau, Lyotard, Spivak. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1900U. Word and Image.

How do words and images represent? This course will examine major statements about the relation between verbal and visual representation from Lessing's classic study Laocoön to contemporary theories of the semiotic and social construction of images. Theoretical readings will be accompanied by analyses of examples from literature and the visual arts, ranging from painting to film and graphic novels. Not open to first-year students. Banner registration after classes begin requires instructor approval.

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ENGL 1900V. Camera Works: The Theory and Fiction of Photography.

This class focuses both on literature influenced by and theoretical considerations of photography. Texts and films to include Barthes' Camera Lucida, essays by Benjamin, Kracauer, and Krauss, Cortazar’s "Blow-Up," Antonioni's Blow-Up, Fitzgerald's Tender is the Night, Sebald's The Emigrants, West's The Day of the Locust, Frampton's Nostalgia, Egoyan's Calendar, Rancière's The Future of the Image, and poetry by Rich, Ashbery, and Larkin. Not open to first-year students and sophomores. Open to English concentrators only.

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ENGL 1900Y. Medieval Manuscript Studies: Paleography, Codicology, and Interpretation.

How do you read a medieval manuscript? This course teaches hands-on methodologies for deciphering the material text, including palaeography (history of scripts) and codicology (archeology of the book); contemporary models of interpreting scribal texts, including editorial theory and analysis of readers' reception; and medieval concepts of textuality and interpretation, including medieval theories of authorship and the arts of memory. Prior course work in Middle English or Latin or other medieval language recommended. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.

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ENGL 1900Z. Neuroaesthetics and Reading.

Analysis of the theories of art, reading, and aesthetic experience proposed by neuroscience and cognitive science in light of traditional aesthetics and contemporary literary theory. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: At least one course on neuroscience or cognitive science and one 1000-level literature course. Instructor permission required.

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ENGL 1901E. Literature and the Digital Humanities.

We will explore the implications of using digital technologies to study literature. How does our understanding of literature and literary study change—if it does—in light of recently developed digital methods for studying such works? How do such methods compare with traditional ways of studying literature? How might literary studies be reconceived in relation to new media studies? Enrollment limited to 20.

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ENGL 1901F. Art of Criticism.

This course explores the art of literary criticism through analysis of individual critics as well as larger schools of criticism. Focusing on the twentieth century, we will read works by those affiliated with high theory as well as those who stood outside that influential development. The goal will be to understand literary criticism as a form of thinking, and an art, in its own right, one with philosophical, social, and literary dimensions. Authors include: Oscar Wilde, Kenneth Burke, Mary McCarthy, Lionel Trilling, Raymond Williams, Paul de Man, Eve Sedgwick, D. A. Miller, John Guillory. Enrollment limited to 20.

Spr ENGL1901F S01 25572 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (A. Anderson)
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ENGL 1910A. Dreamworlds: Utopia from Plato to the Present.

Can acts of writing change the world? This course looks at a number of famous utopias and dystopias from classical time to the modern period and analyzes how the genre's literary experiments transform reading into a political act. Works by Plato, More, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Swift, H.G. Wells, and Le Guin. Films will include Blade Runner and Pleasantville.

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ENGL 1910B. Great Books and Good Movies.

Since the first silent pictures, the film industry has turned to "great books." This course uses films based on "great books" to examine differences between the genres. Frequent screenings; reading and screen journals; critical essays and screenplays. Films/texts include Sense and Sensibility, Great Expectations, Beloved, and The English Patient.

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ENGL 1910E. Lyric Language: Renaissance Forms and Modern Poetry.

Tracing poetic forms from renaissance to modern-- stubborn models like the sonnet (Shakespeare/Berryman), the ode (Jonson/ Creely), and the sestina (Sidney/Bishop); soft forms like blank/free verse (Milton/Wordsworth/Eliot); generic containers like elegy, epigram, and satire (Herrick/Donne/Keats/Auden); low and nonsense verse (Skelton/Caroll/hip-hop); and the functions of repeatable forms like line and stanza (Spenser/Tennyson/Dr. Suess/Heijinian). LILE

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ENGL 1950A. Form and Feeling in Renaissance Poetry.

Pending Approval. Renaissance poets laid claim to the ethical power of poetry to move people through imagination. How does formal imitation and innovation create fields of feeling in the poetry of Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, and Milton? Enrollment limited to 20 seniors.

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ENGL 1950B. Literature and the Ideology of the Aesthetic.

Pending Approval. Theoretical and historical exploration of the idea of literature understood as writing that has the status of art--and of the relation of this idea to the emergence and elaboration of discourses of the aesthetic. First six weeks: decisive eighteenth- and nineteenth-century developments in the meaning of literature as it relates to the aesthetic. Second six weeks: recent positions (espeically poststructuralist and Marxist) that figure prominently in current debates. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors.

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ENGL 1990. Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing.

Independent writing project under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Director for Nonfiction Writing. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose application to the Honors in Nonfiction Writing program have been accepted.

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ENGL 1991. Senior Honors Seminar in English.

Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC

Fall ENGL1991 S01 15751 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (T. Katz)
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ENGL 1992. Senior Honors Thesis in English.

Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENGL1992 S01 15753 Arranged (T. Katz)
Spr ENGL1992 S01 24616 Arranged (T. Katz)
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ENGL 1993. Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing.

This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENGL1993 S01 15764 M 3:00-5:30(15) (C. Imbriglio)
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ENGL 1994. Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing.

Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENGL1994 S01 15765 Arranged (C. Imbriglio)
Spr ENGL1994 S01 24614 Arranged (C. Imbriglio)
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ENGL 2360A. Renaissance Drama.

This course explores Early Modern drama: its styles of representation, material conditions, and political engagements, in Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster, Ford, Beaumont and Fletcher, and others. Drawing on current scholarship, it posits the stage as the site of contests over national identity, royal power, gender ideology, social mobility, nascent capitalism, religious and ethnic differences. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students. Undergraduate English concentrators may request permission of the instructor.

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ENGL 2360B. Before Holinshed: The English Brut Chronicle Tradition.

Holinshed's 16th-century history drew from 400 years of manuscript chronicles, most in verse, which founded the "modern" history of England on a Trojan/Celtic ancient Britain. We will read the medieval versions of these historical narratives from Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wace, and Layamon to the popular 15th-century Middle English prose Brut. Critical engagements with manuscript/print cultures and the "Brut" narrative as a vocabulary for nationalism. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360C. Beowulf.

This course will consist of a careful reading and analysis of Beowulf in its original language. In addition to developing language competence, we will also discuss the poem through comparison to other Old English poems and Scandinavian analogues. Themes will include the manuscript context, heroism, gender, sacrifice, lamentation and elegy, the monstrous, material culture, and contemporary theoretical approaches to the poem. Prerequisite: 2000-level Introduction to Old English or its equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360D. Early Modern Drama.

An intensive introduction, for specialists and others, to the great classics and some less-known gems of a stellar period in English drama. Plays by Marlowe, Middleton, Webster, Jonson, and Ford, among others. Topics: the popular theatre and its audience; urban culture; English nationhood; boy actors and the representation of gender and sexuality; play texts in print culture. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360F. Introduction to Medieval Studies.

Equips students with critical, linguistic, and historical knowledge to interpret Middle English texts (1066-1500). Primary texts by Chaucer and others, to be read in contexts of current critical debates (on topics including textuality, sexuality, and political formations) and medieval conceptual systems (including dream theory, alchemy, arts of memory). Priority to graduate students; no prior Middle English required. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360G. Medieval Manuscript Studies: Paleography and Interpretation.

How to read and understand a medieval manuscript text. Methodologies include paleography, codicology, editorial theory. Hands-on analysis and interpretation of specific Middle English texts in their manuscript medium (in microfilm, facsimile, digital representation, and when accessible, actual manuscripts). For students already acquainted with Old English and/or Middle English; Latin helpful. Textual projects in other medieval languages possible with instructor's consent. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360H. Race and Place in Renaissance Literature.

Reads early modern English drama, poetry, and prose depicting the migration of groups to foreign places (England, the Indies, the Americas) to consider how such writing defines the connection between space and identity. We will consider how this literature values environment as against blood, soil against seed, as determinants of identity capable of marking people as "strange," "alien," or "natural." Authors will include Marlowe, Shakespeare, Fletcher, Massinger, Drayton, Jonson, and Bacon. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students. All others will be admitted only with permission of the instructor.

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ENGL 2360I. Renaissance Embodiments.

Considers Renaissance representations of self in pre-modern terms-that is, inseparable from the physical conditions of climate and region. How did early modern culture draw the line between culture and nature? Where do these theories connect with or depart from modern paradigms of self in such authors as Elyot, Shakespeare, Calvin, Luther, Burton, Donne, Montaigne, Jonson, and Browne? Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360K. The Renaissance and Modernity.

Modernism restages 17th-century cultural and political revolution and restoration. An examination of the problem of style and modernity, looking at practices in poetic and prose style and at the emergence of the term "modernity" at the moment of high modernism and after. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360N. The Pearl Manuscript in Context.

Close translation of the Middle English alliterative poems in British Library Manuscript Cotton Nero A.x, Pearl, Cleanness, Patience, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, with attention to their medieval theological, generic, and codicological contexts. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360O. Irony and Satire.

Works of irony and satire (from the Civil Wars to the death of Swift) allow an investigation of current issues in the study of Civil War, Restoration, and Early 18th-C. texts, including revisionist history, the public sphere, Anglo-Irish relations, print culture, mercantilism, and gender construction. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2360P. Thinking with Romance in the Renaissance.

Modernity defines romance as escapist, a mode that flies from the "real." Yet Renaissance writers placed it at the center of debates about politics, ethics, and knowledge. Tracking its generic fingerprint in Spenser's romance-epic, we will consider its adaptation for the stage as tragicomedy and its relation to epistemological shifts dividing science from fiction, knowledge from pleasure. Authors include Ralegh, Spenser, Shakespeare, Fletcher, Massinger, Bacon, Cavendish. Open to graduate students only.

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ENGL 2360Q. Manuscript, Image, and the Middle English Text.

This seminar will engage with the interpretive issues raised by considering manuscript images in relation to manuscript text. Selected Middle English texts will include Pearl, works by Chaucer, and the popular Middle English prose Brut, in the context of twelve historiated manuscripts of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2360R. Civil Wars, Restoration, and Early Georgian Literature.

The seminar will consider major works from the English Civil Wars to the first years of the eighteenth-century, with attention to cultural and theoretical contexts for understanding important developments such as print culture, war, nation-formation, the marketplace, and public/private spheres. Writers will include Milton, Rochester, Behn, Restoration playwrights, Dryden, Swift, and others. Additional readings will include selections from Adorno, Pocock, Anderson, Zizek, Brown, Johns, and others. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2360S. Alternative Miltons.

This seminar undertakes a close reading of Milton's monumentally significant epic "Paradise Lost." We will also consider the current state of Milton criticism. What's new in Milton criticism? What approaches have been holding fort? Has Milton criticism been slower to take to critical and theoretical innovation than Shakespeare criticism? If so, why, and what might we do about it? On that account, the seminar will engage a range of newer approaches—disability studies, queer theory, trauma theory, eco-criticism, animal studies, technoculture studies, and popular culture studies—to consider what they have to offer by way of new perspectives on Milton. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

Spr ENGL2360S S01 24207 W 3:00-5:30(14) (R. Rambuss)
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ENGL 2360Z. Shakespeare: a Politics of Love.

This seminar will explore certain of Shakespeare’s plays—mainstays such as Romeo and Juliet and Othello but also more marginal texts, such as All’s Well and As You Like It—in order to discern a politics of love. Enrollment limited to 15.

Fall ENGL2360Z S01 15463 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Kuzner)
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ENGL 2380. Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures.

Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.

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ENGL 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall ENGL2450 S01 14727 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENGL 2560A. American Exotics.

From the beginning of colonization all the way up to the American Revolution, America is consistently figured as a remote and alien place. We will explore the figurative transformation of "America" by examining the use of images of the "remote" and "exotic" in British American colonial writing, including poems, plays, maps, travel narratives and natural histories. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560C. Early American Studies.

A critical introduction for graduate students to the scholarly field of early American studies, from the colonial era to the late 19th century. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560E. Liberalism.

An interdisciplinary approach to American culture and literary history through the lens of liberal ideologies. Readings include Franklin, Thoreau, sentimental novel, and Ellison’s Invisible Man. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students. Exceptions with permission by instructor.

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ENGL 2560F. Realism.

Begins with European theories of realism, including Lukacs, Watt, Jameson, and others, who define realism by linking it to some aspect of modernization. Moves to theories that expose the limits of classical realism in the name of someone as some aspect of history it systematically subordinates or excludes, e.g., women, colonial subjects, minority cultures. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560G. Romantic Orientalism.

Representations of the "Orient" in British and transatlantic literary culture during the "Romantic" period (c. 1770-c. 1830). Connections between cultural representation and both assertions of and challenges to British colonial and imperial power. Theoretical, historical and political analysis by Said, Barrell, and others; poetry by Coleridge, Southey, Byron, P.B.Shelley; prose by Sydney Owenson, Charlotte Dacre, Thomas DeQuincey. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560H. Romanticism and the Ideology of the Aesthetic.

Historical development of discourses of the "aesthetic" as they relate to the problem of "romanticism" as the name of a distinctive era in British and European literature and culture. Ideas about the autonomy of art in the period of the French and the Industrial Revolutions. Readings in Baumgarten, Kant, and Hegel; in Coleridge, W. Wordsworth, P. B. Shelley, and Keats. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560K. The Transatlantic Enlightenment.

A graduate seminar in literatures and cultures of the long 18th century in transatlantic context. Emphasis on print culture, the Black Atlantic, colonialism and slavery, as well as the American Revolution. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560L. The Victorian Novel.

An intensive seminar on the Victorian novel. The aim will be historically contextualized, theoretically informed interpretations of some leading examples of this complex literary form. Will focus on the role of the (British) novel, as distinct from the (American) short story, in rise of mass culture, and on recent formalist, stylistic, and historical approaches to the Victorian novel as a literary form. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560N. American Literature and the Corporation.

An examination of 19th-century American literature in the context of the rapid growth of corporate forms in American economic, political, and social life from the mid-1830s through the turn of the century. How does literature participate in the debate this process of incorporation occasioned, and in what ways was it shaped by the process of incorporation occasioned, and in what ways was it shaped by the process? Readings include Hawthorne, Melville, Harper, Grant, Alcott, Crane, and Chestnutt. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560Q. Victorian Fictions of Consciousness.

Victorian novels, Brontë through James, with an emphasis on the ways in which novels engage 19th-century theories of mind and psychology, looking at such central concepts as memory, will, sensation, and perception. Examines the importance of form and the subgenres of Victorian fiction (Bildungsroman, sensation novel, multiplot novel) in the construction of concepts of selfhood and consciousness. Attention also to the place of consciousness in Victorian and 20th-century theories of the novel. This course will also serve as an introduction to working on topics in science and literature. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560R. Romantic Dispossession: Subjectivity and Agency.

This course examines the diverse arguments made by writers of the Romantic era concerning nonidentity, and focuses on the kinds of ethical, political, and aesthetic considerations that arise once identity is forfeited and dispossession is perceived as either a matter of self-discipline, the negative result of sympathy, a characteristic of literary culture, or a sign of melancholic loss. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students. Undergraduate seniors will be admitted only with the permission of the instructor.

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ENGL 2560T. The Realist Imagination.

A study of American literary realism. We will situate realism in the context of the realist turn in American artistic, political, legal, and economic enterprise from the Civil War to World War II, and measure the realist novel's relations to alternative aesthetic ideologies such as transcendentalism, regionalism, naturalism, and modernism. Authors to be considered include Emerson, DeForest, Grant, Twain, Cable, Chesnutt, Dreiser, Wharton, Cather, Anderson, Dos Passos, Faulkner, and Hurston. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560U. Romanticism and the Ruins of Empire.

Representations of the ruins of ancient empires (Babylonian, Assyrian, Roman) in relation to British and French imperialism during the period we call "Romanticism." Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560V. Transatlantic Studies.

This course offers a theoretical and historical examination of "translatlantic" models of literary analysis as an alternative to traditionally national ones. It will look at a recent criticism theorizing the field, including both literary and historical scholarship. Primary readings will be from Rowson, Equiano, Franklin, Emerson, and Twain, among others. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560W. The Figure of the Artist in the Nineteenth Century.

This course considers the changing representations of the artist in the 19th century, as prophet, intellectual, professional, critic, genius, madman, aesthete, and social celebrity. Readings will focus on 19th-century novels, with select essays, reviews, and other nonfiction prose. Authors include George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, Arnold Bennett, George Gissing, H. G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw, Oscar Wilde. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560X. The Rise of the Novel.

The seminar would combine the study of eighteenth-century novels [some canonical, like Robinson Crusoe, Clarissa, Tom Jones, and Tristram Shandy; some less so, like amatory fiction and revolutionary fiction of the 1790's] with important theories of and debates about the novel — its origins, rise, and discourses. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2560Y. Writing the Ruins of Empire: Romantic Cultural Property.

British literary responses to the shifting significance and value status of ancient artifacts and works of art in the period of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars. Ruins as "cultural property," "cultural capital," and "aesthetic object"--then and now. Effects of colonial expansion and imperialist rivalry on collecting, connoisseurship, the advent of public museums, the marketing of antiquities, the marketing of literature. Primary readings in Gibbon, Volney, Byron, P.B. Shelley, Mary Shelley, Anna Barbauld, Felicia Hemans, Hazlitt, Keats.

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ENGL 2560Z. Global Early American Literature.

What does American literature before 1860 look like viewed from a global perspective? Our goal will be to see what specifically literary problems and questions came into focus when we read American literature in terms of economic, social, philosophic, and ideological issues that extend across the globe. Authors may include John Smith, Anne Bradstreet, Charles Brockden Brown, and Herman Melville. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2561A. Manifest Destinies: Liberalism and Expansion in American Literature, 1820-1920.

An investigation of the relations between American literature and the territorial expansion of the United States from the early 19th century through World War I. Topics include the role of liberalism in the rise and operation of American expansion, the relationship between colonialist and imperialist visions of America's manifest destiny, the ideological implications of literary genres of open space (the western, the sea narrative), race and the patterns of internal migration in the United States, and the connection between the Turner thesis and literary form (Howellsian realism, Whitman's poetics and Dickinson's anti-poetics, Jewett's regionalism). Authors include Cooper, Poe, Melville, Douglass, Craft, Whitman, Dickinson, James, Jewett, and Twain. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2561B. Things Not Entirely Possessed: Romanticism and History.

This course explores how Romanticism thinks through the historical, and in particular, it engages Romantic mediations of historical knowledge through aesthetic form. What is the relationship of the aesthetic to the historical? How is subjectivity an effect of a poem’s negotiation of the past? And what role does the "future" play in Romanticism? Authors will include Liu, Pfau, Levinson, McGann, Goodman, Chandler, Ferris, Pyle.

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ENGL 2561C. Intellectuals and the Public Sphere.

Considers the relationship of the artist to the public sphere, focusing on the late nineteenth century. We will look back from debates today over the "public intellectual" to Victorian debates over the "intellectual." Attention to how narratives of intellectual decline in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries portray the figure of the artist: as prophet, intellectual, professional, critic, genius, woman, madman, aesthete, scientist, and social celebrity. Readings will include literary writers and essayists (such as Dickens, Trollope, James, Pater, Shaw, Wilde, Wells), alongside theorists (Humboldt, Weber, Brecht, Benjamin, Habermas, Bourdieu, Latour, Kittler). Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2561L. Nature and Law in American Literature.

This course will explore how American authors registered the transformation of natural history into the sciences of life. It will pay special attention to how new sciences of life influenced the legal and political practices that constitute our understanding of personhood. It will explore how sciences and emerging experimental medicine competed with discourses of the supernatural in deciding who has the right to live and die.

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ENGL 2561N. Studying American Literature in a Digital Age.

How might scholars navigate the digital technologies increasingly used by humanists to access, archive, and study literary (and related) material in the information age? We’ll consider how our understanding of literature and literary study changes—if it does—in light of the digital turn and investigate how literary studies might be reconceived in light of the digital revolution. Enrollment limited to 15.

Fall ENGL2561N S01 15464 M 3:00-5:30(15) (J. Egan)
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ENGL 2561O. The Romantic Detail.

This course reads texts from the Romantic archive that provide a staging ground for the ethics, aesthetics, and politics of the detail. We will explore how a detail can move from part to whole, inconsequentiality to consequence, revelation and reticence, as well as become a sign of gender difference, sexual dissidence, and racial ambiguity. Enrollment limited to 15.

Fall ENGL2561O S01 15465 F 3:00-5:30(11) (J. Khalip)
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ENGL 2561P. Secret History.

During the rise of print culture, an extraordinary number of texts presented themselves as secret histories. These texts, which promise disclosure and truth along with scandal and partisanship, establish a new relationship between literature, politics, and the knowing subject. They contribute significantly to the development of new kinds of writing, such as the novel. Recent scholarship (Aravamudan, Ballaster, McKeon, Bullard, Bowers) will accompany the study of representative texts including work by Behn, Manley, Defoe, Haywood, Steele, and Swift. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spr ENGL2561P S01 24208 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (M. Rabb)
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ENGL 2580. Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures.

Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.

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ENGL 2760A. American Modernist Poetry and Poetics.

Study of the poetry and prose of Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Williams, H.D., Moore, and Hughes, with additional readings in criticism and theories of modernism. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760B. City, Culture, and Literature in the Early Twentieth Century.

Examines the way the city structures early 20th-century culture and history. Through novels, poetry, and cultural criticism, considers a range of topics that include the relation between the city, consciousness, and ideology; the effects of changing urban immigration; and the effects of mobility. Authors include Simmel, Benjamin, Harvey, Williams, Rotella, James, Woolf, Wright, and Eliot. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760D. Contemporary African American Literature and the End(s) of Identity.

Investigates the controversies surrounding the claim that the late 20th century marks the end of nationalist and essentialist paradigms in the scripting of black identity. Readings from a range of literary and theoretical works dealing with this intricate problem, including Stuart Hall, Hortense Spillers, Reginald McKnight, Trey Ellis, Octavia Butler, and Paul Beatty. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760E. Law and Literature: From Response to Responsibility.

Explores modernism as it is shaped by the normative and ethical concerns of a rapidly changing world through literary works, legal writings, and legal opinions. Examines the conceptual, psychological and rhetorical connections between literature and law, and considers how both disciplines shape the imagination but also aim to elicit response and responsibility. Authors include Walter Benjamin, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, Chinua Achebe, and others; legal texts include Holmes, Bentham, Cover and a number of legal opinions. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760F. Metaphoric Expression: Emerson, James, Stein.

According to William Carlos Williams, metaphoric vision continually blinds Americans to the actual conditions of their world. In an attempt to answer this charge, we will read these three densely metaphorical writers against their varied historical backgrounds, hoping in the process to better understand the role played by figurative language in the shaping of American society, culture, and identity. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760G. Modernist Fiction and Theories of Modernism.

Examines a range of modernist fiction--including work by Conrad, Dos Passos, H.D., Joyce, Larsen, Rhys, Toomer, Woolf--alongside selected theories of modernism. Considers approaches ranging from theories of reification and the aesthetic to more recent considerations of modernism's relation to gender, nation, race, empire, and professionalism. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760H. Nationalizing Narratives: Studies in the Twentieth-Century U.S. Novel.

In this seminar, we will examine a number of important 20th-century U.S. novels for the ways in which they conjure the nation both as "imagined community" and "fictive ethnicity." Particular focus will be given to how the category of national identity becomes intertwined issues of race, gender, sexuality, and region as well as with ideologies of the aesthetic. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760I. Possession and Dispossession in the Modern Novel.

Examines modernist sentimentality as it is figured in notions of property. By exploring the legal and literary relationship between owning and being, we will consider how writers such as Forster, Woolf, Joyce, and Lawrence use property to conceive of human relationships-- and by extension, social justice-- in dramatically new ways. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760K. Postcolonial Theory and Africanist Discourse.

Explores central questions in current Anglo-American postcolonial theory, and examines how related questions emerge with specific inflections in writings by Africanist philosophers, historians, and creative writers. Issues include: varied connotations of the very idea of "Africa"; ideology and subjectivity; constructivism and essentialism; nationalism and globalization; aesthetics and politics. Texts by Amilcar Cabral, Frantz Fanon, Stuart Hall, Paulin Hountondji, Fredric Jameson, Ernesto Laclau, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Wole Soyinka, Gayatri Spivak, Yvonne Vera. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students. Undergraduate seniors may be admitted with instructor's permission.

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ENGL 2760L. Literature and Photography.

Since the invention of photography in 1839, novelists have often claimed the camera as an important model for their work. We will endeavor to investigate this claim, asking in the process what the links between modernism and the visual arts have to tell us about the nature of fictional representation. Readings to include a number of theoretical discussions of photography. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760M. Globalism and Postcoloniality.

This seminar focuses on two currents in contemporary literary and cultural criticism: postcolonial theory and theories of world literature. We will read theoretical texts alongside literary works by influential figures associated with concepts of postcoloniality and transnationalism. Our aim is to explore the varied idioms, genres, and philosophical perspectives that the authors make available. Themes include: nationalism and "national consciousness"; biopower and modernity; history and temporality; and the claims of "literature" on the arena of the present. Authors include: Arac, Coetzee, Damrosch, Fanon, Farah, Ghosh, Gordimer, Hall, Jameson, Moretti, Naipaul, Robbins, Spivak, and Walcott. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760N. The Politics of Modernism.

An exploration of the controversies that have surrounded the political implications of modernist form. Topics will include the Brecht-Lukacs debate, surrealism and the politics of the avant-garde, the so-called "great divide" between innovative and popular art, and the relation of modernism to postmodernism. In addition to examining important theoretical statements, we will test their arguments against selected literary examples. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760O. Shame, Colonialism, Ethics.

This course constructs a dialogue between debates on post-Holocaust aesthetics ("Is poetry possible after Auschwitz?") and the central questions of postcolonial theory ("Can the Subaltern Speak?"), and considers the ethical and aesthetic salience of shame. It is organized around three writers whose work suggests that the novel form itself might require decolonization: Naipaul, Coetzee and Caryl Phillips. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760P. The Fifties in Color: Race, Empire, and U.S. Cold War Culture.

Examines U.S. cultural texts of the `50s in relation to both domestic race politics and foreign policy concerns. Explores issues of assimilation, conflict, containment, development, and integration in a transnational as well as a national framework. Writers we study may include Ralph Ellison, Jack Kerouac, Phillip Roth, John Okada and Jade Snow Wong. This course is limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760Q. Ways of Seeing: Modern American Fiction and Photography.

Reads a number of important modernist novels alongside the work of early 20th-century American photographers, focusing on what this fiction's engagement with photography has to teach us about the reproduction and circulation of American identity and history. Writers include James, Dos Passos, Hurston, Agee, Welty, and Ellison; photographers include Stieglitz, Strand, and Weston. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760R. Realism and the American Novel.

An inquiry into the form, purpose, longevity, and afterlife of American realism. In what way did it differ from its British counterpart? In what ways was it different from naturalism, modernism, and romanticism? What was its aesthetic and political legacy? How has it been read by critics? Writers to include Melville, Dreiser, Norris, James, Chestnutt, Wharton, Jewett, and Wright. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760T. Postmodernism and Literary Form.

Intended for graduate students interested in the relationship between socio-historical conditions and literary form, and for those interested in thinking beyond a narrowly periodized notion of the postmodern. Beginning with Lukács's The Theory of the Novel, considers the problematic of literary representation as it emerges in the modern age. Readings include Beckett, Nabokov, Burroughs, Amis, Rushdie, McEwan, Lyotard, and Moretti. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760U. Reading the Black Masses in Literature and Critical Practice.

For more than a century, African American literature and criticism have been definitively shaped by claims about the linked fate of the black masses and the world of letters. These contested assertions provide occasions for rethinking the traditional ends of black literary production. Class conflict, the waning of black nationalism, and diasporic identity politics, are among the topics examined under this rubric. Likely literary writers include Washington, Larsen, Ellison, Brooks, and Wideman. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760V. Neo-Victorianism: Rewriting the Long Nineteenth Century.

This seminar examines recent novelists rewriting canonical 19th-century texts by Dickens and others, playing with matters of postcoloniality and gender. Jack Maggs, for example, answers the questions, "Can the subaltern speak?" and "Does the empire write back?" while Fingersmith offers a lesbian version of the Victorian sensation novel. Patchwork Girl rewrites Frankenstein, stitching together fiction, gender, and identity. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2760W. American Literature and the Visual Arts.

With the publication of several recent studies of cinema and modernism, interest in the relation between literature and the visual arts has never been higher. We will chart the forms this relation takes in the modern era by reading both theoretical attempts to diagnose it (Benjamin, Barthes, Derrida, Rancière) and literary attempts to enact it (James, Stein, Ellison, Williams, Agee). Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760X. After Postmodernism: New Fictional Modes.

What happens when the "postmodern," the period that did away with periodization, is over? This class will discuss issues such as contemporaneity, materiality, subtraction, subjectivity, the event, and the frame in approaching British and American literature at the turn of the 21st century. Readings include Ishiguro, Cooper, Toussaint, Seth, Coetzee, Chatwin, Danielewski, Deleuze, Bergson, Badiou, Lukács, Voloshinov, Adorno, Pasolini, Nancy. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval.

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ENGL 2760Y. American Orientalism and Asian American Literary Criticism.

We examine critical studies of American Orientalism, influential works of Asian Americanist cultural criticism, American Orientalist texts by white and black authors, and literary texts by Asian American authors. Critics, cultural historians and writers we read may include: Christina Klein, Vijay Prashad, Elaine Kim, Frank Chin, Lisa Lowe, W.E.B. DuBois, Susan Choi, Nam Le, Karen Tei Yamashita. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2760Z. African American Literature After 1965: Nationalism and Dissent.

Since the late 1960s, major theoretical and literary currents in African American letters have been profoundly influenced by black nationalism. This seminar examines the persistence of nationalist thought in ongoing debates about racial authenticity, gender inequality, black aesthetics, and diasporic politics. In so doing we will attend to both the complexity of nationalist ideology and the dissent generated by it. Authors include Baraka, Cruse, Giovanni, Morrison, Senna, Whitehead, and Gilroy. Open to graduate students only.

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ENGL 2761B. Temporalities.

Centered on modernism and the early 20th century, this course will investigate the varied models of time pulsing through literary and theoretical texts, and consider a range of issues, including memory and forgetting, historical progress and decay, utopian futurity, and queer temporalities. Readings include work by Freud, Bergson, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Joyce, Woolf, Barnes, Stein, Faulkner. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spr ENGL2761B S01 24826 F 3:00-5:30(15) (T. Katz)
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ENGL 2761K. Poetics of Liveliness: Materiality and Change in Modern and Contemporary Poetry.

This seminar will draw on emerging conversations in “new materialisms,” animal studies, queer theory and environmental literature to consider the problem of describing the variegated rhythms of change occurring within material worlds. Placing emphasis on how poetic texts stage a set of lively entanglements between materiality and temporality we will consider writing by Stein, Olson, Smithson, Hejinian, Robertson, Grosz, Barad. Enrollment limited to 15.

Fall ENGL2761K S01 15466 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (A. Smailbegovic)
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ENGL 2761L. The Post-Slavery Imagination.

This course excavates nineteenth-century literary and political discourses for their positive accounts of a post-slavery US, and it examines how the category of “post-slavery” shaped postwar efforts to articulate the grounds of racial equality in the US. Authors to be considered Brown, Wilson, Emerson, Stowe, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Twain, James, Wright, Hurston, Ellison, Baldwin, Williams. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spr ENGL2761L S01 24209 M 3:00-5:30(13) (D. Nabers)
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ENGL 2780. Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures.

Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.

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ENGL 2900A. Contemporary Feminist Theory: Feminist Address.

Recent feminist theory addresses identity politics and the critique of the subject; problematics of race, class and gender; the challenge of queer theory; the demand for materialist analysis. We consider these topics in light of the problematics of address. What are the forms of feminist address? How are they received or refused? Who are the subjects of contemporary feminisms? Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900C. Theories of Literature: From Classical Antiquity to Postmodernity.

Investigates theories of literature in two self-conscious historical epochs: classical antiquity, represented by figures such as Plato, Aristotle, and Horace, and by practices such as marginal notation of texts, literary commentaries, and performance techniques; and the 20th century, represented by figures such as Adorno, Barthes, and Bahktin, with special attention to the intersections between philosophy and literature and poststructuralist conceptions of textuality. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900D. Walter Benjamin and Modern Theory.

Intensive study of Walter Benjamin's essays on modern culture and literature (in particular Goethe, Baudelaire, Proust, and Kafka). Explores the consequences of his thinking for problems in contemporary literary and cultural theory. German and/or French helpful but not required. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900E. Deleuze: Literature and Aesthetics.

How does Deleuze help us read modern culture? This course will focus on Deleuze's writings on literature, painting and cinema as a point of entry to the work of one of the most original and intriguing thinkers of the late 20th century. We will look at the reasons for Deleuze's fascination with Anglo-American literature, and discuss the extent to which Deleuze's model of literary analysis breaks with -- while remaining fundamentally indebted to -- Marxism and psychoanalysis. Other readers include Melville, Kafka, T. E. Lawrence, as well as films by Antonioni, Godard and Sembene. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900F. Form and Content.

Readings in aesthetics, literary theory, structuralism-poststructuralism, and cultural studies that address the form/content distinction in one of its many avatars. Topics will include the sign, thematics, formlessness, formalism and historicism, tenors and vehicles, structure, and defamiliarization, among others. Previous work in literary or cultural theory strongly recommended. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900G. History and Form.

An exploration of the relation between historical and formalist approaches to literary interpretation, from the New Critics to the so-called "New Formalism." What is the role of form in historically and politically oriented criticism (examples will be taken from Marxism, the New Historicism, feminism, cultural studies, and post-colonial theory)? What happens to history when form takes center stage (for example, in structuralism and deconstruction)? Is it possible (and desirable) to avoid a pendulum swing between the poles of historicism and formalism and to mediate the conflicting claims of history and form? Or is a focus on one at the expense of the other the necessary cost of an incisive interpretive strategy? In addition to theoretical readings that exemplify the conflict between history and form, attention will be paid to the history of reception of one or more literary works in order to articulate the practical implications of their opposition and interdependence. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900H. Queer Passivity.

A study of the concept of passivity in queer theory, literature, and film. Subjects will include AIDS and temporality; the senses and dissolution; ascesis and chastity; pornography and sovereignty. We will explore post-structuralist theories and continental philosophies (Agamben, Cavarero, Deleuze, Derrida, Marion, Nancy) that resonate with the kind of queer receptivity that will be the object of study. Enrollment limited to 15.

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ENGL 2900K. Nietzsche, Foucault, Latour.

The seminar will trace a line of radical thought about truth, language, knowledge and power—and their interrelations—in the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault and Bruno Latour. Particular attention will be given to the significance of their work for poststructuralist language theory, constructivist epistemology and science studies, and current issues involving the relations between science and religion. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2900M. The Reading Effect and the Persistence of Form.

This course examines the "reading effect" as it emerges in work on the question of form and contemporaneous scholarship on the problematics of reading. We will trace the ways in which these related but distinct critical idioms negotiate concepts of mutual concern (interpretation, representation, the reading subject/reading brain). Topics include "new formalism," cognitive studies, symptomatic reading. Theorists from Althusser and deMan to Marcus, Wolfson and Zunshine. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students; undergraduate seniors may enroll with instructor permission.

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ENGL 2900N. Ethical Turns.

Examines the relationship between literature and ethics through the notions of responsibility, conviction, obligation, knowledge, ignorance, and complicity. Readings by Barthes, Benjamin, Arendt, Freud, Lacan, Winnicott, Derrida, de Man, Miller, Butler. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

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ENGL 2901D. War and the Politics of Cultural Memory.

Examines British, European, and American cultural texts and sites that engage in the work of remembering in relation to four conflicts: the Second World War, the Korean War, Vietnam, and the so-called War on Terror. Works by Woolf, Georges Perec, Chang-rae Lee, Phil Klay, and Mohamedou Ould Slah; Agamben, Arendt, Hirsch, Lacoue-Labarthe and Nancy; films by Lanzmann and Coppola. Enrollment limited to 15.

Fall ENGL2901D S01 15467 W 3:00-5:30(17) (R. Reichman)
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ENGL 2901E. Literary Phenomenology.

An exploration of phenomenology’s theories of consciousness, the body, language, and time and their implications for aesthetics, hermeneutics, and the theory of literature. In addition to major figures in the phenomenological tradition (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Gadamer, Ricoeur, Iser), the course will explore such recent developments as embodied cognition, affect theory, kinesthetics, and the new materialism. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spr ENGL2901E S01 24210 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (P. Armstrong)
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ENGL 2901F. Around 1948: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Transformations.

This seminar will look at the year 1948 across international locations and from an interdisciplinary perspective. An array of new nations states, institutions, political and cultural formations and styles emerged at this moment, with the movements of decolonization, the spread of global socialism, and aftermath of the Second World War. We will analyze these events through documents, images, philosophical texts, archives, literary texts from the era.

Spr ENGL2901F S01 24211 W 3:00-5:30(14) (L. Gandhi)
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ENGL 2950. Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory.

An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Priority given to students in the English Ph.D. program. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of instructor.

Fall ENGL2950 S01 15469 T 4:00-6:30(09) (J. Readey)
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ENGL 2970. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.

Fall ENGL2970 S01 14728 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr ENGL2970 S01 23822 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENGL 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Fall ENGL2990 S01 14729 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr ENGL2990 S01 23823 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENGL XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English.

Fall 2016
These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

Comparative Literature
COLT 2830I Histories of the Early Modern Body
Cogut Center for Humanities
HMAN 2970W Ethics/Politics
Judaic Studies
JUDS 0050A Believers, Agnostics, and Atheists in Contemporary Fiction
JUDS 0830 The Bible as Literature
Spring 2017
These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

Comparative Literature
COLT 1420O Proust, Joyce and Faulkner
Ethnic Studies
ETHN 1890U Extravagant Texts: Reading the World Through Asian American Literature
Modern Culture and Media
MCM 2100Q Lacan vs. Foucault
MCM 2110O Reading Remains

Acting Chair

Stephen Merriam Foley

Professor

Amanda S. Anderson
Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English

Paul B. Armstrong
Professor of English

Timothy R. T. Bewes
Professor of English

Mutlu Konuk Blasing
Professor of English

James F. Egan
Professor of English

Leela Gandhi
John Hawkes Professor of the Humanities and English

Philip Gould
Nicholas Brown Professor of Oratory and Belles Lettres and Isreal J. Kapstein Professor of English

Coppelia Kahn
Professor Emerita of English

William Keach
Professor of English

Elizabeth D. Kirk
Professor Emerita of English

George P. Landow
Professor Emeritus of English

Kevin McLaughlin
George Hazard Crooker University Professor of English

George Monteiro
Professor Emeritus of English

Karen A. Newman
Owen F. Walker '33 Professor of Humanities and Professor of Comparative Literature

Melinda Alliker Rabb
Professor of English

Richard M. Rambuss
Professor of English

Marc Redfield
Professor of Comparative Literature; Professor of English

Ellen Frances Rooney
Professor of Modern Culture and Media and English

Geoffrey R. Russom
Professor Emeritus of English

Barton L. St. Armand
Professor Emeritus of English and American Studies

Visiting Professor

Tracy Breton
Visiting Professor of English

Associate Professor

Elizabeth Johnson Bryan
Associate Professor of English

Stuart Burrows
Associate Professor of English

Stephen Merriam Foley
Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Associate Professor of English

Olakunle George
Associate Professor of English; Associate Professor of Africana Studies

Tamar Katz
Associate Professor of English; Associate Professor of Urban Studies

Jacques Khalip
Associate Professor of English

Daniel Kim
Associate Professor of English and American Studies

Rolland D. Murray
Associate Professor of English

Drayton Nabers
Associate Professor of English

Ravit Reichman
Associate Professor of English

Ralph E. Rodriguez
Associate Professor of American Studies; Associate Professor of English

Assistant Professor

James A. Kuzner
Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of English

Benjamin W. Parker
Assistant Professor of English

Ada Smailbegovic
Assistant Professor of English

Visiting Assistant Professor

Lesley E. Jacobs
Visiting Assistant Professor of English

Senior Lecturer

Catherine Imbriglio
Senior Lecturer in English

Jonathan Readey
Senior Lecturer in English

Lawrence K. Stanley
Senior Lecturer in English

Elizabeth Taylor
Senior Lecturer in English

Lecturer

Carol L. DeBoer-Langworthy
Lecturer in English

Kate J. Schapira
Lecturer in English

Michael H. Stewart
Lecturer in English

Visiting Lecturer

Kim Adrian
Visiting Lecturer in English

Mary-Kim Arnold
Visiting Lecturer in English

Adam J. Golaski
Visiting Lecturer in English

Edward Hardy
Visiting Lecturer in English

Robert P. Ward
Visiting Lecturer in English

Visiting Scholar

Andrew Reszitnyk
Visiting Scholar in English

Naihai Zhai
Visiting Scholar in English

English

We study how literature works, how we understand it, and how we write about it. We examine closely matters of language, form, genre, and critical method. We invite you to new practices of reading and writing that promote the understanding of literatures and cultures in English through history, criticism, and theory. We are committed to the understanding of literature from a transnational perspective, emphasizing the movement of texts and peoples across borders of nation, race, gender, and sexuality, now and in the past. And we encourage students to commit themselves to the creation of original knowledge in their reading and writing. 

In addition to the English concentration, we offer an English concentration track in the practice of Nonfiction Writing. The concentration in English and the English/Nonfiction track follow the same core requirements, and students in the English concentration may elect Nonfiction Writing courses as electives. We invite applications from qualified juniors to the honors programs in both English and Nonfiction.  One of the largest humanities concentrations at Brown, English provides a strong foundation for a liberal education and for work in many sectors of employment, especially in the many areas where new media creates demand for transformative writing: the press, publishing, advertising, visual media, public relations, public service, teaching, finance, government, corporate research and administration. English concentrators routinely go on to law, medical, and professional schools as well as to graduate education in literature and the arts.

About the Concentration

We encourage students interested in concentrating in English to come into the department offices at 70 Brown Street and speak with a concentration advisor. Students in English courses who are considering an English concentration are welcome to make an appointment to speak with their instructor. Concentration programs must be approved by a concentration advisor. To declare a concentration, students must fill out an online Concentration form via ASK and enter their plan of study indicating the requirements that each course fulfills.

Concentration Requirements (10 courses1):

1. ONE "How Literature Matters" course (ENGL0100):1
Matters of Romance
Devils, Demons, and Do Gooders
The Literature of Identity
Love Stories
American Histories, American Novels
Being Romantic
The Simple Art of Murder
Serial Fictions
Inventing Asian American Literature
2. ONE course before 1700:1
These are courses that focus on the early modern period, i.e. medieval and renaissance literatures.
3. ONE course after 1700:1
These are courses that focus on the 18th-century and beyond.
4. ONE course in "Literature Across Borders":1
The Literature of Identity
Inventing Asian American Literature
The Terrible Century
The Claims of Fiction
Unstable Subjects: Race and Meaning in Contemporary (African) American Literature
American Literature and Political Radicalism
African American Literature and the Legacy of Slavery
Postcolonial Tales of Transition
Ishiguro, Amongst Others
American Literature in the Era of Segregation
The Origins of American Literature
Europe in the Vernacular
Writing and the Ruins of Empire
Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture
Modern African Literature
The Literature and Culture of Black Power Reconsidered
African American Literature After 1975
The Korean War in Color
Literature and Politics
5. ONE theory course:1
6. FIVE electives 25
Total Credits10
1

 Each course may fulfill ONE requirement. Five courses must be 1000-level courses.  With advisor approval, two of the ten required courses may be taken in departments other than English.

2

 Only TWO courses dealing primarily with the practice of writing at the 1000-level may be counted as electives.

 One ENGL0200 may be counted toward the 10-course requirement only as an elective.

All substitutions and/or exceptions must be approved by the concentration advisor in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. A substitution or exception is not approved until specified in writing in the student’s concentration file housed in the English Department.

English Concentration -- Nonfiction Writing Track (10 courses)

The English concentration also includes a Nonfiction Writing Track. The requirements are the same as 1 through 6 above, but three of the five electives must be 1000-level Nonfiction Writing courses (only ONE of which may be intermediate). Only THREE Nonfiction courses may count toward the concentration.

Honors in English

The English Honors program is intended for students who have been highly successful in their English concentration coursework and who want the opportunity to pursue a research project in more depth than is possible in an undergraduate seminar.  The program is intended for those students with a strong desire to conduct independent research under the supervision of a thesis advisor and culminates in the writing of a thesis during the senior year. 

Admission 

Students apply to the Honors Program early in the second semester of their junior year.  Interested concentrators are encouraged to speak to the Honors Advisor early in their junior year to discuss their plans.  Specific deadlines for admission are announced annually and are available in the department office.  Students who are studying off campus are expected to meet the application submission deadline. 

Admission to the English Honors Program depends on evidence of ability and promise in the study of literature.  To be eligible for admission, students must have received more As than Bs (and no Cs or below) in concentration courses completed.  Students must complete an application; supply a brief writing sample, and request two letters of recommendation from English faculty with whom they have taken courses.  If necessary, letters may come from faculty in related departments.  Letters from teaching assistants may only serve as supporting recommendations.  Candidates must also submit a one-page project proposal signed by the faculty member who has agreed to serve as the thesis advisor.  See procedures and application for more details.

Requirements 

The course requirements for the English Honors Program are the same as those for the regular concentration, with the following additions:

As part of regular coursework, and counting toward the concentration requirements, honors candidates must complete at least three upper-level seminars or comparable small courses in which students have the opportunity to do independent research, take significant responsibility for discussion, and do extensive scholarly and critical writing.  Students are encouraged to include at least one graduate seminar in their program. (Permission to take a graduate course must be obtained from the instructor.) Honors candidates should discuss their proposed course of study with the Honors Advisor.

During the Fall and Spring of the senior year, honors candidates must complete two additional courses beyond the ten courses required by the regular concentration: ENGL 1991 and ENGL 1992. ENGL 1991 is the Senior Honors Seminar, in which students begin to research and write their theses, as well as meet to discuss their work. This is a mandatory S/NC course. ENGL 1992, the Senior Honors Thesis is an independent research course that must be taken for a grade.

December graduates take the following sequence of additional thesis courses instead:
In the 7th semester (Spring), students must take one of the following courses, within which they begin to research and write their theses:
--An Independent Study with their thesis advisor
--or ENGL 1140A: The Literary Scholar
Either course must be taken S/NC.
In the 8th semester (Fall), students must take ENGL 1992 for a grade, as they complete their theses.
Half-year graduates should consult with the Honors Advisor for information about deadlines.

Honors candidates must continue to receive more As than Bs in courses taken as part of the concentration.  Courses completed with a grade of C will not count toward an Honors concentration.  A student who receives such a grade and wishes to continue in the program must complete a comparable course with a grade higher than C.

The Honors Thesis 

The Honors thesis is an extended essay, usually between 50 and 80 pages, written under the supervision of a department faculty advisor and second reader. (Where appropriate, the advisor or the reader, but not both, may be in another department.) The thesis may be an interdisciplinary or creative project, but it is usually an essay on a scholarly or critical problem dealing with works of literature in English. The specific topic and approach of the thesis are worked out between the student and the thesis advisor, with assistance from the student's second reader. This process should begin in the latter part of the student's junior year. A good way to get an idea of what sorts of projects are possible is to visit the Hay Library, which stores theses from previous years, or to meet with the Honors Advisor.

A prospectus describing the project and endorsed by the faculty advisor must be submitted to the Honors Advisor at the beginning of the senior year. At the end of the senior year fall term, a student must submit approximately 25 pages of draft material toward the thesis. Full thesis drafts are due by mid-March; final bound copies of the thesis are due in mid-April. Late theses will not be accepted for honors after the April deadline; students who hand in theses after the deadline but before the end of the term will receive a grade for the thesis course, but they will not be eligible for departmental honors. The completed thesis will be evaluated by the student's advisor and a second reader, each of whom provides written commentary and suggests a grade for ENGL 1992.

Evaluation 

The English Department reviews the academic record as well as the thesis evaluations for each senior completing the Honors Program. Following a successful review, the student will be eligible to graduate with Honors in English.

Honors in Nonfiction Writing

The Nonfiction Writing Honors Program is intended for students who have been highly successful in their English concentration work.  Specifically, it allows those who have an expressed and proven interest in nonfiction writing to pursue more completely a single project under the supervision of a first reader.  The intention is to help students to complete work worthy of publication.  The program culminates in the writing of a thesis during the senior year. 

Admission 

Students apply to the Nonfiction Writing Honors Program in the second semester of their junior year at the latest. Interested students should already have made contact with at least one member of the Nonfiction Writing faculty and should meet with the Honors Advisor to discuss their proposed project.

Admission to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing depends upon a student's demonstrated superior ability in nonfiction writing.  Students must have taken either one intermediate and one advanced writing course, or two advanced writing courses by the end of their sixth semester and completed each of them with an S.  To be eligible for admission, students must have earned more As than Bs (and no Cs or below) in other courses in the concentration plan.  See procedures and application for more details.

Requirements

Students in the Nonfiction Writing Honors Program take two additional courses beyond the ten courses required by the Nonfiction Writing Track -- ENGL 1993 Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing (with the Honors Advisor) and ENGL 1994 Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing; the Honors track will bring to twelve the total number of required courses. The ENGL 1993 grade option must be S/NC; ENGL 1994 must be taken for a grade. Honors candidates should discuss their proposed course of study with the faculty member they choose to direct their thesis.

Honors candidates must continue to receive more As than Bs in courses taken as part of the concentration.  Courses completed with a grade of C will not count toward an Honors concentration. A student who receives a "C" after admission to Nonfiction Honors and wishes to continue in the program must complete an additional course in a comparable subject area, with a grade higher than C.

The Honors Thesis 

The Nonfiction Writing Honors thesis is an extended project, usually of between 50 and 80 pages, written under the supervision of one of the Nonfiction Writing faculty and a second reader (who can be from literature or another department). The specific topic and approach of the thesis are worked out between the student and the first reader, with assistance from the student's second reader. A good way to get an idea of what sorts of projects are possible is to visit the Hay Library, which stores theses from previous years, or to meet with the Honors Advisor. The work typically is in a genre chosen from Nonfiction Writing's spectrum: critical analysis, literary journalism, memoir, lyric essay, or narrative based on travel, science, history, or cultural critique.

Full thesis drafts are due by mid-March; final bound copies of the thesis are due in mid-April. Late theses will not be accepted for honors after the April deadline; students who hand in theses after the deadline and before the end of the term will receive a grade for the thesis course, but they will not be eligible for departmental honors. The completed thesis will be evaluated by its first reader and second reader, each of whom provides written commentary and suggests a grade for ENGL 1994.

Half-year graduates will take ENGL 1200 in the spring of their final year and ENGL 1994 in the fall. (Half-year graduates should consult with the Honors Advisor for information on deadlines.)

Evaluation 

The English Department reviews the academic record as well as the thesis evaluations for each senior completing the Nonfiction Writing Honors Program. Following a successful review, the student will be eligible to graduate with Honors in Nonfiction Writing.

English

The Department of English offers a graduate program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree.

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/english