Mathematics-Economics

The Mathematical Economics concentration is designed to give a background in economic theory plus the mathematical tools needed to analyze and develop additional theoretical constructions. The emphasis is on the abstract theory itself.

Standard Mathematics-Economics Concentration (through the class of 2015):

Economics
ECON 1130Intermediate Microeconomics (Mathematical) 11
ECON 1210Intermediate Macroeconomics1
ECON 1630Econometrics I1
Two from the "mathematical-economics" group:2
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Advanced Macroeconomics: Monetary, Fiscal, and Stabilization Policies
Market Design: Theory and Applications
Bargaining Theory and Applications
Econometrics II
Financial Econometrics
Investments II
Data, Statistics, Finance
Economics and Psychology
Behavioral Economics
Theory of Economic Growth
The Theory of General Equilibrium
Game Theory and Applications to Economics
One additional 1000-level economics course1
Mathematics
At least two calculus courses through MATH 0180 or its equivalent.2
MATH 0520Linear Algebra1
or MATH 0540 Honors Linear Algebra
Select one of the following Options:3
Option A
Probability
Mathematical Statistics
One course from the "advanced mathematics" group, as follows:
Analysis: Functions of One Variable
Ordinary Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations
Functions of Several Variables
Functions Of Several Variables
Option B
Statistical Inference I
Two courses from the "advanced mathematics" group, as follows:
Analysis: Functions of One Variable
Ordinary Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations
Functions of Several Variables
Functions Of Several Variables
Total Credits12
1

 Or ECON 1110 with permission.

Standard Mathematics-Economics Concentration (class of 2016 and beyond):

Economics
ECON 1130Intermediate Microeconomics (Mathematical) 11
ECON 1210Intermediate Macroeconomics1
ECON 1630Econometrics I1
Two courses from the "mathematical-economics" group: 22
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Advanced Macroeconomics: Monetary, Fiscal, and Stabilization Policies
Market Design: Theory and Applications
Bargaining Theory and Applications
Econometrics II
Financial Econometrics
Investments II
Data, Statistics, Finance
Economics and Psychology
Behavioral Economics
Theory of Economic Growth
The Theory of General Equilibrium
Game Theory and Applications to Economics
One course from the "data methods" group: 21
Economics of Education: Research
Labor Economics
Health Economics
Urban Economics
Economic Development
The Economic Analysis of Institutions
Health, Hunger and the Household in Developing Countries
Econometrics II
Financial Econometrics
Data, Statistics, Finance
Finance, Regulation, and the Economy: Research
Two additional 1000-level economics courses2
Mathematics
Calculus: MATH 0180 or higher1
Linnear Algebra - one of the following:1
Linear Algebra
Honors Linear Algebra
Probability Theory - one of the following:1
Probability
Mathematical Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Analysis - one of the following:1
Analysis: Functions of One Variable
Functions of Several Variables
Functions Of Several Variables
Differential Equations - one of the following:1
Ordinary Differential Equations
Partial Differential Equations
One additional course from the Probability, Analysis, and Differential Equations courses listed above1
Total Credits14
1

Or ECON 1110 with permission.

2

No course may be "double-counted" to satisfy both the mathematical-economics and data methods requirement.

Honors and Capstone Requirement:

Admission to candidacy for honors in the concentration is granted on the following basis: 3.7 GPA for Economics courses, and 3.5 GPA overall.  To graduate with honors, a student must write an honors thesis in senior year following the procedures specified by the concentration (see Economics Department website).  Beginning with the class of 2016, students not writing an honors thesis must complete an alternative senior capstone project and obtain approval of a faculty sponsor. 

Professional Track (applies irrespective of graduation year):

The requirements for the professional track include all those of the standard track, as well as the following:

Students must complete two two-to-four month full-time professional experiences, doing work that is relevant to their concentration programs.  Such work is normally done within an industrial organization, but may also be at a university under the supervision of a faculty member.

On completion of each professional experience, the student must write and upload to ASK a reflective essay about the experience addressing the following prompts, to be approved by the student's concentration advisor:

  • Which courses were put to use in your summer's work? Which topics, in particular, were important?
  • In retrospect, which courses should you have taken before embarking on your summer experience? What are the topics from these courses that would have helped you over the summer if you had been more familiar with them?
  • Are there topics you should have been familiar with in preparation for your summer experience, but are not taught at Brown? What are these topics?
  • What did you learn from the experience that probably could not have been picked up from course work?
  • Is the sort of work you did over the summer something you would like to continue doing once you graduate? Explain.
  • Would you recommend your summer experience to other Brown students? Explain.