Urban Studies

The Urban Studies Program teaches students to analyze the city, urban life, and urbanization through a variety of disciplinary lenses. Students learn where cities come from, how they grow, thrive, and decline, how they are organized, and how to construct meaningful, inclusive, secure, and sustainable places. The curriculum examines how urban problems arise, how they have been previously addressed, and how to plan cities of the future.Concentrators enjoy the breadth of courses in American Studies, economics, history, literature, history of art and architecture, political science, sociology, and planning as well as provide in-depth courses integrating those perspectives. We introduce the fundamentals of Urban Studies scholarship as well as intense examination of an urban problem in focused seminars. These advanced seminars offer opportunities to write extensive and synthetic interdisciplinary analyses that serve as capstones to the concentration.The program’s 10-course curriculum provides sufficient flexibility to allow students to pursue specific urban interests or to take courses in urban focus areas of Built Environment; Humanities; Social Sciences; and Sustainable Urbanism. The Program insures that students master at least one basic research methodology and perform research or fieldwork projects, which may result in an honors thesis. Fieldwork training includes working with local agencies and nonprofit organizations on practical urban problems. Capstone projects entail original research papers in Urban Studies seminars; academically supervised video, artistic, or community service projects; and Honors Theses for eligible concentrators.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/urban-studies/

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URBN 0210. The City: An Introduction to Urban Studies.

This introductory course to Urban Studies is taught in an entirely new format. Led by Prof. Neumann, it will include lectures by Urban Studies faculty who will present their views of the field. It offers an interdisciplinary approach to the history, physical design, spatial form, economy, government, cultures, and social life of cities worldwide. Which are the most urgent issues facing cities today? How will continued urban growth affect the environment? How can we learn from historic approaches to urban planning? Which are the most promising solutions to relieve urban inequality? What can be learned from ‘informal housing’ developments? DPLL LILE WRIT

Fall URBN0210 S01 15262 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (D. Neumann)
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URBN 0230. Urban Life in Providence: An Introduction.

An introduction to Urban Studies and to the city of Providence, this first year seminar explores from an interdisciplinary perspective how cities are broadly conceptualized and studied. Students then focus on urban dwelling, using Providence as a first-hand case study. We comprehensively examine urban life and change, attending to urban history, the diverse configurations of people and place, social and environmental issues, and urban sustainability. In a lively and varied approach to local learning, course activities include lectures, discussion, reading and writing assignments, films and other media, guest speakers, and excursions to local sites. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

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URBN 1000. Fieldwork in the Urban Community.

Each student undertakes a fieldwork project in close collaboration with a government agency, a nonprofit association, or a planning firm, thereby simultaneously engaging with community and learning qualitative research methods skills. In weekly seminar meetings, the class examines a series of urban issues and discusses fieldwork methodology. Students also schedule regular appointments with the instructor. WRIT DPLL

Fall URBN1000 S01 16761 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (J. Pacewicz)
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URBN 1010. Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology and Historical Preservation.

Study of the surface and subsurface features of the urban built environment. An introduction to research methods and fieldwork procedures used by archaeologists and historical preservationists who work on urban sites. Students undertake fieldwork projects that involve archival research, close examination of historic structures, and theoretical analysis of the changing urban landscape. Priority given to Urban Studies concentrators and American Civilization grad students. Other students selected on first day of class. WRIT

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URBN 1200. The United States Metropolis, 1945-2000.

This lecture and discussion course will provide students with an introduction to the history, politics, and culture of United States cities and suburbs from the end of World War II to the close of the twentieth century. Readings are drawn from recent work in the political, social, and cultural history of U.S. cities as well as primary sources rooted in the period under study. DPLL WRIT LILE

Spr URBN1200 S01 25716 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (S. Zipp)
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URBN 1210. Regional Planning.

Urban sprawl, uncoordinated land use policy, environmental decline, shrinking cities, regional inequities in housing, education, and tax capacity are all challenges that transcend city boundaries. Does it take regional planning to address these challenges? What can regional planning provide that urban planning cannot? In this course, students will develop a critical understanding of regional planning approaches to economic, social, environmental, and land use issues in the United States and abroad. Students will learn urban and regional planning methods which will be integrated throughout the course. A weekly studio and practical group projects are planned.

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URBN 1220. Planning Sustainable Cities.

What does sustainability mean in the context of degraded urban areas? Can sustainable development be achieved in cities? This course offers a comprehensive, yet critical understanding of the competing theories and practices of sustainable development as applied to cities. Topics include sprawl, energy-efficient transportation, brownfields, community land trusts, green architecture, renewable energy, air and water pollution, and waste recycling.

Fall URBN1220 S01 15265 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (Y. Sungu-Eryilmaz)
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URBN 1230. Crime and the City.

This course focuses on crime and the making of urban space, as well as how the making of urban space helps to create and categorize criminal subjects and the concept of cultural criminality. In addition to looking at the geography of race, class, and power in a contemporary US setting, this semester we will focus in on gang identity and performance, police tactics and territoriality, graffiti as an act of spatial transgression, homelessness, and notions of socio-spatial justice. As I will show with the course texts and through classroom lectures, studying crime is about studying space, and visa versa. DPLL LILE

Fall URBN1230 S01 15263 WF 10:00-10:50(14) (S. Bloch)
Fall URBN1230 S01 15263 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (S. Bloch)
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URBN 1250. The Political Foundations of the City.

This course examines the history of urban and social welfare policy in the United States and abroad. It reviews major theories accounting for the origins and subsequent development of welfare states, explains the "exceptional" nature of American public policy, and employs a combination of historical texts and case studies to analyze the connections between politics and the urban environment.

Spr URBN1250 S01 25812 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (J. Pacewicz)
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URBN 1500. Understanding the City through Data.

Cities are complex systems, but luckily there are lots of data and analysis techniques to make sense of them. In this project-based course, you will learn to conduct a variety of data analysis techniques that are commonly used and essential in urban studies. The case studies will be selected from humanities, social sciences, and real-life urban problems.

Spr URBN1500 S01 25718 M 3:00-5:30(13) (Y. Sungu-Eryilmaz)
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URBN 1870A. American Culture and the City.

This course explores American culture and the way it shapes our cities. Topics include the American dream, race, immigration, urban dilemmas and the seduction of suburbia. We read a book (readings include Alexis de Tocqueville, Richard Wright, Tom Wolfe, and Margaret Atwood); and screen a film (movies include Wall Street, Traffic, Crash, Malcolm X) each week. Prerequisite: POLS 0220. Priority given to Urban Studies concentrators. WRIT

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URBN 1870C. The Environment Built: Urban Environmental History and Urban Environmentalism for the 21st Century.

The term "built environment" suggests an intimate relationship between natural and human-made landscapes. For the last twenty years, environmental historians such as William Cronon have contributed to the project of transcending the false dichotomy between a "pristine" natural environment and the (supposedly artificial) social, cultural, and political terrain of humans. Building upon this important scholarly trajectory, this seminar will re-examine these and other important contributions in light of recent environmental and urban disasters, aiming to bring theoretical readings in environmental history down to earth in order to inspire new ways of thinking about the "environment" for the 21st century. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required.

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URBN 1870D. Downtown Development.

This seminar examines the development and revitalization of the urban core in the United States with a focus on urban planning. Providence is used as a laboratory to explore development from the perspective of the planner, the developer, and city residents. Important concepts are illustrated through field trips, public meetings, and guest speakers. WRIT

Fall URBN1870D S01 15266 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (R. Azar)
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URBN 1870F. Housing and Homelessness.

What is homelessness and where does it come from? Can affordable housing solve the problem? This seminar examines homelessness, low-income housing policies, segregation, gentrification, privatization of public space, and related processes that make it difficult to house the poor. Open to Urban Studies concentrators and by permission based on demonstration of research skills. Enrollment limited to 20.

Fall URBN1870F S01 16056 Th 6:40-9:10PM(05) (H. Silver)
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URBN 1870G. Ancient Cities: From the Origins Through Late Antiquity.

This seminar explores major cities of the ancient Near East (Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, and the Levant), Egypt, Greece, and Italy from the origins through late antiquity. The primary focus will be on the physical appearance and overall plans of the cities, their natural and man-made components, their domestic and private as well as their religious and secular spaces. Objects and artifacts of daily life, including pottery, sculpture, wall paintings, mosaics, and various small finds will be evaluated to establish a more nuanced understanding of the different architectural and urban contexts. WRIT

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URBN 1870H. Rivers and Cities.

Rivers promote urban development and serve as important resources and cultural amenities for communities. This interdisciplinary seminar looks at the use and abuse of selected rivers which have run by or through American cities from the colonial period to the present.

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URBN 1870I. The Changing American City.

This course examines the recent evolution of the American city. We will consider various external forces that act upon the city, principally (a) migration patterns, (b) economic and technological change, and (c) public policy. We will also consider how various groups and political leaders respond to these forces and on what resources they draw. Priority given to Urban Studies and Political Science concentrators.

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URBN 1870J. The Politics of Community Organizing.

Introduces key issues concerning community organizing. Focuses on the life, skills, and tactics of Saul Alinsky and the national organization he founded, the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF). Analyzes the work of the IAF in a number of urban settings. Seeks to develop theories and models for studying community mobilization in urban America. Priority given to Political Science and Urban Studies concentrators. DPLL WRIT

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URBN 1870M. Urban Regimes in the American Republic.

A probing of topical issues in both their theoretical antecedents and their contemporary manifestations. Examines the intellectual debates and the scholarly treatments surrounding issues of power in the city, urban redevelopment policy, urban poverty, urban educational policy, and race in the city. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT DPLL

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URBN 1870N. The Cultural and Social Life of the Built Environment.

This seminar investigates the relationship between people and place. It considers the ways that people create and experience the man-made landscape, how they understand place through various aesthetic forms, and political conflict over space and place. We look mostly at the history and contemporary development of cities and suburbs in the United States. Students will prepare a final project on a specific aspect of the built environment; they will be encouraged to focus their research on Providence or another local community. Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to Urban Studies concentrators and seniors; instructor permission required otherwise. LILE WRIT

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URBN 1870P. Representing the Twentieth-Century City.

Will explore the impact of a variety of techniques of representation on the formulation and conceptualization of a variety of "urban problems" in twentieth-century Europe and America. Will employ an active, "hands-on" approach, and therefore centers on a series of projects: in addition to reading classic works in urban planning history and the history of science, participants will choose their own "urban problem" to explore throughout the semester. They will conduct an in-depth interview with a key figure involved in contemporary debates about this problem, write an "ideas piece" or editorial about it, and, finally, submit a research paper. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT

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URBN 1870Q. Cities in Mind: Modern Urban Thought and Theory.

This seminar investigates the place of the city in the history of modern thought and cultural theory, drawing on selected currents in urban thought and theory from Europe and the United States over the last two centuries. Topics include questions of public and private space, citizenship, selfhood, difference and inequality, media and technology, planning, modernism and postmodernism. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors, preference for those concentrating in Urban Studies. WRIT

Fall URBN1870Q S01 15374 W 3:00-5:30(17) (S. Zipp)
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URBN 1870R. Bottom-up Urbanism.

Cities are produced by those who possess political authority, technical expertise, and dominant forms of economic, social, and cultural capital. In this course, however, we will focus on the production of urban space and fight for spatial justice from the bottom up. We will examine everyday creative, illicit, autonomous, anarchic, and agent-based urbanism as practiced by members of subgroups, from graffiti writers and Occupy protestors to place-based communities of color, who re-envision, re-aestheticize, and physically transform their surroundings, develop new forms of symbolic capital, and produce alternative socio-spatial realities in a quest for inclusive urban futures. DPLL WRIT

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URBN 1870S. The City, the River, and the Sea: Social and Environmental Change at the Water's Edge.

This course examines urban social and environmental change at the water’s edge, focusing in particular on urban rivers, coastal areas, and deltas. Beginning with key frameworks for understanding the relationship between people and place, students explore the history and current concerns of urbanization, within the larger and increasingly urgent inquiry on human dwelling and water/waterways. The course is then organized around key topics and case studies from around the world, framed by historical and scientific data but also explored through ethnography, narrative non-fiction, and documentary work to understand how water, urban dwelling, and change are variously experienced, enacted, and presented. WRIT

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URBN 1870T. Transportation: An Urban Planning Perspective.

This seminar explores how urban planners in the U.S. plan for and around various transportation networks. We will examine how these networks are designed and funded, which modes get priority over others, and ultimately how transportation shapes the built environment. Realworld examples of plans and projects from Providence and Rhode Island are used throughout the course. Important concepts are illustrated through field trips and guest speakers. WRIT

Spr URBN1870T S01 25717 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (R. Azar)
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URBN 1870U. Critical Urban Theory.

In this seminar students will closely read and apply critical theory to thinking about urban formations and inherent socio-spatial inequalities and forms of everyday representation in a contemporary US context. More broadly, students will become familiar with geographical thought coming out of the social sciences and humanities that advances the decidedly spatial perspective that the majority of social, economic, political, and environmental problems and their potential solutions are urban-based. DPLL WRIT

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URBN 1870W. World Cities.

Populations the world over are urbanizing, creating mega-cities with mega-prospects and mega-problems. This course considers urbanization and urban life in the world;s largest and most prominent cites. Examines the economic, political, social, cultural, and other forces that push and pull migrants to global cities and the ways those cities respond to growth--and sometimes decline. Students confront urban challenges--inadequate infrastructure, transportation, and housing environmental degradation, architectural and heritage preservation, social diversity and conflict, crime and informal employment. Students also learn what makes places distinctive by comparing global cities from regions around the world. DPLL WRIT

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URBN 1900. Land Use Planning: The Future of the I-195 Parcels.

This studio examines how one represents, analyzes, constructs and projects the future design of an urban site. One approach examines the city as a series of distinct physical spaces and operates by establishing typological standards and constructs significant and iconic public spaces. The second approach is concerned with the city as a technical object that organizes time – the operational aspects of the city - as well as space. In this studio, we ask you to consider how intervening in a specific location in downtown Providence can initiate a larger plan and longer-term vision through urban and an architectural scale propositions. Enrollment limited to 10 seniors concentrating in Urban Studies and History of Art and Architecture.

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URBN 1910. Drawing and Creating in 2D, 3D and CAD for Architecture and Urban Design.

This class equips students with an array of techniques for developing and recording ideas in architecture and urban design. Geometric techniques, such as orthogonal plans, section cuts, elevations, axonometric projections and simple perspective systems, are introduced along with procedures for exploring qualitative and time-based factors. Practical assignments cover the use of sketch and formal (projection) techniques in both analog and digital media (including CAD applications). Brief readings and class discussions provide a critical understanding of the various techniques, their history, their particular strengths and their appropriate contexts of use.

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URBN 1920. Introduction to Urban Design and Planning: The City as System.

Urban design and planning are the tools that shape the physical and social fabrics of the city: Urbs and Civitas. The distinction between urban and civic -the built city and the city of human relationships- has shifted in light of the current process of global urbanization. This seminar will examine the role of urban design and planning in shaping the systemic city of the 21st century. Our conversations about current theories and practices of urban design, planning and urban systems will be accompanied by a hands-on design exercise to experience how the future of cities is planned in the present.

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URBN 1921. Theory of Architecture and Urbanism.

The course introduces the theory of architecture and urbanism. It focuses on the notion that theory is closely related to the crisis of architecture and urbanism as experienced with the rise of the modern metropolis in the mid-19th century. The formation of mass society, the deployment of new materials such as steel, glass and concrete, and the replacement of manual labour by machine production scrutinized the classical concepts of space, architecture and city. The course will follow the changing concept of theory from the advent of the modern metropolis through high modernism, postmodernity, deconstruction and the age of digital production.

Fall URBN1921 S01 16927 T 4:00-6:30(09) (J. Gleiter)
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URBN 1930. Brown in Providence.

This course will explore the long interrelationship between Brown University and the city it calls home. Through guided readings, independent research and spirited conversation, we will trace the many ways in which Brown’s urban setting has defined the university over its 250 years. We will consider Rhode Island’s unique history as a refuge for the persecuted, the transformations of the Industrial Revolution and the ways in which immense political and demographic changes of the 19th and 20th centuries left their mark on Brown. WRIT

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URBN 1970. Independent Reading and Research.

A specific program of intensive reading and research arranged in terms of the special needs and interests of the student. Open primarily to concentrators, but others may be admitted by written permission. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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URBN 1971. Senior Honors Thesis I in Urban Studies.

A program of intensive reading, research, and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Thesis Advisor in Urban Studies. Mandatory attendance at periodic meetings during the semester is required. Open to Senior Urban Studies concentrators pursuing Honors in Urban Studies. Instructor permission required.

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URBN 1972. Senior Honors Thesis II in Urban Studies.

A program of intensive reading, research, and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Thesis Advisor in Urban Studies. Mandatory attendance at periodic meetings during the semester is required. Open to Senior Urban Studies concentrators pursuing Honors in Urban Studies. Instructor permission required.

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URBN 1981. Honors Thesis Workshop.

This seminar introduces students to independent research and writing skills necessary for successful and timely completion of the honors thesis. Course work includes presentation of one's own thesis drafts and peer review of classmates' work. All students who submit an approved honors thesis proposal shall enroll in URBN 1981 for the spring semester of their thesis research and writing. Concentrators may also enroll in the course during semesters 6 or 7 in preparation for the honors thesis, but must present a written proposal in place of chapters. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors in Urban Studies. S/NC

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URBN XLIST. Courses of Interest to Concentrators in Urban Studies.

Fall 2016
The following courses offered by other departments will fulfill Core Discipline and Seminar Course requirements of the Urban Studies concentration. (Please refer to the Urban Studies website to determine which requirements are fulfilled by these courses.)

Please check with the sponsoring department for times and locations.

Applied Mathematics
APMA 1650 Statistical Inference I
Archaeology and Ancient World
ARCH 1900 The Archaeology of College Hill
Cognitive, Linguistic, Psych Sciences
CLPS 0900 Quantitative Methods in Psychology
Economics
ECON 1620 Introduction to Econometrics
Education
EDUC 1430 Psychology of Race, Class, and Gender
EDUC 1650 Policy Implementation in Education
English
ENGL 0700R Modernist Cities
Environmental Studies
ENVS 1400 Sustainable Design in the Built Environment
Geological Sciences
GEOL 1320 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
History of Art and Architecture
HIAA 0770 Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
History
HIST 1140 Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period
HIST 1550 American Urban History to 1870
HIST 1965A City as Modernity: Popular Culture, Mass Consumption, Urban Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century Paris
HIST 1979L Urban History of Latin America
Public Policy
PLCY 1910 Social Entrepreneurship
Sociology
SOC 1100 Introductory Statistics for Social Research
SOC 1270 Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World
SOC 1340 Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
SOC 1640 Social Exclusion

Director

Dietrich Neumann

Professor

Howard P. Chudacoff
George L. Littlefield Professor of American History

Patrick M. Malone
Professor Emeritus of American Studies

David R. Meyer
Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Urban Studies

James A. Morone
John Hazen White Professor of Public Policy

Dietrich Neumann
Professor of History of Art and Architecture; Professor of Italian Studies; Professor of Urban Studies

Marion E. Orr
Frederick Lippitt Professor of Public Policy

Hilary Silver
Professor of Sociology and Urban Studies

Kenneth K. Wong
Walter and Leonore Annenberg Professor fo Education Policy

Associate Professor

Tamar Katz
Associate Professor of English; Associate Professor of Urban Studies

Samuel Zipp
Associate Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies

Assistant Professor

Rebecca L. Carter
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Urban Studies

Jan Mateusz Pacewicz
Assistant Professor of Urban Studies and Sociology

Urban Studies

The Urban Studies program teaches students to analyze the city, urban life, and urbanization through a variety of disciplinary lenses. Students learn where cities come from, how they grow, thrive, and decline, how they are organized, and how to construct meaningful, inclusive, secure, and sustainable places. The curriculum examines how urban problems arise, how they have been previously addressed, and how to plan cities of the future.  Concentrators enjoy the breadth of courses in American Studies, economics, history, literature, history of art and architecture, political science, sociology, and planning as well as provide in-depth courses integrating those perspectives. We introduce the fundamentals of Urban Studies scholarship as well as intense examination of an urban problem in focused seminars. These advanced seminars offer opportunities to write extensive and synthetic interdisciplinary analyses that serve as capstones to the concentration.  The program’s 10-course curriculum provides sufficient flexibility to allow students to pursue specific urban interests or to take courses in urban focus areas of Built Environment; Humanities; Social Sciences; and Sustainable Urbanism. The Program insures that students master at least one basic research methodology and perform research or fieldwork projects, which may result in an honors thesis. Fieldwork training includes working with local agencies and nonprofit organizations on practical urban problems.  Capstone projects entail original research papers in Urban Studies seminars; academically supervised video, artistic, or community service projects; and Honors Theses for eligible concentrators.

Concentrators who are especially interested in making deeper connections between their curriculum and long-term engaged activities such as internships, public service, humanitarian and development work, and many other possible forms of community involvement might consider the Engaged Scholar Program in US. The program combines preparation, experience, and reflection to offer students opportunities to enhance the integration of academic learning and social engagement.

For a concentration, the program requires ten courses selected from four course groups:

Introduction (choose one):1
City Politics
The City: An Introduction to Urban Studies
Urban Life in Providence: An Introduction
Research Methods (choose one):1
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Inference II
Quantitative Methods in Psychology
Introduction to Econometrics
Introductory Statistics for Education Research and Policy Analysis
Political Research Methods
Methods of Social Research
Introductory Statistics for Social Research 1
URBN 1500
Understanding the City through Data
Core Courses (3 courses required, in at least 3 disciplines, such as American studies, anthropology, economics, education, English, history, history of art and architecture, political science, and sociology, as well as urban planning when staffing allows)3
Cities of Sound: Place and History in American Pop Music
Urban Life: Anthropology in and of the City
Anthropology of Disasters
Urban Economics
Reading New York
Sustainable Design in the Built Environment
Environmental Stewardship and Resilience in Urban Systems
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
Nineteenth-Century Architecture
History of Rhode Island Architecture
Modern Architecture
Contemporary Architecture
City and Cinema
Introduction to Architectural Design
Film Architecture
American Urban History, 1600-1870
American Urban History, 1870-1965 (HIST 1550::American Urban History to 1870)
Jerusalem Since 1850: Religion, Politics, Cultural Heritage
City Politics
Urban Politics and Urban Public Policy
Remaking the City
Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
Social Exclusion
The United States Metropolis, 1945-2000
Regional Planning
Planning Sustainable Cities
Crime and the City
URBN 1240
In Search of the Global Black Metropolis
Seminar courses (choose three) 23
City of the American Century: The Culture and Politics of Urbanism in Postwar New York City
Policy Implementation in Education
City, Culture, and Literature in the Early Twentieth Century
Berlin: Architecture, Politics and Memory
Providence Architecture
HMAN 1971A
City Spaces, City Memories
GIS and Public Policy
POLS 1822S
Politics of Urban Trnsformation
Urban Politics
SOC 1870Q
World Cities
Geographical Analysis of Society
Urban Sociology
Fieldwork in the Urban Community
Fieldwork in Urban Archaeology and Historical Preservation
American Culture and the City
The Environment Built: Urban Environmental History and Urban Environmentalism for the 21st Century
Downtown Development
Housing and Homelessness
Rivers and Cities
The Changing American City
The Politics of Community Organizing
Urban Regimes in the American Republic
The Cultural and Social Life of the Built Environment
Representing the Twentieth-Century City
Cities in Mind: Modern Urban Thought and Theory
Bottom-up Urbanism
The City, the River, and the Sea: Social and Environmental Change at the Water's Edge
Transportation: An Urban Planning Perspective
Critical Urban Theory
Land Use Planning: The Future of the I-195 Parcels
Drawing and Creating in 2D, 3D and CAD for Architecture and Urban Design
Introduction to Urban Design and Planning: The City as System
Brown in Providence
Complementary Curriculum (Total of 2 courses required):2
1. Any course from the Introductory or Core Curriculum options above not used to fulfill another requirement
2. OR Any of the following:
Race, Gender, and Urban Politics
African-American Life in the City
Boston: A City Through Time
Popular Music and the City
Making America: Twentieth-Century U.S. Immigrant/Ethnic Literature
Oral History and Community Memory
Charles Chapin and the Urban Public Health Movement
Inequality, Sustainability, and Mobility in a Car-Clogged World
Anthropology of Homelessness
City and Sanctuary in the Ancient World
Cities and Urban Space in the Ancient World
Cities, Colonies and Global Networks in the Western Mediterranean
City and the Festival: Cult Practices and Architectural Production in the Ancient Near East
Archaeologies of the Near East
How Houses Build People
The Archaeology of College Hill
Mediterranean Cities
Tales of Two Cities: Havana - Miami, San Juan - New York
Urbanization in China: Megacities, Mass Migration, and Citizenship Struggles
Empowering Youth: Insights from Research on Urban Adolescents
Education, the Economy and School Reform
Urban Schools in Historical Perspective
Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture
Land Use and Built Environment: An Entrepreneurial View
Wild Literature in the Urban Landscape
Environmental Law and Policy
Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
The Fate of the Coast: Land Use and Public Policy in an Era of Rising Seas
Seminar on Latino Politics in the United States
Berlin: A City Strives to Reinvent Itself
Theories of Architecture from Vitruvius to Venturi
Gold, Wool and Stone: Painters and Bankers in Renaissance Tuscany
Popes and Pilgrims in Renaissance Rome
Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
Renaissance Venice and the Veneto
Contemporary American Urbanism: City Design and Planning, 1945-2000
Water and Architecture
City Senses: Urbanism Beyond Visual Spectacle
Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period
HIST 1301
Nineteen-Century Cities: Paris, London, Chicago
History of Brazil
Capitalism, Land and Water: A World History: 1848 to the present
Cities and Urban Culture in China
City as Modernity:Popular Culture, Mass Consumption, Urban Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century Paris
HIST 1970R
Colonial Modernities: Europe & the Middle East
Paris Archive: The Capital of the Nineteenth Century, 1848-1871
Japanese Cities: Tokyo and Kyoto
Modernity, Jews, and Urban Identities in Central Europe
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation
Urban Policy Challenges
Urban Revitalization: Lessons from the Providence Plan
Social Entrepreneurship
African American Politics
Infrastructure Policy
Power and Prosperity in Urban America
American Heritage: Democracy, Inequality, and Public Policy
Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World
Human Needs and Social Services
3. RISD courses approved by the Urban Studies Program each semester as applicable to the Urban Studies concentration. 3
4. Any course taken at another university in the US or abroad and approved by the Urban Studies Program each semester (2 maximum)
Total Credits10
1

There are also other statistics courses offered by other departments (e.g., Applied Mathematics, Cognitive Sciences, and Psychology). On occasion, an alternative research skills course may be approved for a specific concentration.

2

The courses provide opportunities to undertake research or fieldwork projects and all qualify as "capstone" experiences.

3

No more than two may be used to satisfy the requirements of this concentration. The RISD course is identified in the student's record at Brown by a RISD course code.


Off-Campus Courses: Some courses taken outside Brown (e.g., in study abroad programs) may be used for credit towards the concentration if the material covered directly corresponds to that taught in Brown courses, or is relevant to the complementary curriculum. Such courses will be approved each semester by the concentration advisor.

Honors

Candidates for Honors must have above average grades and shall apply for this distinction in writing to the Director of the Program by the middle of the second semester of their junior year. They shall include a cover letter with a brief statement of the intended research proposal as well as the name of the member of the Urban Studies faculty who would serve as their advisor and with whom they must work closely. Twelve courses are required for Honors concentrator, two in addition to the ten courses required for a standard program. In fall semester, honors thesis students shall enroll in an independent reading and research course with their adviser (URBN 1970 in their adviser’s section) or take an additional research skills course, and in the Spring, they shall take the Honors Thesis Workshop (URBN 1981). The candidate's final thesis must be of outstanding quality, in order to qualify for honors.