International Relations

International Relations (IR) is a rigorous program that combines student choice with cross-disciplinary training in international and comparative perspective.  The IR program emphasizes: a solid grounding in the methods of analysis used in the social sciences and humanities to help students think critically about international phenomena, the exploration of the empirical and the normative domains of the subject, and flexibility to allow students to customize their IR concentration. Our academic mission is to foster creative thinking about complex global problems and to equip students with the analytic tools, language expertise, and cross-cultural understanding to guide them in that process.

For additional information, please visit the program's website: http://www.watsoninstitute.org/ir/

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INTL 1101. China and the Global Political Economy.

Can (or Should) China Save the World? The program features an academic focus on Political Economy through comparative study of China and the US. US students engage with Chinese students throughout the 8 weeks, spending 4 weeks in Hong Kong and 4 weeks at Brown. Courses are taught by CUHK and Brown faculty, resulting in two course credits. Students are required to register for both courses (INTL 1101 and INTL 1102).

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INTL 1102. The US and the Global Political Economy.

Can (or Should) China Save the World? The program features an academic focus on Political Economy through comparative study of China and the US. US students engage with Chinese students throughout the 8 weeks, spending 4 weeks in Hong Kong and 4 weeks at Brown. Courses are taught by CUHK and Brown faculty, resulting in two course credits. Students are required to register for both courses (INTL 1101 and INTL 1102).

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INTL 1280. Global Security After the Cold War.

Analyzes major contemporary issues of global security utilizing current theories of international politics, emphasizing both continuity and change in global security since the end of the Cold War. Issues examined include proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and of conventional weapons, terrorism, recent arms control and disarmament initiatives, and the changing role of alliances and regional and global security institutions. Prerequisite: POLS 0400. This course is open to Senior and Junior concentrators in IR and Political Science, and to other students by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40.

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INTL 1350. History and Theory of International Relations.

Examines the struggles of power and knowledge which have constituted international relations history and theory. This survey stretches from the beginnings of the Western states system and its early exemplar thinkers like Machiavelli, Grotius, and Kant, to the current issues and contemporary theories of international relations. Focuses primarily on the 'classical' and 'post-classical' theories of international relations.

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INTL 1355. Contemporary Global Politics.

This course provides an overview of contemporary topics in international politics and themes related to Irish politics and society. The international system is a complex and constantly evolving environment. Interactions between states and non-state actors, such as multinational corporations and international non-governmental organizations, produce outcomes that we read about in the news every day. This module offers the student a set of theoretical tools to help understand why these outcomes emerge.

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INTL 1400. Religion and Global Politics.

Examines the increasingly visible role of religion in international affairs and global politics. What are the political manifestations of different religious traditions? What kind of a role does religion play in conflict, economic development, peace-building and diplomacy? Why was religion ignored as a political force in the western world? This course reviews multiple ways religion has been affecting world affairs and delves into specific faith traditions and their histories. Not open to first year students.

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INTL 1410. Foreign Policy Analysis and Crisis Decision-Making.

It is not possible to understand international relations without a concrete understanding of decision-making mechanisms. The course covers major themes in foreign policy analysis; it examines past foreign policy decisions of major actors and investigates the dynamics of crisis decision-making in international politics. How do politicians behave when they need to take an important decision in limited time? Which factors influence how political actors choose one policy over another? We will study the possible explanations in the foreign policy analysis literature and we will analyze cases to gain an understanding of mechanisms behind international politics.

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INTL 1420. Globalization and the Rise of Asia.

This course will study the politics and economics of globalization, in particular the spectacular rise of the Asian economies and their impact on the global economy, financial markets, and the balance of power. The analytic goals of the course are twofold. First, to examine the key problems rapidly developing nations have faced and continue to struggle with in an interdependent world economy, and why some nations have succeeded in moving into a period of unprecedented growth while others have not. Second, to analyze how the rise of the Asian economies will affect the U.S. and other developed nations. Enrollment limited to 35.

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INTL 1440. Ethnicity and Inequality in Global Persepectives.

Drawing on literature in sociology, politics, international relations, economics, and development studies, this course will critically examine the institutions, beliefs, ideas and practices that have engendered ethnic inequality in many parts of the world. Our aim is to help students gain a deeper understanding of how ethnicity, identity and religion interact with the institutions of modern societies so as to produce sustained social and economic disparity along group lines. Another goal is to gain an understanding of how ethnic inequality within countries can translate into global threats.

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INTL 1442. Empathy in International Relations: Humanitarianism, Justice and Global Citizenship.

This class draws on classic and recent work in a range of academic disciplines to explore the intellectual roots and political routes of empathy, equity and cosmopolitan thinking. The course examines the phenomenon of empathy as deep-rooted and potentially hard-wired human disposition to imaginatively inhabit the world-view of others, and through case studies from human rights, labor justice and environmentalist movements examines how, why and when humans come to respect the claims of distant strangers for their attention and action, and thus imagine themselves and others as fellow-citizens of the world.

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INTL 1443. History of American Intervention.

This course reviews modern history through the study of invasions, coups, and other interventions carried out by the United States. From the Marine assault on Tripoli in 1805 to the bombing of Tripoli in 2011, there have been scores of these episodes. They have shaped American history and the history of the wider world. We examine a variety of them, and try to answer three questions about each one. (1) Why did the United States decide to carry out a particular intervention? (2) How was the intervention executed? (3) What have been its long-term effects?

Fall INTL1443 S01 16862 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (S. Kinzer)
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INTL 1444. Comparative Development (SOC 1600).

Interested students must register for SOC 1600.

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INTL 1445. International Political Economy (POLS 1730).

Interested students must register for POLS 1730.

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INTL 1446. Political Research Methods (POLS 1600).

Interested students must register for POLS 1600.

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INTL 1450. Political Economy of the Environment in Latin America.

Introduces students to the political economy of the environment in Latin America. Readings survey topics on resource-based development, environmental conflict, and green governance. Lectures present theoretical accounts of development and the environment and assess their validity in light of the Latin American experience. Relies on history-based analytics and case studies. Topics include conservation of the Amazon, rights of indigenous peoples, mining and environmental well-being in the Andes, and the green revolution in tropical Latin America. Knowledge of Latin American history and politics, political-economy, and environmental studies recommended. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

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INTL 1550. Chinese Foreign Policy.

The objective of the course is to enable students to gain familiarity with the evolution of modern Chinese politics as it related to international relations, as well as a comprehensive understanding of Chinese foreign policy priorities and institutional processes. Exploring various historical explanations, developing critical reading skills, and employing policy analytical tools will enable students to better evaluate the numerous dilemmas confronting academics and policymakers in understanding and responding to China's rise. Students will emerge from the course with a more sophisticated understanding of China's rise and the implications of this momentous development for the international system. Enrollment limited to 40.

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INTL 1700. International Law.

This introduction to public international law covers the nature of legal reasoning in international relations, the interplay of international law and international politics, and the international legal process. Examines selected substantive fields such as state responsibility, the use of force, international human rights, and the U.S. and international law.

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INTL 1750. The International Law and Politics of Human Rights.

The main objective of the seminar is to enable students to understand the different and competing conceptions of human rights present in the contemporary humanitarian agenda. In particular, topics such as the problem of enforcement and the role human rights in foreign policy, genocide, torture, women's rights, humanitarian intervention, and the international criminal court. At the end of the course students will be better equipped to assess critically the potential and shortcomings of the international human rights system.

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INTL 1800D. Survey of Chinese Democracy and Chinese Contemporary History.

Surveys the Chinese democracy movement in the 20th century and up to the present. Examines key leaders, events and development, including the Chinese Democracy Wall movement and the Chinese democratic party. Taught in Chinese. Readings in English and Chinese. Advanced Chinese language skills necessary. Instructor's permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.

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INTL 1800N. Global Media: History, Theory, Production.

Explores the historical and contemporary roles of media in international affairs as a source of information and as an important medium of war and diplomacy. Three tracks: historical, focusing on the dual development of colonial and media empires from early days of print media to the Internet; theoretical, using classical IR and critical theory to examine media as product and instrument of cultural, economic and political struggles; and practical, using biweekly 'Global Media Labs' in which guest media practitioners teamed with media theorists present master classes in print, photography, radio, cinema, television, and online convergences. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

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INTL 1800R. Post-Soviet States From the Past into the Future.

Examines in historical context the emergence of the new post-Soviet states from the disintegrating USSR, the development of their foreign policies, and the evolution of their mutual relations in the political, economic, security, and environmental spheres. Devotes special attention to the functioning of the Community of Independent States and other multilateral institutions. Instructor's permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.

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INTL 1800V. The United States in World Politics.

Examines major aspects of American foreign policy after the Cold War and 9/11 in terms of domestic and international challenges. Discussions of the United States as 'empire' and 'republic,' with independent research and a foreign policy game. Emphasis is on the connections between the processes of policy making and the substance of policies pursued. Prerequistie: POLS 0400 required; POLS 1560 highly recommended. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and senior concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1801E. War in Anthropological Perspective.

Examines war, peace, and militarization using anthropological frameworks. Centers on case studies from several areas of the world, as well as contemporary theories of violence. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

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INTL 1801H. Amazon Governance.

Studies the political economy of Amazon governance in comparative perspective. Readings trace distinct national and local paths of Amazon governance. Topics include the colonial history of deforestation, the impacts of globalizations and nation-state modernization projects, the evolution of environmentalisms and Amazonian contentious movements, and selected case studies of good governance at the grassroots level. Relies on history-based research and multidisciplinary perspectives. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801I. Public Theologies of Governance and Secularism in World Politics.

Public theology of a particular issue includes human interpretation of what is relevant and to what extent particular religious premises can be experienced in the public arena. In the analyses of international politics, what we call "religion" is usually the sum of clashing or converging public theologies. This course comparatively investigates these different religious perspectives towards issues of political governance with case studies from Islam, Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism. The course also focuses on modes of secularism and the challenges they pose to political theologies of faith traditions. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801J. War and Human Rights.

How nations and their adversaries treat civilians and other non-combatants in wartime has become an increasingly central issue in global politics. This seminar will explore the intersection of war, human rights, and the laws of war (also known as the law of armed conflict or international humanitarian law). It will focus especially on how civilians and other non-combatants are protected (or not) in times of war and the politics and institutions of enforcement. Topics include war crimes, genocide, targeted killings, torture, humanitarian intervention, and the international criminal court. Prerequisite: POLS 0400; prior coursework in human rights or international law desirable. Enrollment limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in International Relations and Political Science. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801K. China and the World.

The rise of China has emerged as one of the most important developments in world politics during the early 21st century. Chinese foreign policy will have an important impact on the U.S. economy as well as on U.S. national security. Moreover, China's influence now touches upon every continent of the globe. This course surveys the cultural underpinnings, modern history, institutional structures, and vital regional contexts for contemporary Chinese foreign policy. Students will emerge from the course with a more sophisticated understanding of China's rise and the implications of this momentous development for the international system. Prerequisite: POLS 0400. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801L. Religion and Secularism: Affinities and Antagonisms.

Global events in recent years seem to defy simple ideas of the confinement of religion to a wholly private or otherworldly domain. Is secularism a failed ideal? Or was it simply an inadequate concept to understand modern ethics and politics? In what ways are conceptions of the secular being contested and reformulated in Euro-American and postcolonial contexts? We address these questions by taking up key texts of recent religion/secularism debates, in the process returning to canonical texts by Weber, Schmitt, Nietzsche, Thoreau and others, to reexamine the affinities and antagonisms between religious and secular ideas of morality and power. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801M. Globalization and the Rise of Asia.

This course introduces the politics and economics of globalization and, in particular, the spectacular rise of the Asian economies and their impact on the global economy, financial markets, and the balance of power. Course goals are: First, examine the key problems rapidly developing nations have faced, and continue to struggle with, in an interdependent world economy, and why some nations have succeeded in moving into a period of unprecedented growth. Second, analyze how the rise of the Asian economies will affect the U.S. and other developed nations. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1801N. Global Security After 9-11.

Analyzes major contemporary issues of global security utilizing current theories of international politics, emphasizing both continuity and change in global security since the end of the Cold War with emphasis on security issues after the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Issues examined include proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and of conventional weapons, terrorism, role of intelligence, special military forces and covert action, and the changing role of alliances and regional and global security institutions. Senior (followed by Junior) concentrators in IR have enrollment priority. Other students may enroll on a space-available basis by instructor permission. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801P. Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding.

In this seminar, we will study the dynamics of conflicts, causes of violence and the efforts of the individuals/states/institutions to manage conflict and build peace. Moving from contemporary cases such as Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Somalia, Lebanon, Israel/Palestine, we will discuss the lessons that were learnt in conflict management and the policies to be devised in the future. Understanding the frameworks of such conflicts and the accumulated knowledge on peace-building is essential, as any career in today's world will touch upon conflict settings and negotiations at some point. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801R. Natural Resources and the Environment in the Developing World.

Is resource abundance blessing or curse? Are developing countries too poor to be green? This course surveys topics of resource-based development and the modern environmental history of the Global South, with a historically grounded, inter-disciplinary perspective. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801S. All the News That's Fit to Post: Grappling with Issues for Content Creators in the Global News World.

Journalists operate today in an increasingly global and increasingly digital media environment, confronting new challenges and also seizing new opportunities that simply did not exist a generation ago. The new news world lacks traditional mentoring and editorial frameworks. This seminar focuses on threshold dilemmas that journalists confront, often independently, in newsgathering, writing, and publishing decisions. Through class dialogue and opinion essay writing assignments, the seminar will stress interaction, debate and international sensibilities. It will include real life case studies from Newsweek, newsweek.com and MSNBC. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802A. The Laws of Violence: Lawful Killings in Law Enforcement, Punishment, War and the War on Terror.

This seminar introduces the basic elements of conventional theories of law and state, and explores the centrality that legalized violence plays in both the constitution of law and the state. The goal of the seminar is to identify and examine the constitutive relation between law and violence. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1802B. Korean Politics and Security.

Since 1953, the United States and South Korea have maintained a formal security alliance, and the peninsula remains home to 28,500 U.S. troops. Developments in Korea have an important impact on the region and the world making knowledge of the Koreas and their challenges vital for understanding the dynamics of the region. This course will explore the history, politics, economics, and security of North and South Korea and their role in the larger security context of East Asia. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors concentrating in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802C. Cyber Conflict and Internet Freedom.

This course will examine the problems confronting the United States and its international partners in addressing network and computer insecurity while upholding privacy, civil liberties and other fundamental values. While technical topics will be addressed, it is not a technical course but a course that examines the public policy challenges associated with a major technology issue. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors concentrating in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802E. Citizenship, Nationalism, Migration.

What are the contemporary parameters of political belonging? How do we make a contract with states regarding our rights and responsibilities to the society? When do we move across borders for alternative arrangements and contracts? Moving from these questions, we will investigate the evolution of nationalism and citizenship in history as well as the challenges immigrants and policymakers face in a world where identities are more fluid than ever. We will also explore political, economic and social implications of the attitudes towards citizenship and immigration. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802F. History of American Intervention.

This course reviews modern history through the study of invasions, coups, and other interventions carried out by the United States. From the Marine assault on Tripoli in 1805 to the bombing of Tripoli in 2011, there have been scores of these episodes. They have shaped American history and the history of the wider world. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802G. Reading Global: International Relations through Fiction.

"Any book thoughtfully read sharpens the mind and improves on an individual's professional potential." So declared U.S. General James Amos when he reinvigorated the Marine Commandant's reading list in October 2012. This capstone course is designed in a similar spirit for Brown IR students, built around 20th century works of fiction from around the world which won recognition for the insights they offer on core issues in international relations and development studies. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802I. Human Security.

In this course, we will engage the definitional debate that challenges traditional notions of national security. We will trace the normative, political and intellectual history of this policy lens, and we will examine its real world implications across several key issue areas. What are the conceptual and practical consequences of a concern with human security, as opposed to national security or human rights? Enrollment limited to 20 seniors concentrating in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802J. Regulation of the International Financial Services Sector.

Course examines from a regulatory perspective the modern international financial services sector, its principal players and activities, concerns which they raise for regulatory authorities and the rationales for the different regulatory responses which such concerns have provoked. Focus will be the US financial services sector as a forceful proponent of change in the context of European and Asian political economies which have not always been accepting of the specific initiatives of US commercial actors. Students must show up 1st day to obtain override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802K. Empathy in International Relations: Humanitarianism, Justice and Global Citizenship.

This class draws on classic and recent work in a range of academic disciplines to explore the intellectual roots and political routes of empathy, equity and cosmopolitan thinking. Seeking to extend Benedict Anderson’s insight, that all communities larger than the face-to-face are distinguished by their style of imagining, the course examines the phenomenon of empathy as deep-rooted and potentially hard-wired human disposition to imaginatively inhabit the world-view of others. Students must show up 1st day for override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802L. Norms of Humanity.

This seminar will explore the origins and impact of four types of international standards of humane conduct: human rights, humanitarian law (also known as the law of war/armed conflict,) accountability and justice for past rights violations or war crimes, and humanitarian intervention. Many commentators increasingly refer to these branches of norms as if they belonged to a single “tree,” comprising a so-called “law of humanity.” Taking a different tack, this course encourages a deeper understanding of these international norms’ related-but-distinct sources, development and effects. Students must show up on 1st day for override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802M. Rwanda Past and Present.

In the mid-1990s, few countries on earth were as devastated as Rwanda. As many as one million people or more had been killed in a 100-day genocide, and the fleeing regime had left the country in ruins. Today, however, Rwanda is not only at peace but full of ambition. Some believe it is poised to rise from poverty and become an example for developing countries everywhere. Others worry that trouble is brewing, and that another apocalypse could lie ahead. Students must show up 1st day for override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802N. Arab Revolutions in Comparative Perspective.

This course provides an introduction to one of the greatest locomotives of change in human societies: revolutionary movements. Students will learn the major theoretical perspectives that have been developed to understand these complex phenomena. These tools will be used to analyze a number of different types of revolutionary movements, with a focus on the Arab world. Students must show up first day for override. Priority to IR. WRIT

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INTL 1802O. Global Corporate Accountability: Issues of Governance, Responsibility and NGOs.

How does the international system hold corporations accountable? As the global value chain engages increasingly greater sections of the economy, how do we understand the role of corporations in shaping the ethical and political issues of environment, human rights, labor conditions, equality and opportunity, gender, and community rights. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802Q. Iran and the Islamic Revolution.

Shattering events of 1978-80 in Iran unfolded against the backdrop of the previous decades of Iranian history, knowing that history is essential to understanding the revolution. The revolution cannot be appreciated without studying the enormous effects it's had over the last 35 years. This course places the anti-Shah movement and the rise of religious power in the context of Iran's century of modern history. We conclude by focusing on today's Iran, the upheaval following the 2009 election, reformist president election in 2013, and prospects for reconciliation with the US. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1802Q S01 16825 W 3:00-5:30(17) (S. Kinzer)
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INTL 1802R. After Snowden: Spying in International Relations.

This course examines the special problems of surveillance and spying for democratic societies, with a particular focus on the United States and its experience as the world’s oldest constitutional democracy administering the world’s most pervasive intelligence apparatus. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802S. Politics of International Finance.

The purpose of this course is to present the fundamental variables that shape modern international finance. We will introduce and examine the technical forces that determine international transactions and capital flows, as well as the problems caused by unsustainable imbalances and the subsequent domestic and international political responses. Given the important role that finance plays in international relations, the material will allow the student to establish a conceptual framework to understand the political dynamics and constraints of the global economy. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802T. Nuclear Weapons and International Politics (POLS 1822A).

Interested students must register for POLS 1822A.

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INTL 1802U. International Relations of Russia.

This class provides students with an overview of the sources of contemporary Russian foreign policy (including the legacies bequeathed by the Soviet Union) and from there examines Russia’s position in the international system, the challenges she faces in the global environment of the 21st century, and her relationships with the great powers and with her immediate neighbors. WRIT

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INTL 1802V. Diplomacy, Economics & Influence.

This course examines a dozen diplomatic situations and identifies the players, their interests, and their tools -- and how those produced outcomes.Particular attention is paid to economic factors – pressures, incentives, and influences – that contribute to the outcome. By examining these elements students will understand the economic tools of diplomacy and power, and how to wield them. The course concludes with a close look at China's growing role in the world economy and considers how that will change China's role in world affairs. Enrollment limited to 20 Juniors & Seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1802V S01 17185 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (R. Boucher)
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INTL 1802W. International Journalism: Foreign Reporting in Practice.

Objective: give juniors and seniors direct experience with the job of being a foreign correspondent. Classes focus on two themes—the practice of international journalism and the history and contemporary reality of Cuba. Seminar includes reporting trip to Cuba during spring break. The seminar is valuable to two types of students—those interested in a career in international journalism and students who are not pursuing a career in journalism but who want to learn journalistic skills. Many fields need people who know how to research, conduct interviews, distill information, and write clearly. This is especially important to careers that involve international work. WRIT

Spr INTL1802W S01 26134 W 3:00-5:30 (S. Kinzer)
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INTL 1802X. Global Problems, Global Solutions: From Ebola to Climate Change.

This seminar examines the international responses to the challenges posed by complex global problems like climate change, the Ebola outbreak, migration, poverty, labor conditions, humanitarian crises, and fair trade. Students explore some of the central reasons explaining the international community’s inability to effectively confront global problems and study a series of policy initiatives to solve some of these global problems, initiatives that go beyond the traditional division between international and domestic political spheres and that challenge the idea of an international order formed exclusively by states and international institutions. WRIT

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INTL 1802Y. India in the World.

This course is designed to introduce students to the role of India in the world. From being a newly independent country in the nineteen forties, India is today a globally re-emergent power. The world’s largest democracy and third-largest economy is grappling with linguistic and religious diversity, economic growth and inclusive development, the politics of the Centre-versus-States, uneasy neighborhood relationships, the threat of terror, and the redefinition of her role in the Indo-Pacific world. The Course aims at deepening understanding of the priorities that define India’s global outreach. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1802Y S01 16950 T 4:00-6:30(09) (N. Rao)
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INTL 1803. Risk, Regulation and the Comparative Politics of Finance.

The course introduces students to the comparative history of finance as well as to alternative theories of regulation. It thereby develops students’ ability to compare the role played by financial institutions in different historical periods and national contexts. This comparative perspective puts the recent financial crisis into a broader perspective, allowing students to see the structural as well as more proximate causes of recent financial instability in the industrialized democracies. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR, DS, and Public Policy seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803B. Cyber Conflict – Hackers, Surveillance and Privacy.

The U.S. Secretary of State has announced that the “freedom to connect” is an aspect of fundamental human rights, and has criticized countries that attempt to filter or censor the Internet. Is monitoring of computer networks necessary for cybersecurity? WRIT

Spr INTL1803B S01 26127 Arranged (T. Edgar)
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INTL 1803C. Violence in Latin America: Causes, Consequences and Possibilities for Change.

This capstone seminar focuses on the causes, consequences and possible solutions of violence in Latin America. Students will be asked to grapple with the question: What are the sources of violence in Latin America? How much is the drug war to blame? What about economic inequality, legacies of dictatorship, or cultures of violence? What are some possible solutions -- should the international drug control regime be changed? What are other policy and citizen-led alternatives? Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803D. Questioning Growth: Should Nations Get Rich?.

This course examines growth as a guiding ideology of modern economic practice. How is the dream of growth produced? We take a broadly interdisciplinary view, grounding our investigation in anthropological ethnographies and tracing the outlines of the historic social theory that lead to the economic growth models of the mid-20th century. We review neoclassical economic approaches and consider dissidents in the ecological, Marxist, and feminist traditions. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803F. Foreign Policy and the 2016 Presidential Election Campaign.

This seminar focuses on the relationship between national security policy and presidential politics, with a special focus on the 2016 campaign. We survey scholarly and popular literature on the role of foreign policy in American politics. From there we narrow our focus to presidential politics, and then further to the 2016 campaign. Since much of this campaign’s foreign policy debate will be about questions of intervention in foreign conflicts—when, how, and where to intervene—we will give special attention to varying views on this question. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803G. Global Women’s Issues: Investing in women as strategy for sustainable growth and global development.

In this course, we ask and answer the questions: What are women’s issues around the world? What policies and programs are designed to engage the issues and improve outcomes? What role does and can the private sector play in harnessing the untapped potential of 50% of the globe’s population? Is there evidence to support the need for investment—of resources, focus, and political capital—and to quantify the results of its impact? Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803H. Asian Security: Theory and Practice.

This course provides an introduction to problems of contemporary Asian security and the strategies and foreign policies pursued by the four major powers in Asia: India, China, Japan, and the United States. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803I. Richard Holbrooke and the Rise and Fall of American Power.

To an uncanny extent, the life of Brown graduate and American diplomat Richard Holbrooke mirrors the rise and fall of American power in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. After leaving College Hill, Holbrooke worked for every Democratic president since John F. Kennedy. Over the course of the semester, his career will be used to explore three pivotal US military interventions – Vietnam, Bosnia and Afghanistan – and how they revealed the promise and limits of American power. Enrollment limited to juniors, seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803J. Russia's Escape from Communism.

This seminar introduces students to the economic and political transformation of Russia from the early days of Gorbachev to current-day Putin. The course is policy-oriented and empirical, and there are substantial reading assignments each week. Students are expected to participate in classroom discussions, make oral presentations, and prepare several writing assignments. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803K. Media Wars: The Middle East.

In the last fourteen years, the Middle East has occupied a disproportionate degree of attention in news and social media in the United States and Western Europe, in comparison to other regions of the world today. While some of that media have served to elucidate certain aspects of societies and cultures in the Middle East, other media have further simplified the region to cliches. In this course, we address these themes via media: U.S. news production; television; digital media and cyberterrorism; religion; music; and ISIS. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to IR juniors, seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1803K S01 16949 M 3:00-5:30(15) (N. Bajoghli)
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INTL 1803L. Humanitarianism in Uniform.

The goal of this senior seminar is to explore the relationship between militarism and humanitarianism. When the US Army and Marine Corps released the Counterinsurgency Field Manual in 2006, military officials referred to NGOs as ‘force multipliers’ and soldiers as ‘armed social workers.’ In this course, we will develop a framework to understand military humanitarianism. We will also examine how military humanitarianism exceeds the contemporary geography of terrorism, investigating cases in Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to IR juniors, seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1803L S01 16969 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Greenburg)
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INTL 1910. Senior Honors Seminar.

Open only to Senior students accepted into the honors program in international relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

Fall INTL1910 S01 17011 W 6:30-9:00PM(17) (C. Elliott)
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INTL 1920. Senior Honors Thesis.

Open only to Senior students accepted into the honors program in international relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1970. Individual Research Project.

Limited to juniors and seniors. Section numbers vary by instructor.

Required: A completed proposal form and syllabus, sponsor's and concentration advisor's approval, and written permission from Dr. Elliott (following review of the proposal) prior to registering for any section of this course. Banner overrides will be given by the IR Program manager only, and no overrides will be issued after the Registrar's course add deadline.

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INTL XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in International Relations.

Director

Nina Tannenwald

Associate Director

Claudia Elliott

Professor

Glenn C. Loury
Merton P. Stoltz Professor of Social Sciences

Senior Lecturer

Claudia Elliott
Senior Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Nina Tannenwald
Senior Lecturer in Political Science

Senior Fellow

Timothy H. Edgar
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Stephen A. Kinzer
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

International Relations

The objective of the International Relations concentration is to foster creative thinking about pressing global problems and to equip students with the analytic tools, language expertise, and cross-cultural understanding to guide them in that process. To this end, the concentration draws on numerous departments including political science, history, economics, anthropology, sociology, psychology, religious studies, and area studies. The IR concentration is organized around a multidisciplinary core and two sub-themes: security and society, and political economy and society. It has a three-year language requirement that must be linked to the student’s selected region of the world. All concentrators are required to undertake a capstone project using research in a second language.

Requirements

The IR concentration requires 14 courses and the equivalent of 3 years study of a second language. Regardless of track, all IR concentrators must take all five core courses, research methods, regional focus, and capstone courses.

Security and Society track

Core Courses
Students must take all 5 core courses, preferably during freshman or sophomore year. AP credit does not count toward the concentration.
ANTH 0110Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance1
ECON 0110Principles of Economics1
HIST 0244Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present1
HIST 1121The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits1
POLS 0400Introduction to International Politics1
Track Requirements (five courses distributed between the sub-themes):5
Governance and Diplomacy (two or three courses):
A Global History of the Atomic Age
Law, Nationalism, and Colonialism
History of American Intervention
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Russia and Post-Soviet States
Security, Governance and Development in Africa
The International Law and Politics of Human Rights
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
War in Film and Literature
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Global Justice
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Society (two or three courses):
Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law
Media Wars: The Middle East
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Russia and Post-Soviet States
Research Methods1
Prior to 7th semester. Quantitative or qualitative course from the following approved list.
Ethnographic Research Methods
Statistical Inference I
Quantitative Methods in Psychology
Introduction to Econometrics
Econometrics I
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Regional Focus2
Both courses must be on the same area. Students are required to link these to language study.
Language
Three years university study or equivalent. Must correspond to region.
Capstone Course, from the following options:1
Must be taken senior year. Must incorporate language skills. Students may choose from the following:
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
India in the World
Media Wars: The Middle East
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Senior Honors Seminar
Politics of European Integration
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Global Justice
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Total Credits14

Political Economy and Society Track

Core Courses
Students must take all 5 core courses, preferably during freshman or sophomore year. AP credit does not count toward the concentration.
ANTH 0110Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance1
ECON 0110Principles of Economics1
HIST 0244Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present1
HIST 1121The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits1
POLS 0400Introduction to International Politics1
Track Requirements (five courses from distributed between the sub-themes):5
Economics (two or three courses): All students MUST take Micro and Macro
Intermediate Microeconomics
Intermediate Macroeconomics
Plus an International Economics course:
Current Global Macroeconomic Challenges
International Trade
Financial Institutions
Finance, Regulation, and the Economy: Research
Political Economy (two or three courses):
Environmental Economics and Policy
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Politics of European Integration
Prosperity: The Ethics and Economics of Wealth Creation
Politics, Economy and Society in India
Money and Power in the International Political Economy
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Capitalism: For and Against
Culture, Identity and Development
Research Methods1
Prior to 7th semester. Quantitative or qualitative course from the following approved list.
Ethnographic Research Methods
Statistical Inference I
Quantitative Methods in Psychology
Introduction to Econometrics
Econometrics I
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Regional Focus2
Both courses must be on the same area. Students are required to link these to language study.
Language
Three years university study or equivalent. Must correspond to region.
Capstone Course, from the following options:1
Must be taken senior year. Must incorporate language skills. Students may choose from the following:
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
India in the World
Media Wars: The Middle East
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Senior Honors Seminar
Politics of European Integration
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Global Justice
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Culture, Identity and Development
Total Credits14

The program has a director, an associate director/concentration advisor, and two faculty advisors for each track to assist students in planning their academic programs.