Program in Literary Arts

Since 1968, Literary Arts at Brown University has been a creative and intellectual center for the U.S. literary avant-garde. Along with a handful of other writing programs nationwide, Brown provides a home for innovative writers of fiction, poetry, digital language arts and cross-disciplinary. Established in the mid-1960s by poet, translator and critic Edwin Honig, Literary Arts at Brown continues its tradition of hiring and retaining a faculty comprised of nationally and internationally known authors. Each year, the program offers 60 – 70 classes, awards the M.F.A. degree to approximately 12 graduate student writers, and confers Honors on about 35 talented seniors who will have completed the undergraduate concentration in Literary Arts.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://brown.edu/academics/literary-arts/home/literary-arts

Course usage information

LITR 0100A. Introduction to Fiction.

A workshop for first year students, introducing them to the art of writing fiction. This course is reading and writing intensive. Enrollment limited to 17. S/NC required. FYS WRIT

Fall LITR0100A S01 16070 F 3:00-5:30(11) (M. Talamini)
Spr LITR0100A S01 24888 Th 6:30-9:00PM(12) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0100A S02 24899 F 3:00-5:30(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0100B. Introduction to Poetry.

A workshop for first year students, introducing them to the art of writing poetry. This course is reading and writing intensive. Enrollment limited to 17. S/NC required. FYS WRIT

Fall LITR0100B S01 16080 Th 6:30-9:00PM(04) (J. Baer)
Fall LITR0100B S02 16083 F 3:00-5:30(11) (C. Bergonzo)
Spr LITR0100B S01 24898 F 3:00-5:30(15) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0110A. Fiction I.

A workshop for students who have little or no previous experience in writing fiction. Enrollment limited to 17 per section. This course is limited to undergraduates. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR0110A S01 16071 T 4:00-6:30(09) (A. Toy)
Fall LITR0110A S02 16072 Th 6:30-9:00PM(05) (L. Sichi)
Fall LITR0110A S03 16073 T 6:30-9:00PM(11) (I. Fogelson)
Spr LITR0110A S01 24889 M 6:00-8:30PM(13) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110A S02 24890 T 4:00-6:30(16) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110A S03 24891 T 6:30-9:00PM(12) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0110B. Poetry I.

A workshop for students who have little or no previous experience in writing poetry. Enrollment limited to 17 per section. This course is limited to undergraduates. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR0110B S01 16074 M 6:00-8:30PM(15) (M. Lawrence)
Fall LITR0110B S02 16075 T 4:00-6:30(09) (C. Stough)
Fall LITR0110B S03 16076 T 6:30-9:00PM(09) (P. Ferrari)
Spr LITR0110B S01 24892 M 6:00-8:30PM(13) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110B S02 24893 T 6:30-9:00PM(12) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110B S03 24894 Th 6:30-9:00PM(12) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0110D. Digital Language Art I.

Project-oriented workshop for writers, visual/sound artists, filmmakers and programmers who wish to explore digital media techniques. No experience working in this field (or with computer programming) required. You'll learn through doing, reading, talking and collaborating on works in various traditions. Enrollment limited to 17. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR0110D S01 16077 Th 12:00-2:20(10) (Z. Wimsatt)
Fall LITR0110D L01 16078 T 4:00-5:00 (Z. Wimsatt)
Spr LITR0110D S01 24895 Th 12:00-2:30(10) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110D S02 25871 T 12:00-2:30(10) 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110D L01 24896 T 4:00-5:00 'To Be Arranged'
Spr LITR0110D L02 25873 Th 4:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0110E. Screenwriting I.

This workshop introduces the fundamentals of screenwriting through a variety of readings, exercises and assignments. Our main focus will be on students’ writing, with particular emphasis on exploring the cinematic potential of your stories and themes, and on developing structures that best suit your material and intentions. This course is limited to undergraduates. S/NC. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Fall LITR0110E S01 16832 W 3:00-5:30(17) (L. Colella)
Spr LITR0110E S01 25660 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (L. Colella)
Course usage information

LITR 0200Z. Faking It: Literature in the Age of the Hoax.

How is society simultaneously constructed and undermined by the persistence of fakes? With its cousins the hoax and the forgery, the fake plays the straw man in much of political, religious, and philosophical discourse, but the fake’s insistence on re-conceiving notions of originality and purity is more substantial. Pursuing a definition of the fake, we will consider its many forms in contemporary society alongside novels that parody and complicate the history of these particular deceptions. Authors include: Borges, Bolano, Ishiguro, Byatt, and McCarthy. Enrollment limited to 17.

Course usage information

LITR 0210A. Fiction Writing II.

Topics often include stylistic matters related to tone and point of view, and structural matters like controlling switches in time. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all intermediate workshops. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR0210A S01 16060 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Howard)
Fall LITR0210A S02 16061 T 4:00-6:30(09) (W. VanDenBerg)
Spr LITR0210A S01 24878 W 3:00-5:30(14) (J. Howard)
Spr LITR0210A S02 24879 M 3:00-5:30(13) (C. Unigwe)
Course usage information

LITR 0210B. Poetry Writing II.

Emphasis is placed on verse strategies, meter, rhythm, imagery and rhyme. Writing includes frequent exercises in various poetic traditions. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all intermediate workshops. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR0210B S01 16079 T 4:00-6:30(09) (A. Colarusso)
Spr LITR0210B S01 24897 T 4:00-6:30(16) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0210D. Digital Language Art II.

Project-oriented workshop for writers, visual/sound artists, filmmakers, and programmers wishing to explore techniques for effective and innovative use of text in digital media. Topics include hypertext narrative, kinetic poetry, and recombinant and computer-generated texts. Collaboration encouraged. Work sample (writing, programming, website) due on first day of semester. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR0210D S01 16081 T 12:00-2:20(10) (T. Anderson)
Fall LITR0210D L01 16082 Th 4:00-4:50 (T. Anderson)
Course usage information

LITR 0210E. Screenwriting II.

Emphasis is placed on filmic devices, such as dialogue, voice-over, montage and time. Writing includes frequent exercises. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all intermediate workshops. This course is limited to undergraduates. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0310A. Poetry in Service to Schools and the Community.

We shall be reading, writing and talking about poetry and letting this medium reflect back on other artistic practices -- what it means to live, work & think (in) this way; another key component will be an engagement with community practice through bringing poetry to local schools, a direct personal and enlightening exchange of enlightening ideas and experience. Participants will work independently, in groups, in classes (including this one); you produce, and work with others to produce, art individually as well as communally; you are the gaffer, you are also, and simply, a member of the guild. This feels more like a teacher's enterprise, though I call it, simply, community practice-- what happens when people just put themselves in the position to give their gifts, while allowing, at the same time, others to give equally of themselves. Limited to 17. S/NC. Permission will be granted by the instructor after the first class session. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0310B. City/Spaces: An Introduction to Psychogeography.

Psychogeography is an artistic discipline concerned with the subconscious ways in which we respond to and interact with the physical environment of the city. This course will focus on the intersection of psychogeography and text-both narrative and non-narrative- and the possibilities for walking to inform text and narrative. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0310C. Ethnic Writing (ETHN 0300).

Interested students must register for ETHN 0300.

Course usage information

LITR 0310D. Imagining the City: Visions from Film and Literature.

This course will look at representations of urban space both in films and fiction, and through the lens of critical writings on the intersections between city space, architecture, film, and narrative. How do cities affect us aesthetically and emotionally? How have film and fiction examined, reinvented and revolutionized urban space in the twentieth century? What is the future of cities? These are some of the questions we'll address through readings, screenings, and discussion. As a class we will do weekly creative writing exercises inspired by the films and designed to explore the ways in which poetic space might be evoked through text.

Course usage information

LITR 0310E. Making the Written Word.

While our primary focus will be on language, we shall explore its relationship to sound, video, and performance. Although no prerequisites are required, students should be competent in visual and language arts — we shall work with equal sensitivity in both. Works created shall interrogate the space between image and text as a single composite medium, therefore illuminating advantages and pitfalls of each. We'll consider works by Linda Montano, Jenny Holzer, Lyn Hejinian, Susan Sontag. Required lab sessions in new technologies (Final Cut Pro, Audacity, Logic, Processing) will provide skills necessary to produce conceptually driven works of digital language art. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0310F. Visual Poetry.

This interdisciplinary workshop explores the visual possibilities of language. Considering the page as a starting point, we'll create new works between writing and visual art. Through researching early writing systems, concrete poetry, asemic writing and contemporary works, students will gain a deeper understanding of their own practices. We'll examine the works of Dieter Roth, Carl Andre, Sol Lewitt, Aram Saroyan, Kenneth Goldsmith, Rosmarie Waldrop and more. All visual media welcome. "[Blank space on a page means] freedom. The possibility of anything happening. Every mark on that paper is an interruption, an insertion into a kind of peace." -Susan Howe WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0310H. Art of Film: An Introduction to Filmmaking.

This is a course in the art of film writing, directing, editing picture and sound, and producing, be it narrative or avant-garde. Students will engage the theory and practice of the art of filmmaking via readings, viewings, writings, and making their own films. S/NC required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0310J. The Voice of Text.

The Voice of Text will explore the voice as mediator among text, sound and performance. The vocal instrument will be thoughtfully investigated with examination of extreme and unorthodox iterations of voice/text/sound, including: castrati repertoire, extended technique ranging from Diamanda Galas to black metal, coded shortwave radio transmissions, electronic vocal synthesis and the ecstatic speech of glossolalia. Additionally, voiced text will be given historical context through fiction and poetry, film, theater and music. Through individual and collaborative projects, students will explore a variety of techniques and technologies, harnessing the expressive potential of the voice across a wide variety of disciplines. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0510A. Masters and Servants.

We will consider the relationship between servants and masters as portrayed in fiction and films. We shall examine the basic relation of servitude to sovereignty, extrapolating to the broader power dynamics of two-person relationships. Beginning with the Hegelian dialect of the master and the servant, and building as well on a philosophical framework provided by Nietzche, Kojeve and Bataille, we shall look at the complexities of the relationship between masters and servants, exploring the psychological, social and ethical dimensions of two-person relationships that value each person differently. We shall focus on issues of class and power and look at literature and film in which there are explorations of several complicated manifestations of servitude and mastery: overlaps into gender power dynamics and fetishism, power dynamic reversals both to comic and tragic effect, and questions of boundaries and violation of social propriety and human communication. Core texts will include work from Ishiguru, Wodehouse, D.H. Lawrence, Miabeau, Richardson, Bronë, and Stanley Crawford, and film texts will include Joseph Losey's The Servant and Luis Bunuel's Diary of a Chambermaid. FYS

Course usage information

LITR 0510B. Into the Machine.

Starting from Turing's work on artificial intelligence, we shall examine the cultural and artistic ramifications of the rise of the machine, using Marx and Walter Benjamin to provide a framework. We will look at how machines generate anxiety, with special emphasis on robots, puppets and automatons; and we shall also consider utopian and dystopian images of machines, and visions of near and distant futures. Finally we will look at authors who utilize machine models of operation to generate artistic work. Authors and filmmakers include: Capek, E.T.A. Hoffman, Asimov, Lem, Breton, Redonet, Fritz Lang, Chaplin, Tati. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

Course usage information

LITR 0510C. The Pleasures of the Text.

Enter the radiance of literature, music and film through devotional readings, viewings and listening experiences that will result in a series of weekly creative writing experiments. Dissolve into a narrative or sound or image the way a writer might and return from these experiences inspired and changed. Be prepared for the awe and wonder that only art can afford. Texts may include stories, poems and/or novels by Adler, Baldwin, the Bible, Coetzee, Cortazar, Gluck, Muller, Munro, Morrison, Pancake, Rankine, Schwartz, Wolf and others. Films by Akerman, Anderson, Kurosawa and Herzog. Music by classical, jazz and hip-hop artists. FYS LILE WRIT

Fall LITR0510C S01 16084 M 3:00-5:30(15) (C. Maso)
Course usage information

LITR 0510D. Why Don’t We Fall In Love?.

How do we fall in love? Why? The title of our seminar was inspired by the 2002 summer pop-hit, written and produced by Rich Harrison, and famously performed by Amerie Rogers. Through poetry, film, and music, we will be critical, clinical, and sometimes implicated observers of the dynamics which structure erotic desire, the selfless (or selfish) ambition of love, and its representations. FYS WRIT

Spr LITR0510D S01 25891 T 4:00-6:30(16) (A. Colarusso)
Spr LITR0510D F01 25892 M 6:30-8:30PM 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 0610A. Unpublishable Writing.

This workshop explores writing projects which do not fit into conventional avenues of print publication (i.e. books). Through a series of prompted artistic projects we will explore how writing can interweave in new relationships with time, materials, sequence, procedural approaches, performance, and collaboration. Independent research will support your creative projects throughout the semester. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC. FYS

Course usage information

LITR 0610B. Fiction Through Poetry.

This course is designed for poets, fiction writers, and cross-genre enthusiasts interested in looking at narrative as it occurs at the level of the sentence, even the level of the word. We will use a variety of poetic texts as well as other fractured content as a means to think about fiction and the borderlands of storytelling. Students will be given weekly writing exercises. Enrollment limited to 12 first year students. S/NC. FYS

Course usage information

LITR 0610C. Books By Hand.

We shall explore small press publishing and bookmaking from historical, contemporary and hands-on perspectives. Students will be asked to design and carry out small creative projects throughout the semester as well as research particular concerns in the field. Enrollment limited to 12 first year students. S/NC. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 0710. Writers on Writing Seminar.

Offers students an introduction to the study of literature (including works from more than one genre) with special attention given to a writer's way of reading. This course will include visits to the course by contemporary writers who will read to the class and talk about their work. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Fall LITR0710 S01 16069 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (J. Cayley)
Spr LITR0710 S01 24884 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (M. de la Torre)
Course usage information

LITR 0999. Graphic Novels and Comic Masterworks.

Focused on the influence of graphic novels and comic art, this course examines graphic novels and comic art from seminal texts like Art Spiegleman's Maus through a range of mainstream and independent comics from Marjane Satrapi, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore, David B., Lynda Barry, Daniel Clowes, Frank Miller, and many others, including graphic memoir, reportage, and Indie and DIY zines. The course explores image and language in collaboration, seeking a better understanding of this influential genre. Assignments are critical and creative, both individual and collaborative, and will involve daily reading and writing assignments. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1010A. Advanced Fiction.

The writing of short stories or longer works in progress in regular installments, along with appropriate exercises and reading assignments. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all advanced workshops. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR1010A S01 16057 Th 10:30-1:00(13) (M. Steinbach)
Fall LITR1010A S02 16063 W 3:00-5:30(17) (L. Baker)
Spr LITR1010A S01 24875 T 10:30-1:00(09) (M. Steinbach)
Spr LITR1010A S02 25532 T 12:00-2:30(10) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

LITR 1010B. Advanced Poetry.

Course work includes a body of exercises, close reading of poetry, workshop conversations and conferences. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all advanced workshops. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR1010B S01 16065 M 3:00-5:30(15) (P. Nelson)
Spr LITR1010B S01 24885 W 3:00-5:30(14) (M. de la Torre)
Course usage information

LITR 1010C. Advanced Playwriting.

Course work includes a body of exercises, significant reading, workshop conversations and conferences. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all advanced workshops. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1010D. Advanced Digital Language Arts.

An advanced writing working for which participants produce, individually or in collaborative arrangements, a significant work of language-driven, digitally-mediated art in networked and programmable media. This work will be given historical and critical context, as participants become more aware of what it is they are doing when they use digital systems to write, or when they create instruments for and of writing. Throughout the course — and especially before final projects become the focus — there will be seminar-style reading and discussion: readings from other works of digital language art and from selected critical writing in the field. WRIT

Fall LITR1010D S01 16068 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Cayley)
Course usage information

LITR 1010E. Advanced Screenwriting.

The writing of short screenplays or a longer work in progress in regular installments, along with a body of exercises, workshop conversations and conferences. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all advanced workshops. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR1010E S01 16833 Th 10:30-12:50(13) (L. Colella)
Spr LITR1010E S01 25792 M 3:00-5:30(13) (L. Colella)
Course usage information

LITR 1010F. Advanced Translation.

Translation draws from many fields including linguistics, comparative literature, literary studies, anthropology, cultural studies, cognitive science, and creative writing. While we consider different theories and approaches to translation, students will embark on a semester-length translation project. Expect to read and energetically discuss readings, to give a presentation on your ongoing translation, and to write a critical essay and numerous translation exercises on your way toward completing a manuscript in translation (the length of which will be determined by the work itself and an agreement between professor and student). Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1010G. Writing3D.

An advanced experimental workshop for writing in immersive 3D, introducing text, sound, spatial poetics, and narrative movement into Brown's Legacy Cave (now house in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts) with links to the YURT (Yurt Ultimate Reality Theater in the Center for Computation and Vixualization). An easy-to-learn and easy-to-use application allows non-programmers to create projects on laptops and then to run them in immersive 3D audiovisuality without the necessity for specialist support. Broadly interdisciplinary, the course encourages collaboration between students with different skills in different media, who work together to discover a literary aesthetic in artificially rendered space. WRIT

Spr LITR1010G S01 24887 M 3:00-5:30(13) (J. Cayley)
Course usage information

LITR 1110B. American Political Drama.

What exactly is an American political play? We'll examine issues of personal freedom, community rights, and the positioning of public power. Are we different from the myths of America? Political theater enables us to see our moral choices and aspirations. From Aristophanes to Suzan-Lori Parks, we will look at various political texts while we attempt to create new approaches to the writing of American Political Theater. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110E. Innovative Narrative.

Stereotexts: a project-driven writing workshop focused on innovative multidimensional approaches to narrative. Projects using two or more media such as print and digital formats or texts and sound, filmed text, hyperfictions, narratives with multiple voices or even multiple spaces, text installations, fictions that put contraries into play, etc., are all welcome. Writing samples and project descriptions required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110F. Narrative Strategies.

A course essentially geared to the creative and critical writer interested in experimenting with some of the narrative structures suggested by the great films. To include films of Akerman, Antonioni, Eisenstein, Hou Hsiao, Hsien, Goddard, marker, Tarkovsky and others and texts by Duras, Sebald and Vittorini. Instructor permission required. WRIT

Spr LITR1110F S01 24904 W 3:00-5:30(14) (C. Maso)
Spr LITR1110F F01 25793 T 7:00-9:00PM (C. Maso)
Course usage information

LITR 1110G. Narrative Voice: Fact and Fiction.

No description available. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110J. The Short Story.

Experiments in writing; extensive reading in traditional and experimental collections of fiction in shorter forms. Writing samples of no more than ten pages should be left at 68 1/2 Brown Street on the first day of the semester. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110L. Aspects of Contemporary Prose Practice.

Using Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Purple Hibiscus, Tayeb Saleh's The Weddingof Zein and Other Stories, Luis Bernard Honwana's We Killed Mangy Dog, and Our Sister Killjoy, this course will look at prose narrative in contemporary African Literature, for a background to general narrative practice. Among areas of special interest, the course will examine the contents and structure of the short story, not as an abbreviated novel, but as an autonomous genre. We shall also look at literature in translation, and discuss what the reader loses in the process if anything, and how much that matters, if at all. Students will be expected to work on short stories and novel chapters. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110M. Stereotexts: Experimental Multidimensional Fiction Workshop.

A project-driven writing workshop focused on innovative multidimensional approaches to narrative. Projects using two or more media such as print and digital formats or text and sound, filmed text, hyperfictions, narratives with multiple voices or even multiple spaces, text installations, fictions that put contraries into play, etc., all are welcome submissions. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110N. Workshop for Potential Literature.

A novel without the letter "E", 100,000-billion sonnets by permutation and texts that take the shape of a Mobius-Strip-- all this time and more, as workshop participants try their hands in writing in response to problems created by and inspired by a group of writers engaged in strange constraints and procedures. Instructor permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Spr LITR1110N S01 24883 M 3:00-5:30(13) (P. Nelson)
Course usage information

LITR 1110O. Hybrid Texts, Hybrid Thinking.

In neither being fiction, poetry, memoir, theory, nor art writing but a crossing of these genres, the hybrid text proffers an open and complexly layered environment for engaging questions of perception, knowledge and articulation. In this course, we will study exemplary works of literature and venture briefly into visual art. Both critical and creative responses will be required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110P. Alternative Scriptwriting: Writing Beyond the Rules.

This course will consider various screenwriting genres and how to write against genre or extend the traditional screenwriting forms. Students applying must have already completed either a 90+ page screenplay or have taken Advanced Playwriting (LITR 1010C) or Advanced Screenwriting (LITR 1010E) at Brown. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110R. Performance Dimensions of Text.

This workshop (modeled on a traditional "atelier") explores the relationships between the performative and the printed/textual, asking in particular how the page can serve as a dynamic blueprint for sound, video, movement, and theatrical practice. Weekly examples of works that have pushed the boundaries of literary genres by incorporating performative elements will be combined with student experimentation in long and short pieces. As an interdisciplinary workshop, this course invites students from all backgrounds. S/NC. Instructor's permission required. Enrollment limited to 12. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1110S. Fiction into Film.

A study of various directors' attempts to transfer masterpieces of fiction into film. Concerning both genres we will ask Gertrude Stein's question: What are masterpieces, and why are there so few of them? Includes fiction by Austen, Bierce, Carter, Cowley, Doyle, Faulkner, Forster, Fowles, Kesey, Joyce, McCullers, Morrison, Nabokov, O'Connor, Thompson, Walker, Spielberg, Woolf, Yamamoto as directed by Burton, Forman, Felini, Gilliam, Huston, Jordan, Kurasawa, Lee, Potter, and others. Class and weekly screenings. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC. WRIT

Fall LITR1110S S01 16059 T 10:30-1:00(13) (M. Steinbach)
Course usage information

LITR 1150A. Ecopoetics in Practice.

What we have perpetrated on our environment has certainly affected a poet's means and material. But can poetry be ecological or display values that acknowledge the economy of interrelationship between human and non-human realms? Aside from issues of theme and reference, how might syntax, line break, or the shape of the poem on the page express an ecological ethics? How might poetry register the complex interdependency that draws us into a dialogue with the world? Readings, discussion, essays and creative writing. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all special topics workshop/seminars. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150B. The Foreign Home: Interdisciplinary Arts.

Project-centered workshop for exploration beyond one's "home" genre, whether in video, poetry, fiction, music, performance or visual arts. Contemporary and art-historical interdisciplinary works will ground our investigation into the tension between expertise and "beginner's mind". Collaborative and individual work expected. See general course description above for entry procedures for all special topics workshops/seminars. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150C. Unpublishable Writing.

Before becoming the dominant form of book-marking, "the codex" meant a tree stump where criminals were tied. After examining conventions of western print culture, we will explore literary practices which are performative, sculptural, multimedia, or out-scale. Through the course is primarily for creative projects, critical research will also be expected. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150E. Strange Attractors: Adaptations/Translations.

A workshop for students from all genres and disciplines to explore adaptation as creative process. Adaptation can be between any genres and from any source. See general course description above for entry procedures for all special topics workshops/seminars. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150F. Home and Abroad.

This course combines seminar and workshop sessions for students with special interest in the writing of novels and short fiction. Attention will be given to the ways certain English and American writers - Herman Melville, Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, Graham Greene - have interpreted the lives of people in other and foreign cultures. These are classic examples of the meeting of insiders and outsiders in the house of fiction. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 12. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150G. Books by Hand.

As both a seminar and workshop, this course will explore small press publishing and bookmaking from historical, contemporary and hands-on perspectives. Students will be asked to design and carry out small creative projects throughout the semester as well as research particular concerns in the field. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all special topics workshop/seminars. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150H. Latin American Poetry Live.

We focus on 18 essential poets from Latin America. If you do not weep and run naked shouting through the streets of Providence you will not have read the poems closely. Bilingualism is not a prerequisite, but all the texts are bilingual and we will consider translation issues in a way that is accessible to and engaging for everyone. Several of the poems we consider are book length magisterial works. The poems are political, erotic, domestic, colloquial, innovative, or incendiary, and sometimes all at once. This section does not require permission from instructor. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150I. The Lyric Essay.

Advanced level workshop for graduates and undergraduates to explore the possibilities of creative nonfiction in a radical or hybrid mode. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all special topics workshop/seminars. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150J. The Cinematic Essay.

A creative writing seminar in which we take the Essay Film as the primary inspiration for weekly writing exercises. Works by Marker, Godard, Ivens, Resnais, Varda, Akerman, Herzog, Morris, Su Friedrich, Sadie Benning and Trihn Mon-Ha to be included. Also writing by Cannetti, Gass, Handke, Cha, Hong Kingston and more. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all special topics workshop/seminars. Written permission required. S/NC. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150M. Short Fiction Experiments.

A course in fiction which pushes against the very definitions of stories and fictions. Using short forms, we will examine our habits and assumptions of story telling and engage in willful adventures of mind, spirit, and language. Prerequisites include a passion for trying everything and anything once. No prior writing experience needed. Written permission required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150N. The Novella: An Adventure in Writing.

In this workshop/seminar, we will explore the ever elusive world of the novella - how to think of this work, what the rules are, where the boundaries lay. Alongside their reading of writers such as Marguerite Dumas and Michael Ondaatje, students will embark on their own novella-writing journeys. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150P. John Cage and Meditative Poetics.

Primarily an interdisciplinary literature course, we will experience the writing and thinking of John Cage in the context of a wider exploration of creative process with a basis in american and european interpretations of Buddhist practice and thought. We will explore the work of contemporary artists such as Bill Viola, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman, as well as Samuel Beckett and others. Students in the course will be expected to write in both creative and critical modes. Instruction in basic meditation practice is recommended but optional throughout the semester. Written permission required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150Q. Reading, Writing and Thinking for the Stage.

Composed of contemporary dramatic literature for playwrights. Contemporary texts are studied. Use of each author's dramatic techniques, the influence of the times on his drama, his themes, the demands of market driven theater and popular art considered. Simultaneously students will write an original 60-page manuscript. Students applying must have already completed plays of 60 pages or have advanced playwriting experience. Written permission required. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150R. Exemplary Ancient Fictions.

We shall discuss and examine a selection of pre-Gutenberg narratives from Gilgamesh and Genesis through Ovid and fairytales and medieval romance, with a focus on the ancient art of narrative. We shall also try our hands at exercises in the alternative fictional strategies these works suggest. Course entry based on the submission of a writing sample (and in-class writing in response to an assignment) at the first class session. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150S. What Moves at the Margins.

A multi-genre seminar/workshop based on fiction, non-fiction and dramatic literature that has been banned or otherwise marginalized because it is critical, interrogative and alternative. Weekly writing exercises based on readings and discussions in class. A term project is required. For students who love literature. For admission, students may submit fiction, non-fiction or drama. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150T. Foreign Home.

Project-centered workshop for exploration beyond one's "home" genre, whether in video, poetry, fiction, music, performance or visual arts. Contemporary and art-historical interdisciplinary works will ground our investigation into the tension between expertise and "beginner's mind". Collaborative and individual work expected. Instructor's permission required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150U. Prose City: The Making of Spatial Texts.

In this workshop/seminar, we will explore, through selected reading and writing exercises, some basic questions of "writing city": how is place captured, encompassed; how can the city emerge in language as a character, an event, as reflective space; how do we enter the city; how do we recognize its borders? Students will be asked to create a portfolio of texts for an imagined city, as well as to think through concepts such as "structure," "location," "encounter," and "identity" as they occur in the paragraph. Instructor's permission required. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150V. The Novel in Brief.

This workshop/seminar takes the novel form on a wild ride as it investigates concepts such as compression, fragmentation, miniaturization, and sequencing in the construction of narratives. Students will be required to write their own brief novel over the course of the semester. Writing sample due at first class session. Instructor permission given after review of manuscripts. Enrollment limited to 12. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150W. Clown Aesthetics.

Clown as literary structure and trope as well as character will be our focus. We will ask if this "clown aesthetic" exists, could exist, should or might continue to exist -- in fiction, performance, and film in particular. Clowning of all kinds considered from history, theory, literary and performing arts. Graduate and undergraduate students from all disciplines invited. This workshop course includes individual research as well as collaborative projects. Come to first class for permission. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150X. Reading, Writing and Thinking.

We will explore various ways to engage with a work of art in order to fuel one's imagination and projects. Close textual reading of several books with writing assignments based on the readings. Writers will include Woolf, Stein, Beckett, Coetze, Kertesz and others. Writing samples due at first class session. Instructor permission given after review of manuscripts. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150Y. Fiction Through Poetry.

This course is designed for poets, fiction writers, and cross-genre enthusiasts interested in looking at narrative as it occurs at the level of the sentence, even the level of the word. We will use a variety of poetic texts as well as other fractured content as means to think about fiction, and the borderlands of storytelling. Instructor permission required (bring a writing sample to the first class meeting). Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1150Z. Reading for Writers.

We will look closely and deeply and with a writer's passion and agenda to the various formal decisions used in a variety of astonishing and evocative texts with the objective of utilizing some of these strategies in weekly compositions of our own. Writers include: Aria, Berssenbrugge, Coetzee, Kertesz, Kincaid, Lispector, Mueller. DPLL LILE WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1151B. Figures of Thought.

What can you say about what can’t be said, and what form does such a saying take? From the gnostic gospels to Agamben, Yeats to Yves Bonnefoy, we'll follow these fleeting figures of thought and their messages. We will read a variety of writings from the deep past to the present. These writings will come in a variety of forms but illuminate a path ahead of the one we daily follow. Students will keep journals that respond to the world and writing and bring these as material for discussion in class. Each one will give a presentation during the term. LILE WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1151C. Virginia Woolf: Four Novels.

This is a class for writers and will entail close devotional readings of the texts and weekly writing experiments based on methods, motions, patterns, rhythms, abstractions and other narrative strategies employed by the novels. We'll read the following books by Woolf: Jacob's Room, Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and Between the Acts. S/NC required. Writing samples due at first class meeting. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1151D. Art of Film.

This is a course in the art of film writing, directing, editing picture and sound, and producing, be it narrative or avant-garde. Students will engage the theory and practice of the art of filmmaking via readings, viewings, writings, and making their own films. Each student will complete four films from initial conception to the final film in a collaborative environment. DPLL LILE WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1151E. Latin American Death Trip.

Death is the subject of many of the greatest (most moving, innovative, funny, haunting, political, oneiric) Latin American poems of the 20th century, from Gorostiza’s Death without End to Villaurrutia’s Nostalgia for Death to Saenz’ The Night. What particularities of culture, gender, age, faith or experience might account for the visionary clarity of death as constant companion or permeable border, etc.? What makes the poems great? Our class will read classic Latin American books in bilingual editions (so Spanish literacy is not a requirement, but we will talk about translation issues). DPLL LILE WRIT

Fall LITR1151E S01 16984 W 3:00-5:30(17) (F. Gander)
Course usage information

LITR 1151F. Choose Your Own Adventure.

This game is lit. I mean this Lit is a game. How do the design elements of a novel resemble the design elements of a game? And to what extent have interactive [video] games been designed with novelistic conceits? Your adventure begins here, starting with what lies at the dark heart of the literary adventure genre (Defoe, Conrad, Behn). We’ll sojourn at contemporary indie video games (Undertale, Walking Dead, Broken Age, Gone Home), along the way analyzing how “choice” is utilized to build reciprocal fictions. We will also undertake semester-long projects—creating our own “Choose Your Own Adventure”s. WRIT

Spr LITR1151F S01 25893 M 3:00-5:30(13) (A. Colarusso)
Course usage information

LITR 1151G. Everything Emily.

This is a course that wallows in Emily Dickinson—one of the most important poets at the foundations of American poetry and, still today, one of our most exacting and most experimental practitioners. No one in the ensuing 150 years has surpassed her radical modes of expression, invention, and vision. We will engage with her poetry, her letters, her biography, and many of the works of criticism, visual art, film, and poetry that her work has inspired, as well as exploring the Dickinson collections in Brown’s Hay Library and visiting her Amherst home. WRIT

Fall LITR1151G S01 17065 T 10:30-1:00(13) (L. Swensen)
Course usage information

LITR 1151H. Discomfort.

Comfort is overrated! This course is an invitation to leave our comfort zones and dive into texts that invite us to rethink the way we view history, the world, fiction, writing, race relations etc. We will read recommended texts and discuss them in class. Discussions will include but not be limited to the narrative techniques employed by the writers and our response to the texts, both as readers and as writers. DPLL WRIT

Fall LITR1151H S01 17303 T 4:00-6:30(09) (C. Unigwe)
Course usage information

LITR 1151I. Remaster + Remix.

This workshop/seminar will use the intuition, logic and esthetics of popular music forms such as punk, house, dub step, reggae and blues to delve into the complex connections between a selection of classic novels and versions of these novels retold. What tensions get reset when writers on an empire’s margin write back? What assumptions get shifted when women refocus a novel’s concerns? What are the possibilities and dangers in reconstructing classics while trying to mash them up? And why are we breathless when a stylist riffs? French Antillean notions of creolité will offer guidance. Main guide—the books. WRIT

Fall LITR1151I S01 17304 W 3:00-5:30(17) (C. Channer)
Course usage information

LITR 1200. Writers on Writing.

Offers students an introduction to the study of literature (including works from more than one genre) with special attention given to a writer's way of reading. This course will include visits to the course by contemporary writers, who will read to the class and talk about their work. Enrollment is limited to 30 students.

Fall LITR1200 S01 16064 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (F. Gander)
Spr LITR1200 S01 24881 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (C. Channer)
Course usage information

LITR 1220A. History and Practice of English Versification.

An opportunity to study through reading and imitating poems that represent a variety of poetic eras and traditions. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 1220B. Samuel Beckett.

This course will mark the centenary of the author by reading and discussing a range of works from Samuel Beckett's substantial output of fiction, poetry, drama and translation.

Course usage information

LITR 1220C. The Cantos in their Environment.

A reading of Pound's Cantos, with attention to their origin and developments, their background and their influence.

Course usage information

LITR 1220D. The Bible as Literary Source.

A survey of the English Bible and its presence in English and American literature. Students will learn to notice and account for Biblical echoes in a wide variety of writings from several cultures.

Course usage information

LITR 1220E. Dada and Surrealism.

Two of the most famous modernist movements, studied through their writings, their visual arts, their performances, and their manifestoes; their origins and influence; their place in history. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 1220F. Restoration Drama.

A survey of English drama and theatrical practice from the reopening of the theaters at the Restoration to the early eighteenth century. Works of the major playwrights, including Dryden, Congreve, Wycherly, Gay. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 1220G. The Waste Land and After.

We shall examine Eliot's poem, and then deal with early poems by W.H. Auden and the work of Charles Williams and David Jones. S/NC

Course usage information

LITR 1230C. Poetry Newly in Translation in English.

This is a reading, writing. translation, and discussion class. Commit to a vigorous combination of all four. Some translation theory will be reviewed, but the emphasis of the course is upon models of translations. Texts will include works by Iva Blatny, Inger Christensen, Luljeta Lleshanaku, David Huerta, Takashi Hiraide; new translations of Rimbaud and Baudelaire and others. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC

Course usage information

LITR 1230D. Poetry, Mind, World.

How does the poetic mind negotiate between an account of itself and an account of the world? How have poets used landscape as a model of mind, as an erotics, as elegy? Merleau-Ponty, Hardy, Houle, Alexander, Dewdney, Hass, D'Aquino, Audubon and others. Presentation, several short essays, a poem, and one final essay.

Course usage information

LITR 1230E. Form and Theory of Fiction.

"Form and Theory of Fiction" offers an exploration of narrative theories directed particularly at creative writers, in conjunction with a hands-on examination of contemporary fictional narrative practices. Theoretical readings include historical essays on fiction and work by Gaston Bachelard, Mieke Bal, Gilles Deleuze, and others. Enrollment limited to 20.

Fall LITR1230E S01 17017 M 3:00-5:30(15) (J. Howard)
Course usage information

LITR 1230F. Writing, Reading City.

In this course, we will explore correlations, points of convergence, and possible mimesis between city and text. Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to have a city in question, and to write both imaginatively and critically in response to readings and class discussion.

Course usage information

LITR 1230G. Master Poets of Apartheid Streets: Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Margaret Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks.

With the theme of "Slavery and Justice" in recent Brown University review, [4] "Master Poets of Apartheid Streets: Perpetual Resistance against de jure and de facto Segregation" is the formal and precise embouchure as Critical Realism which legislates as antidote to pernicious social, economic and educational racism: the aesthetic stance of this seminar is "An Integer Is a Whole Number." Through close attention to the conventions of poetry as praxis by these four master poets, in social context, the modality of this study is poetic discourse (what Frederick Douglass called "a sacred effort" in Douglass' description of President A. Lincoln's 'Second Inaugural.' Peripheral insights will be provided by Brown University researchers of the past: Charles H. Nichols, Winthrop Jordan, Richard Slotkin, in their three dissertations, and James R. Patterson's most recent book on "Brown v. Board of Education." Written permission required. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 1230H. Being in Time.

In this discussion-based course, we will examine the many roles time plays in the building of narratives as well as its impact on contemporary concepts of self. We will use both literary and philosophical texts to explore the spaces between time and perception, time and memory, time and experience, and time and grammar. Written permission required.

Course usage information

LITR 1230I. The Documentary Vision in New Literature of the Americas.

A study of genre-defiant works, lyric treatments, atypical narratives, film poems, etc., including works by Anne Carson, Elena Poniatowska, W.S. Merwin, Maggie Nelson, Raoul Zurita and others. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

LITR 1230J. Writing: Material Differences.

An exploration of practices that make a material difference to writing, that may change what writing is in specific cultural circumstance and locations. We will look for such differences through transcultural and translingual experiments with writing, beginning "West" and moving "East." We will engage with a selection of widely divergent writers and genres, with emphases on poetics - particularly a translated rendition of Chinese poetics (such as was taken up by Pound and became influential in English literature) - and on theories that we can use for our practice, from: Fenollosa, Foucault, Derrida, and others. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL

Course usage information

LITR 1230K. Latin American Death Trip.

Death is the subject of many of the greatest (most moving, innovative, funny, haunting, political, oneiric) Latin American poems of the 20th century, from Gorostiza's Death without End to Villaurrutia's Nostalgia for Death to Saenz' The Night. What is up with Latin Americans and death? What particularities of culture, gender, age, faith or experience might account for the visionary clarity of death as constant companion or permeable border, etc.? What makes the poems great? We shall read classic Latin American books in bilingual editions (so Spanish literacy is not a requirement, but we'll talk about translation issues). Students will be expected to participate in literary discussions, to write essays and a death poem. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

LITR 1230L. Eros: Hot and Sour.

Literature, early and late, distant and near, at the intersection of love and loathing. A seminar on selected texts deriving their blood from poetry, their flesh from fiction, their anatomy from form and theory. Including works by Rikki Ducornet, Anne Carson, Roland Barthes, Helen Cixous, Gertrude Stein, Catullus, Henry Miller, et al. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

LITR 1230M. Poetry and Ethics (COLT 1812J).

Interested students must register for COLT 1812J.

Course usage information

LITR 1230N. Robert Coover -- Foremost Storyteller.

We shall examine the works of contemporary American fiction writer, Robert Coover. During his long, celebrated career, Coover has imaginatively responded to writers and forms that have come before him. We'll investigate how Coover appropriates earlier traditions and think about how he simultaneously preserves and subverts literary traditions. We shall consider such concepts as myth, religion, and history, and determine how Coover applies these. We'll focus on authorial strategies and themes explored. Furthermore, we'll define literary terminology as a tools for textual and critical analysis. Finally, through this experience you can develop or refine the capacity for self-expression and communication. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1230O. Suppression and Invention in Modern Persian Literature.

This course begins with symbolic elements from classical mystic Persian literature and journeys into pre- and post-revolution Persian short fiction and poetry. We shall analyze creative responses to restricted expression, study efforts to modernize in a variety of genres, and finish with the rise of the woman writer in Iran. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

LITR 1230P. The New Wave in Iranian Cinema.

We shall explore this movement that produced remarkable award-winning films in Iran. Applying author (auteur) theory, we will study new Iranian movies, analyzing "signs and meaning" in their cinematic language, also investigating effects of Iranian culture on this new artistic wave. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC

Course usage information

LITR 1230Q. London Consequences.

This course focuses upon a selection of British prose from the 1960s and 1970s, and gives particular attention to post-war literary history in Britain, autobiographical fiction and the legacy of neo-modernism. We'll consider the work of, among others, Anna Kavan, J.G. Ballar, Nicholas Mosley, Muriel Spark, Christine Brooke-Rose, Stefan Themerson, Ann Quin and B.S. Johnson, along with (if available) London Consequences, a collaborative novel co-edited by Johnson. WRIT LILE

Course usage information

LITR 1230T. The Origins of the Detective Story.

This class will explore the development of the Detective genre, focusing on its roots in the 19th century and considering more broadly how genres develop and change. Readings include E.T.A. Hoffmann's "Mademoiselle de Scudery", Edgar Allan Poe's Auguste Dupin stories, Wilkie Collins, Arthur Conan Doyle, Martin Hewett, and selections from Detection by Gaslight and The Penguin Book of Gaslight Crime. We will also look at theoretical texts, including Franco Moretti's "Clues". This course fulfills Literary Arts' pre-20th century literature requirement. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

LITR 1230U. Samuel Beckett.

This course will examine the works of Samuel Beckett--novels, plays and stories--from the beginning of his career to his death. We will read the majority of Beckett's work, with a major focus on his novel trilogy (Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable) and on the other work Beckett published between 1948 and 1961 (especially Endgame and How It Is). WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1230V. Why Don't We Fall in Love?.

We focus here on intersections of the erotic and poetry. How do we fall in love? Why? We will explore joy and happiness, love and lust, devotion and seduction. We will also, unfortunately, explore longing, heartbreak, jealousy, unrequited love. We will explore, through literature and film, the ageless enigma that prompted Ruth Stone to proclaim, "there is no choice among the voices / of love..." WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1230W. Spectroscopy: [Identifying] Black Bodies in Narrative.

We shall focus on character development and narrative structure through the formation and presence of textual and cinematic black bodies. Our discussions will focus on the identification of that which is not allowed to speak -- the prototypical foil (Caliban), the other (Man Friday), the black body (Jim). How are narratives (how are we) shaped by that which cannot be acknowledged? DPLL WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1230X. The New Long Poem.

An energetic study of powerful, book-length poems recently published in English, including texts as core to 20th c. literature as Juan Rulfo’s Pedro Paramo to books as archly exacting as John Ashbery's Flow Chart, as affably innovative as Lyn Hejinian's My Life, as ingeniously formal as Inger Christiansen's alphabet and as unruly as Frank Stanford's The Battlefield Where the Moon Says I Love You. Also: Bernadette Mayer’s Midwinter Day, Evan S. Connell’s Notes Found in a Bottle on a Beach at Carmel, W.S. Merwin’s The Folding Cliffs, and the intra-genre Cecilia Vicuna’s Spit Temple. WRIT

Course usage information

LITR 1230Z. Syncretic Gods.

Is it possible to kill a God? What happens within a generation to change the face of a God? To change the nature of a God itself? In this course we will research the various transformations of the myths of Yoruba deities as they too traverse middle passage in the suffocating holds of merchant ships. We will commit to the (subversive) task of imagining and re-imagining the myths of the Orishas. Using as a foundation the seventeen drawings in Cuban artist Alberto del Pozo’s Orichas series, we will cover the storied lives of these our immortal and syncretic Gods. DPLL LILE WRIT

Fall LITR1230Z S01 17062 M 3:00-5:30(15) (A. Colarusso)
Fall LITR1230Z F01 17063 M 1:00-2:50 (A. Colarusso)
Fall LITR1230Z F02 17064 W 1:00-2:50 (A. Colarusso)
Course usage information

LITR 1231A. Time Mechanics: Poetry as Translation.

This seminar focuses on experimental translations and transcreations in the spirit of Spicer’s claim in After Lorca: “A poet is a time mechanic not an embalmer.” Various approaches to leading a text across the time and space divide will be studied. If for Pound to “make new” is to look elsewhere, for Zukofsky it’s to listen closely. If Hawkey’s Ventrakl posits the poem’s decomposition over time, Bang gives us a current, self-obsolescing version of Dante’s hell. And while Hsia Yü’s poems stage the clash of analogue and digital transmission technologies, Brandon Brown offers contemporary readers Fleur du mal version 2.0. WRIT

Fall LITR1231A S01 17060 T 10:30-1:00(13) (M. de la Torre)
Course usage information

LITR 1231B. The Enchantment of Re-Imagining.

The author, Sam Leith, likened the recent Jane Austen project (in which six authors are tasked with rewriting Jane Austen for a modern audience) to “writing fiction as literary criticism.” In this course, we are invited to think more speculatively about the role of re-imagination in literature and society by reading texts which do not only re-imagine the past by reframing history but which also re-imagine life and the present to offer us an alternate view. In some cases, these texts re-write existing classics. We will engage closely with the texts and relevant works of criticism. DPLL WRIT

Fall LITR1231B S01 17305 W 3:00-5:30(15) (C. Unigwe)
Course usage information

LITR 1231C. Experimental Poets of Color.

In this course we'll read and critically engage with contemporary experimental poets of color writing in English in the US and Canada. Exploring the intersection of poetics, aesthetics, critical race (and mixed race) theory, and social justice activism in the arts, we will question the modernist and post-modernist assumptions that experimentation and innovation are exclusively the domain of whiteness. We will explore how racism, colonialism, and other contemporary systems of oppression condition responses to poets of color, and consider how poets of color respond to and engage with these systems both overtly and through their aesthetic experimentation. DPLL LILE WRIT

Fall LITR1231C S01 17421 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (E. Mena-Landry)
Course usage information

LITR 1300. Independent Study in Reading, Research, and Writing About Literature.

Provides advanced students with an opportunity to pursue tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic.

Course usage information

LITR 1310. Independent Study in Creative Writing.

Offers tutorial instruction oriented toward some significant work in progress by the student. Typically taken by honors or capstone candidates in the antepenultimate or penultimate semester. See instructor to seek permission during the semester before undertaking the course of study. One advanced-level workshop is prerequisite. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 1410A. Fiction Honors.

A workshop setting for the completion of theses by advanced writers of fiction. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all honors workshops. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 12 senior Literary Arts concentrators. S/NC.

Spr LITR1410A S01 24876 Th 10:30-1:00(09) (M. Steinbach)
Course usage information

LITR 1410C. Playwriting Honors.

A workshop setting for the completion of theses or capstone projects by advanced writers of dramatic literature. See general course description above for course entry procedures for all honors/capstone workshops. Written permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 1510. Honors Independent Study in Creative Writing.

Provides tutorial instruction for students completing their theses or capstone projects. Typically taken by honors or capstone candidates in their final semester. See instructor to seek permission during the semester before undertaking the course of study. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2010A. Graduate Fiction.

Advanced practice of the art: a writing seminar, limited to graduate students in Literary Arts. Emphasis is placed on developing a better understanding of the creative process, strategies and forms. Written permission required. S/NC.

Fall LITR2010A S01 16062 M 12:00-2:30(12) (C. Channer)
Spr LITR2010A S01 24877 M 12:00-2:30(05) (C. Maso)
Course usage information

LITR 2010B. Graduate Poetry.

Advanced practice of the art: a writing seminar, limited to graduate students in Literary Arts. Emphasis is placed on developing a better understanding of the creative process, strategies and forms. Written permission required. S/NC.

Fall LITR2010B S01 16066 W 12:00-2:30(12) (M. de la Torre)
Spr LITR2010B S01 24882 T 1:15-3:45(10) (L. Swensen)
Course usage information

LITR 2010C. Graduate Playwriting.

Advanced practice of the art: a writing seminar, limited to graduate students in Literary Arts. Emphasis is placed on developing a better understanding of the creative process, strategies and forms. Written permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2110A. Theatrical Styles on Stage and Page.

An investigation of theatrical forms and for collaborations among actors, directors and playwrights. This course is limited to participants in the MFA programs in acting, directing and playwriting. Instructor permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2110C. Reading, Writing and Thinking.

A course for graduate prose writers. We will explore various ways to engage with a work of art in order to fuel one¿s imagination and projects. Close textual reading of several books with writing assignments based on the readings. Writers will include Woolf, Stein, Beckett, Coetze, Kertesz and others. Written permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2110E. The Foreign Home: Interdisciplinary Arts.

Project-centered workshop for exploration beyond one's "home" genre, whether in video, poetry, fiction, music, performance or visual arts. Contemporary and art-historical interdisciplinary works will ground our investigation into the tension between expertise and "beginner's mind". Collaborative and individual work expected. Written permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2110F. Essays Without Borders.

A workshop for writing, performing, or media artists exploring essay or non-fiction forms in any genre. No project too strange, no essay too fanciful. Readings and research into experimental non-fiction. Individual and group work as well as critical and artistic projects. Literary Arts MFAs will be given priority. Come to first meeting for permission. Enrollment limited to 12. Permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2110G. Writing The Novel.

For advanced fiction writers who wish to work in long form. Through this course, participants will read a selection of novels and investigate the form; the primary emphasis will be placed on the work being undertaken by the members of the workshop itself. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2110H. Embodying the Book.

What are the limits of the book? How far can it go? Alternatively, what is its essence? What is absolutely essential to it? This collaborative class brings writers together with RISD industrial designers and graphics artists to consider these questions and to create inventive book structures. Focus will be on collaboration itself, with texts addressing various aspects, such as the ethics of cooperation and group dynamics, as well as on the history and nature of the book as a cultural tool and force. Working in teams of three, students will invent their own structures and work together to embody them.

Course usage information

LITR 2110K. Deep Rivers, Lost Roads, Bent Symbols: Poets and Poetry Outside the Frame.

Geographically and/or aesthetically suspect, often shelved under the wrong rubric. Word-works by hermits and wanderers, sots and sot nots, whose language confirm, as Sister Rosetta Tharpe sang: Strange Things Happening Every Day. Including work by Besmilr Brigham, Wong May, Bernadette Mayer, Mary Reufle, Frank Stanford, David Fisher, a new translation of Beowulf (by an American! A Woman!), and others. There may also be music.

Course usage information

LITR 2210A. House Language.

We shall explore the house and its adjacent places and categories, with a focus upon narrative mannerism, terror and the grotesque, and the creation of literary form. We'll discuss stories, essays, household artifacts and etiquette, architectural plans and dangerous parlor games. Works by, among others: Georges Perec, H.G. Wells, Shirley Jackson, Isabella Beeton, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Frank Lloyd Wright, Rube Goldberg and Edith Wharton.

Course usage information

LITR 2230. Graduate Independent Study in Reading, Research, and Writing About Literature.

Provides graduate students with an opportunity to pursue tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic.

Course usage information

LITR 2310. Graduate Independent Studies in Literary Writing.

Offers tutorial instruction oriented toward some significant work in progress by the graduate student. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2410. Graduate Thesis Independent Study in Literary Writing.

Provides tutorial instruction for graduate students completing their graduate creative theses. Typically taken in the final semester. See instructor to seek permission during the semester before undertaking the course of study. S/NC.

Course usage information

LITR 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Course usage information

LITR 2600. Seminar in Teaching Creative Writing.

A course focused on how to design and lead a creative writing workshop. Reading, writing and laboratory workshop sessions. Designed for first-year Literary Arts graduate students. S/NC.

Chair

Leigh Cole Swensen

Professor

John H. Cayley
Professor of Literary Arts

Robert Coover
T.B. Stowell University Professor Emeritus of Literary Arts

Thalia L. Field
Professor of Literary Arts

Forrest Gander
Adele Kellenberg Seaver '49 Professor of Creative Writing

Carole Maso
Professor of Literary Arts

Meredith Steinbach
Professor of Literary Arts

Leigh Cole Swensen
Professor of Literary Arts

Bernard K. Waldrop
Brooke Russell Astor Emeritus Professor of the Humanities

Assistant Professor

Colin C. D. Channer
Assistant Professor of Literary Arts

Chika Unigwe
Bonderman Assistant Professor of the Practice of Literary Arts

Assistant Professor of the Practice

Monica M. de la Torre
Bonderman Assitant Professor of the Practice of Literary Arts

Joanna E. Howard
Assistant Professor of the Practice of Literary Arts

Visiting Assistant Professor

Andrew E. Colarusso
Visiting Assistant Professor of Literary Arts

Senior Lecturer

Peter Gale Nelson
Senior Lecturer in Literary Arts

Visiting Lecturer

Laura E. Colella
Visiting Lecturer in Literary Arts

Erica Mena
Visiting Lecturer in Literary Arts

Visiting Scholar

Elisabeth G. Bell
Visiting Scholar in Literary Arts

Rosmarie S. Waldrop
Visiting Scholar in Literary Arts

Literary Arts

Brown’s Program in Literary Arts provides a home for innovative writers of fiction, poetry, playwriting, screenwriting, literary translation, electronic writing and mixed media.  The concentration allows student writers to develop their skills in one or more genres while deepening their understanding of the craft of writing. Many courses in this concentration require a writing sample; students should consult a concentration advisor or the concentration website for strategies on getting into the appropriate course(s).

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree with concentration in Literary Arts will be expected to complete the following course work:

1. At least four creative writing workshops from among the following series: LITR 0100, LITR 0110, LITR 0210, LITR 0310, LITR 0610, LITR 1010, LITR 1110, and LITR 1150.  At least two genres must be covered within the four courses taken. An independent study in literary arts (LITR 1310) may count toward the workshop requirement. Other writing-intensive courses may also count, at the discretion of the advisor.

2. Six elective reading and research in literary arts courses, which must include:

  • a course in literary theory or the history of literary criticism
  • a course that primarily covers readings and research in literary arts created before 1800
  • a course that primarily covers readings and research in literary arts created between 1800 and 1900
  • a course that primarily covers readings and research in literary arts created after 1900

    These courses, selected in consultation with a concentration advisor, may come from (but are not limited to) the following departments: Africana Studies, American Civilization, Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, Egyptology, French Studies, German Studies, Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies, Judaic Studies, Linguistics, Literatures and Cultures in English, Middle East Studies, Modern Culture and Media, Music, Portuguese and Brazilian Studies, Slavic Studies, South Asian Studies, Theatre, Speech and Dance, Visual Arts. With approval from the concentration advisor, courses covering pre-20th century time periods may be distributed in a variant manner, so long as they cover two distinct literary time periods that precede the 20th century

3. Among the ten required courses, at least four must be at the 1000-level or above. No more than a total of four classes (workshops or reading/research courses) may be taken outside of the Literary Arts Department at Brown (whether at another institution or within another department's curriculum). No more than two of the ten required courses for the concentration may also count toward fulfilling a second concentration.

4.  During the senior year, all students must take at least one course within the Literary Arts course offerings (courses with LITR designation by the Registrar, or courses approved by the concentration advisor).

Honors in Creative Writing: Course requirements are the same as those for the regular concentration (four workshops, six elective literature-reading courses), with the following changes and additions: honors candidates must include two 1000-level workshops or independent studies among their courses; and complete a thesis. Students who are enrolled in or have completed at least one 1000-level workshop (or independent study) may submit honors applications to the Literary Arts Department from the first day of the fall semester to 20 September. Interested students should obtain information from the office of the Literary Arts Department.

Literary Arts

The Graduate Program in Literary Arts offers a Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A) degree with courses in fiction, poetry, digital language arts and work that cross the boundaries of discipline. 

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/literary-arts