Computer Science-Economics

The joint Computer Science-Economics concentration exposes students to the theoretical and practical connections between computer science and economics. It prepares students for professional careers that incorporate aspects of economics and computer technology and for academic careers conducting research in areas that emphasize the overlap between the two fields. Concentrators may choose to pursue either the A.B. or the Sc.B. degree. While the A.B. degree allows students to explore the two disciplines by taking advanced courses in both departments, its smaller number of required courses is compatible with a liberal education. The Sc.B. degree achieves greater depth in both computer science and economics by requiring more courses, and it offers students the opportunity to creatively integrate both disciplines through a design requirement. In addition to courses in economics, computer science, and applied mathematics, all concentrators must fulfill the Computer Science department's writing requirement by passing a course that involves significant expository writing. 

Standard Program for the Sc.B. degree.

Prerequisites (3 courses):
Introductory Calculus, Part II
Linear Algebra
Honors Linear Algebra
Directions: The Matrix in Computer Science
Principles of Economics
Required Courses (17 courses):
Select one of the following Series:2
CSCI 1450Introduction to Probability and Computing1
or APMA 1650 Statistical Inference I
Series A
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming and Computer Science
   and Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Series B
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction
   and Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction
Series C
Accelerated Introduction to Computer Science
and an additional CS course not otherwise used to satisfy a concentration requirement; this course may be CSCI 0180, an intermediate-level CS course, or a 1000-level course.
Two of the following intermediate courses, one of which must be math-oriented and one systems-oriented.2
Introduction to Discrete Structures and Probability (math)
Introduction to Software Engineering (systems)
Introduction to Computer Systems (systems)
Introduction to Computer Systems
Models of Computation (math)
A pair of CS courses with a coherent theme. 12
An additional CS course that is either at the 1000-level or is an intermediate course not already used to satisfy concentration requirements. CSCI 1450 may not be used to satisfy this requirement.1
ECON 1130Intermediate Microeconomics (Mathematical) 21
ECON 1210Intermediate Macroeconomics1
ECON 1630Econometrics I1
Three courses from the "mathematical economics" group:3
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Advanced Macroeconomics: Monetary, Fiscal, and Stabilization Policies
Market Design: Theory and Applications
Bargaining Theory and Applications
Econometrics II
Financial Econometrics
Investments II
Data, Statistics, Finance
Economics and Psychology
Behavioral Economics
Theory of Economic Growth
The Theory of General Equilibrium
Game Theory and Applications to Economics
and any graduate Economics course
Two additional 1000-level Economics courses2
Capstone Course in either Computer Science or Economics 31
Total Credits17
1

A list of pre-approved pairs may be found at the approved-pairs web page. You are not restricted to pairs on this list, but any pair not on the list must be approved by the CS director of undergraduate studies.  CSCI 1450 may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

2

Or ECON 1110, with permission.

3

A one-semester course, normally taken in the student's last undergraduate year, in which the student (or group of students) use a significant portion of their undergraduate education, broadly interpreted, in studying some current topic (preferably at the intersection of computer science and economics) in depth, to produce a culminating artifact such as a paper or software project.

Standard Program for the A.B. degree:

Prerequisites (3 courses):
Introductory Calculus, Part II
Linear Algebra
Honors Linear Algebra
Directions: The Matrix in Computer Science
Principles of Economics
Required Courses (13 courses):
Select one of the following series:2
CSCI 1450Introduction to Probability and Computing1
or APMA 1650 Statistical Inference I
Series A
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming and Computer Science
   and Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Series B
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction
   and Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction
Series C
Accelerated Introduction to Computer Science
and an additional CS course not otherwise used to satisfy a concentration requirement; this course may be CSCI 0180, an intermediate-level course, or a 1000-level course
Two of the following intermediate courses, one of which must be math-oriented and one systems-oriented:2
Introduction to Discrete Structures and Probability (math)
Introduction to Software Engineering (systems)
Introduction to Computer Systems (systems)
Introduction to Computer Systems
Models of Computation (math)
Two additional CS courses; at least one must be at the 1000-level. The other must either be at the 1000-level or be an intermediate course not already used to satisfy concentration requirements.2
ECON 1130Intermediate Microeconomics (Mathematical) 11
ECON 1210Intermediate Macroeconomics1
ECON 1630Econometrics I1
Three courses from the "mathematical-economics" group:3
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Advanced Macroeconomics: Monetary, Fiscal, and Stabilization Policies
Market Design: Theory and Applications
Bargaining Theory and Applications
Econometrics II
Financial Econometrics
Investments II
Data, Statistics, Finance
Economics and Psychology
Behavioral Economics
Theory of Economic Growth
The Theory of General Equilibrium
Game Theory and Applications to Economics
or any graduate Economics course
Total Credits13
1

Or ECON 1110, with permission.

Honors

Students who meet stated requirements are eligible to write an honors thesis in their senior year.  Students should consult the listed honors requirements of whichever of the two departments their primary thesis advisor belongs to, at the respective departments' websites.

Professional Track

The requirements for the professional track include all those of the standard track, as well as the following:

Students must complete two two-to-four-month full-time professional experiences, doing work that is related to their concentration programs. Such work is normally done within an industrial organization, but may also be at a university under the supervision of a faculty member.

On completion of each professional experience, the student must write and upload to ASK a reflective essay about the experience addressing the following prompts, to be approved by the student's concentration advisor:

  • Which courses were put to use in your summer's work? Which topics, in particular, were important?
  • In retrospect, which courses should you have taken before embarking on your summer experience? What are the topics from these courses that would have helped you over the summer if you had been more familiar with them?
  • Are there topics you should have been familiar with in preparation for your summer experience, but are not taught at Brown? What are these topics?
  • What did you learn from the experience that probably could not have been picked up from course work?
  • Is the sort of work you did over the summer something you would like to continue doing once you graduate? Explain.
  • Would you recommend your summer experience to other Brown students? Explain.