Sociology

Sociology brings all that a good liberal arts education offers, but it is also distinctive for its substantive and methodological  range, as well as its commitment to both theory and practice.

Sociology is known for its substance -- its engagement with issues likely inequality and violence, both among individuals and across nations, and its devotion to understanding institutions, from the family to transnational organizations.  Sociology also cultivates the skills essential to analyzing social forces with precision, with methods like survey research and ethnography, all grounded in sociological theory.  Brown University sociology doesn't just study social problems; we work to develop the policies and practices then address them. 

This concentration assures that students develop the foundations in theory and research methods that enable them to develop literacy in social research.  It expects students to develop their own distinctive expertise within our discipline by requiring capstone or honors work.  And it gives them the chance to put their learning into practice through internships and other work dedicated to engaging  the real world. 

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Sociology/

Course usage information

SOC 0010. Culture, Power and Social Change.

Revolution and Social Movements. Urbanization and Globalization. War and Genocide. These are all examples of social change, and sociology, the discipline for which this course serves as introduction, seeks to understand, and explain, them all and other transformations too. We focus in particular on how technology and power relations help us explain variations in social change, and how culture shapes our recognition and evaluation of those transformations. Although analyzing the USA today is our common ground, our method is both comparative (other societies) and historical (focusing especially on the 20th and 21st centuries).

Spr SOC0010 S01 24874 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (M. Kennedy)
Course usage information

SOC 0020. Perspectives on Social Interaction: An Introduction to Social Psychology.

An introduction to the discipline of sociology examining the individual in social situations. Explores the social development of the person, the development of interpersonal relationships, and the problems of integrating the individual and social system. For each area, the personal and situational factors that bear upon the issue are investigated. The objective is to deepen understanding of the behavior of people in a social context. WRIT

Fall SOC0020 S01 16024 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (G. Elliott)
Course usage information

SOC 0111. Social Change, Dictatorship, and Democracy.

Why are some countries more democratic than others? What effects have industrialization and colonization had on developing world democracies? This course probes those questions from a sociological perspective. We'll explore the relationship between political regimes and socioeconomic factors, like class and race and look at Europe, the US, East Asia, and Latin America, using historical texts, sociological theory, novels, and films. This course will be of interest to concentrators in the social sciences, and students interested in Latin America and Asia. A foundational social science course is recommended. AP U.S. History or AP Comparative Politics is required for high school students.

Course usage information

SOC 0130. American Heritage: Democracy, Inequality, and Public Policy.

America professes equality but exhibits many forms of inequality in schools, race relations, and income. An examination of contrasting elements of American society and a review of the role social science plays in public debate. To illuminate the debates, key topics, such as welfare, immigration, affirmative action, and environmental equity are considered.

Course usage information

SOC 0150. Economic Development and Social Change.

Emphasis on understanding the interrelations among economic, political, and cultural aspects of change in developing countries. The experience of currently developing nations is contrasted to that of nations which industrialized in the 19th century. Compares the different development strategies which have been adopted by currently developing nations and their consequences for social change.

Spr SOC0150 S01 24841 MWF 12:00-12:50(05) (P. Henry)
Course usage information

SOC 0170. The Family.

The state of the contemporary family generates debate within and beyond sociology. That debate is considered by examining different definitions of family, changing gender roles within the family, and the family in cross-cultural context. Special issues include new family forms, such as gay and lesbian families and biological and step-parenthood, as well as changing patterns of work and housework.

Spr SOC0170 S01 24844 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (C. Spearin)
Course usage information

SOC 0200. Population and Society.

Introduces some of the major social issues relating to population size, growth, and change in industrialized and developing nations. Mortality, fertility, and migration levels and trends are analyzed. Also considers contemporary issues, such as HIV/AIDS epidemic, population aging, U.S. immigration, and national and international population policy debates.

Course usage information

SOC 0210. The City: An Introduction to Urban America.

What is special about urban life? How and why do cities differ? How has the way we think about the city changed over time? Can we solve urban problems? An interdisciplinary approach to cities in the U.S. and abroad: their history, physical design, spatial form, economy, government, subcultures, and social life.

Course usage information

SOC 0230. Sex, Gender, and Society.

An introduction to the sociological study of sex and gender. More specifically, this course explores how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. How sexuality influences our lives, is reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and the social institutions is also investigated. This class also focuses on how prevalent gender differences really are in our society and examines the social construction of gender.

Fall SOC0230 S01 16026 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (C. Spearin)
Course usage information

SOC 0240. The Nature of Community: Place, Space, and Identity.

What is a community? How can it best be organized and strengthened? How can communities contribute to social justice? This course examines boundaries and identities, rights, responsibilities, cooperation and conflict, and the roles of volunteerism, sports, stories, language, meals and even sleep in community life. Concern about the nature and well-being of "community" has been at the heart of sociology since the discipline was born, so examining these issues provides an in-depth introduction to the sociological way of thinking. The course is particularly aimed at those working within community settings, such as residential units, student activites, and service programs.

Course usage information

SOC 0270. The Sociological Imagination.

Sociology is a study of the course and effect of social action. Sociologists study human societies by researching social groups, patterns, interactions, and institutions. This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology with the hope of showing students that, as Peter Berger stats, "things are not what they seem." In other words, in this class students will learn to rethink several assumptions about society that are commonly taken for granted. The course strives to make the strange familiar, and the familiar strange.

Course usage information

SOC 0300A. Contrasting Societies.

Offers a cross-cultural examination of major social institutions and characteristics. Addresses questions such as how do families and intergenerational relations differ in various societies? How does the social safety net differ? What is the character of racial and ethnic relations? Integral is a comparison of the United States and other societies. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300B. Environment and Society.

This course examines the intersection between the environment and social structures and institutions. It is centered around environmental sociology, environmental justice, and environmental health. We cover climate change, risk perception and risk communication, environmental consciousness and environmental movements, government regulation, lay-professional differences in scientific knowledge, and various forms of toxic contamination and environmental disasters. Readings are very broad, including work of sociologists, physicians, biologists, journalists, epidemiologists, activists, toxicologists, lawyers, and anthropologists. This course has a required service learning component. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300C. The Nature of Community.

What is community? How can it best be organized and developed? How can communities contribute to social justice? This course investigates such questions by examining the nature of community life, rights and responsibilities of individuals in relation to communities, approaches to community service, and the roles of leadership, ritual, and narrative in community building. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300D. Who Am I?.

A study of self in contemporary society. We examine the structural and situational forces that shape the self and their impact on personal development, orientations to the world, and interpersonal behavior; we investigate the development of the self as a way of being in the world that makes everyday doings and, ultimately society, possible. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT

Spr SOC0300D S01 24843 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (G. Elliott)
Course usage information

SOC 0300E. HIV/AIDS: Politics, Culture and Society.

The current HIV/AIDS crisis is not merely medical. It also involves fundamental political, social and economic issues. Through extensive readings, class discussions and the writing of research papers, we will explore issues such as, what are the sociological barriers to changing sexual behavior? Why do some government, but not others, fail to commit resources to fight the disease? How was improved access to expensive drugs achieved? Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300F. Unequal From Birth: Child Health From a Social Perspective.

Why are the children of immigrants so healthy? How do experiences in families, schools, neighborhoods and the health care system produce unequal health? What are the consequences of health for the economic and social welfare of individuals and populations? We will read, discuss and evaluate social science evidence to understand how social and economic inequalities produce and result from health inequalities among youth. Attention will be given to both industrialized and developing societies, and to potential ways that social policies can equalize children's health. This course is designed for first-year students and should appeal to a variety of interests, including social justice, medicine, research and law. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300G. Populations in Danger.

Examines populations confronted with dangerous social, economic, political, or health crises. These include small Amazon farmers in situations of environmental degradation, Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland in economic and social conflict and under peace agreement, Israelis under threat of random attack with neighbors who demand Israel's extinction, Palestinians under Israeli occupation with a largely powerless and corrupt Palestinian Authority, South Africans under HIV/AIDS pandemic, and undocumented Dominican immigrants in Providence. The seminar will include readings on these populations in danger, lectures by internationally known experts, student presentations and class discussion, and three short essays. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300H. Organizations and Disasters: Living With the Reality of Really Big Mistakes.

This new first year seminar will introduce students to the amazing world of organizational failures and disasters. Recent disasters will be examined within frames provided by several leading organizational theories about how and why modern organizations are so frequently plagued by mistakes that wreak havoc on many constituencies: from customers, patients and employers to innocent bystanders. Among the disasters we will explore as examples will be the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, the Challenger Disaster, the 9/11 attacks, and missestimation of nuclear weapon devastation. We will consider Normal Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and the Normalization of Deviance. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300J. Becoming Adults: Adolescent Transitions to Adulthood.

Adolescence and early adulthood is a critical period in our lives. During this time we experience a number of major life events that mark the transition into adult roles and relationships, and that are of major consequence for the rest of our lives. We leave school, start working, form romantic relationships, begin sexual activity, leave home, become financially independent, get married, and start having children. This seminar explores how adolescent transitions are studied, how they compare across different national contexts, and how individual, family, and community factors affect the type and timing of different transitions. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300K. Inequalities and Health.

We start from the assumption that the social organization of society shapes definitions and experiences of health and illness, the distribution of diseases, and the responses to them. We explore the relevance of social structure and social interaction to health and well-being, emphasizing socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, and social contexts such as relationships, families, schools, and neighborhoods. This is not a "sociology of medicine" course. It will not emphasize the profession of medicine, health care policy, or health care organizations. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 0300L. Environment and Society in Africa.

This seminar will actively examine contemporary environmental issues in Africa. The African setting is a key site for the world's environmental challenges and polices, with a large number of highly visible and valued flora, fauna, and ecosystems. At the same time, Africa nations are severely pressed with competing social issues: poverty, economic development, health, refugees. How can these be reconciled? What roles do the many actors play? This course is multidisciplinary in orientation and broad in scope geographically. Seminar discussion admits a variety of perspectives. Readings span a wide variety of approaches. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. S/NC. FYS

Course usage information

SOC 0310. Theory and Practice of Engaged Scholarship (ESP Seminar).

Efforts are underway across university and college campuses -- in the United States and globally -- to increase opportunities for engaged learning and research. What is engaged scholarship and how does it challenge (and/or complement) more traditional concepts of scholarship and disciplinary knowledge? What are the ethical, practical, and other challenges associated with community-engaged scholarship? The course will use case studies, field work, team projects, and guest speakers from diverse disciplines and sectors to investigate these and other questions. Enrollment limited to Engaged Scholars Program participants. Limited to 20 students per section.

Fall SOC0310 S02 16112 W 3:00-5:30(17) (A. Hance)
Spr SOC0310 S01 24935 T 4:00-6:30(16) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 0400. Deviance, Crime and Social Control.

This course explores the reasons why society creates mandatory rules of behavior, the reasons why members of society sometimes break those rules, and the reasons why society responds to rule-breaking in the ways that it does. We focus on leading sociological, criminological explanations of deviance, crime and social control. Enrollment limited to 100.

Course usage information

SOC 1010. Classical Sociological Theory.

Why do we follow social rules and conventions? And how is social change – that is, the making of new rules and expectations – possible? When we respond to rules, do we act as free-willing individuals or do we follows social structures we have no control over? These questions have motivated generations of sociologists, but many of the arguments have been already developed by the four "forefathers" of sociology: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Georg Simmel. Looking at the transformations around them – the rise of capitalism, the modern nation-state, rational bureaucracy, the metropolitan, the decline of religion, and much more – they developed arguments that allow us to better understand ourselves, our actions, and the contemporary political, economic and social transformations around us. WRIT

Fall SOC1010 S01 16027 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (S. Frickel)
Course usage information

SOC 1020. Methods of Social Research.

This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.

Spr SOC1020 S01 24859 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (J. Owens)
Spr SOC1020 C01 24861 Th 10:20-11:00 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1020 C02 24862 Th 10:20-11:00 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1020 C03 24863 Th 10:20-11:00 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 1050. Methods of Research in Organizations.

An introduction to the various methods used by social scientists to study organizations and to the skills needed by managers and administrators to soundly evaluate problems and assess performance within organizations. Explores both qualitative and quantitative methods. Students gain experience in developing research questions and linking those questions to appropriate research designs. Enrollment limited to 60.

Course usage information

SOC 1060. Leadership in Organizations.

What is leadership? What makes a great leader? Can leadership be learned? Improved? This course explores various theoretical approaches to leadership using a combination of lectures and case-study analysis. Additionally, it aims at developing your personal leadership skills by using self-exploration and reflection, self-assessment instruments, role-play, and feedback from peers. Enrollment limited to 100.

Course usage information

SOC 1080. Groups in Organizations.

Teamwork has become increasingly popular in organizations. Whether structured into the organizational makeup, or temporarily established around specific projects, teams are a critical competency of organizations. They are considered an effective performance unit, and expected to efficiently cope with the fast changes and demands of today's corporate environment. However, deriving the full benefits from teamwork requires correct management of its processes and dynamics. This course dwells on selected issues in team development, internal processes, and members' behavior, as well as management skills needed to effectively lead teams; therefore it can benefit anyone who works in a group, whether as a student or in the business world. Enrollment limited to 35.

Course usage information

SOC 1100. Introductory Statistics for Social Research.

Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.

Fall SOC1100 S01 15662 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (D. Lindstrom)
Fall SOC1100 C01 15670 T 12:00-12:50 'To Be Arranged'
Fall SOC1100 C02 15671 T 4:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Fall SOC1100 C03 15672 W 12:00-12:50 'To Be Arranged'
Fall SOC1100 C04 15673 W 1:00-1:50 'To Be Arranged'
Fall SOC1100 C05 15674 Th 12:00-12:50 'To Be Arranged'
Fall SOC1100 C06 15675 Th 4:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Fall SOC1100 L01 15669 Arranged (D. Lindstrom)
Spr SOC1100 S01 24846 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (E. Fussell)
Spr SOC1100 C01 24847 T 12:00-12:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1100 C02 24848 T 4:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1100 C03 24849 W 1:00-1:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1100 C04 24850 W 1:00-1:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1100 C05 24851 Th 12:00-12:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1100 C06 24852 Th 4:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC1100 L01 24853 Arranged (E. Fussell)
Course usage information

SOC 1114. Law and Society.

A broad exploration of contemporary social-science scholarship on law and legal institutions, covering competing theoretical perspectives and drawing examples from diverse empirical settings. Lectures and discussions survey different ways in which social scientists study legal life, seeking contrasts and commonalities across the various perspectives. Coverage includes: Social-psychological models of rule-following and rule-breaking; social-structural linkages between law and the economy, stratification, and politics; and the dynamic relationship between law and social change--including the role of lawyers, judges and juries in giving law "independent causal significance." Strongly recommended: previous coursework in the social sciences.

Course usage information

SOC 1115. The Enlightened Entrepreneur: Changemakers, Inspired Protagonists and Unreasonable People.

This course explores the practices of enlightened entrepreneurs, with the intention of moving beyond the limiting social/commercial dichotomy to develop a more useful paradigm for understanding entrepreneurs whose ventures lead to positive developments in society and in the environment. You will be exploring the success stories and cautionary tales of entrepreneurs to develop an understanding of how ventures can have an impact on their fields of engagement as well as their fields of influence. Afterwards you will develop an assessment tool for understanding the spectrum of entrepreneurs whose ventures lead to positive developments in society and in the environment.

Course usage information

SOC 1117. Focus Groups for Market and Social Research.

This course introduces students to a range of qualitative research methods commonly used in market and social science research. It is designed to provide students with a skill set that will allow them to conduct and design market and social research that gets below the surface of the traditional survey. Focus groups, ethnographic observation and user-centered research are widely used in product design, communications, marketing and entrepreneurship research. Students will learn and practice all of the methods introduced in the course by conducting a semester-long research project, will gain insight into which methods are most appropriate for particular research needs.

Course usage information

SOC 1118. Context Research for Innovation.

This course brings design thinking into conversation with qualitative research methods, examining the elements of a comprehensive perspective of context. It introduces students to design research methods, ethnographic research methods, and how they work together. Students will learn how to use these methods to identify and engage in "deep hanging out" with the problem, gap or inefficiency in question. They will then move on to patient contextualized opportunity identification for meaningful innovation. By the end of the course, students will have developed a process for effective, through innovation context analysis. Relevant for designers of products, services, organizations , and experience. LILE

Course usage information

SOC 1119. Understanding the Arab Spring: Sociology of the Middle East.

What explains the continuous mass uprisings in different parts of the Middle East since the beginning of 2011? Have they been successful in transforming power structures? Or already been co-opt by the legacies of the older regimes? This class probes the "Arab Spring" comparatively and sociologically from a historical perspective. It is sociological, it assumes a strong relationship between different forms of exclusions (on the basis of religion, ethnicity, gender and class) and the uprisings. It is historical because it explores these exclusions through a close analysis of the historical particularities of nation-state formation in the region.

Course usage information

SOC 1120. Market and Social Surveys.

This course covers the theory and practice of survey research. Topics include questionnaire design and formatting; sample design and selection; interviewing techniques; data base design and data entry; and elementary data analysis and report production. Students individually design and conduct a survey on a topic of their choice, and collectively conduct and analyze a sample survey of the Brown student population.

Spr SOC1120 S01 25914 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (C. Spearin)
Course usage information

SOC 1121. Creative Companies: Entrepreneurship, Markets, and the Culture Industry.

Firms in creative industries influence many physical and psychological aspects of our lives, from what we eat and wear to how we entertain ourselves, but markets for cultural goods are complex and difficult to navigate. Entrepreneurs must, therefore, understand the economic sociology of cultural market and ecosystem in order to capture economic value, a process that recursively relates to cultural norms. Students will analyze business cases of firms in a wide range of creative industries such as art, fashion, film, food, music, publishing, and theater to explore and understand the economic, organizational, and sociological underpinnings of culture, value(s), and markets.

Course usage information

SOC 1240. Human Sexuality in a Social Context.

How do we come to know ourselves as sexual beings? How do individuals develop attractions, make sexual choices, define and enact their own sexuality? What is social about sexuality, and how do institutions and organizations influence understandings of human sexuality over time? This course investigates these questions by examining the processes through which the human body is sexed, from without, by the society into which it is born, and from within, through self-definition, desire, and practice. Social science theories of sexuality will be considered, and cross-cultural and historical accounts of sexual practices will be reviewed. Not open to first year students. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1250. Perceptions of Mental Illness.

This interdisciplinary course centers on the need to understand mental illness in a broad social context. It covers personal experience of mental illness, history of psychiatric concepts and treatment, politics of diagnosis, mental health policy and deinstitutionalization, public attitudes toward mental illness, social factors and epidemiology of mental illness, and links between mental illness and creativity. There is much attention to artistic perceptions of mental illness through fiction, memoirs, drama, music, and art.

Course usage information

SOC 1260. Market Research in Public and Private Sectors.

Introduction to data and research methods for private and public sector organizations. Data used in market research include trends in the population of consumers, economic trends, trends within sectors and industries, analyses of product sales and services, and specific studies of products, promotional efforts, and consumer reactions. Emphasizes the use of demographic, GIS, and other available data.

Course usage information

SOC 1270. Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World.

Applies sociological analysis to understand present and historical cases of ethnic and race relations and conflicts. Topics addressed are the social construction of race and ethnicity; historical processes of racialization; ethnic conflict and the nation state; and the linkages between race, class, and social mobility. Focuses on racial and ethnic relations in the U.S., but also has a strong international comparative component.

Fall SOC1270 S01 16030 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (J. Itzigsohn)
Course usage information

SOC 1310. Social Change in Latin America.

Analyzes the development of modern Latin American societies, focusing on three interrelated processes: the formation of states, the formation of nations, and the formation of socioeconomic systems. The approach is macrosociological, looking at broad processes of structural and institutional change, and historical-comparative, analyzing and comparing how the three processes above developed historically in different Latin American countries.

Course usage information

SOC 1311. Micro-Organizational Theory: Social Behavior in Organizations.

Micro-Organizational Theory focuses on the human dynamics of organizations as natural systems. It examines how individual attitudes, actions, and interactions make a difference for organizational processes and outcomes. This focus is contrasted with more macro-level approaches, which take the organization (instead of the individual) as the primary unit of analysis. For example, studies of organizations from an economic perspective are typically concerned with the performance of the organization relative to its competitors. Studies of organizations from a macro-sociological focus are typically concerned with an organization's routines and structures, contextualized by the broader environment. SOC 1311 takes a more micro and meso perspective that asks questions such as, "why do individuals in organization behave the way they do, how does this affect the organizations of which they are a part and how, in turn, are individuals affected by their organizations?"

Fall SOC1311 S01 15680 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (M. Suchman)
Course usage information

SOC 1315. Macro-Organizational Theory: Organizations in Social Context.

Macro-Organizational Theory focuses on the organization and its social/economic environment. This class will explore various definitions of the organization’s environment, and the many types of macro-level organizational structures in which sets of organizations interact, function, compete, and cooperate. Important questions to be asked include the following:

-What is an organizational environment and how do organizations “deal” with what is outside of their boundaries?

-How are the boundaries of organizations defined/recognized/function?

-How do environments influence organizational strategy and performance?

-What are the major theories for assessing macro-level organizational phenomena?

-What are the many ways in which organizations relate to other organizations?

Spr SOC1315 S01 24866 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (M. Suchman)
Course usage information

SOC 1330. Remaking the City.

Cities are being reshaped by immigration, economic restructuring, and other forces. This course reviews these changes from several perspectives, including the patterns and causes of change, the role of politics and public policy, and how different groups of people (by class, race, and national origin) manage under the new conditions. Readings will emphasize historical and cross-national comparisons.

Spr SOC1330 S01 24867 MW 8:30-9:50(02) (J. Logan)
Course usage information

SOC 1340. Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems.

An introduction to the fundamental principles and methods of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include (a) handling different types of geographic datasets, (b) geo-analytical and modeling tools in GIS, (c) conceptual and theoretical aspects of GIS application development, and (d) errors and uncertainty analysis of GIS applications. Laboratory assignments and the project work provide hands on experiences in GIS. Enrollment limited to 39 juniors and seniors. WRIT

Fall SOC1340 S01 15684 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (R. Franklin)
Course usage information

SOC 1352. Employment and Labor in the New Economy.

This class will introduce students to classical and contemporary theories pertaining to work, employment, and labor markets. Readings and class discussions will specifically focus on individuals’ careers and employment processes within organizations. The course will examine: (1) the sociology of labor markets, (2) employment and careers in the new economy and (3) job search, networks, and hiring decisions. Students will develop knowledge of these key theories, which will be applied in high-profile organizational settings.

Course usage information

SOC 1400. Political Sociology.

Analyzes "American Exceptionalism" through constitutional and cultural controversies. Considers relations between the state and such institutions as the market, the family, associations and churches. Examines the effects of class, race, ethnicity, and gender on American politics.

Course usage information

SOC 1410. Aging and the Quality of Life.

Provides a broad-based knowledge of the aging process and its impact on the quality of life of elders. Explores physical, psychological, social, cultural factors. Assesses different approaches to meeting needs of elders and providing high quality care and examines consequences of an aging population for social institutions. Prerequisites: SOC 0010 or 0020 and PHP 0070 or 0310, or permission of the instructor.

Course usage information

SOC 1420. Violence and Society.

The course focuses on the personal and structural sources and consequences of violence in the U.S. We investigate three levels of violence: interpersonal; institutional, wherein social institutions do violence to individuals or groups; and structural, examining the structures of society that tolerate or promote violence, both within the society and toward other societies. Next, we examine the culture of violence that permeates our society, including the mass media and violence. WE focus on specific forms of violence in our society, including gang violence, bullying, violence within schools, sex trafficking, war, religious violence, and terrorism. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1430. Social Structure and Personal Development.

The relationship between one's place in the social structure and one's own personal growth. Investigates the social aspects of individual growth and change throughout the life course. Also examines social factors involved in the failure to find a meaningful place for oneself in society.

Course usage information

SOC 1440. Intimate Violence.

Explores sociological perspectives of violence in intimate relationships. Begins with theories of violence, including social learning theory, the frustration-aggression hypothesis, and violence as catharsis. Examines the contributions of gender, race status, media violence, and pornography to the issue. Investigates specific forms of intimate violence: sexual aggression (including "acquaintance rape"), partner abuse, elderly abuse, and child abuse. Not open to first year students. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1540. Human Needs and Social Services.

The development of human services and a broad range of social welfare purposes are studied, including health and nutrition programs, job development, youth empowerment, and family, workforce, and educational policies. The role of nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations receives particular attention, and alternative models of human services are discussed. This semester will focus particularly on the impact of community-based programs, featuring case studies from projects funded through the course, "Investing in Social Change," in Fall 2010. The emphasis will be on different means and measures for evaluating impact and demonstrating sustainability and accountability. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

SOC 1550. Sociology of Medicine.

The aim of this course is to give conceptual framework and some analytic tools to examine the context of health, illness and well-being at the micro, meso and macro levels. The focus of our attention will be on health inequalities: how they are produced, their relationships with socioeconomic status, and how to minimize their effects. Special attention will be given to the phenomenon of medicalization, to the ways in which a diagnosis is socially constructed, issues of social justice and equity, and the implications of biotechnological innovation and the rise of health and wellness-oriented culture.

Spr SOC1550 S01 24868 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 1600. Comparative Development.

An exploration of the economic, political, and social changes that constitute development. Both the historical experience of Europe and the contemporary Third World are considered. Major processes examined include state and nation-building, agricultural modernization, colonialism, industrialization, revolution and socialism, authoritarianism and democracy, and socioeconomic distribution. Emphasis on the countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Course usage information

SOC 1620. Globalization and Social Conflict.

Examines the effect globalization is having on the economies and societies of the developed and developing world. Focuses in particular on how new forms of global production and networking are transforming the traditional role of the nation-state, creating new dynamics of wealth distribution, and generating new sources of social conflict and political contestation, including transnational social movements. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1630. Transnational Social Movements and the Environment.

Globalization presents distinct environmental challenges and alters the terrain upon which social movements mobilize and engage for change. How can we understand the relationships between globalization, the environment and society? In what ways is inequality being shaped in this context? How do social movements and advocacy networks engage transnationally to find leverage? Through readings, writing, film, multimedia projects, and engagement with case studies and social theory, this course explores how social movements and advocacy networks mobilize transnationally to achieve environmental justice and sustainability.

Course usage information

SOC 1640. Social Exclusion.

Why are some groups rejected and others accepted? This course examines the mechanisms of belonging and ostracism, social integration and exclusion, theories of diversity and hierarchy, and policies to reduce exclusion and inequality.

Fall SOC1640 S01 16023 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (H. Silver)
Fall SOC1640 S01 16023 Th 2:30-5:00(03) (H. Silver)
Fall SOC1640 S01 16023 T 2:30-3:50(03) (H. Silver)
Course usage information

SOC 1650. Unequal Societies.

This course compares nation-states in terms of various forms of inequality and assesses theories explaining international inequalities. It examines why poverty, income inequality, and poor health are greater in the United States than in comparably affluent countries, why intergenerational mobility varies, and why some societies treat women more equally or are more accepting of immigrants and cultural minorities than others. It asks whether the high standard of living in the Global North comes at the expense of the Global South. What holds unequal societies together and pulls them apart? Can inequalities be reduced?

Spr SOC1650 S01 24869 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (H. Silver)
Course usage information

SOC 1830. Mattering and Dysfunctional Behavior in Adolescence.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 1840. Mattering and Dysfunctional Behavior in Adolescence.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 1870A. Investing in Social Change.

Philanthropy -- "giving away money" -- sounds attractive and simple. But the very acts of contributing and receiving resources affect dynamics and relationships among all involved. We explore philanthropic strategies, social change, the sociological dimensions of philanthropy in historic and current practice. Students engage in teams to investigate a particular community concern, design an investment strategy, recommend the investment of grant dollars. Instructor permission required. Course enrollment is by application only. Applications can be found at swearercenter.brown.edu shortly before the start of class. Students who pre-register must still be selected through the application process and attend the first class meeting. Enrollment limited to 18. WRIT

Spr SOC1870A S01 24870 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (K. Trimble)
Course usage information

SOC 1870B. Seminar in Contemporary Political Sociology.

Explores how political power in society is structured from above and challenged from below. Using contemporary theory and comparative-historical analysis, this seminar critically addresses the power of the modern state, the politics of social class, the character of social movements, and the causes of social revolution. No formal prerequisites. Previous coursework in the social sciences is recommended. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870C. African Development and Demography.

Focuses on the relationship between socioeconomic developments in Africa and their demographic transitions. Particular emphasis will be placed on cultural issues in the analysis of population changes (mortality, morbidity, migration, family, and fertility) in the contexts of economic growth and dependency. Theories of development will be evaluated in the context of African demography; African population patterns will be assessed in their developmental diversity. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870D. Aging and Social Policy.

This seminar examines the policy challenges of Americas aging population, centering on two major themes. The first has to do with the impact of the elderly on society and societal institutions. The second theme concerns alternate models for health and social service provision. We will explore the process of policy formation, focusing on the social and political construction of the problems of aging. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870E. Alternatives to Violence.

We examine nonviolence as a method for resolving serious social conflict. We consider psychological and sociological approaches to understanding why people choose violence, as a precursor to studying theories of nonviolence. We investigate practioners of nonviolence throughout history and analyze nonviolence as a response to such issues as the death penalty, war, and terrorism. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870G. Capitalism, Democracy, and Social Welfare.

This seminar for advanced undergraduate and graduate students explores long-term developments in modern societies. Empirical comparative historical analysis and theoretical assessments of causation, inevitability, and alternative possibilities will be complemented by normative reflections. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870H. Comparative Chinese Family Studies.

Explores central issues in the social research of the Chinese family in both historical and contemporary contexts, with primary emphasis given to the latter and the family systems in China and in Taiwan. Two questions frame the course: "What is going on in Chinese families?" and "Why?" WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870I. Contested Environmental Illness-Research Seminar.

Examines "contested illnesses," focusing on environmental factors in Gulf War illnesses, asthma, breast cancer and other diseases. Students conduct interviews and do field work and document analysis to study lay, scientific, and governmental perspectives. Examines how these disputes can lead to progress in disease detection and etiology, and in the development of less toxic products. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870K. Demographics and Development.

Assesses the social and economic determinants and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration and their impact on the size, distribution, and composition of population in developing societies. Implications of the evolving population structure for planning and policy. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870L. The Economic Foundations of Everyday Life.

Critically examines the relationship between markets and individual, inter-personal, and community level social phenomena. Aims to help students develop knowledge and skills to understand markets as social institutions, evaluate them through different theoretical lenses, analyze their impacts on social life. Students also learn the skills of critical analysis and argumentation needed to form thoughtful opinion, take a critical position, make a decision about important economic and social issues. Thus, students gain expertise as informed actors and advocates in the social and economic system. Prerequisite: SOC 1010, equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870M. Entrepreneurship and Good Work: Engineering Dreams.

In this course, students examine the concepts of creation, organization, promotion, management and risk of ownership, to wit: entrepreneurship. This is done in the context of "good work". Using a combination of relevant case studies, readings, guest lectures and discussion, each participant builds a theory and framework to explore what defines innovative and meaningful engagement during one's working years. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870N. Environmental Sociology.

Since its formal inception in the late-1970s, environmental sociology has developed as a highly interdisciplinary field that simultaneously confronts core sociological questions and challenges. This seminar provides students with a selective overview of major approaches, debates, and interdisciplinary cross-currents shaping the field of environmental sociology. The general goal of the course is to deepen collective understanding of the dynamic interrelationships shaping human societies and the natural environment. To do so, we will consider how sociologists and others have conceptualized society-environment relations and critically assess the various approaches developed to examine those relations, their causes, and outcomes. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870O. Ethnic Entrepreneurship.

This course focuses on the dynamics of urban labor markets in Latin America. In spite of rapid industrialization, large numbers of people in Latin American cities depend on the informal economy for their livelihood. The course begins with a review of the different theoretical approaches to the urban labor markets and the informal economy in Latin America. It then focuses on the relationship between industrialization and urbanization in the region, the economic and social linkages of the informal economy, and the household strategies of labor market insertion. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870P. Explaining China's Rise: Development and Accumulation in Contemporary China.

Few questions pose more significance to scholars and policymakers than the "rise of China". As scholars grapple with explaining China's rise, they also provide tantalizing previews of the future of Chinese growth, by extension, the future of global economy. This course explores the character, conditions, consequences of the rapid Chinese economic growth that many have termed " capitalism with Chinese characteristics". 3 paradigms for explaining growth: a state-centered approach, a market-oriented approach, Marxist, accumulation-centered approach. 3 parts, each examining a separate paradigm of development, providing case studies this paradigm explains growth in specific industries and sectors of the Chinese economy.

Course usage information

SOC 1870R. Groups in Organizations.

Groups are the core social unit of organizations. This class examines the unique processes that make groups more than just the sum of their individual members, as well as the impact of groups on organizations, and the ways in which groups are constrained and influenced by organizational context. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870S. Sociology of Gender.

Gender is among the most prominent organizing principles in our society. From the day they are born—and even earlier as the result of reproductive technologies—on through to the day they die, individuals are gendered. Instead of understanding gender as a set of behaviors derived from innate, fixed biological differences between men and women, this course analyzes gender as a social arrangement shaped by social actors, organizations, and institutions. Drawing from social science research, the course analyzes everyday interactions of intimacy, language, and identity issues, as well as macro structures like the economy, religion, and education, to understand how they affect notions of gender. The course sustains an analysis of sexuality because ideas of femininity and masculinity are constructed around notions of “appropriate” sexual conduct and relations. Although this course focuses on everyday life in this country, the class will explore the production and institutionalization of gender relations in historical moments and spaces beyond the U.S. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

SOC 1870T. Health Professions and Organizations.

An in-depth study of the social history of the professions and institutions of medicine. Primary emphasis will be on the U.S., but some comparative reading will be done as well. Theories of social change will be applied to the medical profession, and organizational processes of change will be used to explain current developments in managed care organizations and in the use of strategic alliances in health care delivery. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870U. Household and Families.

Examination of sociological, economic, anthropological, and historical research on the impact of change on family structure and the effect of family processes on demographic behavior. Trends considered include the rise of one-person households and one parent families. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1870V. Households, Work, and Gender.

Household membership typically entails coordinated behavior. We discuss the organization of work and its gendered dimensions. We explore the determinants and consequences of existing divisions of labor drawing on readings from multiple disciplines. The approach is sociological and comparative. Considerable time devoted to less developed settings. Seminar format. Individual research encouraged. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871A. Sociological Perspectives on Mexico - United States Migration.

This course examines the economic and social determinants of migration, and the consequences of migration for migrant families and communities. Each stage of the migration process is examined: the decision to migrate, getting across the border, adaptation and settlement in the U.S., return migration, and the impact of migration on origin communities. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871B. Sociological Perspectives on Poverty.

Examines the personal experiences of socioeconomic status, with focus on the lower tiers of the hierarchy. We distinguish three levels of poverty: the working poor, marginal workers, and the underclass. Analysis will make use of issues of gender and family, race and ethnicity, and urban and rural settings. We investigate sociological perspectives on the problem of homelessness. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871C. Sociology of the Legal Profession.

This seminar explores the structure and functioning of the legal profession, with a particular focus on the role of lawyers in contemporary America. The approach is broadly sociological, emphasizing that lawyersing, like all professional work, reflects the social dynamics of both the profession itself and the larger society in which the profession is embedded. Topics and materials focus on general social processes, not on the mechanics of getting into law school, choosing a practice area, or succeeding as a practitioner. Through readings and field observations, coupled with weekly discussions and e-mail dialogues, the seminar invites students to refine and extend their thinking on a series of important and controversial topics, including legal education, client relations, professional ethics, inter-professional competition and intra-professional stratification. Prerequisites: familiarity with other areas of sociology or law is helpful, but not essential; previous coursework in the social sciences is strongly recommended. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871D. Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development.

This seminar provides an introduction to the study of development. It looks at the diversity of understandings of the concept of development as well as its practical importance in the world. Students will read texts that present pressing questions and issues concerning development practices, policies, and theories. Efforts to connect broad theoretical debates to understanding contemporary problems will be encouraged. Enrollment limited to 20 sophomores. WRIT

Spr SOC1871D S01 24871 M 3:00-5:30(13) (J. Itzigsohn)
Course usage information

SOC 1871E. Theory and Methods in Historical Sociology.

An examination of work at the intersection of sociology and history. Explores the different theoretical traditions that guide the sociolgical analysis of history, the diverse approaches to conceptualization and comparison used in the investigation of large - scale structures, and the various methodological techniques that are available for generating valid explanations of historical patterns of change. Prerequisites: some background in sociology or history. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871G. Social Goals, Motivation and Behavior in Organizations.

Social goals such as status, reciprocity, and group solidarity take into consideration not only our individual needs, but also the social context. In this course we will learn about these three social goals, various types of organizational motivation, and the role the social goals may play in influencing people's behavior when they work in groups. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871H. Social Perspectives on HIV/AIDS.

This seminar will build upon your understanding of the perspectives and research methods used in sociology through studying the vulnerabilities for HIV infection and the social consequences of the epidemic in east and southern Africa. The course relies heavily on student participation, which will include leading class discussions, making formal presentations, and contributing to class discussions. The readings have been chosen to frame our discussion and to fuel debate; therefore, all readings should be completed before the class for which they are assigned. It is helpful if you have had previous coursework in sociology; however, the course is open to all students interested in the topic. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871I. Advanced Geographic Information Systems.

Advanced GIS will explore students in the social sciences to the tools of spatial analysis. Students will explore both the theoretical foundation for different types of spatial analysis as well the practical implementation of spatial analysis as presented in various software packages. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871K. Nanotechnology and Organizations.

In recent years, nanotechnology has attracted enormous interests from a variety of organizations. This course examines how different organizations - public, private and non-profit - promote and shape the development of nanotechnology. To help students understand the emergence of this new high-tech science, this course also introduces theories and empirical studies in the literature of organizational studies. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871L. Migration, Displacement and Emerging Community Experiences: Contemporary Turkey.

This course explores Anatolia as a dynamic territory of transit, through a critical lens. We will study communities that have been formed through internal and international migration, displacement, and Otherness that forces people to organize along identity lines, resulting in emerging diverse communities within Turkey. We will look briefly at Anatolia’s past and focus primarily on contemporary Turkey. We will compare the reality of the population with the rhetoric and performance of ruling powers pertaining to indigenous status and belonging. Students will leave this course with a comprehensive understanding of population and identity formation in contemporary Turkey as they relate to migration and displacement. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871M. Theories of the Third Sector and Civil Society.

Third Sector- consisting of non-government, nonprofit, social movements organizations-- is an increasingly important segment of societies worldwide. This seminar will train students to critically apply organizational theory to evaluate the contributions, opportunities and challenges of this sector. We will probe critical third sector issues, including: impact, accountability, and sustainability of sector activities; commons issues in the sector such as legitimacy and co-optation; the dynamics of government collaboration; and what constitutes social justice in the distribution of the sector's resources. Prerequisite: at least one course in Sociology. Enrollment preference given to Sociology and BEO concentrators. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871N. Military Health: The Quest for Healthy Violence.

As an institution, the military trains individuals to conduct violence while remaining, at least ideally, healthy. From the standpoint of the organization, the successful soldier is someone who is good at violence at the same time that he or she is mentally and physically fit. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

SOC 1871O. Law, Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

This seminar explores the relationship between legal institutions and macro-organizational change. The course devotes particular attention to the legal and organizational processes that shape (and are shaped by) the emergence of new technologies, new enterprises, and new industries. Although discussions may touch on technical aspects of law and/or entrepreneurship, most topics and materials focus on the general sociological processes that underlie changing organizational environments. The seminar is aimed at advanced students who have some prior familiarity with the sociology of law is helpful, but not essential. Through shared and individual readings, weekly discussions, and e-mail dialogues, the course provides an opportunity for students to refine and extend their thinking on important and controversial topics at the intersection of the contemporary organizational and socio-legal literatures. Prerequisite: SOC 1030 or SOC 1315 required (waivable by permission of instructor). Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. WRIT

Fall SOC1871O S01 16033 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (M. Suchman)
Course usage information

SOC 1871P. Field Methods in Development Research.

An introduction to the various techniques of field methods in development research, with a focus on qualitative and field methods. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871Q. Sociology of Culture.

This upper level seminar reviews classic and contemporary approaches to the sociology of culture, with special attention to the cultural sociology, relational sociology, and questions of political culture. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871R. Knowledge Networks and Global Transformation.

How do refined knowledge and the social relations that organize and distribute it influence changes in the institutions, inequalities and cultural systems and practices that define particular world regions and global formations? And how do global transformations influence the trajectories of knowledge production themselves? We will examine particular knowledge-identified agents, including universities, research institutes, think tanks, and professional associations, to consider why they approach global transformations in the way that they do. And we will consider how particular kinds of global transformations, from the end of the cold war and the transformation of information/communication technology to the last financial crisis, affect knowledge production itself. By exploring intersections between global complexity and reflexivity in this fashion, we hope to increase our own capacities for seeing the world not only as it is, but how knowledge might be used in making better alternatives for the future. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871S. Legacies of Inequality: The U.S. and Beyond.

Does education equalize or widen gaps between people and nations? Has mass imprisonment reduced crime or exacerbated U.S. racial inequality? Does biology determine destiny, or is society more fluid? This course introduces theory and research on social inequality, emphasizing temporal dimensions of social differentiation. Attention will be paid to the characteristics we are given (race, sex), those we achieve (education, income), and institutions and policies we encounter throughout the life cycle (schools, the justice system). By understanding the complexities of social inequality and the challenges of devising solutions, students will leave as informed citizens, better equipped to enter any profession. Enrollment limited to 20. First year students require instructor permission.

Course usage information

SOC 1871T. Who Governs Markets?.

This Course will introduce students to problems of market regulation. It begins with discussion of key turning points and debates around markets and states that shaped contemporary capitalism. We will then explore a wide array of governance institutions and mechanisms, raging from international organizations, private certification agencies to bottom-up social movements and protection rackets. Students will have an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to exploring one particular industry or company through design of a case study. They cases will help develop our understanding of how policies, labor and social movements or forces of competition influenced particular industries. Enrollment limited to 20.

Spr SOC1871T S01 25984 T 4:00-6:30(16) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 1871U. Sample Surveys in Social Research.

This course covers the theory and practice of survey research. Topics include questionnaire design and formatting; sample design and selection; interviewing techniques; data base design and data entry; and elementary data analysis and report production. Students individually design and conduct a survey on a topic of their choice, and collectively conduct and analyze a sample survey of the Brown student population. Please note that this course is a seminar version of SOC 1120. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871V. Update on American Society: Social Trends in the Last Decade.

American society is always changing, and national data sources (especially the American Community Survey and Current Population Survey) provide updated information on social trends every year. This course will review the most significant recent social trends based on these sources, including such topics as income and wealth inequality, racial and ethnic change, immigration, marriage and family patterns, home ownership, and residential segregation. Enrollment limited to 30 juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course usage information

SOC 1871W. Geographical Analysis of Society.

Provides an introduction to a geographical approach to understanding the spatial organization of individuals, societies, and economies. The two main emphases are on theories/concepts and applied analytical tools. We will learn about key theories in geography, sociology, and economics that have attempted to organize and classify the spatial structures and interactions across space of social and economic actors and will work with related analytical techniques. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. WRIT

Course usage information

SOC 1871Z. Martial Arts, Culture, and Society.

In this upper level undergraduate course for which there are no prerequisites, we will consider how sociology, and other social sciences, can help us understand martial arts and how martial arts might inform the social sciences. We shall consider how various bodymindful martial practices, their organizations, and their cultures shape, and are shaped by, different structures of power at various levels of society. We concentrate on martial arts because they straddle such an important axial dimension of society around violence. First priority to Sociology Concentrators. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

SOC 1872A. Stratifcation and Labor Markets.

This class examines theories pertaining to labor market inequality and wealth stratification. What organizational practices shape employment outcomes, and how can they be addressed? What factors are contributing to widening wealth stratification in the USA and abroad. How are establishments, technology, and executive compensation shaping labor market inequality today? These questions, and others, will be addressed by examining processes affecting: (1) organizations, (2) individuals and society, and (3) nations. Theoretical concepts will be explored through practical examples. In addition to discussing key factors shaping inequality and stratification outcomes, solutions to address these issues will be examined through organizational policy initiatives.

Course usage information

SOC 1872B. Sociology of Money.

What is money, wealth, their relationship? How have U.S. Markets for money changed this relationship? How have money markets changed? This is an introduction to current markets for money: how credit/debit is exchanged, how money is produced, what it represents in relation to global production, trade, and wealth distribution. Each week presents a question, than answers this question in two ways:1st explaining how financial instruments work within U.S. market (economic explanation), 2nd examining how financial instruments change market outcomes ( sociological critique). By the end students will understand how money markets work and how they effect the distribution of wealth.

Course usage information

SOC 1872C. Race and Ethnic Relations, Identity, and Inequality.

This course provides an overview of perspectives used in sociological studies of race and ethnicity. It focuses on race and ethnic relation, boundaries, and inequalities through empirical research on interracial or interethnic contact opportunities and racial, ethnic change and variation in interracial or interethnic relationship, romance, and marriage. The goal of the course is to deepen the understanding that racial/ethnic boundaries are rigid, yet may be crossed, blurred, or shifted over time and across generations.

Fall SOC1872C S01 16559 F 3:00-5:30(11) (Z. Qian)
Course usage information

SOC 1872E. Global Sociology: Capitalism, Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World.

The idea of ‘modernity’ commonly rests on the shift from feudal to capitalist society and on political developments, such as the French Revolution. Often obscured in these narratives of modernity are the parallel developments of colonialism and empire that spanned the globe at the same time. Building on global historical sociology, this class goes beyond dichotomous view of history of West/non-West but instead seeks to outline transnational sociology that starts from ‘colonial modernity’. Emphasizing the parallel processes of capitalism and colonialism in the making the modern world, discuss how we can better understand contemporary sociological issues in Europe and beyond.

Course usage information

SOC 1872F. Solidarity and Social Change.

What is solidarity and what enables its expression in the making of social change? Through this course, we shall refine our understandings of the various conceptions of solidarity in the process of altering those power relations, policies, and practices organizing our social world. Although we shall engage different kinds of social change making – from social entrepreneurship and social innovation to social movements and revolution – our focus will be on how different kinds of solidarity are conceived and enabled within and across the world’s principal axes of difference of those transformational practices. DPLL

Fall SOC1872F S01 16013 M 3:00-5:30(15) (M. Kennedy)
Course usage information

SOC 1872G. First-Generation College Students: A Sociological Perspective: A Sophomore Seminar.

Colleges have expanded their focus on diversity to include the social class origins of prospective students. One consequence is the emergence of the notion of first-generation college students: those who are the first in their families to attend college. We examine the challenges facing first-gens as they pursue higher education, focusing on two sources of difficulty: gaining admission and acclimating oneself to college, both academically and socially. Our goals are two-fold: (1) To understand the social barriers, compromises, and internal conflicts that first-generation college students face, and, (2) consider how institutional and structural forces impact and shape these students. SOPH DPLL

Spr SOC1872G S01 25552 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (G. Elliott)
Course usage information

SOC 1872H. Sociology of FIRE: Finance, Insurance, + Real Estate.

This seminar explores the sociology of finance, insurance, and real estate (the “FIRE” sector). Topics covered include: the causes and consequences of the growth of finance, the morality of life insurance, gender discrimination, race and the role of the state in the mortgage market, the interplay between innovation and regulation, and the 2008 financial crisis. We will ask whether the benefits of modern finance are worth its costs, and whether finance merely reflects existing social and economic inequalities, or if there are mechanisms by which finance creates or reinforces those inequalities.

Spr SOC1872H S01 25961 W 3:00-5:30(14) (D. Hirschman)
Course usage information

SOC 1872I. Revolutions and Social Change.

Revolutions are some of history’s most dramatic events, causing rapid social transformations to arise from direct human action. But what exactly is a revolution? What causes revolutions? How do revolutions unfold? What do revolutions accomplish? How can revolutions change the world? In this course, you will answer these questions by examining and comparing a wide range of revolutions across history and the world, from France and Russia to Cuba and Iran. You will explore their social and political dynamics, focusing on their causes, courses, and outcomes, and by the course's end will understand the role of revolutions in history.

Spr SOC1872I S01 25934 T 4:00-6:30(16) (Z. Wilmot)
Course usage information

SOC 1872J. Engaged Research/Engaged Publics: The Science + Craft of Applied Policy Research.

Policy problems are complex. Policy analysis and design is both a science and a craft. Increasingly, policymakers have begun to acknowledge that effective policy research requires not only multiple methods of inquiry, but also interdisciplinary teams of social science researchers, citizens, designers, scientists, artists, consultants, and engineers, among other experts. Generating innovative policy solutions, from this approach, is not a straightforward, linear scientific process, but instead a creative, collaborative, and engaged activity that requires not only iterative and dynamic research methods, but also storytelling, design, and other creative processes. Pre Requisites: Substantive courses in public policy, urban studies, sociology, political science, and anthropology are also recommended, but not required.

Course usage information

SOC 1950. Senior Seminar.

Advanced research seminar for sociology concentrators. Students take each semester in senior year to work on an honors thesis. Participants examine methods for analyzing, writing, and presenting thesis material and apply peer review techniques in assessing each other's work. Culminates in presentation of thesis to the department. Students doing independent study research may also participate with the instructor's permission. Required for "honors" in sociology. WRIT

Fall SOC1950 S01 16085 W 3:00-5:30(17) (G. Elliott)
Spr SOC1950 S01 24906 W 3:00-5:30(14) (G. Elliott)
Course usage information

SOC 1970. Individual Research Project.

Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

SOC 1980. Senior Honors Thesis.

Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

SOC 1990. Senior Honors Thesis.

Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

SOC 2000. Theory and Research in Development.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology. The course has four objectives: 1) to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development; 2) to explore a range of substantive issues including growth, inequality and democratization, 3) to develop interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions; and 4) to foster cross-disciplinary conversation and debate.

Course usage information

SOC 2000A. To Be Determined.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 2010. Multivariate Statistical Methods I.

Introduction to probability, descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Coverage of the linear model, its assumptions and potential biases. Emphasis on hypothesis testing, model selection and interpretation through application with real data.

Fall SOC2010 S01 16035 T 1:00-4:00(10) (M. White)
Course usage information

SOC 2020. Multivariate Statistical Methods II.

This course is a graduate-level introduction to multivariate regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Subject matter includes modeling nominal and ordinal outcomes; truncated distributions; and selection processes. The course also reviews strategies for sample design; handling missing data and weighting in multivariate models. The course employs contemporary statistical software. Special emphasis is placed on model selection and interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010

Spr SOC2020 S01 24829 T 1:00-4:00(10) (Z. Qian)
Course usage information

SOC 2040. Classical Sociological Theory.

This is a graduate-level course requires students to engage in detailed analysis and critical review of sociological thought of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The class will introduce students to the critical thinking, methodological innovation, and historical imagination of sociological theory by reading the original texts of the forefathers of sociology, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.

Fall SOC2040 S01 16036 M 9:00-12:00(01) (D. Hirschman)
Course usage information

SOC 2050. Contemporary Sociology.

This class offers a review of some of the most interesting contemporary social theorists and the most intense debates in current sociological thought. It thematically reviews the works of Jurgen Habermas on the public sphere, Michel Foucault on disciplinary and governmental modes of power, Bruno Latour on modernity and modern science, Pierre Bourdieu on field and habitus and among others. No prerequisites.

Spr SOC2050 S01 24830 W 1:00-4:00(06) (N. Chorev)
Course usage information

SOC 2060. Complex Organizations and Health Policy.

Application of organizational theory to health care organizations, with special emphasis on the development of multi–organizational provider structures, health policy formulation and reform and the influence of regulations and technology on healthcare organization relationships. Written permission required for undergraduates.

Course usage information

SOC 2080. Principles of Population.

An advanced introduction to theoretical and substantive issues in the social scientific study of population. Major areas within sociology are integrated with the study of population, including the comparative–historical analysis of development, family processes, social stratification, ethnicity, ecological studies, and social policy. Primarily for first year Graduate students.

Fall SOC2080 S01 16632 Th 2:00-5:00(03) (E. Fussell)
Course usage information

SOC 2090. Culture and Social Structure.

An analysis of the interrelations of religious ideas, value patterns, and various forms of knowledge on the one hand, and of the societal structures and changes in organizations and roles on the other hand. Offered in alternate years.

Course usage information

SOC 2112. Practicum in Social Research.

Covers the steps involved in social survey research, from site selection and questionnaire design all the way through data dissemination. It assumes a basic level of familiarity with social science research methods, particularly the logic of causal inference. We will discuss the linkage between research questions, site selection, and questionnaire design. We will also discuss in detail many of the practical considerations involved in fielding a survey, including balancing available funds and personnel with ideal sampling strategies and balancing the focus on a particular research topic with the responsibility to collect enough general information to make the data useful to a variety of users.

Course usage information

SOC 2130. Health, Illness and Medicine in Social Context.

The influence of social and economic factors on the development of concepts of health and illness, on the cause and distribution of disease, and on responses to disease. Lay-professional disputes over disease identification and intervention. Implications of medicalization (the expanding social jurisdiction of medicine). The importance of the health care system in American society. Selected issues in recent health policy.

Course usage information

SOC 2150. Socioeconomic Analysis of Development.

Compares economic and sociological perspectives on the problems of development. Topics include problems of conceptualization and measurement, entrepeneurship, capital accumulation, labor force utilization, income distribution, the role of the state, and the impact of international economic relations on developing countries. Prerequisite: a basic undergraduate micro-macro economics course or permission.

Course usage information

SOC 2200. Social Capital and Social Networks.

Explores the consequences of social capital and social networks for economic development. Examines different types and combinations of social relations, network structures of these relations, institutional environments that impact them, and dynamic forms these social relations take. Multilevel development cases include urban ethnic entrepreneurship, rural Third World communities, business networks (financiers, firms), intranational regions, and state-society relations.

Course usage information

SOC 2210. Qualitative Methods.

Emphasis on ethnographic field work through participant observation and interviews. Some attention to content analysis and visual sociology. Technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, transcript analysis, and computer applications. Strong emphasis on quality writing. Analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format. Attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity and autoethnography.

Fall SOC2210 S01 16038 W 2:00-5:00(07) (J. Pacewicz)
Course usage information

SOC 2220. Advanced Quantitative Methods of Sociology Analysis.

Analysis of limited variables (variables at a categorical or ordinal level of measurement). Topics include measures of association, contingency table analysis, binomial and multinomial logistic regression, ordered logistic regression, goodness-of-fit tests, and parameter interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010.

Course usage information

SOC 2230. Techniques of Demographic Analysis.

Procedures and techniques for the collection, evaluation, and analysis of demographic data; measures of population composition, fertility, morality, and migration; construction of life tables, population and projections, population dynamics; responsible use of demographic methodology. Mandatory S/NC.

Course usage information

SOC 2240. Event History Analysis.

An introduction to hazard models and their application to event history data in sociology. Topics include survival distributions, standard parametric models, discrete time approaches, partial likelihood models, and the introduction of covariates. Attention is given to practical application and the estimation of these models with software packages, where possible.

Course usage information

SOC 2260C. Perspectives on Family Planning.

Reviews sociological and demographic perspectives on family planning. How and why did family planning programs develop? What do they entail? Who do they serve? What are the implications of family planning programs for individuals and family life? Individual case studies are considered. International family planning efforts are emphasized.

Course usage information

SOC 2260D. Race, Ethnicity, and Nation: Boundaries, Identities, Inequalities.

This seminar aims to provide students a solid base in the analysis of racial and ethnic boundaries, identities, and inequalities. The seminar addresses a number of central topics in the field and acquaints the students with some key works. The course is divided in three parts. The first part focuses on how race constituted the modern world and on contemporary forms of racialization. The second part focuses on the construction of nations and challenges to their ethnic and racial boundaries. The third part of the course looks at contemporary boundaries of race and ethnicity in the United States. Open to upper level undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Course usage information

SOC 2260E. Structural Equation Models in the Social Sciences.

Structural equation models as used in the social sciences and methodological issues pertaining to such models. Topics include the logic of causal modeling; theories and models; recursive and non-recursive structural equation systems (path analysis); reduced form equations; the problem of identification; unobserved variables and the analysis of covariance structures (using LISREL).

Course usage information

SOC 2260F. Advanced Demographic Techniques.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 2260G. The Souls of Sociology: W.E.B Du Bois and Critical Sociologies of Race.

This course investigates Du Bois’ empirical and theoretical sociological work and its implications for contemporary sociology. W.E.B Du Bois is recognized as a pioneer of sociology of race, but his work is seldom explored. The first part of this course we discuss in-depth Du Bois work to construct the bases for a Du Boisian sociology. The second part we will read contemporary theories of race through the lens of Du Bois’ work. The final section we will read contemporary empirical works in the field of race and ethnicity, reflect how we would conduct them differently from a Du Boisian perspective.

Spr SOC2260G S01 25902 Arranged (J. Itzigsohn)
Course usage information

SOC 2260R. Race and Ethnicity: Boundries, Inequalities, Identities.

The goal of this seminar is to provide students with a solid base on the sociological theoretical and empirical base for the study of race and ethnicity. The course is divided in three parts: The first focuses on the place of race, ethnicity, and nation in the making of the modern world. The second part focuses on key topics and works in the American sociology of race, ethnicity and immigration. The third part focuses on the comparative study of nation making and ethnic and racial politics.

Course usage information

SOC 2270. The Structures of Social Inequality.

Examines the structural bases for social inequality in the U.S.: gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Investigates the processes by which we generate and preserve these social structures, as well as their effects on the individual. Finally, considers the changing nature of social inequality in a postmodern society and comparative issues across societies. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

SOC 2280. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Population.

This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary perspectives on population, drawing on insights from anthropology, economics and sociology in regards to population questions, theories, and methodologies. The focus is on three topical areas in population studies - understanding fertility change, HIV/AIDS, and population structure and process.

Course usage information

SOC 2300. Welfare States.

This seminar examines the political sociology of welfare states and social policies in the United States and abroad. It reviews major theories accounting for the origins and subsequent development of welfare states, explains the "exceptional" nature of American social policy, and discusses recent welfare reforms via institutional histories and in depth case studies.

Spr SOC2300 S01 25461 Th 2:00-5:00(07) (J. Pacewicz)
Course usage information

SOC 2310. Health Institutions and Professions.

Structure and operation of health professions and health care institutions, both historically and at present. Emphasis on structural determinants of health-such as race, class, and gender differences in disease, mortality, environmental exposures, and health utilization-and the importance of nonmedical interventions in improving health status and reducing inequalities.

Course usage information

SOC 2320. Migration.

A review of the major patterns and differentials in international and internal migration in cross-cultural perspective. Emphasizes theoretical models of migration. Offered in alternate years.

Fall SOC2320 S02 17007 W 9:00-12:00(01) (L. Vanwey)
Course usage information

SOC 2350. Social Movements in Health.

Study of social movements dealing with health and illness, with emphasis on contemporary movements such as women's health, environmental justice, environmental health, breast cancer activism, asthma activism. Examination of historical formation, recruitment, links to other movements, lay-professional interactions, research ethics, effects on science and medicine, and impacts on society.

Course usage information

SOC 2360. Fertility.

An introduction to the study of the social determinants of human fertility. Contemporary and historical populations are considered. Theories and frameworks used to guide fertility research are reviewed. Special topics include: fertility decision-making, gender and fertility, work and fertility, adolescent fertility, and population policies and family planning programs.

Course usage information

SOC 2385. Environmental Sociology.

As contestation over environmental concerns proliferates, it draws increasing attention from sociologists. But sociological research on environmental issues raises major challenges. Social-environmental relationships raise theoretical and methodological questions: How do we know an “environmental” issue when we see one? How can we effectively examine the relationships between environmental processes and social processes and structures?

Course usage information

SOC 2430. Fields and Methods of Social Research.

Introduction to strategies sociologists use to formulate theories and conduct methodologically sound research. Hypothesis formulation and research design; special emphasis on identifying causal mechanisms, techniques of operationalization, and choice of relevant comparisons.

Fall SOC2430 S01 17106 M 2:00-5:00(07) (S. Short)
Course usage information

SOC 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall SOC2450 S01 14788 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC2450 S01 23874 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 2460. Sociology Paper Writing Seminar.

This is a special seminar for graduate students in Sociology on the art of writing research papers for publication. The goals of the course are to: 1) learn the process of writing by drafting or redrafting a complete research paper, one section at a time 2) participate in the process of critical peer review 3)become knowledgeable about the process of submission/publication in peer-reviewed journals in Sociology and related social science fields 4) become more familiar with the often hidden processes of journal review , publication ethics, and interpreting/responding to editorial decisions

Spr SOC2460 S01 24834 M 2:30-5:30(07) (M. Suchman)
Course usage information

SOC 2500. Teaching Practicum in Sociology.

No description available.

Fall SOC2500 S01 14884 Arranged (D. Lindstrom)
Course usage information

SOC 2510. Teaching Practicum in Sociology.

No description available.

Spr SOC2510 S01 23883 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 2580. Health and Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender.

Primarily emphasizes race, class, and gender inequalities, but also attends to inequalities of place, social control and official misconduct, and the responsibility of health care providers and researchers in dealing with inequality. Emphasizes social causation of morbidity and mortality rather than inequalities in access to health services and inequalities in clinical interaction, but touches on these other areas as well.

Course usage information

SOC 2600. Comparative Historical Analysis.

The seminar focuses on the application of theory and method in historical sociology. It will combine the reading of exemplary works, both classical and current, in comparative-historical sociology, with an exploration of historical methods that involves methodological readings but focuses on students' use of archives in their own individual research. For graduate students only.

Course usage information

SOC 2610. Spatial Thinking in Social Science.

This course reviews ways in which social scientists have incorporated concepts about space, place, and distance into their theories and research. Examples are drawn from many substantive areas, including the spatial organization of communities, spatial inequalities, and mobility. Separate laboratory meetings introduce methods of spatial analysis encountered in the course readings, including an introduction to GIS and related mapping tools.

Spr SOC2610 S01 24835 T 9:00-12:00(08) (J. Logan)
Course usage information

SOC 2612. Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis for the Social Sciences.

This course is intended for graduate students seeking to learn the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and how to incorporate spatial questions into social science research. The course is primarily a methods course and through required independent project work, students will learn how GIS and spatial analysis are typically employed across the social sciences. By the end students will be proficient in independent use of ArcGIS, most frequently used GIS software package, and will be able to apply the more common tools of spatial analysis. They will also know basics of cartography.

Course usage information

SOC 2960A. Comparative Statification.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 2960B. Democracy and Civil Society.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 2960C. Urban Sociology.

This course will review alternative theoretical perspectives on urban and regional development with an emphasis on variants of ecological and political economy approaches. Substantive topics will include metropolitan restructuring in the U.S. and abroad, growth politics and growth control, neighborhood social networks and collective action, and incorporation of immigrants and minority groups in the metropolis.

Course usage information

SOC 2960D. Organizations and Disasters.

An overview of theory and research on organizations involved in various forms of disaster prevention, and organizations for whom mistakes can lead to major disasters (such as the Nuclear Regulatory Agency, the Office of Homeland Security, NASA, etc.). Students in this class will be involved in literature synthesis, hypothesis formulation, and the development of research designs to test those hypotheses.

Course usage information

SOC 2960E. Poverty as Social Inequality.

The objective of this seminar is to examine historical and contemporary poverty in the U.S. Topics covered include the measurement and analysis of poverty, individual and structural causes of poverty, the geographic distribution of poverty, poverty abroad, the consequences of poverty, and the policies that intend to address poverty. Course is organized around sociological prespectives, although multi-disciplinary scholarship is reviewed.

Course usage information

SOC 2960F. Global Political Economy.

The new phase of capitalism, commonly called "globalization," has radically transformed the postwar order. In this seminar, we will review several debates regarding current political-economic transformations, including: What caused the shift to neo-liberalism? What external economic pressures do states experience? Can domestic factors mediate such pressures? How do developing countries react to the new international environment? And what role does the United States and international organizations play in the new order?

Course usage information

SOC 2960G. Spatial Data Analysis Techniques in the Social Sciences.

Survey course of statistical methods that can be used to analyze spatial and/or clustered data at the individual and aggregate levels. Topics include multilevel analysis; fixed effects approaches; spatial choice; spatial autocorrelation, heterogeneity and dependence. Application with real data. Not a course about Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or mapping techniques.

Fall SOC2960G S01 16042 F 9:00-12:00(01) (L. Anselin)
Course usage information

SOC 2960H. Demography of the Life Course.

This seminar provides an overview of the development and current uses of the life course perspective in studies of demographic behaviors, process and change. Cohorts and age-graded patterns of behavior are considered as are the effects of social institutions, opportunity structures, and behavioral preferences all of which determine alternative life course pathways. Family origins and prior life experiences, along with ethnic/racial, gender, and cultural identities are examined as critical factors giving rise to inter-individual differences in demographic behaviors over the life course. The role of biography and agency in decisions about demographic behaviors and actual experiences are considered, as is their relationship to life course pathways, trajectories, and success. Graduate students and advanced Undergraduates with permission.

Course usage information

SOC 2960I. Internal Migration.

Critical analysis and discussion of current research on trends in, and causes and consequences of internal migration. Specific content of the course varies according to recent developments in the field.

Course usage information

SOC 2960J. Comparing Institutional Forms: Public, Private and Non-Profit Organizational Forms.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 2960K. Comparative Political Sociology.

This course explores both classic and contemporary debates in political sociology. The central thematic is the relationship between democracy and power and includes theories of the state, markets, social class and civil society. The debates are explored through historical and comparative lenses, covering both old and new democracies. Some background in political or sociological theory is recommended.

Course usage information

SOC 2960L. Special Topics in Population.

No description available.

Spr SOC2960L S01 25831 M 9:00-12:00(02) (S. Short)
Course usage information

SOC 2960M. Sociology of Organizations Graduate Seminar.

The sociology of organizations offers a burgeoning and vibrant literature, with relevance not only for self-identified organizational sociologists, but also for scholars in fields as diverse as politics, development, industrial relations, finance, education, health care, and the arts. This seminar offers an intensive exploration of the "state of play" in contemporary macro-organizational theory. Shared and individual readings, coupled with weekly discussions and email dialogues, allow students to refine and extend their thinking on a series of important and controversial topics in the recent literature. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, the syllabus is aimed primarily at graduate students who enjoy some prior familiarity with organizational theory, whether in sociology or a kindred discipline. Enrollment limited to 15.

Course usage information

SOC 2960N. Governance in Development.

No description available.

Course usage information

SOC 2960P. Social Network Analysis.

Provides a synoptic survey of the various methodologies and theoretical frameworks that collectively go by the name "Social Network Analysis" in the social sciences. Students will study the origin and history of social network analysis during the latter part of the 20th Century and work to develop core competencies in the construction, use and interpretation of basic network measures. Special attention will be given to the intersection of social network theory with broader social theory. Although there are no formal prerequisites, students should be advised that social network analysis relies heavily on matrix algebra and basic statistical theory. Open to graduate students in Sociology.

Course usage information

SOC 2960Q. Sociology of Culture and Knowledge.

We focus in this course on a few of the important theoretical and empirical developments in cultural sociology since the 1960s. In particular, we address ways in which culture is conceived and researched and how the sociology of knowledge and understanding underlies this address. We also consider the forms in which such a cultural sociology can inform a wide range of sociological questions, from the formation of the self to the articulation of historical epochs.

Fall SOC2960Q S01 16041 W 9:00-12:00(01) (M. Kennedy)
Course usage information

SOC 2960R. Urbanization in a Global System.

The world is undergoing an unprecedented wave of urban growth, and already more than half of the world's population in living in towns and cities. This course takes a global view of urban issues. In earlier developing regions such as North America and Europe, the focus is on a large scale restructuring of cities related to cycles of growth and decline , challenges to the social safety net, and replacement of local populations by immigrants with different racial, and ethnic or religious backgrounds.

Fall SOC2960R S01 16637 T 9:00-12:00(08) (J. Logan)
Course usage information

SOC 2961A. Advanced Spatial Data Analysis Techniques in the Social Sciences.

This course provides a survey of advanced spatial data analytical techniques with particular focus on methods relevant to applications in the social sciences. Topics include spatial process models, Bayesian analysis of spatial data, spatial models for discrete dependent variables (spatial counts, spatial probit and tobit, spatial multinomial models), spatial panel data (time series of cross-sections with spatial effects). The course introduces use of specialized software packages included in R and the PySAL library for spatial analysis in Python. SOC 2960G or equivalent is a prerequisite. The course requires a solid background in multivariate statistics, basic spatial statistics and spatial regression analysis.

Course usage information

SOC 2961B. Applications in Geographic Information Systems.

This course is for graduate students seeking to develop their GIS skills further and to gain practice applying GIS methods in a research-oriented setting. The course is organized around a set of social science topics—as opposed to sequential coverage of various methods—and the focus is on getting from research question to analytical results to interpretation of findings. The course emphasizes practice matching concept to tool, as well as identifying appropriate tools and combining them successfully. Independent research skills using GIS are developed via the reading of published literature, the guided replication of results, and the interpretation of findings.

Spr SOC2961B S01 25740 F 9:00-12:00(02) (R. Franklin)
Course usage information

SOC 2970. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.

Fall SOC2970 S01 14789 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC2970 S01 23875 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 2980. Reading and Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

SOC 2981. Reading and Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

SOC 2982. Directed Research Practicum - MSAR Students Only.

The Directed Research Practicum is a one semester course taken in conjunction with an on- or off-campus research internship. The course consists of a directed reading of methodological texts and research articles selected by the student and the faculty director that are directly relevant to the methodological issues/challenges encountered in the internship. The student and faculty director will meet weekly to review the readings. The practicum may include written assignments, literature reviews, and data analysis exercises. Faculty directors need not be involved with the actual internship work, unless the student is working on the faculty member’s research project.

Fall SOC2982 S01 17375 Arranged (C. Spearin)
Spr SOC2982 S01 25967 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Fall SOC2990 S01 14790 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr SOC2990 S01 23876 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SOC XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Sociology.

Chair

David P. Lindstrom

Professor

Nitsan Chorev
Harmon Family Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Ann Dill
Professor Emerita of Sociology

Gregory C. Elliott
Professor of Sociology

Mary L. Fennell
Professor of Sociology; Professor of Health Services, Policy and Practice

Frances K. Goldscheider
University Professor Emerita and Professor Emerita of Sociology

Sidney Goldstein
Professor Emeritus of Sociology

Patrick G. Heller
Lyn Crost Professor of Social Sciences

Paget Henry
Professor of Africana Studies and Sociology

Jose Itzigsohn
Professor of Sociology

Michael D. Kennedy
Professor of Sociology

David P. Lindstrom
Professor of Sociology

John Logan
Professor of Sociology

David R. Meyer
Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Urban Studies

Zhenchao Qian
Professor of Sociology

J. Timmons Roberts
Ittleson Professor of Environmental Studies

Andrew M. Schrank
Olive C. Watson Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Susan Short
Professor of Sociology

Hilary Silver
Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies

Mark C. Suchman
Professor of Sociology

Leah K. Vanwey
Professor of Environment and Society and Sociology

Michael White
Robert E. Turner Distinguished Professor of Population Studies

Professor of the Practice

Mathew Johnson
Professor of the Practice in Sociology

Visiting Professor

Luc Anselin
Visiting Professor of Sociology

Associate Professor

Scott A. Frickel
Associate Professor of Sociology and Environment and Society

Margot Jackson
Associate Professor of Sociology

Assistant Professor

Daniel A. Hirschman
Assistant Professor of Sociology

Jayanti J. Owens
Mary Tefft and John Hazen White, Sr. Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs and Sociology

Jan Mateusz Pacewicz
Assistant Professor of Urban Studies and Sociology

Lecturer

Lisa DiCarlo
Lecturer in Sociology

Carrie E. Spearin
Lecturer in Sociology

Adjunct Lecturer

Katherine C. Trimble
Adjunct Lecturer in Sociology

Sociology

Sociology seeks to understand human behavior by studying how individuals connect to the groups and institutions in which they live. Sociologists analyze the interrelationship of social structures with political, economic, and cultural forces, from the micro to the macro level. As a discipline, sociology provides students with the conceptual and analytic tools to make sense of complex social structures in a rapidly changing global environment. Brown’s Sociology department brings together a dynamic group of scholars with international reputations for outstanding achievement in a range of important research areas -- social demography, health and medicine, environmental justice and environmental change, development, politics and democracy, urban and spatial analysis, and organizations and occupations. Concentrators passionate about social challenges may also choose to pursue the Engaged Scholars Program, which allows the opportunity to connect theory and practice and gain hands-on experience working with community partners.

Standard program for the A.B. degree

Ten courses are required:

Requirements: (10 course)
One introductory level course to be selected from:1
Culture, Power and Social Change
Perspectives on Social Interaction: An Introduction to Social Psychology
American Heritage: Democracy, Inequality, and Public Policy
SOC 1010Classical Sociological Theory1
SOC 1020Methods of Social Research1
SOC 1100Introductory Statistics for Social Research1
Two semesters of SOC 1950 Senior Seminar (.500 credit course each semester in senior year)1
Five additional courses5
a. At least three of the optional courses have to be 1000 level and one of them must be a substantive seminar (1870/1871).
b. Students can choose to take up to two (showcase) lower level (0100 level) courses.
c. Students can petition to take two courses outside of the discipline (this will be allowed only when the proposed course makes sense given the insterests of the student, and there is no equivalent sociology course).
Total Credits10

***See the Sociology website http://www.brown.edu/academics/sociology/ for detail regarding Honors and Independent Studies

The Senior Seminar

Sociology requires all concentrators to complete a thesis or project in their senior year as a capstone experience. The purpose of the thesis or  project is to allow students an opportunity to apply the knowledge they acquired on a topic of their own interests. This capstone experience provides a hands on experience through which students learn what can be done with Sociology. To fulfill the capstone requirement students enroll in SOC 1950 – Senior Seminar during the senior year. is a one credit course that students take across two successive semesters.  Students receive 0.5 credit in each semester.   The senior seminar is focused on finalizing a senior project or thesis and giving a presentation of the completed work.  Participation in this seminar allows each cohort of concentrators to discuss their diverse interests and expose them to the wide range of applications of Sociological knowledge.

The senior thesis is supervised by a faculty member who serves as the primary advisor, and one additional faculty member who serves as a reader.  The primary advisor and the reader are chosen by the student and approved by the Concentration Advisor.  The reader will receive a draft and a finished copy of the student's thesis, which the reader will be responsible to grade.  The reader may be involved in the earlier development of the thesis depending upon the arrangement made by the student with the reader.  The senior thesis will normally consist of a major research paper.  By the end of the sixth semester, students must submit a prospectus of the senior thesis to the Concentration Advisor.  At the start of the seventh semester students should submit to the Concentration Advisor a proposal (not more than four pages) accompanied by the signature of one faculty member indicating that he or she is willing to serve as primary advisor on the thesis.  Only a senior thesis qualifies the student for Honors.  A thesis typically includes one or two semesters of course credit through - Senior Thesis/Project (fall semester) and/or - Senior Thesis/Project (spring semester).  and do not count toward the 10 course requirement for the concentration. 

A senior project differs from a thesis in its scholarly content and form, and it depends only on the evaluation of the senior seminar instructor (although students may elect to have a faculty advisor for the project, in addition to the senior seminar instructor).  Whereas the senior thesis follows the form of a conventional research paper, the project allows a wider array of research and creative outputs, including but not limited to video documentaries, photographic exhibitions, and applied or policy related reports with an off-campus organization.  Projects should be complemented by an analytical paper that situates the central subject matter of the project within the context of sociological scholarship.

You should decide your senior project in consultation with the Concentration Advisor  and the instructor of the Senior Seminar.  You may also need to approach a specific faculty member within the department to advise you on your project.  At the beginning of your senior year you should file a written statement the Concentration Advisor describing your senior project (if you opt to have one outside of the instructor).  Students who have a faculty advisor on their senior project may register for - Senior Thesis/Project ( fall semester) and/or - Senior Thesis/Project (spring semester).  SOC 1980 and SOC 1990 do not count towards the 10 course requirement for the concentration. 

Due Dates

During the second week of March, a complete draft of the senior thesis must be given to the faculty advisor and the reader for comments, and the final version of the senior thesis is due during the second week of April ( the exact dates vary from year to year and are announced at the start of the academic year).

During the second week of March, a complete draft of the senior project must be given to the instructor of the senior seminar and the faculty advisor (if the student has one) for comments, and the final version of the senior project is due during the second week of April (the exact dates vary from year to year and are announced at the beginning of the academic year). 

These deadlines are essential to allow faculty time to evaluate theses for awards, and to notify the Registrar with recommendations for honors.  NO EXCEPTIONS WILL BE GRANTED

Honors

In order to be considered for honors, students must receive a grade point average of at least 3.5 (A=4, B=3, C=2) on all concentration courses taken, and can take no more than one (1) of the concentration courses with the "S/NC" option.  Honors also requires a senior thesis, with a recommendation of Honors by the advisor and reader, that demonstrates an understanding of empirical research. 

Independent Study

Students can use no more than one (1) Independent Study course to meet the concentration course requirements.  This course counts  only towards a 1000 level substantive requirement and will not serve as a s substitute for any of the core concentration requirements. 

Social Analysis and Research

The Sc.B. concentration in Social Analysis and Research provides both a conceptual and a working knowledge of the techniques for data collection and analysis used for social research in academic and non-academic environments. The centerpiece of the concentration is a rigorous and comprehensive collection of courses: (1) that develop an understanding of the principles underlying the processes of data collection and analysis; and (2) that train students in the application of advanced statistical techniques for data description and analysis. The concepts and skills learned in these courses are reinforced through engagement in applied research with Sociology faculty and/or internships with local organizations in the for profit and not-for-profit sectors.

Concentrators also take courses that provide grounding in the theoretical approaches to social phenomena that are foundational to social research. Graduates develop an understanding of the concepts and processes that underlie the issues studied by sociologists and the analytic techniques that allow sociologists to understand social relations and individual behavior.

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

Required Core
MATH 0090Introductory Calculus, Part I1
SOC 1100Introductory Statistics for Social Research1
or APMA 0650 Essential Statistics
or ECON 1620 Introduction to Econometrics
SOC 1020Methods of Social Research1
SOC 2010Multivariate Statistical Methods I1
SOC 1010Classical Sociological Theory1
Three (3) substantive or theory courses (non-methodological courses) in Sociology, two (2) of which must be at the 1000-level or above3
Three (3) of the following advanced analysis courses:3
Market and Social Surveys
Focus Groups for Market and Social Research
Market Research in Public and Private Sectors
Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
Spatial Thinking in Social Science
Spatial Data Analysis Techniques in the Social Sciences
Techniques of Demographic Analysis
Qualitative Methods
Multivariate Statistical Methods II
Event History Analysis
Capstone Experience (1-2 courses)1-2
A one-semester research internship (not for credit or for credit as SOC 1970 - Independant Study), or a summer research internship (not for credit)
Sociology Senior Seminar (SOC 1950)
Total Number of Courses (12-13)
Total Credits12-13

***See the Sociology website http://www.brown.edu/academics/sociology/ for details regarding Honors and Independent Studies

Course Substitutions: Students may petition the Undergraduate Concentration Advisor to use one advanced analysis course taken in another department to count toward the three required advanced analysis courses.

Research Internship

A one semester or a summer research internship is required.  The research internship is designed to provide students with hands-on experience in social research.  Students will typically complete the research internship in their junior year or during the summer between their junior and senior years.  Students need to submit an Internship Proposal Form to the Undergraduate Concentration Advisor for approval prior to starting the internship.  Upon completion of the internship, students are required to submit to the Undergraduate Concentration Advisor a brief summary report of their experience, which must be signed by the supervisor of the student's internship.

Academic research internships involve work on a faculty member's research project.  Activities may range from data collection, data entry, data file management, descriptive analyses, and more advanced model estimation.  Students are encouraged to approach faculty about opportunities for working on their research projects.  Off-campus research internships are arranged through the Sociology Department Students Affairs Coordinator or the Undergraduate Concentration Advisor.  Academic and off-campus research internships will typically entail 5-10 hours of work per week and may or may not involve compensation.

Students may receive academic credit for academic research internships and off-campus internships completed during the academic year if they combine the internship experience with an academic component under the direction of a faculty advisor.  Students taking an internship for credit should register for an Individual Research Project (SOC 1970).

The Senior Seminar

 The concentration in Social Analysis and Research requires all concentrators to complete a thesis or project in their senior year as a capstone experience.  The purpose of the thesis or project is to allow students  an opportunity to apply the knowledge they acquired  on a topic of their own interests.  This capstone experience provides a hands on experience through which students learn what can be done with sociological research methods.  To fulfill the capstone requirement students enroll in  SOC 1950- Senior Seminar during the senior year.  SOC 1950 is a one credit course that students take across two successive semesters.  Students receive 0.5 credit in each semester.  The senior seminar is focused on finalizing a senior project or thesis and giving a presentation of the completed work.  Participation in this seminar allows each cohort of concentrators to discuss diverse interests and exposes them to a wide range of applications of sociological knowledge. 

The senior thesis is supervised by a faculty member who serves as the primary advisor, and one additional faculty member who serves as a reader.  The primary advisor and the reader are chosen by the student and approved by the Concentration Advisor.  The reader will receive a draft and a finished copy of the students thesis, which the reader will be responsible to grade.  The reader may be involved in the earlier development of the thesis depending upon the arrangement made by the student with the reader.  The Senior thesis will normally consist of a major research project.   By the end of the sixth semester, students must submit a prospectus of the senior thesis to the concentration Advisor.  At the start of the seventh semester students  should submit to the Concentration Advisor a proposal  (not more than four pages) accompanied by the signature of one faculty member indicating that he or she is willing to serve as primary advisor on the thesis.  Only a senior thesis qualifies the student for Honors.  A thesis typically includes one or two semesters of course credit through  SOC 1980 - Senior Thesis/Project (fall semester)  and/or SOC 1990 - Senior Thesis/Project (spring semester). SOC 1980 and SOC 1990 do not count toward the 12-13 course requirement for the concentration. 

A senior project differs from a thesis in its scholarly content and form, and it depends only on the evaluation of the senior seminar instructor (although students may elect to have a faculty advisor for the project, in addition to the senior seminar instructor).  Whereas the senior thesis follows the form of a conventional research paper, the project allows a wider array of research and creative outputs, including, but not limited to video documentaries, photographic exhibitions, and applied or policy related reports with an off-campus organization.  projects should be complemented by an analytical paper that situates the central subject matter of the project within the context of sociological scholarship. 

You should decide your senior project in consultation with the Concentration Advisor and the instructor of the Senior Seminar.  You ma also need to approach a specific faculty member within the department to advise you on your project.  At the beginning of your senior year you should file a written statement with the Concentration Advisor describing your senior project and listing your advisor for the project (if you opt to have one outside of the SOC 1950 instructor).  Students who have a faculty advisor on their senior project may register for SOC 1980 Senior Thesis/Project (fall semester) and SOC 1990 Senior Thesis/Project (spring semester).  SOC 1980 and SOC 1990 do not count toward the 12-13 course requirement for the concentration. 

Due Dates

During the second week of March, a complete draft of the senior thesis must be given to the faculty advisor and the reader for comments, and the final version of the senior thesis is due during the second week of April (exact dates vary from year to year  and are announced at the start of the academic year). 

During the second week of March , a complete draft of the senior project must be given to the instructor of the senior seminar and the faculty advisor ( if the student has one) for comments, and the final version  of the senior project is due during the second week of April ( the exact dates vary from year to year and are announced at the start of the academic year). 

These deadlines are essential to allow the faculty time to evaluate theses for awards, and to notify the Registrar with recommendations for honors. 

NO EXTENSIONS WILL BE GRANTED.

Honors

In order to be considered for honors , students must receive a grade point average of at least 3.5 ( A=4, B-3, C=2) on all concentration courses taken, and no more than one (1) of the concentration courses with the "S/NC" option.  Honors also requires a senior thesis, with a recommendation of Honors by the advisor and reader, that demonstrates an understanding of empirical research. 

Independent Study

Students can use no more than one (1) Independent Study course (SOC 1970 to meet the concentration course requirements.  This course counts towards a 1000 level substantive requirement and will not serve as a substitute for any of the core concentration requirement.

Sociology

Fifth-Year Master’s (Sc.M.) Program in Social Analysis and Research

The master’s (Sc.M.) program in Social Analysis and Research (MSAR) provides students with advanced methodological training in both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis, with cores in spatial analysis and market research, and individualized supervision of applied, hands-on data analytic research on a faculty project or with an off-campus organization.

Ph D. Program

The department of Sociology offers a graduate program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree. The department also offers a Master or Arts (A.M.) but this option is only open to Ph.D. candidates.

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/sociology