Institute at Brown for Environment and Society

The Institute at Brown for Environment & Society supports research to understand the interactions between natural, human and social systems. Our teaching programs prepare future leaders to envision and build a just and sustainable world. Our engagement programs take research from the lab to the statehouse, the hospital and the public sphere.

Undergraduate and graduate students can study conservation science and policy, water and food security, environmental health, climate science and meteorology, biogeography and evolution, and more. Research is conducted in laboratories, on supercomputers and at field sites around the world.

For additional information, please visit the Institute's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/institute-environment-society/

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ENVS 0070C. Transcending Transportation Impacts.

Students will be engaged in interdisciplinary analyses of the life-cycle costs, environmental impacts, technical developments, and policy innovations at the local and regional level. We will discuss technical modifications in vehicles, such as plug-in hybrids, as well as policy and planning on intermodal systems, recycle-a-bike programs, intelligent transportation systems, and other innovations. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS LILE WRIT

Fall ENVS0070C S01 16133 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (K. Teichert)
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ENVS 0070D. The Misuse of Scientific Information in American Life.

Many important political issues hinge on matters of science or technology. But most Americans are ill-equipped to assess these matters. As a result, we are vulnerable to spin when scientific information is distorted, cherry-picked or otherwise misused to advance financial, political or even religious goals. This course examines ways these phenomena skew public discussion of climate change, vaccine safety, the teaching of evolution, cancer screening, GM food and a host of other issues. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS LILE WRIT

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ENVS 0070E. What Does It Mean To Be Green?.

What does it mean to be green? From saving energy to recycling to eating organic food, in recent years the idea of going green has gained increasing attention. But green is not solely a proxy for environmentalism: it encompasses competing, and at times contradictory meanings. This seminar places contemporary green debates in historical and cross-cultural contexts. We'll examine multiple paradigms of greenness in the Global South as well as the Global North. Topics range from imperial visions of tropical landscapes to the green revolution emphasis on agrochemicals, from conservation to climate change. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. DPLL FYS WRIT

Fall ENVS0070E S01 16775 M 3:00-5:30(15) (D. Graef)
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ENVS 0110. Humans, Nature, and the Environment: Addressing Environmental Change in the 21st Century.

Offers a survey introduction to contemporary environmental issues and is a "gateway" class for those interested in concentrations in environmental studies/sciences. We explore the relationships between human societies and the non-human environment through a survey of topical cases, including: human population growth and consumption, global climate change, toxins, waste streams, water resources, environmental justice and ethics, and agro-food systems. This course also analyzes various solutions—social, political, technical, and economic—put forth by institutions and individuals to address questions of environmental sustainability. One 90-minute weekly discussion group required. WRIT

Fall ENVS0110 S01 16132 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (D. King)
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ENVS 0120. Botanical Roots of Modern Medicine (BIOL 0190E).

Interested students must register for BIOL 0190E.

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ENVS 0121. Plants, Food, and People (BIOL 0190H).

Interested students must register for BIOL 0190H.

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ENVS 0220. Physical Processes in Geology (GEOL 0220).

Interested students must register for GEOL 0220.

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ENVS 0240. Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet (GEOL 0240).

Interested students must register for GEOL 0240.

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ENVS 0241. Climate and Climate Change (GEOL 0030).

Interested students must register for GEOL 0030.

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ENVS 0260. Religion Gone Wild: Spirituality and the Environment (RELS 0260).

Interested students must register for RELS 0260.

Fall ENVS0260 S01 16382 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 0300. Environment and Society in Africa (SOC 0300L).

Interested students must register for SOC 0300L.

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ENVS 0410. Environmental Stewardship.

Challenges students to address the economics and logistics of implementing strategies to conserve resources and reduce the negative impacts of the built environment. The goal is to learn the rationale, process and technical aspects of the practice of environmental stewardship. Topics include sustainable design, institutional change, and corporate environmental responsibility. Students collaborate in interdisciplinary teams on applied projects. Permission by instructor by application process prior to enrollment in the class.

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ENVS 0420. Principles of Ecology (BIOL 0420).

Interested students must register for BIOL 0420.

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ENVS 0455. Coastal Ecology and Conservation.

Enables students to master fundamental ecological concepts and explore how this knowledge can be used to inform conservation and management. Students will develop scientific skills and experience the challenges of coastal conservation science through both case studies and field trips, including a mandatory overnight trip. Suitable for students with at least some biology background; the course is aimed at first and second year undergraduates. Expected background: BIOL 0200 or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 15; instructor permission required. WRIT

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ENVS 0460. Restoration Ecology.

This intermediate-level, writing intensive course will enable students to master fundamental ecological concepts and understand how this knowledge can be used to inform ecological restoration and stewardship, particularly in urbanized coastal areas of New England. Through case studies, discussions and field trips to active restoration sites, students will deepen their scientific knowledge and experience the challenges and opportunities of ecological restoration. This course is particularly appropriate for students interested in engaged research as they will meet and collaborate with environmental professionals. Course capped at 15 - admission by application only. Contact Prof. Leslie, Heather_Leslie@brown.edu by May 1, 2015 to apply. Pre-requisite: BIOL 0200 or equivalent. WRIT

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ENVS 0490. Environmental Science in a Changing World.

Introduces students to environmental science and the challenges we face in studying human impacts on an ever-changing earth system. We will explore what is known, and not known, about how ecosystems respond to perturbations. This understanding is crucial, because natural systems provide vital services (water and air filtration, climate stabilization, food supply, erosion and flood control) that can not be easily or inexpensively replicated. Special emphasis will be placed on climate, food and water supply, population growth, and energy.

Fall ENVS0490 S01 16577 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (S. Porder)
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ENVS 0495. Introduction to Environmental Social Science.

This course introduces students to core areas of theory and research in the environmental social sciences. It also challenges students to think carefully about what we learn and don’t learn when we apply different disciplinary lenses to interdisciplinary environmental challenges.

Spr ENVS0495 S01 25015 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (S. Frickel)
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ENVS 0510. International Environmental Law and Policy.

Introduces students to principles of international environmental law and examines how international organizations, national governments and non-state actors interact to address human impacts on the global environment. Considers effects of treaties, trade agreements and foreign aid on resolution of trans-boundary environmental problems including climate change, marine governance, biodiversity loss and trade in endangered species and hazardous waste. Students negotiate a mock treaty (NEWORLD) to mitigate some aspect of human impact on global change from the perspective of different state and non-state actors. Introductory coursework that addresses some aspects of environmental studies or environmental science is recommended. WRIT LILE

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ENVS 0520. Wild Literature in the Urban Landscape.

Combines deep study of ecological poetry, fiction, essays and other writing with service to schools in the community through exploration of local ecological challenges through both creative and more discursive expressions. The field-work or community component to this course will involve students in conducting workshops that combine literature and ecology in order to better elucidate and understand local issues related to, for one example, eco-industrial histories associated with Gorham Silver in Providence and the current state of Masphpaug Pond on the Reservoir Triangle, where a public high school, Alvarez, now sits on contaminated soil. Enrollment limited to 22 undergraduates. S/NC.

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ENVS 0580. Foundations of Physical Hydrology (GEOL 0580).

Interested students must register for GEOL 0580.

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ENVS 0700A. New England Environmental History.

Explores the environmental history of New England from the arrival of people circa 10,000 years ago to the present day. Topics include Native American and colonial environmental interactions and 20th century environmental transformations. From abandoned textile mills to Northern forests, understanding the history of a place can help us plan for its future.

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ENVS 0700C. Extinction: A Global History.

In the past five centuries, about 800 species of animals and plants have gone extinct, the majority of them in the last one hundred years. Recent estimates suggest that 41 percent of described amphibians, 26 percent of mammals, and 13 percent of birds currently face the threat of extinction. We will examine the current global extinction crisis as a biological, historical, cultural, economic, and political phenomenon. This course adopts an interdisciplinary approach by examining the issue of extinctions from the perspectives of the humanities and environmental sciences.

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ENVS 0900. Quantitative Methods in Psychology (CLPS 0900).

Interested students must register for CLPS 0900.

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ENVS 0930A. Appropriate Technology (ENGN 0930A).

Interested students must register for ENGN 0930A.

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ENVS 1000. Fieldwork in the Urban Community (URBN 1000).

Interested students must register for URBN 1000.

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ENVS 1070. The Burden of Disease in Developing Countries (PHP 1070).

Interested students must register for PHP 1070.

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ENVS 1110. Estuarine Oceanography (GEOL 1110).

Interested students must register for GEOL 1110.

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ENVS 1260. Indigenous People and Nature: Birds (ANTH 1260).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1260.

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ENVS 1270. From Magic Mushrooms to Big Pharma: Anthropology of Drugs (ANTH 1880).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1880.

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ENVS 1330. Global Environmental Remote Sensing (GEOL 1330).

Interested students must register for GEOL 1330.

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ENVS 1331. Weather and Climate (GEOL 1350).

Interested students must register for GEOL 1350.

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ENVS 1350. Environmental Economics and Policy.

This course equips students with theoretical and empirical tools to analyze environmental issues from the perspective of economics. First, we review when and why the markets fail, competing policy solutions (e.g., cap-and-trade), and cost-benefit analysis. Second, we survey methods to quantify the benefits of environmental regulations, including revealed and stated preference methods, a primer on climate-economy modeling, and a real-world application in a class research project. Third, we study the costs of environmental regulations. We conclude with advanced policy considerations (e.g., trans-boundary pollutants), private market solutions/corporate social responsibility, and select special topics (e.g., resources and economic development). Economics concentrators must register for ECON 1350 instead.

Fall ENVS1350 S01 16817 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (L. Barrage)
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ENVS 1355. Environmental Issues in Development Economics.

Examines environmental issues in developing countries, including air and water pollution, land use change, energy use, and the extraction of natural resources. Uses microeconomic models of households and firms, linking household/firm decision-making on environmental issues to choices in labor, land, and product markets. Develops basic empirical techniques through exercises and a project. For readings, relies exclusively on recent research to illustrate the roles of econometrics and economic theory in confronting problems at the nexus of the environment, poverty, and economic development. Suggested background: ECON 1630, and ENVS 1350 or ECON 1480. Prerequisites: ECON 1110 or 1130; and ECON 1620.

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ENVS 1356. Health, Hunger and the Household in Developing Countries (ECON 1530).

Interested students must register for ECON 1530.

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ENVS 1370. Environmental Geochemistry (GEOL 1370).

Interested students must register for GEOL 1370.

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ENVS 1400. Sustainable Design in the Built Environment.

Provides students with an in-depth understanding of sustainability, as it relates to planning, engineering, architecture, landscape architecture and green buildings. Students conduct economic and environmental analyses to examine planning, design and building problems and opportunities holistically. Interdisciplinary teams work on applied design projects. LILE

Fall ENVS1400 S01 16134 W 3:00-5:30(17) (K. Teichert)
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ENVS 1410. Environmental Law and Policy.

Introduces students to environmental law in the United States. Uses legal decisions and policy frameworks to consider the roles of non-/governmental actors in formation and implementation of environmental policy. Students will become familiar with major federal environmental laws and regulatory databases and see how legal precedent, differing understandings of risk and alternative regulatory and market-enlisting strategies have shaped solutions to environmental problems. Provides opportunity to apply legal skills to local environmental legislation or legal problem. Intermediate coursework in Environmental Studies, Political Science, Community Health, Urban Studies or other environmentally-related coursework is recommended. First year students need instructor permission.

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ENVS 1415. Power, Justice, and Climate Change.

Climate change creates injustices in who caused the problem, who is suffering worst and first, and who is taking action. Power differences between nations and social groups drives unequal disaster risks and "compounded vulnerabilities" for poor peoples and nations, and has led to gridlock in United Nations negotiations. The course reviews social and political dimensions of climate change, including local and national adaptation and mitigation efforts, media dynamics, collective and individual denial, negotiations, and the rise of climate social movements. Enrollment limited to 40. WRIT

Spr ENVS1415 S01 25399 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (J. Roberts)
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ENVS 1440. Conservation Biology (BIOL 1470).

Interested students must register for BIOL 1470.

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ENVS 1450. Ecosystem Analysis.

Develops ability to measure and characterize important biological and physical parameters of terrestrial ecosystems. Weekly field trips to explore measurement techniques and develop testable questions and/or hypotheses about different forested ecosystems. Qualitative and quantitative writing exercises explore how to describe the patterns and processes associated with the ecosystems visited. One Saturday field trip to central Massachusetts and one weekend field trip to New Hampshire are required. A background in environmental issues, as evidenced by taking BIOL 0420, is strongly recommeded.

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ENVS 1455. Marine Conservation Science and Policy.

Students will develop an interdisciplinary understanding of ocean ecosystems and how humans are connected to them socially, economically, and ecologically. Integration of the scientific and human dimensions of marine conservation will be achieved through analysis of the current status, trends, and threats to ocean ecosystems, and the range of solutions to mediate these threats. This course is designed for advanced juniors, seniors and graduate students; participating students are expected to have background in at least one related field (e.g., biology, geosciences, sociology, economics, or political science) beyond the intermediate level. Suggested prerequisites include ENVS 0490, BIOL 0420 or 1470.

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ENVS 1460. Microbial Diversity and the Environment.

This is a lecture and discussion based course that focuses on the role of microbes in biological, geological, and environmental processes. This includes: introductory concepts, origins of life, bacterial evolution, role in climate change, metabolic diversity of biogeochemical cycles, microbial communities and interactions, habitat specific examples, and applications in the environment and human health. Recommended background courses: BIOL 0200, CHEM 0330 and an intermediate science course (e.g., BIOL 0280, GEOL 0240, or ENVS 0490). WRIT

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ENVS 1490. SES-Independent Study/Science Writing.

The culmination of the Semester in Environmental Sciences at the Marine Biological Laboratory is an independent research project that builds on the topics covered in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem analysis core courses. In addition students participate in a seminar designed to help improve their ability to tell a lay reader about science. Enrollment is limited to students in this program. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENVS1490 S01 11071 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 1491. SES-Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis.

Team-taught course examining: the structure of terrestrial ecosystems fundamental biogeochemical processes, physiological ecology, impacts of environmental change on the landscape; the application of basic principles of ecosystem ecology to investigating contemporary environmental problems. Part of the Semester in Environmental Science at the Marine Biological Laboratory; enrollment is limited to students in this program. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENVS1491 S01 11072 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 1492. SES-Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis.

Team-taught course examining the structure of freshwater, estuarine and marine ecosystems; impacts of environmental change on the landscape at local regional and global scales; the application of basic principles of ecosystem ecology to investigating contemporary environmental problems such as coastal eutrophication, fisheries exploitation. Part of the Semester in Environmental Science at the Marine Biological Laboratory; enrollment is limited to students in this program. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENVS1492 S01 11073 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 1493. SES-Environmental Science Elective.

Two environmental science electives are offered each fall semester as part of the Semester in Environmental Science at the Marine Biological Laboratory, including: aquatic chemistry, mathematical modeling of ecological systems and microbial ecology. Enrollment is limited to students in this program. Instructor permission required.

Fall ENVS1493 S01 11074 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 1500. Environmental Justice and Climate Change in Rhode Island TRI-Lab Engaged Research.

The TRI- Lab (Teaching, Research, Impact) on Climate Change and Environmental Justice in Rhode Island will be taught by a team including two experts from the RI state Department of Health. It will investigate ways to reduce the climate change-related public health risks to vulnerable individuals in three targeted neighborhoods in Providence, and increase the capacities of these neighborhoods to respond to climate change threats. Content topics to be covered include: projected climate change impacts in RI; public health risk assessment; risk outreach and communications strategies; state and federal policies, design and evaluation of adaptive responses; community-based research methods.

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ENVS 1510. Environmental Theory and Philosophy.

Each student develops his or her own concept of "socially better." The task is to understand conceptions of "socially better" belonging to various authors and others in the class, to put one's own concept in context with the readings and class discussion, and explain why that concept is sensible and should be taken seriously by others. Prerequisite: ENVS 1350 or permission of the instructor.

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ENVS 1530. From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy.

Examines the evolution of property law and tenure in land, water, the atmosphere and natural resources, and the consequences of these property rights regimes for environmental protection. Readings drawn from the scientific, legal, public policy and popular literature are used to consider the development of American attitudes about the relationship between people and nature; the relationship between public and private rights in the land, sea, freshwater, atmosphere and wildlife; and the use of innovative property rights regimes in environmental policy. Intermediate coursework in Environmental Studies, Urban Studies, American Civilizations or other environmentally-related coursework is recommended. WRIT

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ENVS 1540. Technology and Material Culture in America: The Urban Built Environment (AMST 1520).

Interested students must register for AMST 1520.

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ENVS 1555. Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems.

Urban agriculture and community gardens have a critical function in a small but increasing movement toward more localized and sustainable food economies. This class will explore research and readings from multiple disciplines on the role of urban agriculture in world development and sustainability practices. Further, we will explore current U.S. farm policy, labor practices, and institutions impacting agricultural systems. More importantly, students will learn organic practices and be involved in planning and developing local urban agriculture projects. Enrollment limited to 40. Instructor permission required. E-mail Prof. King to request override (Dawn_King@brown.edu).

Spr ENVS1555 S01 24965 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (D. King)
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ENVS 1556. Environmentalism and the Politics of Nature (ANTH 1556).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1556.

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ENVS 1570. Guts of the City: Perspectives on Urban Infrastructure and Environmental Planning (URBN 1570).

Interested students must register for URBN 1570.

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ENVS 1575. Engaged Climate Policy at the UN Climate Change Talks.

Twelve undergraduate students will study a group of core readings, conduct independent and group projects, and attend the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's (UNFCCC) 22nd Conference of the Parties (COP22) and related climate change events in Marrakesh, Morocco in November 2016. Students will critically analyze contemporary political events; develop and addresses pertinent research questions; engage with and interview experts in the field; craft policy-relevant and empirically grounded publications; and develop experience in using social media. Team-based research may be shared at the climate negotiations in Marrakesh. Contact J. Timmons Roberts for an application - j_timmons_roberts@brown.edu.

Fall ENVS1575 S01 16971 M 3:00-5:30(15) (J. Roberts)
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ENVS 1580. Environmental Stewardship and Resilience in Urban Systems.

This course investigates current environmental impacts and risks related to urban infrastructure systems. Students analyze efforts to minimize negative environmental, health and economic impacts of the built environment. The course explores urban initiatives to increase sustainability and resiliency of infrastructure systems in anticipation of increased risks related to climate change. The goal is to learn the rationale, process and technical aspects of the practice of environmental stewardship and resilience planning in an urban context. Students will develop competence in technical analysis, policy analysis, and program implementation through case studies and systems analyses.

Spr ENVS1580 S01 25014 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (K. Teichert)
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ENVS 1615. Making Connections: The Environmental Policy Process.

The diminishing quantity and quality of the resources of the Earth carries profound implications for the fulfillment of human rights and aspirations. But even as we understand better the intrinsic interdependencies between humans and the environment, policy gridlock persists. Indeed, the findings of fundamental environmental science are regularly contested on political grounds. The purpose of this course is to learn how to apply knowledge to map the relevant policy context in environmental issues, and to develop the tools and approaches to address any problem of decision in the environmental arena more creatively, effectively, and responsibly. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

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ENVS 1650. Statistical Inference I (APMA 1650).

Interested students must register for APMA 1650.

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ENVS 1660. Instrumental Analysis with Environmental Applications (GEOL 1660).

Interested students must register for GEOL 1660.

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ENVS 1700B. Watershed Policy + Management: Governance Beyond Borders.

Changes in land use at parcel and landscape scales have altered water cycles, water quality and water-dependent ecosystems. Governance Beyond Borders examines the management of water, land use and aquatic life in coastal watersheds. We will consider the accomplishments of the top-down, expert-driven federal laws of the 1960s and 1970s. However we will focus on integrated, trans-boundary approaches to governance of land, water, pollutants and aquatic life and become immersed in thinking like a watershed. ENVS1410 is desirable but not required. Other relevant courses could include BIOL1470, ENVS1350, ENVS1530, ENVS1615. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. Instructor’s approval is required. WRIT

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ENVS 1710. Environmental Health and Policy.

Provides an overview of environmental health methods and their application to policy and regulation. Students will learn the basic tools of environmental health sciences, including toxicology, epidemiology, and risk assessment, as well as the scientific basis for regulation. Traditional environmental health concerns will be discussed, as well as emerging discourses on environmental health issues, including urban pollution and its concomitant health concerns, climate change, issues of health disparities and environmental injustice, and the interrelationship between humanitarian crises and environmental degradation. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students of all fields, space permitting. Prerequisite: ENVS 0110 or instructor permission.

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ENVS 1711. Current Topics in Environmental Health (PHP 1700).

Interested students must register for PHP 1700.

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ENVS 1720. Environmental Justice: The Science and Political Economy of Environmental Health and Social Justice.

Provides an overview of environmental justice history, theory and definitions. Students will review quantitative, qualitative, and theoretical approaches for understanding the origins and persistence of environmental discrimination. Examines the regulatory, institutional, structural, political, and economic forces that underlie patterns of race and class-based discrimination and their implications for environmental health among diverse communities. Case examples of environmental justice organizing will inform students of positive efforts by people of color in protecting their communities. Not open to first year students. Prerequisite: ENVS 0110.

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ENVS 1725. Political Economy of the Environment in Latin America (INTL 1450).

Interested students must register for INTL 1450.

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ENVS 1755. Globalization and the Environment.

What are the effects of globalization on the environment? Can globalization be greened? Corporations, civil society, international organizations and states are in a race to globalize their rules, sometimes working together, and others times in bitter conflict. This course seeks to understand this set of issues through a mix of examining concrete social/environmental problems and studying theories of globalization and social change. While addressing global issues and the impacts of wealthy nations, this course focuses most on the developing countries, where the impacts of these global issues appear to be worst, and where resources are fewest to address them. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT

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ENVS 1790. North American Environmental History (HIST 1790).

Interested students must register for HIST 1790.

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ENVS 1791. From Nature's Dangers to Nature Endangered: A History of American Environmental Thought (HIST 1977T).

Interested students must register for HIST 1977T.

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ENVS 1820. Environmental Health and Disease (BIOL 1820).

Interested students must register for BIOL 1820.

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ENVS 1824. Environmental Political Thought (POLS 1824L).

Interested students must register for POLS 1824L.

Fall ENVS1824 S01 17470 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 1872. Feathery Things: An Avian Introduction to Animal Studies (HMAN 1972F).

Interested students must register for HMAN 1972F.

Fall ENVS1872 S01 16786 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 1890. Native American Environmental Health Movements (ETHN 1890J).

Interested students must register for ETHN 1890J.

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ENVS 1900. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications (GEOL 1320).

Interested students must register for GEOL 1320.

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ENVS 1910. The Anthropocene: The Past and Present of Environmental Change.

Scholars in many disciplines have begun using the term the Anthropocene to signal a geological epoch defined by human activity. This seminar examines the Anthropocene idea from the perspective of environmental history. What activities might have changed the planet – the use of fire thousands of years ago, or agriculture, or fossil fuels? Is the Anthropocene another term for climate change, or does it include pollution and extinction? Is it a useful concept? Drawing on anthropology and the sciences as well as history, we will use the Anthropocene to think through environmental change and the human relationship with the non-human world. WRIT

Fall ENVS1910 S01 17119 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (B. Demuth)
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ENVS 1920. Methods for Interdisciplinary Environmental Research.

This course provides an introduction to a wide range of research approaches in the social and environmental sciences. We will cover the epistemological and theoretical foundations of various research approaches and discuss implications of these foundations for what research questions are answerable and what evidence one can bring to bear to answer such questions. By the end of the semester, students will be able to write a clear and answerable research question, and know what methods are appropriate to use to answer such a question. Enrollment limited to ENVS Juniors. ENVS seniors must receive instructor override from Professor VanWey, leah_vanwey@brown.edu. WRIT

Fall ENVS1920 S01 16580 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (L. Vanwey)
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ENVS 1925. Energy Policy and Politics.

From coal power to solar power, energy drives economies and increases quality of life world-wide. However, this same energy use can, and often does, lead to severe environmental destruction/pollution and global warming. This course serves as an introduction to energy policy in the United States and also explores global attempts to solve energy problems. This course examines different types of energy sources and uses, different ideological paths driving energy policy, the environmental impacts of energy use, current global and domestic attempts to solve energy problems, and the role of renewable and alternative forms of energy in future energy policy.

Spr ENVS1925 S01 24966 M 3:00-5:30(13) (D. King)
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ENVS 1927. Nature, Society and Culture.

This senior seminar provides a selective overview of major approaches, debates, and interdisciplinary cross-currents shaping environmental sociology. It’s designed to give substantive background to undergraduate students interested in pursuing a specialization in environmental sociology or related field in graduate studies. It will also give Sociology graduate students a broad foundation from which to build their own environmental sociological research program. Our general goal is to deepen collective understanding of the dynamic interrelationships shaping human societies and the natural environment.

Fall ENVS1927 S01 16966 Th 4:00-6:30(09) (S. Frickel)
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ENVS 1929. The Fate of the Coast: Land Use and Public Policy in an Era of Rising Seas.

For the last few decades, there has been a land-rush on the ocean coasts of the United States. Unfortunately, this swamps the coast at a time when sea levels are on the rise. In some places the rise is natural, in some places the rise is exacerbated by human activities and everywhere it is fueled by climate change. This course will examine the causes of sea level rise, the effects it produces on land, the steps people have taken to deal with these effects and their consequences, and possible remedies. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to juniors and seniors. WRIT

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ENVS 1930. Land Use and Built Environment: An entrepreneurial view (ENGN 1930S).

Interested students must register for ENGN 1930S.

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ENVS 1931. Renewable Energy Technologies (ENGN 1930U).

Interested students must register for ENGN 1930U.

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ENVS 1965. Engaged Environmental Scholarship and Communication.

This upper level seminar will enable to students to place their research in the context of environmentally relevant policy and practice. Development of an environmentally-focused thesis or independent research project is a prerequisite. Students will hone practical professional skills, e.g. how to communicate scientific findings to the media and policy audiences; oral presentation skills, and tips on professional interactions. Required of all Brown Environmental Fellows (http://blogs.brown.edu/bef/), and open to others engaged in environmentally relevant projects from the natural and social sciences and humanities. Enrollment is limited to 15 seniors and graduate students, by application only (available Fall 2011). Instructor permission required. Contact Heather_Leslie@brown.edu for more information. WRIT

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ENVS 1970. Independent Study.

First semester of individual analysis of environmental issues, required for all environmental studies concentrators. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor override required prior to registration.

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ENVS 1971. Independent Study.

Second semester of individual analysis of environmental issues, required for all environmental studies concentrators. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor override required prior to registration.

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ENVS 2010. Special Topics in Environmental Studies.

A mandatory seminar for graduate students in environmental studies. This course develops group problem-solving skills by addressing a current local, national or global environmental issue. We will work on problem definition, identifying options for addressing the problems, and crafting potential solutions. In all stages we work closely with non-profit groups, government agencies, or firms, who have the capacity to implement solutions. Students learn basic research design and begin the process of developing a research question and possible methods for conducting their Master's thesis research.

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ENVS 2110B. Radical American Romanticism:Democratic, Environmental,+ Religious Traditions in America(RELS 2110B).

Interested students must register for RELS 2110B.

Spr ENVS2110B S01 25057 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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ENVS 2420. The Structure of Cities (ECON 2420).

Interested students must register for ECON 2420.

Course usage information

ENVS 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Course usage information

ENVS 2980. Reading and Research.

First semester of thesis research during which a thesis proposal is prepared. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor override required prior to registration.

Course usage information

ENVS 2981. Reading and Research.

Second semester of thesis research. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor override required prior to registration.

Course usage information

ENVS 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Director

Amanda Lynch

Deputy Director or Education

Dov F. Sax

Deputy Director of Research

Leah K. Vanwey

Professor

Timothy D. Herbert
Henry L. Doherty Professor of Oceanography

Amanda Lynch
Sloan Lindemann and George Lindemann, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Environmental Studies

John F. Mustard
Professor of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences; Professor of Environmental Studies

J. Timmons Roberts
Ittleson Professor of Environmental Studies

Leah K. Vanwey
Professor of Environment and Society and Sociology

Visiting Professor

Lenore H. Manderson
Visiting Professor of Environmental Studies

Associate Professor

Scott A. Frickel
Associate Professor of Sociology and Environment and Society

Meredith K. Hastings
Associate Professor of Environment and Society and Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences

Stephen Porder
Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Environment and Society

Dov F. Sax
Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies

Assistant Professor

Lint Barrage
Assistant Professor of Economics and Environment and Society

James R. Kellner
Peggy and Henry D. Sharpe Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies

Assistant Professor Research

Siri Veland
Assistant Professor of Environment and Society (Research)

Senior Lecturer

Kurt Teichert
Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies

Lecturer

Dawn King
Lecturer in Environment and Society

Visiting Lecturer

Cornelia Dean
Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Environmental Studies

Visiting Scientist

Guy W. H. Edwards
Visiting Scientist in Environment and Society

Postdoctoral Research Associate

Hayley N. Schiebel
Postdoctoral Research Associate in Environment and Society

Environmental Studies

Many of the most pressing challenges of the 21st Century are environmental ones. We must find ways to feed a growing human population while maintaining the natural life support system provided by the Earth's ecosystems; to make built environments more efficient as urban areas continue to grow dramatically in size; and to meet the challenges posed by rising sea-level and increasing global temperatures. These challenges are complex, multifaceted and can best be solved with expertise from multiple, relevant disciplines. To prepare students to meet these challenges, the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES) offers two undergraduate degrees: an A.B. in Environmental Studies and a Sc.B. in Environmental Science. The two degrees vary primarily in the number of course requirements; the Sc.B. is a more in-depth treatment of a single field. Both degrees provide interdisciplinary exposure to the natural and social sciences, as well as public policy. Both degrees also develop depth in a primary field by requiring students to select one of four tracks of study. Concentrators might also consider pursuing the Engaged Scholars Program, which allows them to connect theory and practice and gain hands-on experience working with community partners. 

Through a rigorous set of core courses, track requirements, and a course or project-based capstone experience, our students are primed to make meaningful contributions to environmental scholarship and outreach at local, national and global scales.


If you have administrative questions regarding theses concentrations or wish to be added to the email directory listing upcoming events, then please contact Jeanne Loewenstein, the administrative manager.

Standard program in Environmental Studies and Environmental Science:

The Institute at Brown for Environment and Society administers two concentrations, one offering an A.B. degree in Environmental Studies (requires 14-15 courses) and the other a Sc.B. degree in Environmental Science (requires 19-20 courses). Below are a set of course offerings arranged into four tracks:

  1. Air, Climate & Energy
  2. Conservation Science & Policy
  3. Land, Water & Food Security
  4. Sustainability in Development

Requirements for the A.B. in Environmental Studies:

Core Requirements
ECON 0110Principles of Economics 11
ENVS 0490Environmental Science in a Changing World 21
ENVS 0495Introduction to Environmental Social Science1
BIOL 0210Diversity of Life1
or GEOL 0240 Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet
Methods - one course1
Methods for Interdisciplinary Environmental Research
Electives - three courses3
You may choose among any ENVS course, any course shown on one or more of the tracks, and any prerequisites listed for a required course.
Capstone - one or two courses1-2
This requirement can be met with a two-semester thesis (ENVS 1970 and ENVS 1971), one or two semester practicum (ENVS 1970 and/or ENVS 1971), one-semester research project (ENVS 1970 or ENVS 1971), or an approved capstone course. Approved capstone courses are project-based senior seminars.
Track Specific Requirements 5
Track 1 - Air, Climate, and Energy
Climate: Select One
Weather and Climate
Principles of Planetary Climate
Physics:
Foundations of Mechanics
Energy Technology: Select One
Renewable Energy Technologies
The Science and Technology of Energy
Policy: Select One
Environmental Law and Policy
Power, Justice, and Climate Change
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Engaged Climate Policy at the UN Climate Change Talks
Making Connections: The Environmental Policy Process
Globalization and the Environment
Energy Policy and Politics
Sustainable Infrastructure: Select One
Sustainable Design in the Built Environment
Environmental Stewardship and Resilience in Urban Systems
Track 2 - Conservation Science and Policy
Ecology:
Principles of Ecology
Conservation:
Conservation Biology
Ecology & Conservation Topics: Select One
Coastal Ecology and Conservation
Community Ecology
Terrestrial Biogeochemistry and the Functioning of Ecosystems
Policy: Select One
International Environmental Law and Policy
Environmental Law and Policy
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Engaged Climate Policy at the UN Climate Change Talks
Making Connections: The Environmental Policy Process
Energy Policy and Politics
Statistics: Select One
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Introduction to Econometrics
Track 3 - Land, Water & Food Security
Climate: Select One
Weather and Climate
Principles of Planetary Climate
Biology: Select One
Diversity of Life
BIOL 0190H
Plants, Food, and People
Principles of Ecology
The Evolution of Plant Diversity
Coastal Ecology and Conservation
Environmental History: Select One
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Environmental History
The Anthropocene: Climate Change as Social History
Policy: Select One
International Environmental Law and Policy
Environmental Economics and Policy
Environmental Law and Policy
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
Engaged Climate Policy at the UN Climate Change Talks
Making Connections: The Environmental Policy Process
Energy Policy and Politics
Politics of Food
Tools: Select One
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
Global Environmental Remote Sensing
Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
Track 4 - Sustainability in Development
Environment and Development: Select Two
Urban Economics
Health, Hunger and the Household in Developing Countries
Power, Justice, and Climate Change
Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
Environmental Stewardship and Resilience in Urban Systems
Globalization and the Environment
Policy: Select Two
International Environmental Law and Policy
Environmental Economics and Policy
Environmental Law and Policy
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Engaged Climate Policy at the UN Climate Change Talks
Making Connections: The Environmental Policy Process
Energy Policy and Politics
Analysis Tools: Select One
Introduction to Econometrics 3
Ethnographic Research Methods
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
Global Environmental Remote Sensing
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Focus Groups for Market and Social Research
Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
Total Credits14-15
1

Students with AP scores of 4 or 5 in Macroeconomics plus a 4 or 5 in Microeconomics may place out of ECON 0110. Students who place out of ECON 0110 must substitute this course with an additional environmental elective.

2

Concentrators with an AP score of 5 in Environmental Science may waive out of ENVS 0490. Students who place out of ENVS 0490 must substitute an additional environmental elective.

3

 Students pursuing the Sc.B. must take ECON 1620.

Requirements for the Sc.B. in Environmental Science:

Requires ALL 14-15 course requirements as listed in the A.B. Program14-15
Additional Track­ specific requirements for the Sc.B.5
Track 1 - Air, Climate, and Energy
Math: Select Both
Introductory Calculus, Part I 1
Introductory Calculus, Part II 1
Environmental Economics: Select One
Environmental Economics and Policy
Advanced Climate: Select One
Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics
GEOL 1520 - Ocean Circulation and Climate
Thermal/Chem: Select One
Thermodynamics
Environmental Geochemistry
Track 2 - Conservation Science and Policy
Math: Select One
Introductory Calculus, Part I 1
Evolution: Select One
Evolutionary Biology
Organismal Diversity: Select One
Invertebrate Zoology
The Evolution of Plant Diversity (BIOL 0460 - Insect Biology)
Sophomore Seminar: Insect Biology
Rhode Island Flora: Understanding and Documenting Local Plant Diversity
Comparative Biology of the Vertebrates
Env. Econ: Select One
Environmental Economics and Policy
Tools: Select One
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
Global Environmental Remote Sensing
Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
Track 3 - Land, Water & Food Security
Math: Select One
Introductory Calculus, Part I 1
Chemistry: Select One
Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure
Earth/Life Systems: Select Three
Conservation Biology
Biogeography
Terrestrial Biogeochemistry and the Functioning of Ecosystems
Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Global Water Cycle
Environmental Geochemistry
Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics
Instrumental Analysis with Environmental Applications
Track 4 - Sustainability in Development
Sociology and Politics: Select One
Demographics and Development
Introduction to International Politics
Globalization and the Environment
Critical Perspectives on Development: Select One
Community Engagement with Health and the Environment
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development
Economic Perspectives: Select Two
Intermediate Microeconomics
Environmental Issues in Development Economics
Economic Development
Health, Hunger and the Household in Developing Countries
Economic Growth
Climate: Select One
Weather and Climate
Total Credits19-20
1

Students with an AP exam of 4 0r 5 on Calc AB may place out of MATH 0090.  Students with an AP exam score of 4 or 5 on Calc BC may place out of MATH 0090 and MATH 0100.  Students who place out of these courses must substitute an additional environmental elective.

Honors

Candidates for honors must have a minimum GPA of 3.3 in their concentration courses at the end of their 6th semester, and must have completed a successful thesis or practicum proposal. Students may apply during the first month of their 7th semester. Honors will be conferred upon the successful completion of the thesis or practicum.