History of Art and Architecture

Work in the department of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown is conceived as an interdisciplinary undertaking, in which students are encouraged to become familiar with the variety of methodologies and practices that have historically been, and continue to be productive in our fields. We also maintain a longstanding commitment to museum studies and the study of objects through a close working relationship with the Museum of the Rhode Island School of Design.  Interested students in this department have the opportunity to hold internships and (in the case of graduate students) proctorships at the museum. 

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/art-history/

Course usage information

HIAA 0001. Architectural Design.

Design principles presented in the first semester are further developed through a series of projects involving actual sites with their concomitant physical and historic-cultural conditions. Issues of context, methodology, program and construction are explored for their possible interrelated meanings and influences on the making of architectural form.
Estimated Cost of Materials: $55.00

Spr HIAA0001 S01 25894 MTh 1:10-6:10(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0002. Advanced Design Studio.

These studios, three of which are required for graduation, are offered by individual instructors to students who have successfully completed the core curriculum. They are assigned by lottery on the first day of classes. Once assigned to an advanced studio, a student may not drop studio.

Fall HIAA0002 S01 17219 MTh 1:10-6:10(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr HIAA0002 S01 25895 MTh 1:10-6:10(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0003. Architectural Projection.

This course introduces the beginning student to the origins, media, geometries and role(s) of projection drawing in the design and construction process. The student will learn systems of projection drawing from direct experience, and be challenged to work both from life and to life. Subjects such as transparency, figure/ground, sciagraphy, oblique projection, surface development, volumetric intersections, spatial manipulation and analytic operations will build on the basics of orthographic and conic projection. The course involves line and tone drawing, hand drafting, computer drawing(Autocad) and computer modeling(Rhino).

Fall HIAA0003 S01 17217 T 1:10-6:10(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0004. Architectural Analysis.

This course will develop one's ability to critically read and understand architecture through formal, geometric, tectonic and spatial analytic processes. Analysis acts as an intermediary between observation, expression, and understanding, offering deep insights into works of architecture. The course builds upon the processes introduced in Architectural Projection. Through various conceptual and representational frameworks, the issues of mapping-layers. Point of view, scale, morphology, topography and tectonics will be explored as part of a larger creative process, embracing visual imagination, communication and critique.

Estimated Material Cost: $50.00.

Spr HIAA0004 S01 25925 F 1:10-6:10(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0005. Structural Analysis.

The basic content will be statics and strength of materials. The first portion will deal with force vectors, trusses, cross-sectional properties, and shear/moment diagrams, followed by stresses, strains, material applications and the analysis procedures necessary to compute structural behaviors. This class is foundational to all future structural design classes such as Wood Structures and Steel Structures. A math test will be given prior to the first class to determine which students are required to attend a supplemental lecture class instructed by the teaching assistant. This course is a pre-requisite for Steel Structures, Wood Structures, and Concrete Structures.

Fall HIAA0005 S01 17220 F 9:40-12:40(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0006. Wood Structures.

This course will review the fundamentals of wood in architecture with a focus on wood materials and construction systems and lumber and timber structural analysis and design. Work includes timber systems consisting of conventional framing trusses, laminates, built-up sections and connections. In addition, this course will review the principles of structural loads; gravity, lateral, live and dead. The concept of lateral resistance through standard wood framing systems will be explored. Manufactured lumber has become a major part of today's wood construction industry and the design and detailing of these materials will be explored in depth.

Spr HIAA0006 S01 25926 T 1:10-4:10(10) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0007. Environmental Design II.

The study of basic concepts of Human Environmental Comforts. Inherent within 'physio-environ' considerations are principles of temperature, humidity, heat transfer, air movement, and hydrostatics. These principles will be studied in terms of their abstract physics and mathematics, through empirical benchmarking and as the basis for a design proposal that includes considerations of larger scale strategies as well as assemblies. Emphasis will be placed on the principles behind the technology, the behavioral characteristics and the qualities of the systems' operation considered in making building design decisions.

Spr HIAA0007 S01 25924 W 1:10-4:10(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 0010. A Global History of Art and Architecture.

Introduction to the global history of art, architecture and material culture from cave paintings to installation art. The course is both an historical survey as well as an analysis of case study examples. In addition to examining visual strategies of representation, the course explores the varied ways in which art shapes and reflects cultural, social, religious, and political concerns. Weekly one-hour conference required. Limited to 225. A

Spr HIAA0010 S01 25712 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (S. Bonde)
Course usage information

HIAA 0011. Introduction to the History of Architecture and Urbanism.

Western architecture and urbanism from classical antiquity through the eighteenth century: patterns of development; major architects and monuments; methods of interpretation. Does not presume previous knowledge or special skills. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0012. Theories of Architecture from Vitruvius to Venturi.

Theories and Design from Classicism to Postmodernism: An inquiry into the ways in which the nature of architecture has been thought, both inside the profession and outside, since Vitruvius first defined its study and practice as an “interdisciplinary discipline.” The seminar will study selected texts and designs in the culture of western architecture from antiquity to the present. Drawn from works in architectural, social, political, and aesthetic theory the seminar will deepen our understanding of historical architecture and open up ways of interpreting contemporary design culture. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0013. Introduction to Indian Art.

This course presents aspects of Indian art over a period of 2,000 years, and introduces the art of Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism, Islam, and colonial and post-colonial India. Emphasis is placed on characteristic features, functions and socio-political contexts of stupas, temples, mosques, churches, and other architectural sites as well as sculptures, painted manuscripts, paintings, and photography. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0021. Arts of Asia.

From sacrificial cauldrons to sunflower seeds, and Roman Buddhas to five-toed dragons, this course introduces the incredible diversity of traditions that collectively constitute the arts of Asia. Organized around a series of case studies of exemplary objects, the course explores the temporal, geographic, material, and thematic range of Asian art through the life stories of individual things. Tracing histories of human ingenuity and value, we will examine the ways these things changed the people who saw them and were themselves changed in the process of being seen. And we will come to know them through the ways they change us. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0031. Pre-Islamic Empires of Iran.

Introduction to art and architecture of the Ancient Near Eastern empires that flourished between the 6th century BCE and the Islamic conquests of c. 630 CE. We will consider the material culture of the Achaemenids, Seleucids, Parthians, and Sasanians, empires that inhabited primarily the areas of Mesopotamia and the Persian plateau, but spread at times as far afield as the Mediterranean coast, Egypt, the Caucasus, and the Indus Valley. Lectures will prioritize close analysis of the most illuminating art and architecture, so that you leave the course knowing not only the material evidence but also current approaches to interpreting it. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0040. Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture.

A comparative examination of the three artistic cultures of the medieval Mediterranean: Islam, the Byzantine empire, and the predominantly Christian regions of western Europe. Medieval Jewish art is also treated. Topics include medieval attitudes toward the use of images, the architecture of worship (churches, synagogues, and mosques), royal and domestic art, and instances of contact among all three cultures. Weekly one-hour conference required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0041. The Architectures of Islam.

Through selected case study examples, the course examines the varied manifestations of Islamic architectures. The course spans fourteen centuries and three continents, and examines religious as well as secular buildings. We will trace the sources and 'invention' of Islamic architecture in the Umayyad dynasty of the seventh and eighth centuries, and will explore its varied manifestations up to the contemporary period. By examining cross-cultural and trans-regional interactions, we will also investigate the relationship between Islamic and non-Islamic architectural traditions. A WRIT

Fall HIAA0041 S01 16894 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (S. Bonde)
Course usage information

HIAA 0042. Islamic Art and Architecture.

The formation of an Islamic artistic expression in art and architecture and the regional manifestations of that art from central Asia and the Middle East to Sicily and Spain. Weekly one-hour conference required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0061. Baroque.

The course surveys the visual culture of Rome from 1564-1700. During that time Rome became the center of Artistic change in Europe, the seat of the Counter-Reformation Catholic Church and the dominant source of classical learning. All media that participated in these historical developments are included: from papal urban plans to Bernini's fountains and Caravaggio's paintings. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0062. The Age of Rubens and Rembrandt: Visual Culture of the Netherlands in the Seventeenth Century.

Surverys the amazing art in Holland and Flanders that revolutionized all media. We will see how paintings, sculpture, and architecture formed the historical environment of life in the 17th-century Netherlands. The work of such artists as Rubens, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, and Vermeer is presented as part of this history of art in a "golden age." Weekly one-hour conference required. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0070. Introduction to American Art: The 19th Century.

This undergraduate lecture course traces the rise of American painting in the period from the Revolution to the dawn of modernism in the 20th century. Major figures, such as Thomas Cole, Frederick Church, Winslow Homer and Albert Pinkham Ryder, will be examined, as will significant movements, such as the Hudson River School and Tonalism. Discussion will help place American art within the context of history, the invention of national identity, and parallel developments in popular visual culture. Enrollment limited to 50.

Fall HIAA0070 S01 15297 MWF 12:00-12:50(12) (D. Nickel)
Course usage information

HIAA 0074. Nineteenth-Century Architecture.

Surveys stylistic developments, new building types, and the changing conditions of architectural production through the 19th century. Special emphasis placed on the social context in which buildings were designed and used. Weekly one-hour conference required. WRIT A

Course usage information

HIAA 0075. Introduction to the History of Art: Modern Photography.

This class will survey the history of photography as an art form and means of visual communication in the modern era. The photograph will be considered from both esthetic and social perspectives; photography's rise as a medium of personal expression will be examined, as will technology's role in the creation of new regimes of spectatorship, and the mass dissemination of visual information. The class follows the rise of photography's acceptance as an art form in the twentieth century, and culminates with its prominence within the phenomenon of postmodernism. Prior coursework in modern history or art history is helpful. Enrollment limited 80.

Course usage information

HIAA 0081. Architecture of the House Through Space and Time.

This undergraduate lecture course focuses on one building type, the house, through time in Mesopotamia, China, Japan, the Islamic world, the African diaspora, India, Britain, Rhode Island, and Germany and France. Houses can be minute or monumental, vernacular or high art, provide minimal shelter or afford the material and psychic satisfaction of home. By studying houses, we can bypass some of architectural history’s biases, and explore some of the major debates in the discipline: What is architecture? Who determines what is included/excluded in this category? And on what basis do they make these claims? WRIT A

Course usage information

HIAA 0089. Contemporary Photography.

This course surveys the rise of photography in the art world in the period after 1960. It examines both the development of photography as an independent medium and the appropriation of lens-based imagery by Pop Art, conceptual art, minimalism, and eventually Postmodernism.

Course usage information

HIAA 0321. Toward a Global Late Antiquity:200-800 CE.

Competing empires, the division of the eastern and western halves of Roman territory; long distance trade, the rise of monotheism, the spread of Buddhism: how did these factors affect the art and architecture associated with the Roman west, Constantinople, Ctesiphon, Alexandria, the Han Dynasty capitals, and Gandhara? This course takes an expanded view of Late Antiquity, extending beyond typical that associate the period with the post-classical west, to explore the dynamic creativity and intercultural connectivity of an era once considered a "Dark Age" in a world history. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0340. Roman Art and Architecture: From Julius Caesar to Hadrian.

An introduction to the major monuments in Roman art at the point when the Empire emerged up to the time of the creation of the Pantheon. No prior background required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0400. Early Christian, Jewish, and Byzantine Art and Architecture.

No description available. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0440. Gothic Art and Architecture.

Examines Gothic art and architecture to explore its sources and "invention" in mid-12th-century France and to trace its varied manifestations in European art to the 16th century. Special attention is given to cathedral architecture and decoration. Weekly one-hour conference required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 0460. Muslims, Jews and Christians in Medieval Iberia.

The cultural diversity of medieval Spain and Portugal is proclaimed by their Christian churches, Islamic mosques and Jewish synagogues. The three distinct cultures that produced these buildings lived together for centuries in medieval Iberia, sometimes in peace, sometimes not. For almost eight centuries (711-1492) writers, scholars and artists emerged from a cultural environment of intellectual borrowing nurtured by uninterrupted contact through marriage, conversion, commerce and travel. This convivencia of Jews, Muslims and Christians will be examined from the perspectives of literature, music, art, architecture, archaeology, and history. WRIT FYS

Course usage information

HIAA 0550. Gold, Wool and Stone: Painters and Bankers in Renaissance Tuscany.

Examines the paintings, sculpture, graphic art, and architecture of Tuscany in the 15th century, primarily in Florence but also venturing into Siena, Arezzo, Borgo San Sepolcro. Using Renaissance critical terms and analytical tools, we take into account the technical and commercial habits of craftspeople, the economy of the cities and towns, and the forms and functions of art in domestic, civic, and religious spheres. Weekly one-hour conference required. WRIT / A

Course usage information

HIAA 0560. Popes and Pilgrims in Renaissance Rome.

Examines Renaissance Roman painting, sculpture, and architecture in the context of the unique urban character of the city: site of antique myth, religious pilgrimage, and a cosmopolitan court. Beginning with Filarete and Fra Angelico, we move through the Renaissance (Michelangelo and Raphael), looking at the formation of artists' workshops and academies, ending with the urbanization programs of Sixtus V. WRIT A

Course usage information

HIAA 0570. The Renaissance Embodied.

Renaissance depictions of the body range from muscular, idealized nudes to decaying, but ambulatory, corpses. Artists dissected human cadavers and, for the first time since antiquity, reflected the use of living models in their workshops and studios. In this course, we examine art that embodied power and sexuality, death and disease, the divine and demonic, the marginalized and the fantastic. We consider a diverse set of bodies as they were represented in paintings, sculpture, drawings, decorative arts and prints in relation to contemporary religious, political and social concerns.

Course usage information

HIAA 0580. Word, Image and Power in Renaissance Italy.

This class is designed to introduce cultural and historical perspectives on Italy from Siena in the Middle Ages to Venice in the High Renaissance. Taught by professors of Italian Literature, Art History and History, we will move across Italy and the centuries focusing on monuments of literature, art, architecture, and history through different disciplinary lenses. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0600. From Van Eyck to Bruegel.

Artists of Flanders and Holland effected a revolution in the techniques and subjects of painting during the 15th and 16th Centuries. This course explores the roots of artistic change in religion, urban history, politics, Italian humanism, economics, and craft traditions. The focus is on the great works of such artists as Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder.

Course usage information

HIAA 0630. Cultural History of the Netherlands in a Golden Age and a Global Age.

Between 1580 and 1690 two nations emerged in Europe from what had been one unified region. To the north, the Dutch Republic gained its independence from Spain and developed as a bastion of liberty, ideas in ferment, visuals arts, Calvinist faith, science, technology, and global economic reach. To the south, the "loyal" Netherlands, now Belgium, returned to the Spanish and Catholic fold, but sustained its leading position in the arts, competed in global trade, and negotiated a new compromise of government. In this course we present an interdisciplinary, comparative view of the "two" Netherlands and their legacy in the world. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0660. Giotto to Watteau: Introduction to the Art of Europe from Renaissance to French Revolution.

Giotto to Watteau introduces the great works of European art from the Renaissance to French Revolution. What ideas and forces enabled artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Hieronymus Bosch, El Greco, Caravaggio, and Rembrandt to transform the visual world so profoundly that their innovations still radiate outwards through history into the present? What are the best terms and concepts to describe and understand the new styles that developed between 1300 and 1800? Lectures, discussion, reading, and direct looking consider these questions in a way that works for students at an introductory level. A

Spr HIAA0660 S01 25897 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (J. Muller)
Course usage information

HIAA 0710. The Other History of Modern Architecture.

This lecture course presents modern architecture as the product of the cultural, technological, political, and intellectual developments associated with capitalist expansion across the globe. By exploring the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its effects on Western industrialization, European Jesuit gardeners in China, modernization efforts in 19th century Turkey and Japan, and tropical climate and colonial policy in India, Nigeria, and other global sites; the course will expose students to the “99 percent” who are frequently excluded from discussions about modern architecture, but whose labor and cultural traditions were crucial to the heroic modernism of the West. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0770. Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora.

This lecture course introduces the built environments in and of "Africa," from the earliest known examples to the contemporary moment. Through a consideration of texts and images, we will interrogate "Africa" as both a construct and concrete geographical entity characterized by diverse cultures, contexts, and histories. In addition to exploring the content of various architectural and urban traditions, we will approach our topic from the point of view of the theoretical paradigms that have governed the historiographical interpretation of particular periods, regions, and cultures. Readings will be arranged thematically and according to chronology and geography. Weekly one-hour section required. A DPLL WRIT

Fall HIAA0770 S01 15292 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (I. Osayimwese)
Course usage information

HIAA 0771. African American and Caribbean Architectures: Domestic Space.

This course explores domestic landscapes occupied by African-Americans between the earliest years of slavery and the Second World War. We will examine some of the most common housing forms that diasporic Africans inhabited during those years—plantation slave quarters, tenant shacks, and urban tenements, to name a few. Our premise is that study of domestic life can reveal how political, economic, and social forces inform everyday life. The goals of the class are twofold: to improve our understanding of the social history of diasporic Africans and to develop sensitivity to the study of ordinary, everyday landscapes— or “vernacular architecture.” WRIT A

Course usage information

HIAA 0801. Art After ‘68.

The tumultuous social unrest of the 1960s was concretized in a worldwide succession of civic revolts in 1968. Throughout this period, art was an organizing tool for various political events. In turn, the concept of 1968 generated an aesthetic response that supported, documented and historicized the period. This course will examine the art and new art forms created in the wake of 1968. We will also look closely at the strategies of contemporary art making that are influenced by the spirit of 1968. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0810. 20th Century Sculpture.

Writing in 1937, sculptor Naum Gabo posed the question, “What are the characteristics which make a work of art a sculpture?” Gabo’s question has a general resonance for the entirety of the twentieth century, where the medium of sculpture formed many of the significant debates within art. This lecture course is a survey of sculpture in the twentieth century. We will examine the medium through its definitions, material (metal, paper, plastic, stone, wood, etc.), methods (carving, casting, modeling, welding, etc.), practitioners, movements, theories and related practices, like architecture. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0830. Revolutionary Forms: 100 Years of Art and Politics in Latin America.

This course surveys Latin American art within the context of socio-political and intellectual concerns in the region. We will consider a wide variety of media with an eye to local and global events that prompted their production. We will examine how artworks embodied, challenged, and helped to shape history. We will survey major trends in art production: from photography during the Mexican Revolution to participatory and activist art in the beginning of the 21st century. Students will acquire visual and critical analysis skills in order to actively engage with their visual surroundings. Previous knowledge of art history is not required.

Course usage information

HIAA 0840. History of Rhode Island Architecture.

This course examines the historical development of architecture and building in Rhode Island within the larger context of colonial and national trends and with a focus on important manifestations of a distinct regional identity. Emphasis will be placed on stylistic developments, new building types and technologies, and the social and economic influences on the creation of the built environment.A

Course usage information

HIAA 0850. Modern Architecture.

The "classic" period of European and American modern architecture from the turn of the century to the 1950s. Presents both the established canon of masterpieces by among many others, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe, and LeCorbusier, and counterbalances this approach with information about new building materials, changing conditions of architectural production, and the "mechanisms of fame." A

Course usage information

HIAA 0860. Contemporary Architecture.

Stylistic, technological, and theoretical developments in architecture from the 1960s to the present. Analyzes movements such as "Brutalism," "Postmodernism," and "Deconstruction" and works by architects such as Frank Gehry, I. M. Pei, and Zaha Hadid. Emphasizes the complex conditions of architectural production in different parts of the world. Complements HIAA 0850, but may be taken independently. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0861. City and Cinema.

An examination of the mutual influence between two of the major art forms of the 20th century: film and architecture. Concentrates on European and American film sets throughout the 20th century and explores their formal and iconographical sources in contemporary architectural discourse. Presentation and examination of sketches, paintings, still photographs, and film clips as well as writings by directors, set designers, critics, and architects (Eisenstein, Reimann, Kracauer, Bunuel and many others). A

Spr HIAA0861 S01 24778 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (D. Neumann)
Course usage information

HIAA 0870. 20th Century British Art: Edwardian to Contemporary.

The field of British art offers a wide view onto the history of art and aesthetics. This survey of British art in the twentieth century will examine the nation's art, artists, and art movements alongside its current events. Readings will be drawn from periodicals, primary documents (artist's letters and manifestos) and secondary texts (Alloway, Hall, Read and others). Architecture, literature (Martin Amis, Joseph Conrad, Lynton Kwesi Johnson and others) and music will be considered throughout the course. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 0881. City and Cinema.

An examination of the mutual influence between two of the major art forms of the 20th century: film and architecture. Concentrates on European and American film sets throughout the 20th century and explores their formal and iconographical sources in contemporary architectural discourse. Presentation and examination of sketches, paintings, still photographs, and film clips as well as writings by directors, set designers, critics, and architects (Eisenstein, Reimann, Kracauer, Bunuel and many others). A

Course usage information

HIAA 0931. Eco-aesthetics.

This course examines a movement in contemporary art and visual culture – termed “eco-aesthetics” – that works to raise awareness of global climate change and to resist forces of environmental degradation. We will begin by tracing a history of emerging artistic-ecological consciousness in the US and Europe in the 1960s and 70s, and then take a more global, interdisciplinary look at shifting methods of photographic, filmic, and new media documentation and representations of a “post-natural” landscape in the Anthropocene Age. We will analyze collective eco-aesthetic activism in the 21st century, exploring artistic collaborations in various local, regional, and global contexts. WRIT

Fall HIAA0931 S01 17422 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (B. Cohen)
Course usage information

HIAA 1020. Topics in East Asian Art.

Topics in East Asian Art. Topics will be listed separately. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1090. Writing About the Arts.

Writing is a critical skill for those who engage in the practice of art history, art criticism, and art theory. This writing-intensive workshop/seminar will offer students the opportunity to encounter various kinds of art in various real-world settings, then write about them. Different genres of art writing will be explored (reviews, museum wall texts, scholarly analyses, etc.) and, through frequent short assignments, participants will be learn to write with greater clarity, precision, and organization. Readings will explore the problems entailed in art historical description and what happens when visual ideas become texts. WRIT

Spr HIAA1090 S01 25723 W 3:00-5:30(14) (C. Martin)
Course usage information

HIAA 1101. Introduction to Architectural Design Studio.

Introduces students to basic tools and strategies in architectural design. A number of exercises will introduce students to questions about form, function and structure and teach them to learn from close observation of the built environment. The second half of the semester is devoted to the design of a small house by each student, which will be presented in a scale model and a full set of drawings at the end of the semester. A jury of invited architects and professors will conduct a discussion of each project. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. A LILE

Course usage information

HIAA 1101A. Illustrating Knowledge.

This seminar will investigate the history of illustration from the first manuscript maps and printed herbals to the present, including paintings, photographs, and computer imaging. We will investigate the role of pictures in the exchange of scientific ideas, and modes of representation developed in both the arts and the sciences. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT LILE

Course usage information

HIAA 1101B. Seeing and Writing on Contemporary Arts.

The purpose of this writing intensive seminar (especially designed for freshmen) is to train the students in both seeing and writing on contemporary art. The class will be based on looking at specific works of art of the twentieth century in museum context (using nearby collections, notably) and on how to translate visual observations into analytical and critical writing. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1102. Architectural Drawing and Sketching.

There are two primary objectives for architectural drawing and sketching. First, it is a tool to record and document visual encounters with natural and man-made environments, artifacts and buildings. Second, it is the ability to transmit thoughts and ideas on paper (or the tablet). It is the initial spontaneous recording of the creative act in progress. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1103. Introduction to Architectural Design.

From tectonics and program to aesthetics and theory, architecture is regulated by a complex set of interlocking priorities that can shift radically from one project to another. Architectural design is the process by which architects bring clarity, order and meaning to this complexity. It is laborious, uniquely fulfilling, and can be learned only through doing. Unlike classroom instruction, studio education is based not in didact but in dialogue. Its aim is to develop in each student the concepts, methods and skills necessary to create and successfully communicate their designs. Studio requires an active approach to learning, a high degree of motivation and self-discipline. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1105. Otherworldly and Other Worlds: Representing the Unseen in Early Modern Europe.

This course will examine European beliefs about vampires, witches, angels, demons, “monstrous races” and other enchanted and unseen beings between 1500-1800— the era of the famous witch hunts and a period of confrontation between belief and disbelief about these figures. Spurred by new instruments like the telescope, new technologies in printing and cartography, and unprecedented travel across the globe, knowledge about the universe increasingly expanded in this period to incorporate new discoveries and observations. Close analysis of several case studies will highlight how dramatic debates about these creatures played out in visual form in early modern Europe. FYS WRIT

Fall HIAA1105 S01 17457 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (K. Whitford)
Course usage information

HIAA 1120B. History of Urbanism, 1300-1700.

Examines major themes in the history of urbanism by concentrating on selected towns and cities in order to explore general issues (e.g. the relationship of town and countryside and the emergence of capital cities) and characteristic urban building (e.g. fortifications, designed squares, civic monuments). No prerequisites. A short oral presentation and term paper are required.

Course usage information

HIAA 1120C. History of Western European Urbanism 1200-1600.

Examines major themes in the history of urbanism by concentrating on selected towns and cities in order to explore general issues (e.g. the relationship of town and countryside and the emergence of capital cities) and characteristic urban building (e.g. fortifications, designed squares, civic monuments). No prerequisites. A short oral presentation and term paper are required.

Course usage information

HIAA 1150C. El Greco and Velazquez.

This course will study the great Spanish artists El Greco and Velázquez in relation to the major developments in 16th- and 17th- century European painting and in the context of the social, political, and intellectual concerns of Habsburg Spain, as well as the particular cultural milieu in which they each worked. We will trace El Greco’s career from his native Crete to Venice and Rome and finally to Toledo, and Velázquez’s from the commercial metropolis of Seville to the court in Madrid. In addition, we will examine their modern reception by art historians, artists, and collectors in Spain and beyond.

Course usage information

HIAA 1150D. El Greco and the Golden Age of Spanish Painting.

This seminar examines the career of the Greek painter from Crete known as El Greco in Spain where he worked in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Empahsis will be given to the interaction of various European traditions in the culture of Counter Reformation Europe. Weekly readings and discussion and individual projects required. Enrollment limited to 25 students.

Course usage information

HIAA 1170B. Twentieth-Century American Painting.

HIAA 0800 is a suggested prerequisite. Weekly one-hour section required.

Course usage information

HIAA 1181. Prefabrication and Architecture.

Architects have been captivated prefabrication since the Industrial Revolution revealed the benefits of mechanized human labor. This undergraduate project seminar will examine the provenance and relevance of prefabrication. We will consider the prefabricated traditions of Africa and Asia as the foundation for the discipline of “vernacular architecture”; and conceptualize prefab as a technology of colonial expansion, solution to the postwar housing crisis, expression of 1960s counterculture, and response to climate change. Case studies will be drawn from Africa, Australia, Asia, Europe, and North America. A WRIT

Fall HIAA1181 S01 15343 F 3:00-5:30(11) (I. Osayimwese)
Course usage information

HIAA 1200A. Ancient Art in the RISD Collection.

The RISD Museum's ancient collection will be studied firsthand and in light of recent scholarship in Greek and Roman art and archaeology. Using the collection as a springboard, the course will explore original contexts for museum objects; issues of cultural property and museum ethics; conservation, restoration and display in museums; and notions of historical interpretation in museum display.

Course usage information

HIAA 1200D. Pompeii.

Pompeii and its neighboring towns are the best examples for studying the life, art, and architecture of a Roman town. This seminar covers the works of art and the life in the town as reflected in the monuments excavated over the past 250 years. Instructor permission required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1201. Brushwork: Chinese Painting in Time.

How did the tenor of the individual brushstroke become the locus of value in traditional Chinese painting? What other possible standards of excellence—such as verisimilitude—were displaced in the process? This course pursues these questions by analyzing the great monuments of Chinese painting from the perspective of the aesthetic debates that defined them over the centuries. Proceeding from the famous Six Laws of Painting down to the aesthetic watershed of the Northern and Southern Schools, the course traces the fraught interplay of artistic practice and critical judgment in China over more than a thousand years. No prior knowledge required. WRIT

Spr HIAA1201 S01 24818 F 3:00-5:30(15) (J. Moser)
Course usage information

HIAA 1300. Topics in Classical Art and Architecture.

No description available. Topic courses listed separately. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1301. The Palaces of Ancient Rome.

This seminar addresses the palatial art and architecture of the ancient Roman Empire. Key themes include the architectural articulation of political power; the role of international relations in expressing cultural power; the interplay of influence among palaces and villas; the art of adornment, luxury, and collecting; the interaction of architecture and landscape, including interior gardens and urban environments; the critical analysis of archaeological evidence, reconstruction, and legacy. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1302. Women and Families in the Ancient Mediterranean.

What was life like for the women of the ancient Mediterranean? What rights, roles, responsibilities, and expectations defined their lives? Why is the examination of art and architecture such an important source for answering these questions? This course will provide a comparative perspective exploring Greek, Etruscan, and Roman case studies. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1303. Pompeii: Art, Architecture, and Archaeology in the Lost City.

Buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE, Pompeii stands as a time capsule of city life in the Roman Empire of the 1st century. Exploring the city’s grand public baths, theaters, and amphitheaters, its seedy bars and businesses, its temples for Roman and foreign gods, and its lavishly decorated townhomes and villas, this seminar will reconstruct a panoramic view of Roman daily life and consider the Vesuvian region’s modern reception since its rediscovery in the 18th century. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1304. Spectacle! Games, Gladiators, Performance, and Ceremony in the Roman World.

Theaters, amphitheaters, baths, circuses, and imperial residences pepper the former territory of the Roman Empire. Modern films conjure the fantastic, yet ephemeral, events of days long past, amplifying the fascination of these ubiquitous ruins. For the Romans, however, spectacle was not only about fun and games. What really took place in these spaces, and why? Learn to separate fact from fiction as we consider artistic, architectural, and archaeological evidence to understand how and why spectacles were fundamental to Roman daily life. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1305. Pre-Columbian Art + Architecture.

Survey of ancient art and building in ancient America, with a focus on Mexico, Central America, and the Andes. Underlying concepts include: meaning and method, cosmos and kingship, narrative and symbol, personality and authorship, empire and royal court. Rich collections of the Haffenreffer museum will form the focus of work in the class. WRIT DPLL LILE

Course usage information

HIAA 1310. Topics in Hellenistic Art.

Topics course . Topics listed separately. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1360X. The Aesthetics of Color: History, Theory, Critique (GNSS 1960X).

Interested students must register for GNSS 1960X.

Course usage information

HIAA 1400F. Research Seminar Gothic Art.

No description available. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1410A. Topics in Islamic Art: Islamic Art and Architecture on the Indian Subcontinent.

This course focuses on architecture, manuscript paintings, and decorative arts produced under the patronage of Islamic rulers, who dominated the Indian subcontinent between 1192 and 1858. The class will examine works of art as instruments in the process of establishing an empire as well as expressions of political and religious power. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1410B. Painting in Mughal India 1550-1650.

The Mughal (Muslim) rulers of north India in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries presided over what was then the richest, most cosmopolitan culture in the world. The earliest rulers were open-minded and intellectually voracious; they brought together Persian, Turkish, and a variety of indigenous Indian traditions to create a distinctive new way of representing and living in the world. This cultural interaction, and the important role played by Portuguese missionaries and English traders, will be the focus of this seminar.

Course usage information

HIAA 1430A. The Visual Culture of Medieval Women.

Considers women as patrons and producers of medieval art and architecture, and examines the imaging of women in medieval works of art. Topics include: feminist perspectives in medieval history and art history, patronage by royal and aristocratic women, costume and textile production, and the art and architecture of female monastic communities. Optional FLAC French conference offered.

Course usage information

HIAA 1440B. The Medieval Monastery.

The seminar examines the medieval and early modern monastery as a research problem. The course examines the development of the monastery, and investigates the religious and functional aspects of monastic architecture. We will explore historical, art historical and archaeological approaches to monasticism. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 12. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1440D. The Gothic Cathedral.

A

Course usage information

HIAA 1460. Topics in Medieval Archaeology.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 1550A. Prints and Everyday Life in Early Modern Europe.

Uses the resources of the RISD Museum in graphics and decorative arts (weaponry, embroidery, textiles, and ceramics) from the early modern period. Examines the use of ornament and mythological and sacred themes as they relate to crafts and the transmission of culture, focusing on the making, distribution, materiality, and histories of objects of everyday life. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1550B. Topics in the Early History of Printmaking: Festival and Carnival.

This course looks at the printed festival books made for recording ideal versions of royal entries, funerals, weddings and other printed expressions of regal celebration, alongside printed, painted and otherwise recorded evidence of popular celebrations such as carnival, and civic and religious festivals such as the Sienese palio. Although beginning with circulated prints and books, we will also look at the material culture of these events in their widest sense to investigate the advertisement and control of festival cultures. The class will focus on early modern Italy but students are welcome to broaden our geographic horizons. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

HIAA 1550C. Dreaming of Food in the Early Modern World.

Floods, wars, trade, climate change, class distinctions, carnivals and public feasts kept food at the forefront of the early modern imagination. Focusing on Italy, but including its global connections, we will look at the cultures of food as the material of art and literature in markets, vineyards, courts, recipe books, medicine, kitchens, and the dreams of the hungry. Investigating the cultivation, presentation and consumption of food through related arts and the evolution of manners allows us to consider the design of tableware, food sculpture, and tapestries alongside more canonical arts. Some previous art history required, languages helpful. Upperclass seminar. LILE WRIT

Spr HIAA1550C S01 25373 M 3:00-5:30(13) (E. Lincoln)
Course usage information

HIAA 1560A. Italy and the Mediterranean.

Sicily, Venice, and Rome were Medieval and Renaissance international centers whose populations of pilgrims, traders, soldiers, and diplomats occasioned opportunities for cultural cooperation and violence between East and West. We will study mosaics and architecture of the multi-ethnic Norman rule following the Islamic conquest of Sicily; Venetian relations with the Ottoman Empire and its Greek colonies in goods, painting styles, architecture and atlases; and in Rome obsessions with Egyptian engineering, the vitality of Arabic studies, and reports of travelers resulting from papal efforts to incorporate Eastern Christians under the umbrella of the Roman church. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1560B. Mannerism.

This class provides an opportunity to study courtly painting, sculpture, prints, drawing and architecture of the movement that became known as Mannerism. The material will focus most strongly on the art of Florence and Rome, but we will also be looking at France and Bohemia, and at the history, literature and literature of art of those centers. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1560C. Renaissance Venice and the Veneto.

This course explores the visual culture, theater, ritual, architecture, and urban development of Venice and the Veneto from the late medieval period through the 16th century, tracing the development of painting, sculpture, architecture and a literature of art within the city¹s unique physical configuration and relationship with the East. For advanced students, written permission required and given at first meeting. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1560D. Siena from Simone Martini to Beccafumi.

This course will focus on the art and architecture of republican Siena over the 250 year period before its annexation to Tuscany in 1555. We will study the relationships between piety, work, and politics in a rich period of building and decorating that has determined the look and, to an extent, the culture of the city until the present day. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1560E. The Arts of Renaissance Courts.

Courts were active patronage centers in the areas of secular and religious painting, sculpture and architecture, book illumination, rich narrative textiles for interior use and ornamental ones for costume, as well as ephemeral works for theatrical productions, triumphal entries and festivities. Artists working at court were able to ignore guild regulations, and acquired a status for themselves that set them apart from other urban practitioners. Centering our investigation on primary sources as far as possible, we will study a wide range of works, materials, ideologies and practices that contributed to the reputation of the Italian courts as centers of opulence and power. Final project and weekly class meetings required. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1560F. Topics in Italian Visual Culture: The Visible City, 1400- 1800.

We will look at the image of the city in all media, attending to the contexts in which they are illustrated, the technologies of representation and the reasons for imagining cities, taking into account iconic and symbolic representations, personifications, maps and views, and comparing visual and textual descriptions of the places of early modern urban life. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1600A. Bosch and Bruegel: Art Turns the World Upside Down.

An in-depth look at the work of these two enigmatic Netherlandish artists. After seeing how art history uses various methods to establish what they actually painted and drew, we will move outwards to interpretation and historical study of their images of comedy, proverbs, religion, and landscape. Artworks in local museums will be important focuses of discussion. Prerequisite: HIAA 0010 or 0500.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600B. Caravaggio.

Caravaggio is one of the great revolutionary artists and a real cultural phenomenon in his own time and ours. This seminar considers in-depth the nature of his work, the different historical strategies used to explain it, and possible new approaches. Prerequisites: HIAA 0010 or HIAA courses in early modern art.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600C. Italian Baroque Painting and Sculpture.

Examines developments in painting and sculpture in 17th century Italy with focus on the impact of the Catholic church and the rediscovery of antiquity on church and palace decoration, public andprivate commissions, and the rhetoric of Baroque style andiconography. Study of individual artists, including Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Gianlorenzo Bernini, as well as artacademies, the mechanics of patronage and writings about art andartists.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600D. The Art of Peter Paul Rubens.

The seminar will study the seminal work of Rubens in all its aspects.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600E. The World Turned Upside Down.

Seminar examining the comic and satirical traditions in Netherlandish art, including works by Hieronymus, Bosch, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Adriaen Brouwer, and Jan Steen. How do visual images connect with writers such as Erasmus and Rabelais, with polemical satires of the Reformation, and with popular literature along the lines Renard the fox. What historical developments were at play in the formation of comic stereotypes and the representation of charged events such as the celebration of carnival?

Course usage information

HIAA 1600F. Antwerp: Art and Urban History.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600G. Art + Religion in Early Modern Europe.

In this seminar we will reconstruct the various ways in which visual communication participated in the practice and changes of religious life during the early modern period (1400-1800). Topics will range from the role played by prints in the spread of the Reformation to the design of new kinds of architecture for the implementation of the Catholic Counter Reformation. Close attention will be given to the significance of iconoclasm (destruction of images), ideals of visual communication for religious persuasion, the invention of new methods of meditation with visual focus, and the relationship between sacred words and images. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600H. Comedy in Netherlandish Art From Hieronymus Bosch to Jan Steen.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600I. Collections and Visual Knowledge in Early Modern Europe: 1400-1800.

Examines the ways in which collections organized and developed new kinds of knowledge and practices. Collections were decisive in the formation of art, history, science, religion, politics, and international relations. We will discuss the rationales behind these different kinds of collections, the order in which things were placed, the visual organization and architecture that created the first museums, and the economics of collections. Attention to the collections of kings, artists, natural scientists, middle class citizens, humanists, and the devout will provide examples from a wide variety of perspectives. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

HIAA 1600J. Rembrandt.

This seminar will concentrate on art of Rembrandt. We will study his technique, development, and varied subject matter in all media from drawings to etchings and paintings. Rembrandt's work will be related to the historical contexts in which it was created and displayed. Prerequisite: previous courses in History of Art and Architecture. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

HIAA 1650A. About Face: English Portraiture: 1600-1800.

About Face: English Portraiture, 1660-1800: This course will consider the function and meaning of portraiture in England from Sir Peter Lely's 'Beauties' of Charles II to James Gillray's social and political satires. We will pay particular attention to the interrelationships between official portraiture and unofficial forms such as caricature.

Course usage information

HIAA 1650B. Visualizing Revolutionary Bodies 1785-1815.

The French Revolution was accompanied by crisis in representation that was both political and cultural. This seminar will examine the problem of how artists and their publics sought to image, or literally to "embody" new forms of individual and communal identity in painting, prints, public festivals, and sculpture. Students will be encouraged to draw on the resources of the John Hay Library, the RISD museum, and other local museums and archives for their research projects.

Course usage information

HIAA 1650C. Visual Culture and the Production of Identity in the Atlantic World, 1700-1815.

This seminar will examine the production, reception and circulation of visual culture within the vortex of the 18th century Atlantic world (including such sites as Britain, France, colonial America, Mexico and the Caribbean). Enrollment limit 20.

Course usage information

HIAA 1650D. Souvenirs: Remembering the Pleasures and Perils of the Grand Tour.

Examines visual image and objects, ranging from portraits, landscape watercolors and graphic satires, to cork models of antiquities, which served to remind and remake travelers' ideas of Italy and other sites on the eighteenth century Grand Tour of the European continent. We will examine the role of anxiety, laughter, pleasure and danger in a rite of passage that was designed to elevate and educate young men, artists, and increasingly, women and men from the middling orders. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1711. Black and White: Imagining Africans and African Americans in Visual Culture.

Examines forms of visual culture-paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture- that participate in the formation of racial, social, and national identity in the U.S. from c. 1776-1930. Focuses on how visual culture figured African and African Americans in their interrelationships with each other and with other social groups in the U.S. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1770. Architecture and Visual Culture of Empire.

This combined undergraduate and graduate seminar examines important urban and architectural concepts and practices that accompanied the expansion of colonial rule across much of the world during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics to be considered include: how early cultural encounters prefigured later representations of colonizing/colonized communities and their corresponding material cultures; colonial spatial orders and their implied relationship to forms of governance; debates on colonial domesticity and the proper arrangement of the home; and post-colonial architectural developments that grew out of the historical experience of de-colonization. We will consider primarily territories formerly under British, French, and German rule. WRIT A

Course usage information

HIAA 1850A. Frank Lloyd Wright.

Seminar concentrating on the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright-usually considered the most important architect in American history-and the critical discourse surrounding it. Selected scholarship serves as a paradigm for broader discussions about the history, contemporary roles, and shortcomings of architectural criticism and historiography. Examines the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation's approach to critical scholarship and the commercialization of Wright's oeuvre.

Course usage information

HIAA 1850D. Film Architecture.

Since the 1920s, a far-reaching discussion about the mutual influence between the two most important art forms of the 20th century - film and architecture - has engaged set designers, architects, cinematographers and critics. Apart from a fascination with the impact that the techniques of the new medium, such as montage, slow motion, close-ups and camera movements, would have on the perception and presentation of architecture, there continuously has been an enormous interest in the potential of film sets as a realm where visionary, historic, mystical or psychological space could be developed. This seminar will study selected chapters in the history of cinematic set design through the twentieth century and examine masterpieces, major movements, protagonists, and crucial theoretical debates. In addition, the course looks at the depiction of the city through film and the role of the movies as a reflection, commentary, and experimental laboratory for contemporary architecture. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1850E. Architecture, Light and Urban Screens.

This seminar explores the history, theory and practice of architectural illumination and the notion of electric light as a "building material." We will also consider the current interest in urban screens and media facades. The course will follow a historic trajectory from ca. 1900 to the present and will introduce the students to the most important techniques, protagonists and critical debates over the past 100 years. We will critically examine the broader implications of lighting design, the tension between luminous advertising and architectural illumination, the relationship to stage lighting, the implications of a "nocturnal modernity" and the use of light for propaganda purposes. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1850G. Contemporary American Urbanism: City Design and Planning, 1945-2000.

Examines the history of American urban planning from the canonization of the modernist tradition following WWII to its effect on urbanism over the remainder of the twentieth century. We will examine the influence of the modernist tradition on major urban processes of the time period, including urban renewal, sprawl, suburbanization, and downtown revival. The class considers how modernism was received and will include discussion on postmodern urban analysis and contemporary approaches to green planning. No prerequisites, but prior courses in twentieth century architecture, art, or visual culture will be helpful. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1850H. Berlin: Architecture, Politics and Memory.

This course deals with the architecture and urbanism of the German capital and the way the city’s traditions of commemoration in different phases of its history and under different political regimes. Students will research historic structures and sites of the 19th through 21st Centuries and engage with the intense German debate about historic preservation and commemoration. Depending on the approval of a GELT grant, one section of the course will be taught in Berlin during spring break. There we would meet with local architects, politicians and artists to discuss the city’s engagement with its dramatic past. A WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1870. Cannibalism, Inversion, and Hybridity: Creative Disobedience in the Americas.

This seminar examines how artists and intellectuals have depicted, constructed, and defied the notion of “America”. While focusing on Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries, we will also consider Chicano/a artistic production in the U.S. We will look at a series of concepts—cultural cannibalism, inversion, hybridity, in-betweeness, and tropicality—that shape our present understanding of the continent and subvert the legacy of colonialism and imperialism. This seminar considers these terms as current theoretical modes of inquiry and as recurring themes in cultural production, including literature and the visual arts. WRIT DPLL

Course usage information

HIAA 1870B. SoCal: Art in Los Angeles, 1945 to the Present.

Recent exhibitions, scholarship and media have turned to Los Angeles as a site of exploration of both American art and the larger frameworks of the Americas and international contemporary art. The character of media is directly connected to the circumstances of Los Angeles as a creative community built around an industry of visuality (film). This undergraduate seminar will examine postwar architecture, exhibitions, installation, land art, painting, performance, photography, public art and sculpture in Los Angeles and its impact on art history. This course may be open to a limited number of graduate students. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1890E. SoCal: Art in Los Angeles, 1945-Present.

Recent exhibitions, scholarship and media have turned to Los Angeles as a site of exploration of both American art and the larger frameworks of the Americas and International contemporary art. The charecter of media is directly connected to the circumstances of LA as a creative community built around an industry of visuality (film). This UG seminar will examine postwar architecture, exhibitions installation, land art, painting, performance, photography, public art and sculpture in LA and its impact on art history. This course may be open to a limited number of graduate students. WRIT

Course usage information

HIAA 1890G. Contemporary Art of Africa and the Diaspora.

Will explore the art of contemporary Africa and its diaspora with an eye towards understanding the political and economic context in which it is produced and consumed. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, putting key theoretical texts from anthropology on the political economy of Africa in dialog with the works of contemporary artists. However, the intent here is not to reduce creativity to an economic activity alone, though we will be addressing the topic of art markets. Rather, we will explore artistic practices that surmount "the tyranny of the 'already,'" as Malian writers Konate and Savane have eloquently said. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course usage information

HIAA 1910A. Providence Architecture.

Seminar examining selected aspects of the architecture of downtown Providence from the late 19th century to the present. Projects require research at local archives, libraries, and architectural drawings collections. Instructor permission required. A

Spr HIAA1910A S01 25514 M 3:00-5:30(13) (D. Neumann)
Course usage information

HIAA 1910B. Project Seminar: The Architecture of Bridges.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 1910D. Water and Architecture.

The seminar explores the varied ways in which water is manipulated in architecture and urban planning. We examine several case studies, including Roman aqueducts such as the Pont du Gard, medieval urban and monastic hydraulic systems, Renaissance and early modern garden (and fountain) design, and the local examples of Slater Mill and the Providence water supply. A

Course usage information

HIAA 1910E. Project Seminar for Architectural Studies Concentrators.

A

Course usage information

HIAA 1910F. City Senses: Urbanism Beyond Visual Spectacle.

Architecture and urbanism provide synesthetic experiences of space that don't necessarily privilege visual perception. This project seminar explores alternative approaches to design and an understanding of the city through explorations of all the senses. We will examine case studies of cities through the sounds of church bells, traffic, and water fountains; the smells of foods, plants, and sewers; or even the feelings of light and shade. Students are encouraged to work on projects that map the city through unconventional sensory markers, record sounds, distill scents, or film different corporal means of navigating the urban environment.

Course usage information

HIAA 1920. Individual Study Project in the History of Art and Architecture.

Reading and reports on an approved topic, supervised by a member of the staff. Project proposals must be submitted and approved no later than the first week of the semester. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 1930. The History and Methods of Art Historical Interpretation.

This seminar provides an overview of the methods and theories used by art historians and introduction to the history of the discipline. Through readings and discussions, we will examine how art history emerged as an intellectual pursuit and humanistic discipline in the modern era, and review its foundations in the Western philosophical tradition. The transformations wrought by the advent of critical theory and the incorporation of approaches from outside the discipline of art history will receive particular attention in the second half of the course. Open to juniors and seniors concentrating in History of Art and Architecture or Architectural Studies.

Course usage information

HIAA 1931. Museums, Histories, Critiques.

This course offers a historical and theoretical examination of the art museum from its eighteenth century inception to contemporary expectations and institutional critiques. We will explore the philosophical and social implications of collection and classification, architecture and display practice; institutional mission and audience experience; interpretive strategies and educational goals; curatorial practice and the artist as curator. This critical framework will offer a means to examine the museum's role in structuring knowledge and facilitating experience and its place within intellectual discourse and public life. WRIT

Fall HIAA1931 S01 17292 F 10:00-12:30(14) (S. Ganz Blythe)
Course usage information

HIAA 1990. Honors Thesis.

The subject of the thesis and program of study will be determined by the needs of the individual student. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 2212. The Pictured Text.

Writing makes language visible, and thus concerns images. Language also delimits the legibility of imagery. Turning words into images and images into words occurs at great speed around us. This course explores the relation of text and image across world traditions—Chinese, Mayan, Egyptian, Islamic, Greco-Roman, and others, extending up to the present. Topics include: calligraphy, context, scribal practice, the form and shape of writing, including typography, hidden or pseudo-writing, graffiti, and contemporary art.

Fall HIAA2212 S01 16321 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Moser)
Course usage information

HIAA 2300B. Research Seminar in Roman Art and Architecture: Topography of Rome.

Major monuments of the city of Rome from the Republic to the rise of Christianity.

Course usage information

HIAA 2300C. Allegories/Symbols in Roman Art, Origins in Hellenistic Art, Augmentation in Early Christian Art.

Roman historical relief sculpture.

Course usage information

HIAA 2400A. The Visual Culture of Medieval Women.

The course treats the history of women as commissioners, creators and subjects of medieval art. Case studies will be drawn from western Europe, Byzantium and Islam. Weekly seminars consider feminist perspectives in medieval history and art history; imaging of women in medieval art; archaeological approaches to gender and the analysis of gendered spaces; and the art and architecture of female spirituality.

Course usage information

HIAA 2410C. Representing the Past: Archaeology Through Image and Text.

The archaeological past exists for us through intermediaries that may be written or visual. Drawings, descriptions, photographs, graphs, charts and computer visualizations all display a considered image of the past. This seminar takes a critical look at the literature on visualization, and at the strategies by which scholars have re-presented the archaeological past of a range of cultures.

Course usage information

HIAA 2430B. The Afterlife of Antiquity.

Examines the survival and revival of classical art and architecture in the Middle Ages. Discussion focuses on selected case studies from across Europe and critically engages the secondary literature on classical revival.

Course usage information

HIAA 2440A. Recent Approaches to the Gothic Cathedral.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 2440B. The Medieval Monastery.

The seminar examines the medieval and early modern monastery as a research problem. The course examines the development of the monastery, and investigates the religious and functional aspects of monastic architecture. We will explore historical, art historical and archaeological approaches to monasticism. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 12.

Course usage information

HIAA 2440C. Recent Approaches to the Gothic Cathedral.

No description.

Course usage information

HIAA 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall HIAA2450 S01 14742 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 2540A. Book Illustration in the Early Modern Period.

This course will examine book illustration in the early modern period, seeking to identify the ways visual information is produced and how it relates to information in the text. Relationships between decoration in illustration and in architecture and painting will also be explored with an eye to the roles of pattern and visual convention in overtly didactic visual material.

Course usage information

HIAA 2540B. Print Culture in Early Modern Europe.

Examines the uses of prints, book illustration, and other pictorial printed schema in the early modern period, seeking to explain some of the ways visual information was produced and reproduced. Relationships between the prints and other arts are explored, with an eye to the roles of visual convention in overtly didactic materials such as maps and charts.

Course usage information

HIAA 2540C. Illustrating Knowledge in Early Modern Europe.

We will look at the history of scientific illustration in the age of the first printed books, using works in special collections libraries to investigate the exchange of ideas and the development of specializations in the arts and sciences from about 1450-1800. Focusing primarily on Italian examples, comparative projects may be chosen from any country in which the student can read the language.

Course usage information

HIAA 2540D. The Theater that was Rome.

"The Theater that was Rome" is a digital research site uniting text and images to portray the development of Rome (1500-1800) in the flood of printed information that proceeded from interest in the physical and mythological city. Our goal is to provide historical and critical interpretation of these illustrated books and prints that created Rome as a theater for the most advanced technological and decorative feats of an international group of artists, architects, engineers, authors, and publishers, looking at their productive collaborations, and using original materials, often in languages other than English, at the Hay Library and on the website. For graduate students; qualified upper-level undergraduates should contact the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15.

Course usage information

HIAA 2550A. The Visual Cultures of Southern Italy.

A workshop devoted to the visual cultures of Southern Italy, a geographical location with an unstable ruling population and sense of cultural identity from the late medieval through the early modern period. Projects about any aspect of art/architecture of Italy from south of Rome to Sicily are welcome. Research requires reading ability in Italian, Spanish, or French.

Course usage information

HIAA 2550B. Art and Charity in the Renaissance.

This seminar looks at the roles of art and architecture in commissioning charitable works in the service of maintaining a healthy civic body, including the design and decoration of hospitals, orphanages, ghettoes, homes for women, immigrants and the poor, in the context of institutional structures that provide for marginal people. Examples will be from Italy, but students may work in other areas.

Course usage information

HIAA 2600B. Flemish Art.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 2600C. Rubens.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 2600D. The Visual Culture of Religion in Antwerp: 1585-1794.

The seminar will study the central role of visual culture in Counter Reformation Antwerp.

Course usage information

HIAA 2600E. Jesuit Global Strategies in Art and Conversion.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the first global strategy to use art for the purpose of persuasion and conversion. In Europe, Asia, and the Americas during the early modern period, the Jesuits adapted their messages of visual communication, in architecture, prints, paintings, maps, dress, and rituals, to meet what they calculated would be the conceptual frameworks and customs of their target audiences, whether Chinese court officials, Flemish peasants. The seminar will search for the deeper historical roots of this strategy which up to now have not been traced. Open to graduate students only.

Course usage information

HIAA 2650A. Visual Culture and Cicum-Atlantic Exchange in the Long Eighteenth Century.

This course examines art and other forms of visual representation that imaged the colonial exchange between Europe and the Caribbean from the late 17th through the early 19th centuries. Readings include current scholarship in postcolonial theory devoted to theorizing colonial relationships in terms of transculturation and exchange. Students are encouraged to select research topics that allow them to take advantage of the rich trove of primary resources at the John Carter Brown and John Hay libraries.

Course usage information

HIAA 2760C. Paris in the 1860s.

No description available.

Course usage information

HIAA 2850A. Architectural Theory in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

Examines key texts in the history of architecture since the 1800s. Contrasts texts by architects with their actual work and places them into the social, political, and art historical context of their time. Texts by Schinkel, Semper, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, Otto Wagner, Le Corbusiser, Walter Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and others.

Course usage information

HIAA 2850B. Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright.

A seminar concentrating on the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright and the surrounding critical discourse. Wright is usually considered the most important architect in American history. Selected scholarship serves as a paradigm for broader discussions about the history, contemporary roles, and shortcomings of architectural criticism and historiography. Examines the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation's approach to critical scholarship and the commercialization of Wright's oeuvre.

Course usage information

HIAA 2850C. Architecture, Urbanism, and Post-Colonial.

This graduate seminar explores the relationship among architecture and urban design, colonial empire, and national development, via a comparative analysis of cultural interactions between Europe and its non-western "others" from ca. 1800 to the present. We will draw upon recent critical debates on orientalism, colonialism and empire, and politics of representation as well as interdisciplinary studies of modernity and identity.

Course usage information

HIAA 2850D. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

This seminar will explore the work of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, one of the most influential architects of the 20th Century. While Mies has been continually discussed and exhibited (the Museum of Modern Art alone held 7 exhibitions about him since 1947, most recently in 2001), to this day, his work has neither been contextualized sufficiently nor has its reception been criticially examined. Apart from studying and understanding Miles van der Rohe's work in its context, this seminar will explore responses by comtemporary critics and compare those to later interpretations.

Course usage information

HIAA 2850E. Architectural History's Future.

Through readings of new, cutting edge texts, this graduate seminar will reconsider how we write and teach architectural history. We will explore provocative recent frameworks such as the “global,” the shift from considering objects to thinking about processes, systems, networks, institutions etc. Our goal is to develop a self-reflexive praxis as historians, teachers, designers, and cultural workers.

Course usage information

HIAA 2860A. The Museum and the Photograph.

This graduate seminar examines the relationship between two rapidly evolving modern institutions: the history of photography and the modern art museum. Through readings, discussions, and independent research, we will look at how the history of photography has been affected by its unique association with the museum, and what this means for it as a field of intellectual inquiry. Enrollment limited to 18.

Course usage information

HIAA 2860B. Photographic Origins.

Through a series of directed readings and discussions, this seminar explores the origins and implications of photography's invention in the wake of Enlightenment philosophy, the industrial revolution, and Romanticism in Europe. No prerequisites, but background in the history of photography and/or 19th century Western art is encouraged.

Course usage information

HIAA 2860C. Roland Barthes.

In the past few decades, the ideas of the French philosopher Roland Barthes have been indispensible to our understanding of the photograph as a theoretical object. This graduate seminar will critically examine Barthes' writings on the subject, from Mythologies to Camera Lucida, placing them within the larger context of Barthes' structuralist project as a whole and contemporary analyses of photography and lens-based imagery.

Course usage information

HIAA 2860D. Photography and Objectivity.

From the moment of its arrival in Western culture, the photograph has been characterized as the product of a machine, of optics and chemistry. The mechanical nature of the medium seemed to guarantee it a special relation to its subject: the photograph showed something real, through an analog technology that was essentially objective. This graduate level seminar will investigate the notion of objectivity, as it has been analyzed in the history of science and other fields, and as it has been discussed in relation to photography. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

Course usage information

HIAA 2860F. The History of Photography in Theory and Practice.

As an area of academic inquiry, photography has been studied for only a few decades. But in the period, a variety of theoretical approaches to its history have been proposed and debated, across a spectrum of disciplinary perspectives. This graduate seminar examines the implications of this short, expansive historiography for scholarly work undertaken today and in the future.

Fall HIAA2860F S01 16831 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (D. Nickel)
Course usage information

HIAA 2870H. What is Contemporary Art History.

Contemporary art history is a field in formation. As such, it is often contested and embraced, misunderstood and championed. Is contemporary art history a radical new field with a discrete set of practices, methodology and historiography? Or is contemporary art history simply a study of the present? Is the study of the contemporary relevant to other areas of art history? Is contemporary art history a model for other disciplinary approaches to the present? Throughout the term, this graduate seminar will discuss each of these questions. This course is open to students of all art historical periods.

Course usage information

HIAA 2920. Methods of Research and Art Historical Interpretation.

Required of first-year and second year history of art and architecture A.M./Ph.D. students. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.

Fall HIAA2920 S01 16918 M 3:00-5:30(15) (E. Lincoln)
Course usage information

HIAA 2930. Practicum Working with Wood in the Middle Ages.

The graduate Practicum for 2015 will engage with the significant and understudied collection of medieval and early modern wooden sculpture at the RISD Museum. We will examine the collection from the perspective of its changing contexts: from forest to workshop, to the decorative, devotional and ceremonial roles objects played in medieval and early modern spaces. We will then consider the later contexts of these works: their use and reuse in early modern and modern sites, the circumstances of their transfer to collections of individuals and institutions and finally their installation as single works of art in the RISD museum.

Course usage information

HIAA 2940. Master's Qualifying Paper Preparation.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 2970. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for their doctoral examination.

Fall HIAA2970 S01 14743 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr HIAA2970 S01 23836 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 2980. Individual Reading (Single Credit).

Single credit. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 2981. Individual Reading (Double Credit).

Double credit. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 2982. Individual Reading for the Doctoral Candidate.

Single Credit. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 2983. Dissertation Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

HIAA 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who are preparing a thesis and who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the Registration Fee to continue active enrollment.

Fall HIAA2990 S01 14744 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr HIAA2990 S01 23837 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 2991. Dissertation Preparation.

For graduate students who are preparing a dissertation and who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment.

Fall HIAA2991 S01 14745 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr HIAA2991 S01 23838 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

HIAA 2992. Master's Thesis Preparation.

For students preparing a terminal MA thesis, may be repeated in the following semester. Sign up for sections according to individual primary advisor.

Course usage information

HIAA XLIST. Courses of Interest to Concentrators.

Fall 2016
The following related courses, offered in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in the History of Art and Architecture. Please see the course listing of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

Classics
CLAS 0660 The World of Byzantium
Cogut Center for Humanities
HMAN 1972C Picturing Paradise: Art and Science in the Americas
Italian Studies
ITAL 1580 Word, Image and Power in Renaissance Italy
Urban Studies
URBN 0210 The City: An Introduction to Urban Studies

Chair

Sheila Bonde

Professor

Roberta Bickford
Professor Emerita of History of Art and Architecture

Barrymore A. Bogues
Asa Messer Professor of Humanities and Critical Theory

Sheila Bonde
Professor of History of Art and Architecture; Professor of Archaeology and the Ancient World

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun
Professor of Modern Culture and Media; Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Stephen D. Houston
Dupee Family Professor of Social Science

Kay Dian Kriz
Professor Emerita of History of Art and Architecture

Evelyn Lincoln
Professor of History of Art and Architecture; Professor of Italian Studies

Steven D. Lubar
Professor of American Studies; Professor of History; Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Jeffrey M. Muller
Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Dietrich Neumann
Professor of History of Art and Architecture; Professor of Italian Studies; Professor of Urban Studies

Douglas R. Nickel
Andrea V. Rosenthal Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Rebecca Schneider
Professor of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies; Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Rudolf M. Winkes
Professor Emeritus of History of Art and Architecture

Catherine Zerner
Professor Emerita of History of Art and Architecture

Assistant Professor

Courtney J. Martin
Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Jeffrey C. Moser
Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Itohan I. Osayimwese
Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Visiting Scholar

Anne M. Schulz
Visiting Scholar in History of Art and Architecture

Architecture

The Architecture concentration allows students to develop a broad understanding of the concepts and methods for the planning and design of buildings, landscapes, and cities. The concentration was planned with the explicit goal of connecting architectural training firmly with the humanities and providing a greater awareness of global, environmental, social and economic issues in the built environment. This approach to the education of architects and urban planners is meant to provide them with the tools needed in today’s urban global society. Students who complete the concentration will have the option of transitioning into a 2-year Masters of Architecture program at the Rhode Island School of Design or several other architecture schools.

Concentration Requirements

Two RISD double-credit Design Studios: Students will take the courses at the Rhode Island School of Design but will register at Brown.2
Architectural Design
Advanced Design Studio
Six Core Requirements: 6
Select Four (4) Courses from RISD: Students will take the courses at the Rhode Island School of Design but will register at Brown.
Architectural Projection
Architectural Analysis
Structural Analysis
Wood Structures
Environmental Design II
Select Two (2) Courses from Brown:
A Global History of Art and Architecture
Islamic Art and Architecture
Architecture of the House Through Space and Time
Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
Modern Architecture
Contemporary Architecture
Prefabrication and Architecture
Six Additional Electives: 6
Two courses from History and Theory:
Introduction to American Art: The 19th Century
Architecture of the House Through Space and Time
Popes and Pilgrims in Renaissance Rome
Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
Contemporary Architecture
Prefabrication and Architecture
The Medieval Monastery
Providence Architecture
Water and Architecture
Two classes from Engineering and Design:
Introduction to Engineering
Dynamics and Vibrations
Mechanics of Solids and Structures
Appropriate Technology
DesignStudio
Projects in Engineering Design
Structural Analysis
Design of Civil Engineering Structures
Renewable Energy Technologies
Four additional electives from the following:
The Archaeology of College Hill
Tales of Two Cities: Havana - Miami, San Juan - New York
Urbanization in China
Reading New York
Environmental Stewardship
Sustainable Design in the Built Environment
Humans, Nature, and the Environment: Addressing Environmental Change in the 21st Century
Japanese Cities: Tokyo and Kyoto
Urban Latin America
Leading Social Ventures - Social Entrepreneurship in Action
Social Entrepreneurship
City Politics
International Political Economy
Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
Stage Lighting
Performance Historiography and Theatre History
Introduction to Set Design
Advanced Set Design
The City: An Introduction to Urban Studies
Fieldwork in the Urban Community
The Environment Built: Urban Environmental History and Urban Environmentalism for the 21st Century
Studio Foundation
Digital Printmaking
Sculpture II: Conceptual Propositions
Total Credits14

Honors

For students in the concentration who intend to go to architecture school afterwards, typically their design project in their double credit second RISD studio will be ideal for a capstone or honors project.  For others, who might tend towards theory or history of architecture, an honors thesis is still a valid option.

History of Art and Architecture

The concentration in History of Art and Architecture introduces students to the history of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students in HIAA explore Western and non-Western areas ranging over a wide period of time (Ancient, Medieval, Islamic, East Asian, Latin American, Early Modern, Modern/ Contemporary). Concentrators often focus on a particular period (e.g. ancient, modern architecture), a particular branch of the field (e.g. urbanism), or a methodology (e.g. semiotics, critical interpretation, archaeology), but students may choose to create their own program of study. Concentrators will receive essential training in perceptual, historical, and critical analysis. Concentrators often study abroad for first-hand knowledge of works of art and monuments as well as for exposure to foreign languages and cultures. Because foreign language skills are essential for pursuing art historical studies in a professional environment or in graduate school, HIAA requires two years of foreign language study.

History of Art and Architecture Requirements

To complete the concentration, you will be expected to take a minimum of ten courses (11 for honors). Our goal in setting out these requirements is to welcome students into a lively and diverse department that also shares a cohesive and strong commitment to the field. We as a faculty want students to cultivate their special interests and also to venture into areas that may not be so familiar but that will open new and exciting possibilities for them. Ten courses are only the minimum requirement. Beyond that students are encouraged to take courses at RISD, participate in study abroad programs, and take courses in other Brown departments. As we are a truly interdisciplinary department, you will also find that our faculty collaborates with members of other departments to teach courses that bring together the strengths of different disciplines. We encourage both experimentation and concentration.

Our general survey in history of art and architecture (HIAA 0010) is an excellent foundation for the concentration. It is not a prerequisite for taking other lecture courses but you can count it as one of the 4 non-core courses required for the concentration (see below for core and non-core courses).

Since the history of art and architecture addresses issues of practice within specific historical contexts, concentrators are encouraged to take at least 1 studio art course. Courses in history also train students in methods and approaches that are highly relevant to the history of art and architecture. Study abroad can be a valuable enrichment of the academic work available on campus, in that it offers opportunities for first-hand knowledge of works of art and monuments as well as providing exposure to foreign languages and cultures. Study abroad should be planned in consultation with the concentration advisor in order to make sure that foreign course work will relate meaningfully to the concentrators program of study.

Four core general lecture courses, numbered HIAA 0020 - HIAA 0940. The courses should be distributed between three of the seven available areas of the discipline: Ancient; Medieval; Islamic; East Asian; Latin American; Early Modern (ca. 1400-1800); Modern, Contemporary 14
A Global History of Art and Architecture
Introduction to the History of Architecture and Urbanism
Theories of Architecture from Vitruvius to Venturi
Introduction to Indian Art
Pre-Islamic Empires of Iran
Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture
The Architectures of Islam
Islamic Art and Architecture
Baroque
The Age of Rubens and Rembrandt: Visual Culture of the Netherlands in the Seventeenth Century
Introduction to American Art: The 19th Century
Nineteenth-Century Architecture
Introduction to the History of Art: Modern Photography
Architecture of the House Through Space and Time
Contemporary Photography
Toward a Global Late Antiquity:200-800 CE
Roman Art and Architecture: From Julius Caesar to Hadrian
Early Christian, Jewish, and Byzantine Art and Architecture
Gothic Art and Architecture
Muslims, Jews and Christians in Medieval Iberia
Gold, Wool and Stone: Painters and Bankers in Renaissance Tuscany
Popes and Pilgrims in Renaissance Rome
The Renaissance Embodied
Word, Image and Power in Renaissance Italy
From Van Eyck to Bruegel
Cultural History of the Netherlands in a Golden Age and a Global Age
The Other History of Modern Architecture
Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
African American and Caribbean Architectures: Domestic Space
Art After ‘68
20th Century Sculpture
Revolutionary Forms: 100 Years of Art and Politics in Latin America
History of Rhode Island Architecture
Modern Architecture
Contemporary Architecture
City and Cinema
20th Century British Art: Edwardian to Contemporary
City and Cinema
Two core seminar courses, numbered between HIAA 1040 and HIAA 1890 12
Topics in East Asian Art
Writing About the Arts
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio
Illustrating Knowledge
Seeing and Writing on Contemporary Arts
Architectural Drawing and Sketching
Introduction to Architectural Design
History of Urbanism, 1300-1700
History of Western European Urbanism 1200-1600
El Greco and Velazquez
El Greco and the Golden Age of Spanish Painting
Twentieth-Century American Painting
Prefabrication and Architecture
Ancient Art in the RISD Collection
Pompeii
Brushwork: Chinese Painting in Time
Topics in Classical Art and Architecture
The Palaces of Ancient Rome
Women and Families in the Ancient Mediterranean
Pompeii: Art, Architecture, and Archaeology in the Lost City
Topics in Hellenistic Art
Research Seminar Gothic Art
Topics in Islamic Art: Islamic Art and Architecture on the Indian Subcontinent
The Visual Culture of Medieval Women
The Gothic Cathedral
Painting in Mughal India 1550-1650
The Medieval Monastery
Topics in Medieval Archaeology
Topics in the Early History of Printmaking: Festival and Carnival
Italy and the Mediterranean
Mannerism
Renaissance Venice and the Veneto
Siena from Simone Martini to Beccafumi
The Arts of Renaissance Courts
Topics in Italian Visual Culture: The Visible City, 1400- 1800
Bosch and Bruegel: Art Turns the World Upside Down
Caravaggio
Italian Baroque Painting and Sculpture
The Art of Peter Paul Rubens
The World Turned Upside Down
Antwerp: Art and Urban History
Art + Religion in Early Modern Europe
Comedy in Netherlandish Art From Hieronymus Bosch to Jan Steen
Collections and Visual Knowledge in Early Modern Europe: 1400-1800
Rembrandt
About Face: English Portraiture: 1600-1800
Visualizing Revolutionary Bodies 1785-1815
Visual Culture and the Production of Identity in the Atlantic World, 1700-1815
Souvenirs: Remembering the Pleasures and Perils of the Grand Tour
Black and White: Imagining Africans and African Americans in Visual Culture
Architecture and Visual Culture of Empire
Frank Lloyd Wright
Film Architecture
Architecture, Light and Urban Screens
Contemporary American Urbanism: City Design and Planning, 1945-2000
Berlin: Architecture, Politics and Memory
SoCal: Art in Los Angeles, 1945-Present
Contemporary Art of Africa and the Diaspora
Providence Architecture
Project Seminar: The Architecture of Bridges
Water and Architecture
Project Seminar for Architectural Studies Concentrators
Individual Study Project in the History of Art and Architecture
The History and Methods of Art Historical Interpretation
Honors Thesis
Four elective courses. These can include courses taught in the department, cross-listed courses from other departments, or courses in other departments approved by the concentration advisor. HIAA 0010 may count as one of these courses but cannot count as one of the four core lecture courses. Students are encouraged to take a studio class as part of this requirement. 24
Total Credits10
1

 The six core lecture and seminar courses must be taken in the History of Art and Architecture department and cannot be replaced with independent study, honors thesis or classes taken in other departments, universities, or high schools.

2

 A maximum of two (2) credits may be allowed for courses taken at other universities (transfer credits or from study abroad) or courses that also count toward a second concentration. No concentration credit will be granted for AP/A-level scores, or for language classes. 

Architectural Studies Track

The Optional Architectural Studies track within the History of Art and Architecture concentration blends a variety of disciplines toward the study of buildings and the built environment. The concentration prepares students for the continued study of architecture and the history of architecture in graduate school as well as careers in related areas such as urban studies.

Because the architectural studies program was especially designed for students wishing to gain greater experience in the practical skills necessary for a career in architecture or a related field, concentrators are required to take a course in design from the Visual Arts Department, the Rhode Island School of Design or an introduction to architectural design, theatre set design at Brown University.

Four lecture courses. These courses will be numbered between HIAA 0020 and HIAA 0940 and will be marked with an "A" in the course description. The courses must be distributed over three of seven areas in architectural history: Ancient; Medieval; Islamic; East Asian; Latin American; Early Modern (ca. 1400-1800); Modern/Contemporary.4
Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture
Islamic Art and Architecture
Pre-Islamic Empires of Iran
The Architectures of Islam
Baroque
The Age of Rubens and Rembrandt: Visual Culture of the Netherlands in the Seventeenth Century
Introduction to American Art: The 19th Century
Nineteenth-Century Architecture
Introduction to the History of Art: Modern Photography
Architecture of the House Through Space and Time
Contemporary Photography
Toward a Global Late Antiquity:200-800 CE
Roman Art and Architecture: From Julius Caesar to Hadrian
Early Christian, Jewish, and Byzantine Art and Architecture
Gothic Art and Architecture
Muslims, Jews and Christians in Medieval Iberia
Gold, Wool and Stone: Painters and Bankers in Renaissance Tuscany
Popes and Pilgrims in Renaissance Rome
The Renaissance Embodied
Word, Image and Power in Renaissance Italy
From Van Eyck to Bruegel
Cultural History of the Netherlands in a Golden Age and a Global Age
The Other History of Modern Architecture
Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
African American and Caribbean Architectures: Domestic Space
Art After ‘68
20th Century Sculpture
Revolutionary Forms: 100 Years of Art and Politics in Latin America
History of Rhode Island Architecture
Modern Architecture
Contemporary Architecture
City and Cinema
20th Century British Art: Edwardian to Contemporary
City and Cinema
One seminar or independent study in architectural history, numbered between HIAA 1100 and HIAA 1890, and marked with an "A" in the course description. 11
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio
Illustrating Knowledge
Seeing and Writing on Contemporary Arts
Architectural Drawing and Sketching
Introduction to Architectural Design
History of Urbanism, 1300-1700
History of Western European Urbanism 1200-1600
El Greco and Velazquez
El Greco and the Golden Age of Spanish Painting
Twentieth-Century American Painting
Prefabrication and Architecture
Ancient Art in the RISD Collection
Pompeii
Brushwork: Chinese Painting in Time
Topics in Classical Art and Architecture
The Palaces of Ancient Rome
Women and Families in the Ancient Mediterranean
Pompeii: Art, Architecture, and Archaeology in the Lost City
Topics in Hellenistic Art
The Aesthetics of Color: History, Theory, Critique (GNSS 1960X)
Research Seminar Gothic Art
Topics in Islamic Art: Islamic Art and Architecture on the Indian Subcontinent
The Visual Culture of Medieval Women
The Medieval Monastery
The Gothic Cathedral
Topics in Medieval Archaeology
Prints and Everyday Life in Early Modern Europe
Topics in the Early History of Printmaking: Festival and Carnival
Italy and the Mediterranean
Mannerism
Renaissance Venice and the Veneto
Siena from Simone Martini to Beccafumi
The Arts of Renaissance Courts
Topics in Italian Visual Culture: The Visible City, 1400- 1800
Italian Baroque Painting and Sculpture
The Art of Peter Paul Rubens
Bosch and Bruegel: Art Turns the World Upside Down
Caravaggio
The World Turned Upside Down
Antwerp: Art and Urban History
Art + Religion in Early Modern Europe
Comedy in Netherlandish Art From Hieronymus Bosch to Jan Steen
Collections and Visual Knowledge in Early Modern Europe: 1400-1800
Architecture and Visual Culture of Empire
Frank Lloyd Wright
Film Architecture
Architecture, Light and Urban Screens
Contemporary American Urbanism: City Design and Planning, 1945-2000
Berlin: Architecture, Politics and Memory
A project seminar from the HIAA 1910 series. This must be taken in the junior or senior year. 1, 21
Providence Architecture
One studio art course in design 31
Three elective courses. These can include other courses taught in the History of Art and Architecture department and cross-listed courses in other departments that are pertinent to architectural studies. They may also include a select number of non-cross-listed courses approved by the concentration advisor. 4, 53
Total Credits10
1

 The two seminars cannot be replaced with independent study, honors thesis, or classes taken in other departments or universities. 

2

 In years where no project seminar is offered, any seminar that qualifies for architectural studies can become the starting point for a senior project.

3

 The studio course may be taken at Brown, RISD, Harvard Career Discovery and similar six week + summer programs.

4

 The non-cross-listed courses include but are not limited to MATH 0090, MATH 0100, PHYS 0030, PHYS 0040, ENGN 0030, Urban Studies and Engineering courses, and scenic design and technical production courses offered by the department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies. 

5

 A maximum of two credits may be awarded for courses taken at other universities or for courses that count toward a second concentration.  No concentration credit is awarded for high school AP/A-level courses or for language courses.

The below pertains to ALL concentrators in the department:

Language Requirement

You will be expected to demonstrate reading proficiency in a language other than English. By learning the language of another culture you will gain a deeper understanding of its art, literature and history. Aside from this, knowledge of a foreign language will equip you with a skill essential skill for pursuing art historical studies in a professional environment or graduate school. The requirement can be fulfilled by either passing an 0500 level language course at Brown or by demonstrating an 0500 level reading ability in a placement test administered by Brown University language department (Students who declared their concentration before August 2013 are expected to demonstrate proficiency at the 0400 level). 

Self Assesment

All concentrators are required to write an essay when they file for the concentration that lays out what they expect to gain from the course of study they propose.  All second semester seniors will be required to write a final essay that takes measure of what they have learned from the concentration, including their capstone and other experiences relating to their study of the history of art and architecture. For students doing a capstone, their capstone director will read this essay. A department subcommittee will read essays written by students not electing to do a capstone.  The self-assessment should be turned in with a revised list of courses actually taken and the final paperwork for concentration approval.

Capstone Project

At the beginning of your senior year you will be actively encouraged to propose and undertake a Capstone Project. The Capstone Project is intended to challenge you with an opportunity to synthesize at a high level of achievement the knowledge and understanding you have gained by concentrating in the History of Art and Architecture or Architectural Studies. To propose and work on a Capstone Project you will need the support of a faculty sponsor. Capstone Projects embrace many possibilities. You can perfect a seminar paper in which you have developed a strong interest. You can participate in a graduate seminar to which the instructor has admitted you. You can serve as an undergraduate TA. You can work as an intern in museums and auction houses such as Christie's. You might work on an archaeological excavation. You can participate in the Honors Program. Beyond these opportunities, the Department is open to other approaches. You should work with a faculty sponsor and with the Undergraduate Concentration Advisor to decide what will work best for you.

Honors

The Honors program in History of Art & Architecture and Architectural Studies will be administered as follows: accepted students will sign up for HIAA 1990  in the Fall and in the Spring. In the Fall, students will meet regularly with the whole Honors group and HIAA faculty to discuss methodology and general research and writing questions. In the Spring, students will continue to meet to present their research in progress to each other for comment and feedback. They will also be meeting regularly with their advisors and second readers throughout the year. Finished drafts of the thesis (which will generally be no more than 30-35 pages in length (exceptions to be determined in consultation with the instructor), not counting bibliography and visual materials) will be due to the advisor and second reader on April 1 of the Spring semester. Comments will be returned to the students for final corrections at that point. There will be a public presentation of the Honors work at the end of the Spring semester.

Students wishing to write an honors thesis should have an 'A' average in the concentration. It is advisable for them to have taken at least one seminar in the department and written a research paper before choosing to undertake a thesis. While acceptance into the Honors program depends on the persuasiveness of the thesis topic as well as the number of students applying, students may refine their proposals by speaking in advance with potential advisors. No honors student may take more than four classes either semester of their senior year-- being considered one of your four classes. Students who are expecting to graduate in the middle of the year are encouraged to discuss a different capstone project with individual advisors or the concentration advisor.

Honors Application Process

During the second semester of the junior year all concentrators will be invited to apply for admission to the Honor Program in History of Art and Architecture and Architectural Studies.

Admission to the Honors Program

  1. To be admitted to the Honors Program you should have produced consistently excellent work and maintained a high level of achievement in all your concentration course. You should have earned an A grade in most of your concentration courses.
  2. The key project for honors is to write an honors thesis. When you apply for admission you will be asked to submit a proposal of no more than two double-spaced pages that states the topic (subject and argument) of the research to be undertaken as clearly as possible, and add a one-page bibliography of the most relevant books and major articles to be consulted for the project. This three page application should be submitted, along with a resumé and a printout of the student's most recent available transcript and submitted to the Department with a short cover letter stating who you feel the most appropriate advisor and second readers are for the thesis and why, and what your preparation is for this project. Clarity and brevity are considered persuasive virtues in this process. Applicants will be notified about the success of their applications at the end of the semester.
  3. For admission to the Honor Program you must include with your proposal a letter of support from a faculty member of the History of Art and Architecture Department who has agreed to serve as your thesis advisor. You should discuss the thesis topic with your advisor before you submit your proposal. During the process of researching and writing you will meet regularly with your advisor to discuss your work.

Writing the Honors Thesis

  1. If you are accepted into the Honors Program you will register for HIAA 1990 during the two semesters when you are working on a thesis. This is a seminar led by the Department Undergraduate Concentration Advisor in which all honors students meet once a month to present the current progress of their work. It is a valuable opportunity to share ideas and receive feedback from your fellow honors students and faculty alike. The honors seminar also offers a practical framework around which you can organize the progress of your work.
  2. You will meet regularly with your thesis advisor and with a second reader to develop your ideas and writing.
  3. Finished drafts of the thesis, which will generally be no more than 30-35 pages in length (exceptions to be determined in consultation with the instructor), not counting bibliography and visual materials, will be due to the advisor and second reader by April 1 of the Spring semester or by November 1 of the Fall semester if you plan on graduating in December. Comments will be returned to the students for final corrections at that point. There will be a public presentation of the Honors work at the end of the Spring semester.

History of Art and Architecture

The department of History of Art and Architecture offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts (A.M.) degree and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree.

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/history-art-and-architecture