American Studies

The Department of American Studies at Brown remains committed to the interdisciplinary study of the American experience, drawing on a range of methodologies and practices to understand American society and cultures. As one of the oldest departments of American Studies, Brown’s program has an almost seventy year history of activist teaching faculty fully engaged in research; prize-winning and productive graduate students who now teach their own students around the world; and curious and exciting undergraduates who use their educations in a wide range of fields from medicine to law; from social work to library science. In 2005, in collaboration with the Center for Public Humanities, that administers the degree program, American Studies began an A.M. in Public Humanities, based on our revitalized undergraduate curriculum that fosters a publicly engaged scholarship and the John Nicholas Brown Center's mission to support and strengthen the work of arts and cultural organizations that strive to preserve, interpret, and make the humanities, meaningful and accessible. Faculty and students have together pioneered new avenues in transnational research, exploring the role of the United States in the world and the importance of the world in the United States, and expanded our research and teaching into digital scholarship.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/AmCiv/

Course usage information

AMST 0150B. Boston: A City Through Time.

This interdisciplinary seminar for first year students will examine the City of Boston from its seventeenth-century origins to the present day. Among the topics covered will be architecture, city planning, physical expansion, political leadership, urban renewal, historical preservation, park development, racial and ethnic tensions, and suburban sprawl. Includes a Boston tour. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

Course usage information

AMST 0150C. Bodies of Knowledge: Gender, Race and Science.

This course examines how science and medicine have located racial and sexual differences in the human body and gendered the natural world from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, with a focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider historical changes in the production of scientific knowledge about gender, race, and sexuality, as well as debates about who participates in scientific work. FYS

Course usage information

AMST 0150D. The West in the American Imagination.

No region has such a purchase on Americans' collective imagination as the West. No region is so drenched in misrepresentation and mythology. In this seminar, we will use fiction, film, and works of history to explore the American West as both historical reality and wellspring of collective myth. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

Course usage information

AMST 0150F. What Does A Woman Want?.

This course is an introduction to psychoanalysis and its vexed and productive relationships to women and feminism. Freud asked his famous question: "What does a woman want?" after years of clinical practice and theoretical speculation. Woman's desire remained a mystery to him, but the attempt to solve it has given rise to a rethinking of human sexuality, of gender, of social structures, and of creativity. We will read foundational texts by Freud and by feminist disciples and critics of psychoanalysis theories. The literary texts will be read as critiques of theoretical positions, as well as examples of particular historical constructions of gender. The course is broadly interdisciplinary and explores the boundaries and intersections of different disciplinary practices and frameworks. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

Course usage information

AMST 0150I. Race, Sex, and Biology: A Cultural History of Differences.

Are your race, gender, and sexual orientation biologically pre-determined? This course traces the history and cultural implications of theories of racial and sexual differences. We examine three "scientific" theories -- Darwinism, eugenics, and genetics -- in popular culture, public policies and social movements, and consider how these social constructs both empowered and disempowered women, homosexuals, and racial minorities. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0150J. The Boy Problem.

Focusing on the beginning, middle, and especially concluding decades of the 20th century, this course examines the ways in which both expert and popular discourse in the US have conflated male adolescence with social pathology and have constructed an image of the teenage boy as both symptomatic of and responsible for the nation's ills. Particular attention will be paid to issues of gender, race, and class. Primary source readings and original research will be emphasized. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

Course usage information

AMST 0150K. Culture, Communities, and Change.

Studying varied organizations such as museums, community arts groups, rock bands, and dance companies, this seminar works on three levels. Students consider the role of cultural production in local, national, and international economies and lives; think about methods for studying creative communities; and write the "biographies" of Providence cultural organizations. Issues of tourism, representation, hierarchy, urban space, and social change as well as questions about who puts culture to work and the role of cultural workers will be addressed. We will consider public humanities, engaged scholarship and community organizing as methods as we explore the Providence cultural scene. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students. FYS WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0150L. Object Histories: The Material Culture of Early America (HIST 0550A).

Interested students must register for HIST 0550A.

Fall AMST0150L S01 17444 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 0150M. 95 North: New York Fictions.

In this course we will consider humanity’s fate in twentieth-century and postmillennial Gotham. Through a broad range of literature and film that treats New York as a destination unto itself, 95 North examines the city’s representational status as our nation’s de facto capital by focusing on its most undemocratic and antisocial features (e.g., widespread disaffection, racial animus, gentrification, vice, and criminality). Writers include James Weldon Johnson, Saul Bellow, LeRoi Jones, Frank O’Hara, Samuel R. Delany, Jay McInerney, Diana Son, and Teju Cole. FYS

Course usage information

AMST 0150N. Color Me Cool.

This seminar is an introduction to graphic novels produced in the U.S. since 1985 and will train you in critically interpreting graphic novels. We will pay close attention to the relationship between the visual and textual components of the novels. While we will draw on many critical reading tools, we will use Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics to give us a shared critical vocabulary. I may use one superhero graphic novel as a point of contrast, but the course will focus on graphic novels such as Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Adrian Tomine's Shortcomings and the like. FYS

Spr AMST0150N S01 25730 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (R. Rodriguez)
Course usage information

AMST 0150P. The Teen Age: Youth, Society and Culture in Early Cold War America.

An interdisciplinary and multimedia exploration of the experiences, culture, and representation of youth in the United States from the end of World War II through the beginning of the Vietnam War. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT FYS

Fall AMST0150P S01 17037 M 3:00-5:30(15) (R. Meckel)
Course usage information

AMST 0170A. American Slavery On Screen.

Since the advent of American cinema, antebellum slavery has remained an abiding topic of interest for filmmakers and theatergoers alike. From Thomas Edison’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1903) to Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), our infatuation with the peculiar institution appears be as relevant to our nation’s ongoing discussions about race and civic belonging as it was to those antislavery debates that precipitated the Civil War. This course examines the various ideological ends to which cinematic slavery has been put to use. SOPH DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 0190A. Selling Love, Selling Sex: Romance in Popular Culture.

Where do our beliefs about love and romance come from? Is it true that "sex sells"? This course examines representations of love in advertising and popular culture from the 1920s, 1950s, 1980s and the present. We'll compare texts such as Ladie's Home Journal, I Love Lucy, and Dynasty to Maxim, Desperate Housewives, and Mad Men. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190B. Histories of Memory/Memories of History.

This course examines the role of historical narratives in popular culture and politics, using memoir, films, newspapers, political cartoons, and scholarship to think about how such narratives build and break local, national, and transnational communities, serve and interrupt different kinds of political agendas, and reform the way we orient ourselves to the way we live and to those with whom we live. How is the past made? By whom? Topics will include the Holocaust, the Vietnam War, Columbus, memorials, and holidays. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190C. American (Mass)culinities: Sexuality, Race and Aesthetics.

This course explores masculinity in American popular cultures since 1945. Starting with theories of homosociality, racial and gender formation at the turn of the century, to modern and post-modern cultural productions that visualize or narrativize "masculinity" including novels, films, and video. Through frameworks of psychoanalytic theory, queer theory and critical race theory we think about masculinity as narrative, as a set of discourses, an epistemology, an aesthetic and privileged form of Americana. How we understand the politics of race and sexuality through images of male bodies? What it means to decouple masculinity and men? What are the relationships between gender/genre? Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190D. Popular Music and the City.

This course will examine the relationship between popular music and its sociocultural context by concentrating on three urban music forms; blues, soul, and hip hop. Readings will focus on: (1) concepts such as audiences, the music industry, cultural infrastructure, and race; (2) processes such as urbanization, demographic change, and the politicization of popular music. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190E. It's the End of the World As We Know It: Zombie and Apocalypse Narratives in American Pop Culture.

Zombie narratives originated as part of racist colonial ideologies prevalent in Haiti and the Caribbean, and have since become a means of social and political critique. This course charts how the zombie has been re-appropriated and redeployed in American culture. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we examine zombie and apocalypse narratives in film, literature, comics, and video games. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190F. Beyond the Tourist Trap: The Past, Present, and Future of Asian American Urban Spaces.

Beyond the lure of the "exotic" food, cultural festivals, and distinctive architecture of Chinatowns, Little Tokyos, Filipinotowns, Koreatowns, Little Saigons, and Little Indias, Asian American spaces are at once historical remnants of an exclusionary past and the current embodiment of the diversity of ethnic communities. This class seeks to understand such spaces by considering the people involved — those within and outside of the community — and the complex relationships among community groups. Texts will include histories, maps, works by urban planners, and a field trip to Boston's Chinatown. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190G. The Fringe is the Fabric: Anti-Immigrant Movements in the United States.

This course traces nativist anti-immigrant movements and violence in the United States. Starting in the colonial period and ending with contemporary issues, the course demonstrates how anti-immigrant movements occur across place and time and serve to police the boundaries of U.S. citizenship. The course relies on fiction, documentary films and other historical texts to highlight continuing violent conflicts. We focus on the use of "vigilante" violence and put contemporary discussions of immigration in a new frame. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190H. Junkies, Robots, and Fight Clubs: Revisioning the "American Dream" in US Popular Culture.

From fembots to fightclubs, this course explores our obsession with revisions of the American Dream. We examine film and literary translations of three recycled stories—Rags-to-Riches, the Open Road, and Domestic Bliss—to better understand how we narrate the "American" experience and consider how these nationalizing narratives construct race, class, and gender. Films and texts include "Stepford Wives," "Easy Rider," and "Wall Street." Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190I. Re-Thinking Political Aesthetics: Beauty, Modernity, and Justice in the Americas.

The United States and the Americas have always been spaces of intertwined artistic, political, and religious expression. Yet, in the growing field of political aesthetics, works of European modernism are prized while examples from the Americas are rarely mentioned. This course examines the philosophical texts used to frame the field of political aesthetics, as well as food in the colonial diet of New Spain, painting during the Civil War, photography and the New Negro movement, jazz and the Beat generation, and other case studies of American expression that engage, complicate and re-construct the relationship between art and politics. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190J. Four-Color Creatures: Race, Gender, and Monstrosity in American Comic Books and Popular Culture.

This course explores the relationship between race, gender, and monstrosity in American popular culture, particularly in comic books and graphic novels. Utilizing the concept of the monster as a metaphor, we examine the intersection of these discourses to interrogate how monstrosity informs our collective understanding of the other and affects the representation of race and gender in contemporary print ephemera and visual culture. To compliment our understanding of these materials, we engage with scholarship in the emerging fields of Monster Studies and Comic Studies to highlight the way that these artifacts embody larger trends within American society. WRIT.

Course usage information

AMST 0190K. The American War/Vietnam War: Politics, Struggle, and the Construction of History in the US/Vietnam.

What Americans call the "Vietnam War," the Vietnamese remember as the "War of Resistance against the United States for National Salvation." This class seeks to explore multiple American and Vietnamese perspectives on a prolonged conflict that profoundly shaped the nations' political, social, and cultural landscapes. We focus on differences and similarities in Vietnamese and American interpretations of the origins, conduct and denouement of the war. We examine war memories through memoirs, monuments, movies, documentaries, magazines, and newspapers, as well as in foreign and domestic policies. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190S. Los Angeles Plays Itself: Culture and Critique in the City of Angels.

Explores the history of culture produced in and about Los Angeles during the last century, examining representations of the city in literature, film, television, music, and theory. Texts ranging from detective novels to teen dramas to hip-hop songs will reveal the ongoing conversations and conflicts among Los Angeles's diverse inhabitants that have shaped its physical, cultural, and social landscapes. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190T. Talking Social Reform: From Populism and Progressivism to Obama and McCain.

This course argues that two broad "languages" of social reform, coming out of the Populist and Progressive Movements of the late nineteenth century, have shaped the ways in which Americans understand politics. Students consider how the possibilities for contemporary reform and change have been informed by these languages. We will examine political texts discussing the New Deal, the eugenics movement, the Cold War, liberalism, and the New Left, among others. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190U. Sports Mediated: Athletics and the Production of Culture in 20th Century America.

When we watch sports, we're watching more than a game. Newspapers, radio, television, and the internet produce athletic spectacles within certain cultural boundaries determined by profits, as well as by race, gender and class. The course questions how sports media played a generative role in late twentieth century American culture through three case studies: Michael Jordan's rise to sports stardom; the emergence of skateboarding as an "alternative" sport; and controversies surrounding transgender and transsexual athletes. Non-sports fans are welcome and encouraged! Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. Instructor permission required. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190V. Reading the City: Literary Tourism in New York, Los Angeles, Santo Domingo and Manila.

What shapes our conception of a city we haven't visited? Is it the novels we read or the films we watch? How do our ideas change when we tour or live there? This course investigates New York, Los Angeles, Santo Domingo, and Manila through the various social, political and sexual experiences portrayed in novels, creative nonfiction, poetry, and film. Mindful of our own role as reader-tourists, we will compare depictions of reading, visiting, touring, and living in cities especially with regards to issues of identity and its transformation. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190W. Displaying Activism Then and Now: Making an Exhibition for Social Justice.

We will investigate the possibilities for activism and social relevance through museum exhibitions. We will create an exhibition at the John Hay Library that displays historical and contemporary activism, based on student choices of possible movements including queer rights, animal rights, and environmental concerns. Students choose objects, write labels, and act as curators for the exhibit. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190X. Gendered Mobility: Migrant Women Workers in a Globalized Economy.

Today's women workers migrate at a historically unprecedented rate. This class looks at Third World women who migrate for work in global cities. We examine their experiences through the intersectional lens of gender, race, class, and nationality. We also question the social, political, and economic forces that drive migration and draw women workers to specific destinations. Finally, we will look at the multiple inequalities these workers confront and the ways in which they negotiate and challenge them. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190Y. Dead or Alive?: The American West in Popular Culture.

This course traces the imagined Western frontier as seen in television, film, photographs, museum exhibits, art, tourism, amusement parks, performance, video games, and science fiction. It explores these imagined spaces through the lenses of popular and visual culture, placing the West within the larger social, cultural, economic, and political histories of the US. Both real and imagined, these images defined and consolidated the identities of Westerners and those who wanted to be Westerners. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0190Z. Queering the Archive: History and the Politics of Identity.

How is history made? Who makes it? Who benefits from how stories of the past are told? How might we queer the making of histories and how could this influence our futures? This course follows feminists, queer theory scholars, and activists in their journeys to critically analyze historical archives and open up queer readings of the past. We will spend time with variety of cultural texts including Cheryl Dunye’s film The Watermelon Woman, Lara Kramer’s performance piece NGS (Native Girl Syndrome), and Octavia Butler’s novel Kindred to think about historical knowledge production and its relationship to identity formation. WRIT DPLL

Spr AMST0190Z S01 25933 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (V. Thomas)
Course usage information

AMST 0191B. Race and Nation in the U.S.: Belonging, Longing, and Resistance.

This course examines how representations of race continue to be critical to the formation of the American nation. We will look at cultural and historical texts that grapple with how “race” is used to (1) define who does and does not belong to the U.S., (2) configure feelings of longing for a homeland, and (3) resist dominant narratives of national inclusion through visual art, performance, and stand-up comedy. The course will use Middle Eastern Americans as its primary case study of these larger themes, and will also incorporate many readings that touch on African American and Latinx experiences. WRIT DPLL

Spr AMST0191B S01 25957 MW 8:30-9:50(02) (I. Yalzadeh)
Course usage information

AMST 0191G. TV on History: Representations of the American Past on Commercial Television.

This course explores commercial television's influence on our understanding of the American past and the way that this sense of history, in turn, helps audiences to form cultural and political identities. We will discuss foundational methods for critical analysis of television as we use this inquiry to examine some of the guiding themes of American Studies. This class, which has a significant viewing component, traces the evolution of history-based programming in many genres and considers the message and impact of programs such as Ken Burns' Civil War, Roots, Colonial House, and Mad Men. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191H. "My Body, My Choice"?: Reproductive Politics in the U.S. since Roe v. Wade.

From waiting periods to mandatory ultrasounds, a record number of provisions aimed at restricting women's access to abortion were enacted in 24 U.S. states in 2011. Dubbed the "war on women" by numerous observers, these legislative battles evidence the difficulty in determining reproduction's "proper" place in governmental politics. But is there more to this battle than abortion? Beginning with Roe v. Wade, this course explores how welfare, labor, citizenship, the family, religion, and activism alter mainstream conceptions of reproductive politics. Using a variety of sources, including films and websites, we will consider what an expansive reproductive freedom might entail. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191I. Identities on the Move: South Asian Americans In Popular Culture.

Interdisciplinary course looks at the migration, representation and cultural productions of the South Asian diaspora in the United States. We'll examine how category of "South Asian" was created as well as the ramifications of such a label: what does it mean to be South Asian in the United States? Through the examination of academic texts, as well as literature, television and film, we'll explore how South Asian Americans navigate the United States while at the same time, maintaining (or, in some cases, disrupting) connections to countries in the South Asian subcontinent. Enrollment limited to 17. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191J. These Are The Breaks? Rethinking Black Performance in the 20th Century.

In this course students will look critically at cabaret, documentary film, theatre, dance, popular music, and museum exhibitions, rethinking the ways that Black performances have been configured in debates about American identity in the 20th Century. Rather than try to understand Black performance, and performers, in reductive aesthetic and political frameworks, students will read and write about them as heterogeneous and complex. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191K. New Jack(ed) Cinema: Negotiating Race, Criminality, and Place in the Hollywood Film.

This interdisciplinary course engages critically with film to examine issues of race and criminality, and to better understand our collective, spatial, and personal identities. We study a sub-genre of films, from the 1990s, and investigate how these films interact and intersect with other cultural texts and narratives of race, criminality, sexuality, gender, and the American dream. Films studied include "Colors"; "New Jack City"; "Clockers"; "Boyz 'n the Hood"; and "Menace II Society"; while readings come from film studies, sociology, history, memoir, and policy studies. Enrollment limited to 17 first-year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191L. Are You Creative?: The Rise of a Modern Virtue.

Are you creative, or, even, a "creative"? Do you plan to be an entrepreneur, a writer, or an artist? Today, "creativity" is championed by education activists, fringe artists, and corporate CEOs alike. This course gives a critical perspective by tracing the biography of an idea through various fields. We will look everywhere for signs of creativity and focus on the relationship between creativity, work, and economic development, taking of Providence, RI, the "Creative Capital" as an example. We will talk to people involved in various aspects of the city's creative strategy to observe the effects of this powerful idea. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191M. The Vietnam War and Visual Culture.

This course examines how our understanding of one of the most mediated armed conflicts of the twentieth century has changed. Why has "Vietnam" become a metaphor for imperial wars and how has it figured in cultural production within and beyond the United States? Considering photographs, films, and personal narratives beginning during the war and continuing into the present, we recognize the fictive and flexible nature of history and how even the worst experiences are made available for collective memory and mass consumption. The course works to decenter the United States and takes into account long-range ramifications and multiple voices. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191N. Beyond Entrepreneurs, Adoptees, and G.I. Wives: Korean American Experiences.

What does it mean to be Korean American? This course explores the historical and contemporary experiences of people of Korean descent in the United States. In the broader context of U.S.-Korean/Asian relations and through the lenses of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, this course will examine the connections and differences in the lives of diverse Korean populations. The composition of these populations ranges from adoptees, military wives, and entrepreneurs to secondary migrants from Latin America. Throughout the semester, students will be familiarized with the central themes in immigration and ethnic studies such as diaspora, transnationalism, racial formation, and community formation. Enrollment limited to 17 first years and sophomores.

Course usage information

AMST 0191O. Revolting Bodies: Aesthetics, Representation, and Popular Culture.

Our understanding of ourselves and others are formed by visual images and bodily feelings that are social in origin. They make us feel (un)comfortable, sublime, ridiculous, grotesque. In this course we will examine how the materiality of the body grounds our metaphors about identity and subject formation. This course moves between cultural studies, queer theory, disability studies, science fiction, drama and film asking how representations structure they way we "know" and "see" bodies. Ultimately we will explore how revolting bodies--bodies that disgust, repulse, signal their difference--can become bodies in revolt--bodies that resist and imagine new possibilities. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191P. Beyond Chinatown: The Past, Present, and Future of Asian American Spaces.

Beyond the "exotic" dishes, cultural festivals, and distinct architecture of Chinatowns, Little Tokyos, Little Manilas/Filipinotowns, Koreatowns, Little Saigons, and Little Indias, Asian American spaces are both historical remnants of racial oppression and the current home of diverse ethnic communities. Using field trips, films, first person accounts and scholarly explorations, this class examines such spaces by considering the people involved—tourists and residents—and how their complex relationship creates urban and suburban ethnic spaces. Students will workshop and revise papers as well as gain a grounding in approaches to Asian American studies, urban studies, and to the study of public spaces. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191Q. Disbelieving the Evidence: Popular Opposition to 20th Century Public Health Initiatives.

Why do Americans reject programs that make them healthier? Many of the most effective public health initiatives in the 20th century encountered deep resistance. This course explores three initiatives (vaccination, fluoride, and black lung) that continue to generate skepticism or outright opposition. Students will practice several different styles of writing intended for different audiences, including an op-ed and a Wikipedia entry. This writing-designated course will appeal to students of public health, politics, and those interested in the social impact of medical research, as well as those wanting practice in science writing. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191R. Fat, Messy, and Late: Unregulated Bodies in American Capitalism.

This course examines disorganized bodies in 19th and 20th century US history and how slenderness, neatness, and timeliness became virtues. Through these lenses we study capitalism working upon individual bodies; the way these "moral virtues" generate forms of self-regulation; and the way these forms of self-regulation perpetuate the status quo. We draw upon history, sociology, anthropology, and critical theory, starting each section in the 19th century and moving to the present. Using our personal experiences, we examine how belief systems become internalized. This interdisciplinary course welcomes community health and biology concentrators as well as humanities and social science concentrators. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191S. Visualizing the Middle East: From National Geographic to the Arab Spring.

American visual media remains flooded with images, inspiring and hopeful, or horrifying and terrifying, of the peoples and places of the Near East. By examining National Geographic photography, Hollywood cinema, televised news programs, and images and videos encountered online, we examine how visual culture has both reflected and actively helped shape the relationship between the U.S. and the Near East. Students will experiment with a diverse methods of visual analysis, work with a class Tumblr site, and write and revise a series of essays. Enrollment limited to 17 first year students and sophomores. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191T. American Identities: Memoir and Autobiography in the Twentieth Century.

How do we think about our own place in history? This writing-intensive seminar examines how individual Americans have explored the relationship between their identity and historical events, and introduces the legitimacy of using individual experiences to understand history. Themes include the gendering of domestic and public space, the formation of identity within families, class alignments, societal expectations of gender/sexuality, how American exceptionalism manifests itself at the individual level, and narrative (un)reliability. Our discussions center on autobiographies, memoirs, and films from authors such as Audre Lorde, Harry Crews, Malcolm X, Alison Bechdel, and Tobias Wolff. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191U. Imagining the American Mind.

How are theories about our minds and brains represented in American culture? We use literature and film, psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, history and sociology to investigate how we imagine our minds, and the consequences of those representations for our ideas about race and gender, for our social lives and responsibilities, for our means to communicate to one another and, even, to know ourselves. Writing in different formats, students bridge the gap between the humanities and the human sciences. Concentrators in biology and neuroscience consider the cultural history of their research while humanities/social science students explore how culture ties to science. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191V. American Capitalism and Its Critics.

In the wake of the Great Recession, many Americans have become disenchanted with capitalism, wondering whether the market economy harms more than it helps. This course introduces students to writers, artists, and activists from the past who shared that feeling and in plays, essays, films, and photographs protested the rise of capitalism in the United States. We will explore issues of power, poverty, profit, and equality through in-class discussions and four writing assignments. Students interested in history, art, literature, and economics will learn more about class, capitalism, and the history of American politics. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191W. American Indian Law and Legacies.

From the U.S. Constitution to MTV and Urban Outfitters, this course traces the history and legacies of American Indian law and policy. Using a case studies approach, students will read legal documents alongside film, television, literature, blogs, poetry, photography, fashion, news articles, manifestos, and Twitter to explore the ways in which American Indian law and policy manifests in the daily lives of contemporary Indian people and Native nations. All students welcome! This course will be of special interest to those studying indigenous histories and cultures, American government, representations/memory, and law. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191X. Troubled Pasts and Visual Cultural: Comparative Models from Providence to Pretoria.

This course examines the intersections of visual culture, commemorative politics, and individual and collective memories to analyze the politics of memory. We will look at debates over formal and informal engagements with the memory of three traumatic events: the "Dirty War" in Argentina, South African apartheid, and September 11th, 2001 in the US. Looking at the past as contested ground we will explore the challenges, ethics, and controversies around representing these events across a variety of mediums including film, art, music, and memorials. This class will be of interest to students of visual culture, cultural politics, and memory studies. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0191Y. Cradle of Democracy?: Race, Childhood, and U.S. National Identity.

From Elian Gonzalez to Trayvon Martin, children play an important role in political narratives concerning domestic and international affairs. Engaging with a range of texts—including blogs, films, and online exhibits—students will consider how the idea of childhood and the bodies of children have constructed our gendered and racialized sense of self. Such ideas about difference and belonging also emerge through children’s material culture, and so students will create a children’s book and multimedia website as well as visit the Providence Children’s Museum. WRIT DPLL

Fall AMST0191Y S01 16774 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (F. Bevel)
Course usage information

AMST 0191Z. Food and Gender in U.S. Popular Culture.

Why is salad coded as feminine and steak as masculine? This course examine how gender is constructed and performed in sites across the U.S. food system, taking in farm fields, supermarkets, home kitchens, and restaurants. We explore food production, cooking, feeding, eating, and dieting, through a variety of food texts, including cookbooks, advertisements, and the Food Network. We will engage all of our senses (especially taste!), as we explore how gender intersects with other significant cultural categories and shapes everyday food experiences in the United States. WRIT DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 0192A. Unsettled Things: Objects and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America.

This course explores the history of collecting, with a focus on local museum and university collections. College Hill is home to numerous accumulations of things, from Civil War relics to Old Master paintings and fragments of taxidermy. Where did these objects come from? Why were they collected? How have their meanings and uses changed over time? How might we reconsider them today? Students will examine objects; read about collecting and the development of natural history, anthropology, history, and fine art; write research papers that incorporate material culture methodology; and co-curate an exhibition. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 0192B. Remixing Racial Codes: Interraciality in Literature and Film Post-1945.

Through a reading of select critical theory, literary texts, and films, students will look critically at the ways in which interracial relationships have been prescribed and figured in U.S. culture post-1945. Decentering the dominant narrative of black-white miscegenation, we will give equal attention to the role that Asian bodies play in complicating this binary. We will also investigate the potentiality of texts to challenge social norms or reclaim injurious identities. Authors include Lillian Smith, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Celeste Ng. Films include Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), Snow Falling on Cedars (1999) and Beyond the Lights (2014). WRIT DPLL

Fall AMST0192B S01 16690 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (S. Enzerink)
Course usage information

AMST 0192C. Race in the Museum.

From the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture to Walt Disney World’s EPCOT theme park, this course examines how museums and cultural institutions address issues of race and identity. We will think critically about the display of race and difference in sites of leisure and consider how such institutions can be reclaimed as spaces for dialogue and action. At the end of the course, students will propose an original exhibition plan exploring these issues. This course will be useful for students interested in public history, visual culture, and critical race studies. WRIT DPLL

Spr AMST0192C S01 25954 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (A. Pullagura)
Course usage information

AMST 0192D. Social Memory and the 60s: From Nixon to Nostalgia.

The 1960s were watershed years in the US. From the Civil Rights movement to the Vietnam War, women’s liberation to Woodstock, a series of revolutions occurred during this decade. How do we remember the 1960s? How do we understand its legacies embodied in texts, images, music, memorials, and rituals? This class uses the interdisciplinary methods of memory studies to answer these questions by analyzing primary sources and learning new collaborative research methods. Students interested in sociology, anthropology, and history will find new approaches to enduring questions about how societies remember and forget crucial events and experiences. DPLL WRIT

Fall AMST0192D S01 17407 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (A. Anderson)
Course usage information

AMST 0253. Religion, Politics, and Culture in America (HIST 0253).

Interested students must register for HIST 0253.

Fall AMST0253 S01 17464 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 1010. Introduction to American Studies: American Icons.

Why do certain American photos, novels, and films become 'iconic?' What does the very word 'icon' mean? Studying a collection of American images, texts, places, and practices, this course investigates the key themes of American Studies. DPLL LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1250A. American Folk Art.

Examines material expressions of folk culture in America from the 18th century to the present. Focuses on the study of regionally idiosyncratic artifacts decorated beyond necessity and emphasizes the importance of the cultural context in which they were made and used. Visits to local burying grounds and museum collections during class and a Saturday field trip. Concludes with an original research project and final paper.

Course usage information

AMST 1250B. Gravestones and Burying Grounds.

Students examine gravestones and burying grounds as material evidence of American cultural history. Themes include the forms of written language and visual imagery in colonial New England, changing roles of women and minorities in society, historical craft practices, implications of stylistic change, attitudes towards death and bereavement, and the material evidence of discrete cultural traditions. Includes field trips.

Course usage information

AMST 1250E. The Neoclassical Ideal in America, 1775-1840.

This course examines the art, architecture, and domestic furnishing of America in the early national period. It focuses on visual culture as a reflection of the new nation's self image as a democratic and enlightened society. Includes class visits to local burying grounds and museum collections, and a Saturday Boston field trip.

Course usage information

AMST 1250F. Topics in Material Culture: Houses and Their Furnishings in Early America.

Old houses and the objects used to furnish them are interpreted as material evidence of domestic life in colonial and early national America. Through slide lectures and field trips, this class examines Providence's historic buildings, museum collections, and public archives as primary documents in the study of cultural history. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1250G. Topics in Material Culture Studies: The Arts and Crafts Movement in America 1880-1920.

In the 1880s an international movement to reform the design of buildings and their furnishings took hold in America. Its proponents wanted to improve visual life in America by advocating the pride and honesty of craftsmanship and by embracing the ideal of unity of design--by which means they hoped to change the way Americans lived and worked. This course examines the architecture, furniture, silver, ceramics, and printed works of the Arts & Crafts Movement in America from 1880 -1920. Understanding and interpreting material life is emphasized through local field trips and first-hand experience with the collections of the RISD Museum.

Fall AMST1250G S01 16452 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (R. Emlen)
Course usage information

AMST 1500A. Research and Transnational Communities: Qualitative Fieldwork Methods.

This course will equip students with the skills to design and implement their own transnational American Studies or Public Humanities research project. We will consider different qualitative social science research methods including, ethnographic participant observation, formal and informal interview techniques, and survey data analysis. Students will learn how different methodologies lend unique insights into specific research questions, and will be able to identify different methodological bases for empirical findings across diverse transnational social problems. Throughout the course, we will explicitly engage the personal, public, and ethical concerns involved with conducting research with transnational communities, including researcher positionality, privilege, ethics, and responsibility.

Course usage information

AMST 1500B. Broadway Modern: Race, Gender, Class, and the American Musical.

[WINTERSESSION] What is musical theatre? What makes the Broadway musical quintessentially "American"? And what do these brightly colored, mesmerizing, beguiling spectacles reveal about the troublesome workings of race and class, gender and sex, nation and world? Searching for answers to these and other questions, students in this course will survey, critique, and theorize the complicated, strange, and often disturbing history of the genre, from its 19th century roots in minstrel performances, Shakespeare, and European opera, through the heyday of the mid-20th century, and, finally, right up to to the current, provocative productions of "Hamilton" and "Shuffle Along." DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1500C. Critical Approaches to Global Humanitarianism in Thailand.

Course will introduce students to conceptual and analytical frameworks that question the sources of power and privilege inherent in contemporary global social action. Concerned with the increasing prevalence of market-based solutions to social problems, this course takes the framework the “industrial complex” its starting point of inquiry. This lens has been productive to understand the systems through which the state, market, and civil society converge to achieve both social and entrepreneurial goals. The course will explore three dimensions of market-based solutions to global humanitarian problems in Thailand, ultimately interested in benefits, opportunities, constraints and/or unintended consequences that global humanitarianism may have.

Course usage information

AMST 1510. Museum Collecting and Collections.

This course will explore and examine the methods, practices, and theory of collections management in a museum setting including collections development, museum registration methods, cataloging, collections care, and interpretation. Through readings, discussion, workshops, site visits, and exhibitions, students will explore what it means to be physically and intellectually responsible for museum objects. This course places heavy emphasis on experiential learning and will include several project-based assignments.

Fall AMST1510 S01 17077 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (R. Potvin)
Course usage information

AMST 1520. Technology and Material Culture in America: The Urban Built Environment.

A slide-illustrated lecture course that examines the development of the urban landscape. Covers American building practices and the effects of human-made structures on our culture. Examines technological and behavioral aspects of architectural design and urban development. Topics include housing, factories, commercial buildings, city plans, transportation networks, water systems, bridges, parks, and waterfronts. A companion course to AMST 1530.

Course usage information

AMST 1530. Technology and Material Culture in America: The Automobile in American Life.

Examines the cultural significance of the automobile. Employs materials and methodologies from various disciplines to study this machine and the changes it has produced in our society and our landscape. Slide-illustrated lectures cover such topics as the assembly line, automobile design, roadside architecture, suburbs, auto advertisements, and the car in popular culture.

Course usage information

AMST 1550. Methods in Public Humanities.

A survey of the skills required for public humanities work. Presentations from local and national practitioners in a diverse range of public humanities topics: historic preservation, oral history, exhibition development, archival and curatorial skills, radio and television documentaries, public art, local history, and more. Enrollment limited to 50.

Course usage information

AMST 1560. Comparative Cultural Heritage: Hong Kong and New England.

This 8-week summer course begins with four weeks in Hong Kong, exploring the ways that private individuals, institutions, and government have preserved the city’s cultural heritage, examining the conflict and negotiation of economic and political interests in urban renewal and heritage conservation and preservation. The second four weeks are in Providence, where students will explore the history and present-day philosophy and politics of preserving sites and stories from Colonial times to the present, exploring historical archaeology, historic preservation, museum exhibition, and oral history. This is a double credit course. Enrollment limited to nine Brown students and nine from Hong Kong. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 1570. Site- Specific Writing in Brown's Historical Spaces.

Using on-site writing techniques, students will write, workshop, and direct research-based site-specific short plays to be performed by local actors in historic Providence mansions. Class discussion will explore local history (class includes a walking tour), performance texts, and types of site-specific work. Students will emerge having written and directed a research-based work in a National Historical Landmark. Enrollment limited to 13. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 1580A. Artists and Scientists as Partners: Theory to Practice (TAPS 1281Z).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1281Z.

Course usage information

AMST 1596. Education Beyond the Classroom Walls: Teaching and Learning in Cultural Institutions.

Explore teaching and learning beyond classroom walls. We will focus on teaching/learning in cultural institutions (museums, historic houses, children’s museums). We will begin with our own experiences with this kind of learning, then explore the pedagogical methods, underlying philosophies and learning theories, debates, and goals of informal education today. What kind of learning happens in cultural institutions? How does it compare to learning in schools? Which pedagogical methods are most common in cultural institutions today and how do they align with stated goals? What are the debates within the field and what are our visions for the future of the field?

Course usage information

AMST 1600A. Global Macho: Race, Gender, and Action Movies.

Carefully sifting through an oft-overlooked but globally popular genre - the muscle-bound action - this class asks: what sort of work does an action movie do? What is the role of women in this genre? How should we scrutinize these supposedly empty trifles of the global popular? How should we think critically about movies that feature - often without apology - a deep, dangerous obsession with masculinity, patriarchy, war, and lawlessness, with violence outside of civil society. In short, from Hollywood to Hong Kong to Rio to Paris to Mexico City, what makes the action movie genre tick? DPLL, WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1600B. Global China: Flows, Forces, and Friction.

This course will provide an overview of contemporary issues surrounding Global China, including the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, as well as their regional and global influence through migration, culture, multinational trade, and labor manufacturing. We will study institutions (the government, family, and education), forces of globalization (rural to urban migration, ethnicity and identity, human trafficking, diaspora communities, labor production and consumption, and cultures of resistance (underground music, human rights movements, radical internet blogging, environmental justice activism and Chinese contemporary art). DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1600C. The Anti-Trafficking Savior Complex: Saints, Sinners, and Modern-Day Slavery.

How can we understand the global movement to combat human trafficking within critical frameworks on "industrial complexes"? Drawing from scholarship on the prison industrial, non-profit industrial, and white savior complexes this course examines human trafficking through the lens of race, class, gender, and national forms of power and subjectivity. Readings will problematize the so-called saints and sinners of the movement, investigating various global helping projects that exist to stop "modern day slavery." DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1600D. Sports in American Society.

This course seeks to understand, analyze, and criticize sport--seen here as one of the primary institutions in the lives of Americans. Working from the basis of sporting events in the Durkheimian sense of symbolic community, we will elevate them to the status of religious and educational institutions in our everyday lives. Using the primary lenses of gender and race this class examines sports at five different levels--professional, Olympic, NCAA, scholastic, and youth--and uses the "Big 3" sports of baseball, basketball, and football to understand how athletics have impacted, and will continue to impact, American Society. DPLL

Spr AMST1600D S01 25269 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (H. Levey Friedman)
Course usage information

AMST 1600E. Performance, Politics, and Engagement (TAPS 1680).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1680.

Course usage information

AMST 1601. Health and Healing in American History.

Surveys the history of American medicine in its social and political contexts, including changing understandings of disease, treatment practices, and medical institutions. Focuses on how gender and race have informed how patients and healers have made sense out of pain and disease. WRIT

Fall AMST1601 S01 16453 MWF 11:00-11:50(02) (D. Weinstein)
Course usage information

AMST 1610A. American Advertising: History and Consequences.

Traces the history of American advertising, particularly in the 20th century, to understand the role advertising plays in our culture. Topics include the rise of national advertising, the economics of the advertising industry, the relation of advertising to consumption, the depiction of advertising in fiction and film, and broadcast advertising. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1610C. American Popular Culture.

This interdisciplinary course examines the history of popular culture in the industrialized United States, drawing on methodologies from different fields, and using a variety of evidence, including minstrel song sheets, amusement parks, television, and romance novels. We look at the audience, the producers and the texts presented by American popular culture both domestically and internationally. LILE WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1610F. Asian America Since 1945.

Since the end of WWII the Asian American community has undergone radical transformations. This course will examine the shifting political and cultural status of Asians in America, the demographic revolution in Asian America ushered in with the Immigration Reform Act of 1964, Asian Americans and globalization of the US economy, and Asian Americans in contemporary US race relations. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1610G. Asian American History.

This course focuses on Asian America as a historical subject and on Asian Americans as makers of their own histories. It is loosely chronological but principally organized around the emergence of an Asian American historical voice. Films, personal accounts, and historical analyses will be read. Many of the texts feature photographs, which we will engage primarily as historical documents. Examining the material realities they represent or suggest, we will also probe their political, economic and cultural dimensions. As weapon, commodity and heirloom, photography has been integral to shaping Asian Americans' visibility and therefore their social position in the United States. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1610H. Asian Immigration to the Americas.

Asian America is an extremely diverse community including fifth generation Californians and yesterday's arrivals: Hmong from Laos, Indians from Guyana, Japanese from Brazil, native born Americans, immigrants, refugees, adoptees, doctors, garment workers, physicists, poets, and storekeepers. The patterns of migration and settlement from Asia to the Americas-U.S. and Canada, the Caribbean and Latin America-over the past two hundred years are examined.

Course usage information

AMST 1610I. Beyond Chinatown: Asian Communities in the United States.

From Manila villages in 18th-century Louisiana, to Punjabi-Mexican families in early 20th-century California, to today's "little Saigons" and Asianam cyberspace, Asian Americans have built a diverse array of communities in the U.S. The historical circumstances, social forces, and political movements that have shaped these communities are examined. Particular attention paid to the dynamics of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality in the development of these communities.

Course usage information

AMST 1610J. Body and Soul: Health and Sexuality, 1860-1920.

Examines the history of women/gender in relation to discourses about sexuality (both physical and mental) in the era of the Civil War through the progressive era. It samples a variety of ideas and movements, including efforts to regulate sexuality and initiatives to advance women into the medical and "helping" professions. Specialization is given to issues of class, race and ethnicity. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1610L. Child Welfare in Twentieth-Century America.

Examines the evolution of child welfare in the United States from its origins in the late 19th century through its purported crisis in the late 20th. Specifically, will trace the history of policies and programs aimed at providing support for dependent children, and at dealing with deviant or delinquent children. Emphasis will be on understanding the social, cultural, and political contexts in which child welfare was formed and transformed during this century.

Course usage information

AMST 1610M. Childhood and Adolescence in American Literature and Culture.

A survey of how changing ideas of childhood and the "new" construction of the category of adolescence are mirrored in American fiction and poetry from the Puritans to the present. Among the writers considered are Anne Bradstreet, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Henry James, and J. D. Salinger. Provides a comparative cultural perspective by studying works by Wordsworth, Dickens, Pater, and Kosinski.

Course usage information

AMST 1610N. Citizenship, Race, and National Belonging in the Americas.

What is the relationship between citizenship, national belonging, and ideologies of race in the Americas? In what ways do gender and class differences affect this relationship? Focusing on these questions, this course compares the racial and social experience of the U.S. Latinos with that of the populations in various countries in the hemisphere.

Course usage information

AMST 1610O. Civil Rights and the Legacy of the 1960s.

Recent mainstream interpretations of the 1960s tend to neglect the presence and participation of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the various movements for civil rights. Using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on historical, autobiographical and contemporary texts, films, and documentaries, this course examines the Latino experience during the Civil Rights period and explores its legacy today in the lives of Latino and other racial minorities.

Course usage information

AMST 1610P. Class, Culture, and Politics.

Surveys the working class and radical movements that have challenged the ruling economic, political, and cultural systems. Major topics include the railroad uprising of 1877, the Knights of Labor, sexual utopianism and spiritualism, black nationalism, the Socialist and Communist parties, women's and gay liberation, and the modern ecology movement. Emphasizes cultures. Prerequisite: At least one semester of a college-level course in U.S. history or literature. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1610R. History of Sexuality in the United States.

This course introduces students to the history of sexuality in America from the colonial era to the present. This is not only a history of gay and lesbian communities. Rather it builds on those histories to create a portrait of how Americans, gay and straight, lived sexual lives in relationship to disciplines of knowledge, cultural and political institutions, and popular culture.

Course usage information

AMST 1610S. Immigration to the United States from the Sixteenth Century to the Present.

Explores 350 years of immigration to what is now the U.S. Organization is both chronological and topical. We will reconstruct and compare the major waves of immigration, consider causal theories of migration, examine U.S. immigration policy over time, debate the economic impact of immigration, and discuss the institutions and strategies that immigrants have designed to facilitate adaptation.

Course usage information

AMST 1610U. Introduction to Latino Studies.

A survey of the ways that aspects of the histories and cultures of the U.S. and Latin America have contributed to shape public policy issues and to differentiate the experiences of U.S. Latinos. Among the questions guiding class discussions: What are the implications of grouping nationally, racially, and socially heterogeneous populations under one term, such as Hispanic or Latino? To what extent do "ethnic labels" foster alliances among different ethnic or racial groups? DPLL LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1610V. Introduction to Latino Studies II: Culture and Identity.

Explores the ways in which gender roles and intergenerational expectations-diversified by race, class, national identity, and citizenship status-shape the varied identities and cultural experiences of Latinos and Latinas in different decades of the post-World War II period in the U.S.

Course usage information

AMST 1610W. Latino Immigration in the 20th Century.

The purpose of this course is to examine the political, economic, cultural and social impact of Latina/o immigration in the 20th Century and on Latina/o identity formation. We examine the intimate and personal history of the United States in relation to Latin America, Central America, the Carribean, and Mexico that established interdependent relationships between nations and its people.

Course usage information

AMST 1610X. Latino Popular Music and Culture.

This course explores the various forms of popular culture associated with U.S. Latino communities. It focuses on the production, dissemination, and consumption of mass mediated cultural forms, primarily music, television, film and journalism, but it also examines other cultural expressions such as vernacular art, food, festivals, and folklore. Prerequisite: At least one semester of college-level course in U.S. history or literature.

Course usage information

AMST 1610Y. Latinos and Film.

Examines the way Latinos have been constructed-and misrepresented-in Hollywood film from the silent era to the present, and compares these images with contemporary Latino-made films that counteract Hollywood stereotypes with more accurate and complex images of their own histories and cultures. Readings introduce students to film criticism from a Latino perspective. Weekly screenings in and outside class.

Course usage information

AMST 1610Z. American Popular Culture.

Popular culture is part of everyday life, but also an important site to examine how American identities have been both shaped and reflected through film, television, music, performance, and fashion. We trace American popular culture from the nineteenth century to the present, paying particular attention to the development of different media, and looking at the production and reception of popular culture, as well as the cultural texts themselves. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1611A. Making America: Twentieth-Century U.S. Immigrant/Ethnic Literature.

Examines the literature of first and second generation immigrant/ethnic writers from 1900 to the 1970's. Attempts to place the individual works (primarily novels) in their literary and sociocultural contexts, examining them as conscious works of literature written within and against American and imported literary traditions and as creative contributions to an ongoing national discourse on immigration and ethnicity. DPLL

Fall AMST1611A S01 16985 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (R. Meckel)
Course usage information

AMST 1611C. Pacific Rim in American History.

This course is a comparative study of Filipino, Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Indian settlement in the United States. It begins in the 1700s when Filipino seamen first settled in what is now Louisiana and Texas and concludes with the end of World War II. Attention will be given to immigration from Asia and its relationship to the development of the capitalist world system, the role that Asian American labor played in class and racial formation in America the political economies of Asian American communities, and the various social movements and legislative efforts to exclude Asians from American society and Asian resistance to exclusion.

Course usage information

AMST 1611E. Popular Culture in the United States.

Focusing on popular culture since industrialization, the course will examine particular forms (broadcasting, romance novels, amusement parks, sports) we will as look at the producers of, and the audiences for, those forms. Requirements include three papers based on outside readings and a final.

Course usage information

AMST 1611F. Race, Gender, and Community in Latina Autobiography.

Examines how Latinas chronicle their identities in transitions vis-á-vis markers of race and gender. Through autobiography, memoir, literary criticism, and theoretical readings emphasizing the negotiations of self, place and community via social and geographical locations including family, region, and the nation. Engages in critical interpretation of the socio-cultural and political worldviews of Latina self-discovery and self-authorship.

Course usage information

AMST 1611G. Race, Ethnicity, Religion and Community.

This course examines the intersection of religion and community for communities of color in the United States. A survey of these communities is guided by the desire to discover the collective stories and memories that socialize social and ethnic identites, and serve as a source of personal and political transformation. Out point of entry for understanding the sacred is at "ground level" perspective.

Course usage information

AMST 1611H. Religion and Society in the United States.

Offers a sociological perspective on theories of the relationship between religion and societies that will help us understand and analyze current religious practices and trends, both inside and outside of religious institutions. Students will conduct several observations in religious institutions and create religious rituals of their own.

Course usage information

AMST 1611J. Sex, Love, Race: Miscegenation, Mixed Race and Interracial Relations.

This class will explore the conditions and consequences for crossing racial boundaries in North America. We will take a multidisciplinary approach, exploring literary, anthropological, and historical writings along with several feature and documentary film treatments of the subject.

Course usage information

AMST 1611K. The Century of the Child? Child Welfare in Twentieth-Century America.

Examines the evolution of U.S. child welfare from its origins in the late 19th century through its purported crisis in the late 20th century. Traces the history of policies and programs aimed at: providing support for dependent children; improving infant and child survival and health; protecting children from exploitation and abuse; and dealing with deviant and delinquent children.

Course usage information

AMST 1611M. Trauma and the Shame of the Unspeakable: The Holocaust, American Slavery, and Childhood Sexual Abuse.

The problem of representing traumatic experience has been raised by witnesses and survivors, psychoanalysts, psychologists, sociologists, philosophers, and artists. This course compares three historical situations--The Holocaust, American slavery, and childhood sexual abuse--by reading histories, memoirs, and fictions, and analyzing material cultural artifacts such as memorials. Questions about the relation of individual trauma to collective and cultural trauma will be pursued through readings that will include Freud, Jeffrey Alexander, Judith Herman, Dominique La Capra, Primo Levi, Jill Christman, Harriet Jacobs,Toni Morrison, Gayle Jones and Art Spiegelman.

Spr AMST1611M S01 25444 MWF 12:00-12:50(05) (B. Haviland)
Course usage information

AMST 1611O. Early American Film.

American film-making from its origins as a technological amusement to the period of classic Hollywood cinema. Particular attention given to representations of gender, race, and ethnicity with comparisons to the evolution of European film. The Birth of a Nation (1915) by by D. W. Griffith will be a key text in dialogue with African-American director Oscar Micheaux's Within Our Gates (1920).

Course usage information

AMST 1611Q. The Asian American Case: Race, Immigration and the Law.

The central historical themes are exclusion, citizenship rights, and and equal protection. The experience of Chinese and Japanese Americans dominates the historiography but we will use that scholarship to help us think about a wider range of issues across time.

Course usage information

AMST 1611R. Bourgeois Blues: Class Conflict in African American and Caribbean Literature and Film.

This course investigates class differentiation and its effects in African-diaspora novels, autobiographies, and films (such as The Good Negress, Brothers and Keepers, Crick Crack Monkey, and "Sugar Cane Alley"). Alongside these literary works and films, we will read a wide range of critical/theoretical essays on class and class conflict and the intersection between class and race, gender, sexuality, and nationality.

Course usage information

AMST 1611U. History of American Technology.

Technologies reflect and transform American society and culture. This course examines the invention, introduction and use of new machines and systems, with a focus on infrastructure, manufacturing, and information and communication technologies. Special attention paid to labor, business, political and cultural contexts of technological change.

Course usage information

AMST 1611V. Color Me Cool: A Survey of Contemporary Graphic Novels.

Surveys a variety of comic books and graphic novels, both mainstream and independent. The emphasis, however, will be on the independent graphic novel. Students will also read history and criticism to understand better the context from which the books emerge and to grasp more firmly their visual and textual aesthetics. Must attend first three lectures to be eligible for enrollment.

Course usage information

AMST 1611W. Asian Americans and Popular Culture.

From the Fu Manchu to Lucy Liu, Asian Americans have long been the objects of loathing, terror and desire, in American popular culture. This course looks Asian Americans in popular literature, music, theater, film and television as subjects, producers and consumers.

Course usage information

AMST 1611X. Narratives of Liberation.

The theme of human liberation has appeared in literary works from around the world and across centuries. This course will examine a variety of narratives that foreground the attainment pf physical, spiritual, and political freedom for individuals and groups. Beginning with the Book of Exodus and traveling through African American slave narratives, British proto-feminist novels, Latin American testimonios, and contemporary films, we will examine how a wide range of writers and filmmakers have conceptualized the goal and the process of liberation in their works. Requirements for the course will include two papers/projects and a final exam.

Course usage information

AMST 1611Z. The Century of Immigration.

Examines in depth the period of immigration that stretched from the 1820s through the 1920s and witnessed the migration of over 36 million Europeans, Asians, Canadians, and Latin Americans to the United States. Explores causal theories of migration and settlement, examines the role of family, religion, work, politics, cultural production, and entertainment in immigrant/ethnic communities, and traces the development and impact of federal immigration policy.

Course usage information

AMST 1612A. Chicago and America.

This course explores the history of Chicago, but also uses the city as a way to think about issues in American history. Sources include novels, memoirs, popular histories, film, and music.

Course usage information

AMST 1612B. Celluloid America.

The American motion picture developed as a unique art form in the late 19th century and its enduring cultural and social significance is irrefutable. In this course, we will explore US history using cinema to explore the cultural values represented within and shaped by the medium. Topics include the invention of the moving image, the rise and fall of the Hollywood studio system, and the emergence and evolution of film genres and styles (i.e. westerns, film noir, musicals, etc.) as a means of economically appealing to the masses and cultivating viewership domestically and abroad.

Course usage information

AMST 1612C. Growing Up in America.

This course will consider American narratives of adolescence and coming of age from the nineteenth century to the present. We will examine the archetypal aspects of coming to grips with maturity and the world, class and gender roles, and the invention of "adolescence" as a new psychological category. International perspectives will be provided by reading some British and Japanese works. Authors covered will include Dickens, Melville, Twain, Alcott, Kerouac, Hemingway, Baldwin, Mishima and Tan, among others. Lectures, class discussions and student reports. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 1612D. Cities of Sound: Place and History in American Pop Music.

This course investigates the relationship between popular music and cities. We will look at a number of case studies from the history of music in the twentieth century. We will try to tease out the ways that certain places produce or influence certain sounds and the ways that musicians reflect on the places they come from in their music. Accordingly, we will consider both the social and cultural history of particular cities and regions--New Orleans, Memphis, Chicago, New York, Washington DC, and others--and aesthetic and cultural analyses of various forms of music--including blues, jazz, punk, hip-hop, and others.

Course usage information

AMST 1612G. Henry James Goes to the Movies.

This course will focus on some of the novels and stories by James that have been made more than once into films or tv shows - Washington Square, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, and The Golden Bowl - and study the narrative and visual choices as interpretations of James's texts. Critical readings on the art of fiction and the art of film will also be introduced.

Course usage information

AMST 1612K. Immigrant America and Its Children.

With a focus on the experiences of the immigrant second generation, this course seeks to expose students to the recent social science literature on contemporary immigration to the United States, including discussions on its origins, adaptation patterns, and long-term effects on American society. We will closely examine patterns of assimilation and adaptation for the children of immigrants, address the challenges they confront when trying to straddle two cultures, describe their ethnic identity formation, and interrogate the effects of their increasing presence on U.S. schools and society in general. The experiences of the second generation will be examined in various institutions including the family, labor market, schools, and community, and we situate these institutions in both national and transnational spheres. The course will consist of lectures by the instructor combined with class discussion of assigned texts. This course will also provide students with an analytic framework to address questions of multiculturalism. The course will also help students develop a better understanding of the dynamics of race, class, gender, and sexuality in society.

Course usage information

AMST 1612L. Eating Cultures: Food and Society.

This course will look at various ways to understand the complex role of food in society. We will look at issues of food production and consumption, and how our relationship to food contributes to the political and social structures that we live with. Our approach will be historical and pay special attention to the ways in which communities of color and immigrants have shaped, and have been shaped by, the food they cultivate, harvest, consume, and market. Field trips and readings explore how food creates ways for people to form bonds of belonging while also creating bonds of control and regimes of inequality. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

AMST 1612M. Children of Immigrants.

Gives an overview of the experiences of the children of contemporary immigrants in the United States. It looks at their experiences in key social institutions including schools, the family and ethnic community. The course will examine the integration of immigrant children and how factors of race, class, and gender shape their experiences. To address the integration of immigrant children, the course will look at their process of assimilation, maintenance of transnational ties, and lastly the formation of youth identity.

Course usage information

AMST 1612N. Political Theatre of the Americas (TAPS 1610).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1610.

Course usage information

AMST 1612O. 21st Century American Drama (TAPS 1650).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1650.

Course usage information

AMST 1612P. First Nations: the People and Cultures of Native North America to 1800 (HIST 1805).

Interested students must register for HIST 1805.

Course usage information

AMST 1612Q. Women / Writing / Power.

An introduction to American women's writing and to the development of feminist literary practice and theory. This course will cover a broad historical range from the colonial poets Anne Bradstreet and Phillis Wheatley to contemporary writers Toni Morrison, a Nobel Laureate, and Marilynne Robinson, a Pulitzer Prize winner. Attention to the effects of racial, class, and cultural differences will inform this course that will focus on gender and literature. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1612R. Race, Inequality, and the American City since 1945.

This course will explore the dynamics of race and class in American cities during the post-World War II period. The readings and discussions will focus on suburbanization, the decline of central cities, conflict over the use and definition of urban space, urban governance, spatial fortification, and popular dissent. The cities examined will include Buenos Aires, Chicago, Detroit, Liverpool, Los Angeles, New York City, São Paulo, and St. Louis.

Course usage information

AMST 1612S. Introduction to American Indian Studies (ETHN 1890H).

Interested students must register for ETHN 1890H.

Course usage information

AMST 1612T. Slackers and Hipsters: Urban Fictions, 1850-Present.

Slackers and Hipsters surveys the cult of the cool and disaffected in literature and film over two centuries. Beginning with Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivner," but also sampling works as varied as Chatterjee's English August and Kunkel's Indecision, we'll examine both the aesthetic and political implications of the "slacker" in his/her ironic, apathetic, and peculiarly alienated view of the world.

Course usage information

AMST 1612V. Sinner, Saints, and Heretics: Religion in Early America (HIST 1511).

Interested students must register for HIST 1511.

Course usage information

AMST 1612W. Rethinking Women's Bodies and Rights: Transnational Reproductive Politics.

This course examines the issues and debates surrounding women's reproduction in the United States and beyond. It pays special attention to how knowledge and technology travel across national/cultural borders and how women's reproductive functions are deeply connected to international politics and events abroad. Topics include: birth control, eugenics, population control, abortion, prostitution, reproductive hazards, genetic counseling, new reproductive technologies, midwifery, breastfeeding, and menstruation. Students will analyze historical and contemporary materials concerning women's reproductive roles, as well as read scholarly studies on reproductive issues in various parts of the world.

Course usage information

AMST 1612X. Performances in the Asias (TAPS 1270).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1270.

Course usage information

AMST 1612Y. Twentieth-Century Western Theatre and Performance (TAPS 1250).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1250.

Course usage information

AMST 1612Z. First Nations: the People and Cultures of Native North America to 1800 (HIST 1512).

Interested students must register for HIST 1512.

Course usage information

AMST 1700B. Death and Dying in America.

No description available. Open to juniors and seniors concentrating in American Studies.

Course usage information

AMST 1700C. Slavery in American History, Culture and Memory.

Nearly four centuries have passed since the first enslaved Africans arrived in what is today the United States. More than 140 years have passed since American slavery was abolished. Yet slavery remains a palpable presence in the United States. In this interdisciplinary course, we will examine slavery as a problem in American history, culture, and memory, exploring the institution and its legacies in such arenas as history, literature, cinema, visual arts, and heritage tourism. Open to juniors and seniors concentrating in American Studies.

Course usage information

AMST 1700D. Race and Remembering.

This junior seminar engages debates in Ethnic Studies, History, Gender Studies, and the Public Humanities that grapple with the relationship between historical narratives, memory, and social relations of power. Students will examine current tensions in national memory. Each year the topic of this course will change to consider racial formation through alternating social and cultural institutions. This semester we will consider the history of racial formation through encounters with the judicial system, with policing practices, with detention, and incarceration. Students will collaborate to make these histories publicly accessible using methods in public humanities. DPLL LILE WRIT

Fall AMST1700D S01 15461 W 3:00-5:30(17) (M. Martinez)
Course usage information

AMST 1700F. American Publics.

Americans worry about the quality of their civic life and fear its decline. This junior seminar examines an important concept, the public sphere, in its popular and political dimensions as well as looking at the challenges to the boundaries of American public life. Who is a citizen and thus eligible to participate? The course pays particular attention to concerns about the impact of new media--print, broadcasting, the internet--and offers a range of possible final projects. Not open to first year students or sophomores. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1700G. Public Memory: Narratives of 9/11.

This junior seminar will focus on narratives concerned with the events of 9/11 and their aftermath: documentary, testimony, stories, memoirs, novels, graphic novels and feature films. We will also study and visit some of the memorials and museums that have been proposed or created in connection to 9/11 and consider them in the context of public memory and public art. Course work will require a project or research paper that engages the question of the role of the humanities in the creation of the public memory of catastrophic events. Enrollment limited to 20 junior and senior American Studies concentrators. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1700I. Community Engagement with Health and the Environment.

This junior seminar explores how local community organizations are taking up issues of health and the environment in culturally relevant contexts. We will examine issues of environmental justice, health disparities and the basic tenets of community based participatory research. We will then partner with a local community organization and, depending on need, assist in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of a program designed to improve the local environment and/or health status of the community. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT

Spr AMST1700I S01 24195 W 3:00-5:30(14) (E. Hoover)
Course usage information

AMST 1700J. The Teen Age: Youth, Society and Culture in Early Cold War America.

An interdisciplinary and multimedia exploration of the experiences, culture, and representation of youth in the United States from the end of World War II through the beginning of the Vietnam War. Enrollment limited to 20 junior and senior American Studies concentrators. Others by permission of the instructor. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1800. Honors Seminar.

This seminar is for second-semester junior American Studies and Ethnic Studies concentrators who are interested in writing an honors thesis in their senior year. The outcome of this course will be a proposal for the honors thesis along with a bibliography and a research plan and schedule. Topics covered will be the research methods associated with different disciplines; how to make the thesis interdisciplinary; integrating public projects and new media into a thesis. Open to juniors concentrating in American Studies and Ethnic Studies. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC

Spr AMST1800 S01 24206 F 3:00-5:30(15) (B. Haviland)
Course usage information

AMST 1900A. The Problem of Class in America.

Class is everywhere in American life, but rarely discussed explicitly. This course will investigate why this is. How does class operate in American life? Why is it so often obscured? What are the cultural, political and historical forces that have made it such a contested category? We will approach class from a variety of disciplines, including history, cultural studies, and sociology; study the ways class interacts with race and gender; and consider the prospects of class in America in the context of the twenty-first century's widening inequality and globalized economy.

Course usage information

AMST 1900B. America and the Asian Pacific: A Cultural History.

From Columbus to the present, Asia has been central to the shaping of American culture. This course will examine the role of trade, migration and cultural exchange across the Pacific in the shaping of American culture and society. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1900C. Narratives of Slavery.

This course analyzes circum-Atlantic accounts of racial slavery in various forms, including the slave narrative, iconography, historiography, film, and performance. In so doing, it interrogates how factors such as form and/or genre, race, gender, power, and geography influence narrative and knowledge production regrading slavery. Key themes the course addresses include racial slavery as civil and social death, ancient and modern/colonial genealogies of slavery, gendered experiences of bondage, regionalism in U.S. historiography of slavery, and the un/spoken and un/representable nature of atrocity. The course also examines contemporary narratives that underscore the significance that racial slavery brings to bear upon the present. DPLL WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1900D. America as a Trans-Pacific Culture.

From Columbus to the present, Asia has been central to the shaping of American culture. This course will examine the role of trade, migration and cultural exchange across the Pacific in the shaping of American culture and society. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1900F. Transnational Popular Culture.

This course looks at popular culture as a transnational phenomenon. Taking up issues of cultural imperialism, globalization, domestication, and the economics of the culture industry, the course considers the history of cultural flows, from nineteenth century topics such as Chinese opera in the U.S. and Wild West shows in Europe to twenty-first century fast food, anime, sports, Disney, and music. We will consider both the consumers and producers of popular culture in Europe, South America, Asia and Africa, as well as those in the United States. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1900G. Movements, Morals, and Markets.

This seminar will provide a theoretical and empirical overview of contemporary transnational social movements. Addressing issues ranging from fair-trade and labor exploitation, to environmental protection, to indigenous rights, and LGBTQ advocacy, social movements increasing draw from morality and the global market in order to achieve their goals. This course critically investigates the ways in which humanitarian action is celebrated, contested, and commodified through art, social enterprise, and various other formal and informal institutional arrangements. DPLL WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1900I. Latina/o Cultural Theory.

Advanced seminar designed to familiarize students with past and present debates in Latina/o Studies. Knowledge of these critical conversations will aid students in making their own contributions to the field as they write their theses and dissertations. We will read such folks as Jose Limon, Mary Pat Brady, Frances Aparicio, and Gustavo Perez Firmat, to name but a few. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900J. Race, Immigration and Citizenship.

"Who can become an American?" is a central question in American society. This seminar examines the construction of national identity, citizenship as a legal and cultural status, and the struggle for equal protection of the law. The experience of excluded Asian and Latino immigrants are key to understanding this historical and ongoing process. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900K. China in the American Imagination.

Since Columbus, China has occupied a special place in the way America has been imagined and in the ways Americans have imagined their place in the world. This seminar will explore the relationship between China and America from Columbus to the present. While politics and diplomacy play an important role, the emphasis will be on trade, immigration and culture. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900L. Cold War Culture The American Culture in the Cold War.

This seminar will expore domestic politics, social movements, family life, sexuality,gender roles and relations, intellectual currents, and popular culture in the United States during the Cold War years. Special topics include adolescence, "conformity", and the rise of television. Sources include historical monographs, memoir, film, and fiction. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900N. Ethnicity, Identity and Culture in 20th Century New York City.

Explores the processes by which 20th-century New Yorkers created a self-consiously modern, urban, and ethnic American culture. Focuses on literary and artistic representations of life in 20th-century New York as manifested in works by five ethnic groups of New Yorkers that immigrated or migrated to the city after 1800: Jews, African Americans, Italians, Chinese, and Puerto Picans. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900O. Filipino American Cultures.

Examines the situation of Filipinos in the U.S. Drawing from social history, cultural studies, literature, and visual culture, the readings focus on the Filipino experience in the U.S. through a study of self-representations in various forms such as literature and visual culture. Readings include Campomanes, Rafael, Bulosan, Linmark, and San Juan. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900P. Essaying Culture.

This course is interested in the essay as form. As a verb, essay means "to make an often tentative or experimental effort to perform." We will explore through reading and our own writing the poetic, gnomic, and often desultory moves the essay makes as it seeks to understand its cultural objects. Like the novel, the essay is an omnivorous form. It consists of fragments, poetry, personal reflection, lists, rational argument, and much more as it winds its way to understanding. We will be reading a range of essays, as well as theories of the form. WRIT

Fall AMST1900P S01 15459 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (R. Rodriguez)
Course usage information

AMST 1900Q. From Perry to Pokemon: Japan in the United States, the United States in Japan.

This course traces the cultural interactions between Japan and the United States beginning with Matthew Perry is 1854 voyage. Topics include Japanese scrolls depicting Perris arrival; paintings, architecture and musical forms that traveled between the two countries; the U.S. occupation of Japan after World War II; the popularity of anime and other Japanese films in the U.S.; and the importance of American popular culture in post-war Japan. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900R. Gender, Race, and Class in the United States.

Focuses on the emergent feminist scholarship that both empirically and theoretically analyzes how the intersection of race, class, gender, sexual preference, and age shapes the lives of women, men, and transgendered people in the U.S. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900S. Green Cities: Parks and Designed Landscapes in Urban America.

Examines the cultural meaning and public use of greenspace in American towns and cities. Covers city parks and metropolitan park systems; the landscaping of riverfronts, streets, cemeteries, and company property; and the contributions of landscape architects such as Frederick Law Olmstead and Warren Manning to the field of urban planning. Begins in the 17th century with the creation of Boston Common and ends by reviewing the latest greenway plans for Providence. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900U. Immigrant Radicals: Asian Political Movements in the Americas 1850-1970.

Between 1854 and 1965, Asian immigrants to the United States and other countries in the Americas were barred from immigration and citizenship. Circuit of ideas and political movements evolved to resist exclusion, disenfranchisement, and discrimination. We will examine: Chinese Americans and the Chinese revolution, the Ghadar movement among Indians of the Diaspora, and the Japanese American left and Japan. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900V. Immigrants, Exiles, Refugees, and Citizens in the Americas.

Focuses on populations who leave their homelands within the Americas. Examines the meaning of categories "refugee," "exile," "citizen," and "immigrant" in the postwar period. Explores the experience and reasons of people who leave their homelands, the relations between their countries of origin and their new society, and their access to rights in both countries. Questions the extent of population movements in the Americas as redefining conceptions of citizenship, rights, nation, and national identity in the U.S. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900W. Latina Literature: The Shifting Boundaries of Identity.

Focuses on the relationship between national identity and ethnic identity in narratives by and about Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican and Central and South American women in the U.S. Texts by and about women from other ethnic and minority groups. Readings from Gloria Anzaldua, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Dolores Prida, Cristina Garcia, Julia Alvarez, among others. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900X. Latina/o Religions: Encounters of Contestations and Transformations.

The purpose of this seminar is to survey and review the literature in the new and emerging field of Latina/o Religions. We seek to define the Latina/o religious experience and identify its unique qualities and expressions in relation to other religious movements and expressions in the Americas. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900Y. Latino New York.

The Latino population of NYC in the present generation has generated new lines of inquiry for the study of diasporas in contemporary urban settings. This course undertakes an analysis of this experience from diverse interdisciplinary perspectives, with a focus on cultural expressions and representations and with a view toward new ethnographic and historical approaches. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1900Z. Latinos and Film.

Analyzes the way Latino ethnicities have been constructed-and misrepresented-in Hollywood films from the silent era to the present, and examines contemporary work by Latino directors, producers, screenwriters, and actors who produce films that counteract the negative stereotypes of Hollywood films with more accurate, complex, and positive images of their own histories and cultures. Weekly screenings both in and out of class and readings that introduce a new body of film criticism from a Latino perspective. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901A. Latinos in Black and White: Race, Ethnicity and Identity in the Americas.

This seminar looks critically at traditional models of "race relations" in the Americas, the historical development and expressions of "blackness," "brownness" and "whiteness" at regional, national and international levels, and their contemporary articulations and ramifications. A primary focus will be the social and political dimensions of "ethnicity" and "race" in relations between Caribbeans and African Americans in New York City. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901C. Making America: The Immigrant Experience in Literature.

Examines the literature produced by immigrants and their children who came to the U.S. between 1865 and 1965. Will place literature in its sociocultural and literary contexts, considering it as a creative contribution to debates on acculturation, generational conflict, intermarriage, racism, gender politics, labor exploitation, and immigrant entrepreneurs. Will read works by authors of Chinese, Irish, Scandinavian, Japanese, Slavic, East European Jewish, Mexican, and Caribbean origin. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901D. Motherhood in Black and White.

Focuses on American motherhood with respect to race: under slavery; at the turn of the 20th century; and in contemporary society. Texts include fiction, film, history, feminist and psychoanalytic theory, e.g. "Uncle Tom's Cabin,'' "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl," "Imitation of Life," and "The Reproduction of Mothering." Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL WRIT

Fall AMST1901D S01 15212 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (B. Haviland)
Course usage information

AMST 1901F. Orientals: The Representation of Asians in American Popular Culture.

This is a research seminar designed to explore questions relating to the cultural construction of Asians as a racial group in the United States. The seminar will interrogate the ideas of race, ideology, Orientalism and popular culture. The seminar will then analyze various moments in the formation of dominant images of Asians in American Culture. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901G. Race and Art in America.

How do art and space function as a critical practice, a tool of resistance, and a form of self-determination in racialized 20th-century America? This course will introduce students to ways of looking at and analyzing examples of visual, performance, and mixed-media artwork by African American, Asian American, and Chicano artists who resist, challenge, deform, and subvert traditional concepts of art. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901H. Race and Poststructuralism.

Poststructuralism continues to be a major preoccupation in the discourse of the academic left, but relatively few courses consider how poststructuralist interrogations of subjectivity and history can help us to think about race in a U.S. context. This seminar begins with an overview of key poststructuralist concepts, then moves to poststructuralist texts which take up race as a primary object, and finally takes up the collision between poststructuralist thought and racial identity politics. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901I. Race and Sexuality in Contemporary U.S. Film.

This course aims at producing cultural criticism about the representation of race and sexuality in U.S. films of the 1980s-90s. By examining the circulation of images and ideas about bodies in Hollywood and "independent" production, we consider how cultural norms are constructed. Texts include films, popular film criticism (print and televisual), film theory, and industrial history. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901J. Race Immigration and the Law: The Asian American Case.

From 1870 to 1943, Chinese were defined by their "race" as ineligible for citizenship and immigration. Similar prohibitions against Japanese, Filipinos, and Indians followed in the early 20th century. This seminar will examine Asian American struggles against exclusion and how they shaped American definitions of citizenship, race, and constitutional rights. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1901K. Racial Formation in North America.

No description available. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901L. Reading Latina/o History through Fiction.

Examining the imaginative act of writing, the course studies the fictional portrayal of historical subjects, facts, and events. Focuses on how non-fiction is fictionally processed in contemporary Latina and Latino novels. How do "Latino" facts--molded by struggles for civil and human rights and U.S. foreign intervention--speak? How does novelist orient readers toward an understanding of social reality? Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1901N. Researching the History of Children and Childhood.

Explores how to research and interpret the ways that race, class, gender, and region have shaped the social organization, cultural meaning, and experiences of American children and childhood. Focus is on the possibilities and challenges posed by various types of evidence: visual and literary representations, memoirs, child rearing advice, toys and play, children's literature, clothing, and protective and restrictive laws. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1901O. Rivers in the Industrial City.

Rivers promote industrial development and serve as important resources and cultural amenities for communities that have a substantial manufacturing base. This interdisciplinary seminar looks at the use and abuse of rivers in American industrial cities from the 18th century to the present. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901Q. Screening Men: Hollywood Masculinities, 1944-Present.

Surveys Hollywood representations of dominant masculinity with the aim of interrogating these representations. Considers how such representations have changed over time and how changes may be read in relation to contemporary social, economic, and political pressures. In addition, considers how these texts interact with theoretical issues of representation, identification, and spectatorship. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901R. Social Movements of the 1960s.

This course examines U.S. social movements from 1954 through 1974, concentrating on the 1960s. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, we examine such topics as the Civil Rights Movement and the emergence of Black Nationalism, the antiwar movement, the relationship between the New Left and second-wave feminism, and the movement for gay liberation. The course also pays attention to how the 'sixties' are represented in contemporary culture. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901S. Society and Identity: A Comparative Approach to the Colonial Americas.

Compares New Spain, the British North American mainland, and the Caribbean from initial colonization in the 16th century to 18th-century wars of independence. Focuses on the complex interplay of class, gender, race, and ethnicity that defined social formations and shaped identities. Reading biographies of ordinary people as well as synthetic histories, engages the past on different levels and connects individual identity and action to broader historical processes. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901U. The Charm of Anticipated Sucess: Varieties of the American Dream in U.S. History.

The American Dream is one of the great myths of our national history-not "myth" in the sense of a falsehood, but rather a widely-held belief whose validity cannot be definitively proved or disproved (like "all men are created equal"). Using sermons, fiction, songs, and other cultural forms, this research seminar explores the complexities of the myth from the time of the Puritans to the present. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901V. The Contested City: Urban Culture in America, 1880-1940.

Focusing on the popular culture of American cities, this course examines the evolution, commercialization, uses, and struggles over vaudeville, jazz, and early film, and leisure activities such as dancing, nightclubbing, drinking, and shopping. Consideration will be given to the gendered, class-based, and racialized nature of leisure activities and spaces, reform efforts, and the dynamics of social change. Prerequisite: At least one semester of college-level course in U.S. history or literature. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901W. The Development of Black Feminism.

Beginning with the participation of black women in the abolition movement and ranging forward to current black women novelists and feminist theorists, this course will examine the intellectual development of black feminism. We will pay particular attention to black feminism as an area of critical study, and will explore the concepts of representation, ideology, discourse, race, gender, and sexuality. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901Y. The Making of U.S. Child Welfare.

Will examine the origin and design, at the beginning of this century, of the U.S. child welfare system. The separation of child from adult welfare, the definition of a special relationship between children and the state; foster care versus institutional care; the juvenile justice system; child labor; infant and maternal welfare; aid to children in families; and school-based welfare are some of the topics to be covered. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1901Z. The Old/New Immigration.

By comparing and contrasting the migration and adaptation experiences of Russian Jews and southern Italians, explores in depth the massive immigration from eastern and southern Europe that took place between 1880 and 1924. Topics include: the causes and countours of emigration, settlement patterns, adaptation and assimilation, ideologies of left and right, immigration as a gendered experience, immigrant writers and intellectuals, nativism and restriction, and the "new immigration" and national memory. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902A. The Politics of Asian American Culture.

From Bret Harte's "Heathen Chinee" to Bill Clinton's John Huang, Asian Americans have been represented as aliens in American culture. The task of Asian American cultural production has been to create a space for an Asian American citizenship. This course looks at autobiography, fiction, drama, film, and cultural criticism to understand how Asian American culture makers have sought to combat imposed stereotypes, subvert structural hegemony, and undermine self-imposed orthodoxies. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902E. The Second Americans: Narratives and Images of Hispanics in the U.S. 1513-1945.

Confronts the notion of Latinos as "foreign" by demonstrating historical depth and geographic breadth of the Hispanic/Latino experience in what is now U.S. territory-from colonial Florida, Califorina, and the Southwest, to early 20th-century Puerto Rican and Cuban communities in New York. Explores contrasting Hispanic and Anglo views of the presence of Hispanics via such diverse sources as historical chronicles and autobiographies, Hollywood films, romance novels, and popular music. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902H. Topics in Asian American History and Culture: Diasporas and Transnationalisms.

This seminar reviews the theoretical literatures on diaspora and transnationalism. We then place Asian migrations to the Americas (North America, Hawaii, the West Indies, Central and Latin America) in the context of migrations out of and within Asia in the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, we consider transnationalism as an analytical framework for understanding the process of Asian-American community formation. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902J. Topics in Latino Studies: Racial Ideologies, National Belonging, and Citizenship in the Americas.

What is the relationship between citizenship, national belonging, and ideologies of race in the Americas? In what ways do gender and class differences affect this relationship? Focusing on these questions, the racial and social experience of U.S. Latinos are compared with that of the populations in various countries in the hemisphere. Theoretical readings and empirical examples. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902N. Uncovering the Story of Latina/o Identity: Movement, Space and Cutlture.

This course examines the mutliple ways of knowing and understanding Latina/o cultural identity and expression in the Americas. The story of a Latina/o cultural identity is mapped out as place and sentiment in both historical and contemporary periods. We utilize theory and method from both the social sciences and the humanities to uncover and better understand the story of Latina/o identity and ourselves. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902O. Urban Borderlands.

This course analyzes changing patterns of immigration from Latin America to the U.S. by comparatively examining the emergence of various Latino communities and cultures in selected cities. It explores interethnic relations among the various Latino communities, as well as Latinos' interactions with other racial and ethnic groups. The cities to be considered are Los Angeles, New York, Miami, San Antonio, Washington DC, and Providence-the last of which will be explored via student projects in the community. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902P. Women and American Modernism, 1900-1940.

No description available. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902Q. Chicano Studies Seminar.

Explores the culture and politics of Mexican people in the United States leading up to and through the 1960s and 1970s, and the post-nationalist period that continues to the present. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, including readings and films that explore the history, sexuality, art, music, labor, and gendered identities of this diverse community. Prerequisite: Introduction to America/Ethnic Studies recommended. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902T. Henry James and The American Scene.

A study of James's representation of the American read in the context of the cultural changes of the late nineteenth century: Daisy Miller, The American, The Portrait of a Lady, The Golden Bowl and selections from his travel writings, including The American Scene. Writings by James's contemporaries, W. E. B. Du Bois and Thorstein Veblen will will also be studied. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902Y. The Black Female Body in American Culture.

This course on gender and representation will use the black female body as an example of the ways in which images, both verbal and visual, of women of color are utilized within American culture. Through literature, film, visual art, and popular culture, we will consider the legacy of slavery, the persistence of stereotypes, sexual violence, and black women's resistance. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1902Z. Radio: From Hams to Podcasts.

This course examines the history of radio broadcasting and asks if a consideration of radio's historic flexibility can predict the future of this interesting medium. Readings will focus on the exciting new field of radio studies, emphasizing economics, structures, and listeners. Topics include radio's ability to cross borders, create racial and gender categories, and change programming possibilities. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. WRIT

Spr AMST1902Z S01 24403 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (S. Smulyan)
Course usage information

AMST 1903B. Alien-nation: Latina/o Im/migration in Comparative Perspective.

Explores how Latina/o immigration to the United States has reshaped the meaning of "America" over the last hundred years. We will study Latina/os in comparison to other im/migrants and examine how US immigration policy has created a nation partly composed of "alien" residents, some citizens, others not, who have constructed alternative notions of belonging. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903E. City of the American Century: The Culture and Politics of Urbanism in Postwar New York City.

This seminar will investigate the life, history and culture of New York City from World War II to the fiscal crisis of the mid 1970's, with a particular interest in transformations in the built environment of the city and region. We will primarily focus on the cultural representations, intellectual visions, and political struggles that arose around these transformations, but will also consider their effects on everyday life. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students concentrating in American Studies.

Course usage information

AMST 1903F. Topics in Asian American History: Migration, Race and Citizenship.

This seminar will explore the relationship between Asian Americans and the US State in three historical moments; the era of exclusion, WWII internment, and the post-civil rights era. We will look at citizenship as a cultural signifier that organizes race, gender, sexuality and class as well as a legal status. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903G. Oral History and Community Memory.

Students in this seminar will conduct oral history interviews and archival research to create an audio and visual history of one Providence neighborhood. Collected materials will be prepared for public presentation as a walking tour and web site. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 1903H. Space and Place: Geographies of the Black Atlantic.

Is the map on an iPhone representative of the space beneath our feet? Does a 'map' have to represent geographic space or can it represent something else? For centuries people have sought to make sense of the geographies of their everyday lives as well as environments out of their purview. In this course, we will engage with a number of approaches to space and place including historical, cultural, ethnographic, literary, geographic, and artistic, focusing on African diasporas and the Black Atlantic. Students will analyze texts, artworks, and web-based projects, and at the end of the course, create their own maps. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 1903J. Anthropology and Art.

Art is a historic topic of inquiry in anthropology. From the early days of collecting and displaying ethnographic relics in cabinets of curiosities to the bustling movements of art and artists in global art markets, anthropologists have sought to understand social life through art, and art through social life. Through readings, discussions, films, digital materials, and artworks, we will learn about artists, art worlds, art practice, and how anthropologists have studied the arts. Course assignments include critical responses to course material, a final research project, and participation in Providence arts events.

Course usage information

AMST 1903P. Please, Please Me.

This seminar will investigate theories of pleasure and its representation in a range of fictional texts. What is it that makes a text pleasing and for whom? How do we talk about pleasure and explain it to others? I am especially interested in the representation of pleasure from the 1970s on. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903Q. Out of Place: Regional Boundaries and their Transgression in Novels, Photography, Public Humanities.

This class explores the meaning of "region" in contemporary American culture. Focusing primarily on the West, we'll examine the construction and transgression of geographical and ideological regional boundaries. Questions considered include: What does crossing boundaries tell us about hte stability and meaning of region? What role do race, gender, and nationality play in moving across regional lines? What do shifting regional identities tell us about the possibilities and problems in ways of transforming identity? Sources include fiction, essays, websites, and photography. We use skills and ideas built over the semester to consider the ways museums and other public sites construct regional boundaries. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors, with priority given to American Studies concentrators.

Course usage information

AMST 1903R. Big Business, the Bomb, and Smokey Bear: Cold War Origins of Today's Environmental Movement.

Beginning with the psychological, cultural, and environmental changes brought by the Atomic Bomb, this seminar traces Americans' growing environmental awareness and concern with corporate power. We will look at classics like Aldo Leopold's Sand County Almanac and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, as well as films, poetry, popular texts, and histories complicating traditional notions of the origins and conduct of the contemporary environmental movement. Students will have the opportunity to explore an aspect of environmentalism or the environment in depth through a semester writing project. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903T. The Materiality of History: Material Culture Theory and Practice.

Focusing on Native American, early American, and contemporary US material culture, this course develops critical methods for analyzing historic materials, not as silent monuments to the past, but as legible research materials for scholarly work. Who studies 'things', and with what methods? From the invisible to the living to the monumental, what are the limits of "thingness"? What is the role of commodification and American consumerism? Through selected readings and site visits, we will identify 'best practices' for integrating artifacts, collectibles, and every day things with documentary research in narrating and exhibiting the past. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903V. Asian and Latino Immigration.

This seminar examines the ways in which the histories of Asian and Latino immigration parallel and intersect each other throughout US history. Capitalist development and labor migrations; wars and refugees; immigration policies and changing racial formations will be among the topics we explore. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students concentrating in American Studies and Ethnic Studies. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1903W. The Boy Problem: Male Adolescence as Social Pathology.

Focusing on the beginning, middle, and especially concluding decades of the 20th century, this course examines the ways in which both expert and popular discourse in the US have conflated male adolescence with social pathology and have constructed an image of the teenage boy as both symptomatic of and responsible for the nation's ills. Particular attention will be paid to issues of gender, race, and class. Primary source readings and original research will be emphasized. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903X. Style and the Man: Masculinity in Fashion and U.S. History.

This class will examine the role clothes have played in constructing notions of masculinity and manhood from the mid-19th century to the present. We will take seriously the oft-heard comment, "the clothes make the man," by studying the sartorial circumstances around the formation of men's fashion. These circumstances include class, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, and generation. Our study will be episodic and privilege New York and Los Angeles, though other locations will be considered comparatively. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors concentrating in American Studies.

Course usage information

AMST 1903Y. American Publics.

Americans worry about the quality of their civic life and fear its decline. We examine the public sphere's popular and political dimensions as well as challenges to the boundaries of American public life. Who is a citizen and thus eligible to participate? The course pays particular attention to concerns about the impact of new media--print, broadcasting, the internet. Taught simultaneously with the same course at the University of Melbourne, Australia, students will be linked digitally for discussion and collaborative writing. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1903Z. Shrine, House or Home: Rethinking the House Museum Paradigm.

This seminar will examine historic house museums within the context of American culture from the founding of Mount Vernon in 1853 to their present decline in popularity and relevance. Utilizing sources from a variety of disciplines including literature, women's and family history, and museum and preservation theory and practice, students will re-examine the prevailing historic house museum paradigm and develop interpretation plans for house museums in the Providence area. Enrollment limited to 20. If oversubscribed, priority is given to students in the Public Humanities Programs and Department of American Civilizations. No prerequisites.

Course usage information

AMST 1904A. Memories, Memorials, Collections and Commemorations.

To understand how American culture thinks about the past, we will explore a range of texts including museum exhibits, historical society collections, memorials, and civic celebrations. These sites and objects, the material culture of memory, help us understand the construction of national, community and personal identity. Students will also undertake practical projects in memorialization and commemoration, among them designing the program for a new memorial to the Rhode Island slave trade. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1904B. Henry James Goes to the Movies.

This course will focus on some of the novels and stories by James that have been made more than once into films or tv shows - Washington Square, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, and The Golden Bowl - and study the narrative and visual choices as interpretations of James's texts. Critical readings on the art of fiction and the art of film will also be included. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1904C. The Pacific Rim in American History.

Investigates the circuits of people, goods and ideas between Asia and the Americas. Although these flows have been at work for the past half millenium, this course will focus principally on three historical moments: the trading world of the 17th and 18th centuries; colonialisms and their critics in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and the "American Century" in the late 20th century. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1904D. End of the West: The Closing of the U.S. Western Frontier in Images and Narrative.

In 1893, Historian Fredrick Jackson Turner declared "the closing of the American frontier," touching off an argument among historians about the meaning and significance of European expansion and settlement in the area west of the Mississippi River. Historians, filmmakers, television producers and photographers have continued the debate in their writings, images, and drama that will be the subject of this class. We will consider the various ways The West has "ended" in popular culture and academia, and consider how these narratives shape our present perceptions of the region and the people and cultures that inhabit and border it. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1904F. The American Experience: The Southeast Asian Refugees/Americans.

Explores the complexity of the American experience, the displacements and diasporas of the Vietnamese, the Cambodians, the Hmong, the Lao, and the Iu Mien in America through multiplicity of perspectives and interdisciplinary approach. Special emphases are on the reinvention of new lives in New World, the American-born generation, how the American-ness and the sense of "home" are constructed, defined, and contested through literary and cinematic works, self-representations, and cultural productions written and produced by these new Asian Americans themselves. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1904G. Museums, Identities, Nationhood.

Will explore the national museum as a cultural institution in a range of contrasting contexts, revealing how these museums have been used to create a sense of national self, deal with the consequences of political change, remake difficult pasts, and confront those issues of nationalism, postcolonialism and multiculturalism which have come to the fore in national politics in recent decades. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 1904I. Art/Place.

This course surveys the many ways in which contemporary artists respond to, remake, and intervene in places, and teaches students to articulate their own creative responses to place. We will be working intensively in Providence's Jewelry District, collaborating with the nonprofit Artists in Context to create a public artwork, and developing each person’s creative practice in response to the narrative and aesthetic prompts of this contested space. The course will culminate in a final exhibition of student projects curated by the students themselves. Enrollment limited to 14. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1904J. The Asian American Movement: Communities, Politics and Culture.

In 1969 students at S.F. State College invented a new social category; they called it Asian America. This seminar begins with an examination the Asian American Movement, its origins and aspirations, its ideological cross currents, its failures and enduring legacies. But the central question we will ask is, what relevance does the Asian American Movement have for struggles for social justice today? Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1904L. Cultural Heritage, Curation and Creativity.

The course examines current theories and practices in cultural heritage work from various international perspectives and places them in dialogue with practices, theories and critical perspectives from the contemporary arts. It offers students the opportunity to participate in a practical and creative cultural heritage project, realizing a curated experience/event/experience within the urban environment of Providence. Questions of material and form; the relationship between language and vision; the role of description in interpretation; and what constitutes learning through visual experience will be considered. Following readings in cultural heritage theory, curatorial studies and critical theory, the course will engage students both intellectually and practically through individual and group curatorial projects. Enrollment limited to 14 juniors and seniors. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1904M. Charles Chapin and the Urban Public Health Movement.

Examines the science, politics, and programs of the 19th and early 20th century urban public health movement. Scope will be national but the focus will be on Providence, particularly during the tenure of Charles Chapin as Superintendent of Health. Will result in the mounting of an exhibit illustrating and explaining one of facet of the movement. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1904N. The Korean War in Color (ENGL 1761V).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1761V.

Course usage information

AMST 1904O. Native American Environmental Health Movements (ETHN 1890J).

Interested students must register for ETHN 1890J.

Course usage information

AMST 1904P. Queer Relations: Aesthetics and Sexuality (ENGL 1900R).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1900R.

Course usage information

AMST 1904Q. Engendering Empire (ETHN 1890K).

Interested students must register for ETHN 1890K.

Course usage information

AMST 1904R. New Narratives: New Media: New Museums.

This course explores the challenges to narrative modes, institutional patterns, and models for studies in material culture that are posed by emerging digital media practices. This course will focus on the example of the collections and resources of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. Readings in brain science and anthropology that focus on the cognitive and social mechanics of cultural capital formation to project development techniques in simulation and prototyping that derive from movie production, interaction design, game development and architecture. Students from a broad spectrum of arts and science backgrounds, including specifically those from museum curation and computer science, are welcome. Enrollment limited to 15. LILE

Course usage information

AMST 1904S. Ethnic American Folklore: Continuity and the Creative Process.

The course investigates how folklore and the oral culture of diverse cultural groups have transformed within their texts and in their creative representations and meanings. It looks into the dynamics of cultural continuity and the creative process involved, from oral narratives, foodscape, family lore, the senses of place, and the senses of home. At the juncture of the oral, the written, the popular, and the high tech, what are the new cultural forms, new cultural products, communication milieu and venues negotiated and contested. Anthropological field research methods and training will be a major emphasis of the course. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

AMST 1904T. Women and Work in the 21st Century.

Debates about women and work seem to be everywhere in American culture, dominated by the question of whether professional women can "have it all." Simultaneously, women—especially women of color—continue to be concentrated in the lowest-level, most poorly-paid jobs. And as more families depend on women's income, the contradictions between waged work and unwaged family work grow more acute. Controversies about women and their labor—waged and unwaged—have a long history in the U.S. This course will explore current debates from historical, sociological, and theoretical perspectives, with particular attention to the impact of race and class. Enrollment limited to 20 sophomores, juniors, seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1904V. Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World.

This seminar will explore the knowledge-production and military-financial infrastructures that maintain empires, as well as the means through which people have either resisted or embraced empire. While some attention will be made to the 19th and early 20th century colonial context, the bulk of the course will focus on the Cold War liberal era to the neoliberal regime that continues today. Possible topics include: popular culture and ideology, the Cold War university, area studies, international anti-war networks, transnational labor activism, the anti-colonial radical tradition, and the Arab Spring/Occupy Movements. Weekly readings; evaluation based on participation and analytical essays. Enrollment limited to 20. No overrides will be given before the semester begins. Please come to the first class meeting if you are interested in taking the course. DPLL

Spr AMST1904V S01 24401 W 3:00-5:30(14) (N. Shibusawa)
Course usage information

AMST 1904W. Native American Environmental Health Movements (ETHN 1890J).

Interested students must register for ETHN 1890J.

Course usage information

AMST 1904X. Imagining And Depicting China In America.

Geographically remote and less-obviously intertwined politically and culturally, China’s distance has fostered an active imaginary, producing rich visual and textual resources. This seminar examines narrative and visual culture over the long period Americans have been fascinated with China and the Chinese, from the 18th century to the present. Visual primary sources are our principal “texts” and include paintings, cartoons, decorative arts, photography, films, fiction, news articles, and government documents. The goal of the course is to interrogate how we envision China and the Chinese today, placing that vision within a critical historical perspective.Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1905A. Crises in American Capitalism.

We are now in the midst of what is commonly called the Great Recession—the biggest economic crisis since the Great Depression. This course investigates these two crises in American capitalism: how they were caused, resisted, represented, and remembered. Students will be asked to interrogate the meanings of these economic crises, and to consider their various political and cultural uses. Assigned texts will include history, fiction, journalism, film, memoir, and photography. Enrollment limited to 20 sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 1905B. Media and Modern Childhood (GNSS 1960S).

Interested students must register for GNSS 1960S.

Course usage information

AMST 1905C. Mainstream Journalism in America (through the prism of The New York Times).

Jefferson is supposed to have said that if he were forced to choose between a free government and a free press he would choose a free press, because without it a free government would not survive. It is certainly true that newspapers, and later the electronic media, have had major impacts on American politics and society. Now these media are in a period of convulsive change; their business model is broken and no one can fix it. This course will consider the growth, evolution, influence and future of these media, particularly The New York Times. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

AMST 1905D. African American Musical Theatre (MUSC 1905D).

Interested students must register for MUSC 1905D.

Course usage information

AMST 1905E. American Poetry II: Modernism (ENGL 1711A).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1711A.

Course usage information

AMST 1905G. Literature and the Problem of Poverty (ENGL 1710K).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1710K.

Course usage information

AMST 1905J. American Poetry I: Puritans through the Nineteenth Century (ENGL 1511O).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1511O.

Course usage information

AMST 1905L. Transpacific Popular Culture.

General Tso’s Chicken is as American as apple pie, half the nation’s 8-year olds practice some “ancient” Asian form of mayhem, and K-pop is still big in Mexico City while Spidey is a political superhero in Hong Kong and Bangkok street protesters flash Mockingjay salutes. In this seminar, we will use three spaces of cultural production and consumption, food, performance and street art, to illuminate deep circuits of migration, labor, culture, and popular politics across and around the Pacific. DPLL

Spr AMST1905L S01 24199 M 3:00-5:30(13) (R. Lee)
Course usage information

AMST 1905M. Whose Heritage?: National Landmarks for Diverse Publics.

In this course students examine the commemoration of specific sites, private and public, in creating, remembering, and preserving public history. Through theoretical readings, case studies, and workshops, students explore the intersection of people—as individuals, community members, and citizens— with their built environment, historic memory, and narrative. We explore how cultural heritage gets made, who chooses the sites, and whose history gets remembered by writing a U.S. National Park Service Landmark nomination for a local Chinese American site. The course also compares American cultural heritage programs with those of other countries and provides practical experience with National Park Service processes. DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1905N. War and the Mind in Modern America.

This course examines how the crucible of war has shaped modern conceptions of human nature. Moving from the Civil War to the present, we will consider questions such as changing theories of combat trauma, evolutionary and social scientific explanations for why people fight wars, and the role of memory in individual and collective understandings of violent conflicts. Students will analyze representations of war in film and literature in addition to reading historical and theoretical texts. WRIT

Fall AMST1905N S01 15599 M 3:00-5:30(15) (D. Weinstein)
Course usage information

AMST 1905O. Reading and Righting Histories of Violence.

This seminar proposes “histories of violence” as a useful framework to interrogate the varied forms of violence that constitute Western liberal modernity. These forms include systems of state power and imperial practices; subjective violence through raced, gendered, and sexualized hierarchies; and narrative violence that prevents histories and voices from emerging through the erasure of archives and narrative silencing. Course readings consider ongoing local and transnational struggles to reckon with the violent histories of slavery, empire, colonialism, nationalism, and democracy. They offer interdisciplinary models for researching and narrating these histories. Class discussions with consider avenues for reckoning with histories of violence. DPLL LILE WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1905Q. Laboring Women: Work, Reproduction, and Leisure since Reconstruction.

This course examines US women’s history from the late 19th century to the present, with a focus on labor broadly defined. It will consider how differences among women (e.g. race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality), as well as their status as women, historically shaped their experiences of work, cultural life, activism, and reproduction. WRIT

Course usage information

AMST 1905R. Theory and Practice of Local History (HIST 1972E).

Interested students must register for HIST 1972E.

Spr AMST1905R S01 25705 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 1905S. Enslaved! Indians and Africans in an Unfree Atlantic World (HIST 1970B).

Interested students must register for HIST 1970B.

Course usage information

AMST 1905V. Digital Communities.

Community and online engagement have been falsely cast in a dichotomous light -- either a cure-all or a sure failure. Working with local and online communities will shape our understanding and questions about the complexities of groups. We'll learn context, tools, and tricks for building powerful community-based campaigns. Students examine how projects can gain new participants while maintaining their focus and think about the differences in community involvement in on-line spaces and off. In a hands-on project, this class explores how to work together in digital space, to create moving media, and to build a campaign for support and growth.

Course usage information

AMST 1906H. Beauty Pageants in American Society.

Beauty pageants are often ridiculed, and even vilified, in American society. Yet their cultural power—from “There She Is” to Toddlers + Tiaras to pageant waves—is undeniable. What accounts for the enduring power of beauty pageants? This course draws on inter-disciplinary scholarship across the social sciences and humanities to examine how and why pageantry and American femininity have become linked in the public consciousness. By the end of this course you will be able to use beauty pageants as a lens to carefully examine gender, race, age, and appearance, and apply that critical thinking to other pop culture phenomena. WRIT

Spr AMST1906H S01 24420 T 4:00-6:30(16) (H. Levey Friedman)
Course usage information

AMST 1906I. Collecting Culture: Indigenous Objects, Colonialism, and Museums.

This course addresses "global indignity" in comparing ethnographic collections in Taiwan and North America. How do Anthropology museums maintain and interpret objects collected under English, US, or Japanese colonialism. In hands-on and virtual examination of museum collections, students follow ethnographic artifacts from useful circulation to glass cabinets—and ultimately to art galleries. We explore collecting and representation strategies of “ethnic” objects in relation to colonialism, decolonization, ethnic politics, and nationalism. What are strategies of the post-colonial museum and indigenous-led design? WRIT DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1906J. Race, Gentrification, and the Policing of Urban Space (PLCY 1701W).

Interested students must register for PLCY 1701W.

Spr AMST1906J S01 25999 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 1906K. Crimes of Gender and Sex: Producing and Imprisoning Criminals in the Age of Mass Incarceration.

Growing interest in mass incarceration has brought new attention to longstanding critiques of the criminal justice system. This course looks beyond failings such as “tough on crime” sentencing and racist policing to examine criminal justice as a system that defines and produces criminality. Specifically, we will examine criminalization as a social, political, and cultural process that not only makes certain bodies “criminal,” but also reinforces dominant beliefs about gender, sexuality, and sex. We will explore theories of criminality, methods of policing and imprisonment, rehabilitation initiatives, and prison activism through an intersectional lens. WRIT DPLL

Course usage information

AMST 1906N. Whiteness, Power, and Privilege: The Invention and Persistence of the White Race.

Terms like whiteness and white privilege have entered the American mainstream in the wake of racial tensions and the rise of movements like Black Lives Matter. This course seeks to situate historically, socially, psychologically, politically, economically, and corporeally what is meant by whiteness and how it affects our daily lives in this country and at a global level. Through engagement with classic texts in critical whiteness studies and select case-studies, students will discuss the invention, development, and power of whiteness. From the advent of race-based slavery to the 2016 Presidential Election, this course explores the meaning and power of whiteness. DPLL WRIT

Fall AMST1906N S01 17420 T 4:00-6:30(09) (M. Reilly)
Course usage information

AMST 1906P. Food in American Society and Culture.

How do we define American food and how does food define Americans? What determines what we eat, how we eat it, and what we believe we should eat? How is food used to construct and declare ethnic, racial, regional, class, and gender identities? How have food and nutrition been employed as signifiers of social justice and injustice and as sites of political struggle? What issues inform current discussions of the economics of local, national, and global food production and consumption? What is meant by eating responsibly? This course will examine these and other related question currently animating food studies.

Spr AMST1906P S01 26087 Arranged (R. Meckel)
Course usage information

AMST 1970. Independent Reading and Research.

Required of all honors candidates in the senior year. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 2010. Introduction to Interdisciplinary Methods.

Introduction to interdisciplinary studies required of all first-year graduate students in American Studies. Graduate students from other departments may enroll with permission of the instructor.

Fall AMST2010 S01 15457 Arranged (M. Martinez)
Course usage information

AMST 2020E. Introduction to Interdisciplinary American Studies.

This graduate-level course offers an introduction to the discipline of American Studies through a close reading of four important texts representing different methodologies and theories within the discipline. We will also read a series of seminal articles focused on transnationalism, highlighting the significance of border-crossings to the American experience throughout the semester. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with pedagogical approaches within American Studies, through active seminar discussions, fieldtrips within the community, and work with material and visual media as well as secondary texts.

Fall AMST2020E S01 15460 W 3:00-5:30(17) (C. Frank)
Course usage information

AMST 2220A. Digital Scholarship.

This course examines how the social sciences and humanities changed as a result of the information revolution. We will look at changes in museums, publishing, knowledge production, and pedagogy. Students learn digital tools and use them to create new media projects experimenting with public scholarship, digital humanities research, archival tools, and/or classroom possibilities. Digital novices welcome. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

AMST 2220B. Culture, Politics and the Metropolitan-Built Environment.

This interdisciplinary readings seminar will provide graduate students with an introduction to recent scholarly work on 20th century and contemporary cities and suburbs. Readings will be drawn from cultural, political, social, and intellectual history, American Studies, political science, sociology, and ethnography. They will investigate the interconnections between urban and suburban development and the role of ideology, class, gender, race, and globalization in shaping planning, architecture, culture, policy, politics, and social movements. This class is open to students in American Studies, History, Sociology, Political Science, Anthropology, and other disciplines who find themselves interested in multi-disciplinary approaches to the study of cities and suburbs.

Spr AMST2220B S01 24400 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (S. Zipp)
Course usage information

AMST 2220D. Museums in Their Communities.

This seminar examines in detail the internal workings of museums (of anthropology, art, history, science, etc.) and their place in their communities. Accessions, collections management, conservations, education, exhibition, marketing, research, and museum management are among the topics discussed. Open to graduate students only.

Course usage information

AMST 2220E. American Orientalism and Asian American Literary Criticism (ENGL 2760Y).

Interested students must register for ENGL 2760Y.

Course usage information

AMST 2220G. Old Media New Artists: Innovation and Contingency in African American Culture.

What are the defining characteristics of newness in twentieth-century African American culture? How have black creative artists repurposed their respective disciplines in accordance with and against the shifting proclivities of African American social politics? Through an interdisciplinary focus that considers music, literature, visual arts, and interactive media, this seminar proposes several alternative epistemological frameworks for recognizing the emerging artistry of our time. Enrollment is limited to 20 graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2220I. Skin Deep: Reading Race, Reading Form.

There is a movement away from symptomatic/paranoid readings of literature. In 2009, Stephen Best/Sharon Marcus pitched this in their call for surface readings, which deals with what is manifest/present in texts, rather than the latent/concealed. I hope to get beyond politically-instrumental readings of literature/to thinking in a sustained fashion about language/form/aesthetics of race. The seminar will divide between reading histories/theories of race (obsession with physical variation as race and technologies of seeing that we use to read race)/working through a range of post-nationalist works of literature/sharpening our understanding of reading as a mean-making event. Limited to Grad Students and seniors.

Course usage information

AMST 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall AMST2450 S01 14696 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 2500. Museum Interpretation of the American Experience.

A seminar examining methods of museum interpretation, the ways that museums convey information to the public with exhibits, tours, demonstrations, films, video tapes, slide shows, interactive computer programs, publications, and other techniques. We will visit museums that have an historical or anthropological focus and read theoretical and critical writings on the public interpretation of American material culture.

Course usage information

AMST 2510. Industrial Archaeology.

No description available. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 2520. American Studies: Professional Issues in American Studies.

This course explores the mechanics of a doctorate degree in American Studies. We will explore the constitution of our field through the elaboration of field exam lists and narratives, query its pedagogical application in the design of undergraduate syllabi, and begin to outline and enact our participation in the profession both within and beyond the academy. At the end of this class, students will have constructed a portfolio that will assist their progress towards a degree and provide the tools with which to chart pathways once a degree is in hand. S/NC

Fall AMST2520 S01 15458 Arranged (L. Alvarado)
Course usage information

AMST 2540. Methods in Public Humanities.

This course surveys public humanities work, including cultural heritage preservation and interpretation, museum collecting and exhibition, informal education, and cultural development. It also provides an overview of the contexts of that work in nonprofit organizations, including governance, management, and development.

Fall AMST2540 S01 16885 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (S. Smulyan)
Course usage information

AMST 2550A. Asian American Political Movements to 1970.

This research seminar will examine political movements in Asian immigrant communities in the United States and the Caribbean before the emergence of "Asian America" in the late 1960s.

Course usage information

AMST 2550B. The Japanese in the Americas.

A research seminar on the comparative historical experience of Japanese in Hawaii, mainland U.S., Brazil, and Peru. Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Course usage information

AMST 2550C. Advanced Seminar on Asian American History.

Advanced seminar on Asian-American history, diaspora studies and globalization.

Course usage information

AMST 2580. Managing and Evaluating Arts and Culture Institutions.

Cultural and arts organizations are re-assessing why they exist, who they serve and how they should be structured and supported to do their best work. This course explores how current and emerging field leaders, practicing artists and educators; trustees and donors, philanthropists and public officials answer these questions. Students will investigate how a particular institution is adapting (or not) to new conditions. Students will formulate responses to real world dilemmas from the perspective of Executive Directors, program officers, practicing artists, educators, and community members.

Fall AMST2580 S01 17340 W 3:00-5:30(17) (M. Vogl)
Course usage information

AMST 2590. Creativity, Community and Controversy in Cultural Policy.

The art of making good policy lies in making tough choices between competing options to maximize public good. Governments perceive the arts/arts-education as amenities and slash their budgets. However, creative placemaking initiatives, the expansion of the creative economy, the rise of design thinking suggest new ways for policy makers to constructively resolve apparent dilemmas to advance arts policy goals. The course explores public policies that stimulate the arts; how arts advocates make their case to public officials; the benefits of the arts to the communities; and how policy makers in many sectors in the US and internationally leverage/exploit, arts-based solutions.

Fall AMST2590 S01 17338 T 4:00-6:30(09) (M. Vogl)
Course usage information

AMST 2640. Mechanics of Cultural Policy in America.

This seminar presents and analyzes contemporary institutional initiatives and policies relating to culture, including public art, tourism, historic preservation, and museums. It demonstrates how political, social, cultural, advocacy, and media organizations from the local to international level shape policies designed to protect and present cultural sites and activities in society. Enrollment limited to 10 graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2650. Introduction to Public Humanities.

This class, a foundational course for the MA in Public Humanities with preference given to American Studies graduate students, will address the theoretical bases of the public humanities, including topics of history and memory, museums and memorials, the roles of expertise and experience, community cultural development, and material culture. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students.

Spr AMST2650 S01 24196 W 3:00-5:30(14) (S. Lubar)
Course usage information

AMST 2651. The Responsive Museum.

This course considers the many kinds of experiences available to people in art museums. Although art museums have tended to embrace the values of art history, visitors use them in surprising, personally meaningful, powerful ways. Among the topics we will activate: building community, stimulating creativity, evoking memory and associations, learning about the self and others, healing, and crossing cultural boundaries. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2652. Community Documentary and Storytelling.

This class focuses on ways that documentary methodologies and storytelling help individuals articulate and negotiate issues of race, ethnicity, gender and social class in local and regional communities. Through readings, discussions, and presentations by guest speakers, students will examine written, digital, visual, video/film, and oral presentations and performances as ways to express community stories. We will also consider how such projects can facilitate civic engagement. The class will involve participation in a community documentary project. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2653. Public Art: History, Theory, and Practice.

The course offers an opportunity for RISD and Brown students to work together to understand the growing interdisciplinary field of public art. We will explore the potential of working in the public realm as artists and/or arts administrators. Topics include: pivotal events and artworks that formed the history of public art from the early 20th century to the present; approaches to site-specificity; ideas of community and audience; current debates around defining the public and public space; temporary vs. permanent work; controversies in public art; memorials, monuments, and anti-monuments; case studies; public art administration models, among others.

Fall AMST2653 S02 16900 M 1:30-5:30(06) (J. Zweig)
Course usage information

AMST 2654. Designing Heritages: From Archaeological Sensibilities to Relational Heritages.

Do you believe in the past? This course takes as its starting assumption that pasts are not temporally distant from today. They are contemporary experiences whose structure and mediation impact how we live in our shared world. This course will explore the intellectual history of archaeological thought and the development of heritage theory. While simultaneously exploring practical design skills, it will provide context to contemporary synergies between art, archaeology and heritage studies through interdisciplinary studies of architecture, art history, cultural criticism, heritage studies and archaeological theory. Enrollment limited to 18 seniors and graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2655. Against Invisibility: Asian America/s, Collective Memory and the Public Humanities.

This seminar confronts the problem of Asian American invisibility in U.S. public culture. The popular “model minority” narrative about (primarily East) Asian Americans has effaced radically different trajectories of migration, community formation and racializations as well as sharp contradictions of class, gender, and sexuality. We will study different strategies and projects deployed by Asian American communities to confront, remember and memorialize collective memories of these struggles. Students will draw on their research and work with community groups to design exhibits, memorials, and arts projects that will help change this dynamic.

Course usage information

AMST 2656. Cultural Policy Planning.

Cultural policy is the aggregate of governmental activities in the arts, humanities, and heritage. This seminar explores its history and public/private context and offers practical insights about how to influence cultural policy design, especially methods to achieve public consensus through planning. Students discuss contemporary issues, examine policy planning principles, and learn practical methods through case study to develop policy recommendations. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2657. Museum Interpretation Practices.

Examines current interpretive practices and offers students the opportunity to participate in creating gallery interpretation for the museum context. Questions of material and form; models of attention and perception, the relationship between language and vision; the role of description in interpretation; and what constitutes learning through visual experience will be considered. Throughout the semester students will develop an interpretive practice through a series of workshops, exercises, site visits and critical discussions. Enrollment limited to 14: seven seniors and graduate students, along with seven RISD students.

Course usage information

AMST 2658. Releasing the Imagination in Public Humanities Practice.

Designed to stimulate and nourish creative approaches to work in museums and other venues of public humanities practice. Students will be invited into a series of creative adventures drawing on essential skills of close looking, deep listening, persuasive writing, and creative production. Essays from Maxine Greene's "Landscapes of Learning" and "Releasing the Imagination," as well as an array of personal essays, exhibition catalogues, fiction, and research from the fields of education, sociology, and psychology. Enrollment limited to 15 graduate students; undergraduates may be admitted with instructor permission.

Course usage information

AMST 2659. "Paradigm Dramas" Revisited: American Studies in Historical Perspective.

The course offers an in-depth exploration of the radical roots and continual transformations of the academic discipline of American Studies within particular historical contexts, beginning in the early 20th century into the present. We will read seminal texts responsible for the formation of defining moments in the discipline's history, including the "myth & symbol school," "American exceptionalism," multiculturalism, post-nationalism and transnational American Studies. Students will produce reviews of current texts and reflect on future possibilities for a mature and globalized American Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students.

Course usage information

AMST 2660. Projects in Public Humanities.

Devoted to one or more advanced projects in Public Humanities not covered in detail by the regular courses. Projects in public humanities provide practical, hands-on project and group project management experience that is essential for careers in museums, historic preservation, and cultural agencies. Students will work with faculty advisor to project completion. Written permission and topic description required. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. This course is repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: AMCV 2650 or demonstrated ability of equivalent experience. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

AMST 2670. Practicum in Public Humanities.

Practicums in public humanities provide practical, hands-on training that is essential for careers in museums, historic preservation, and cultural agencies. Students will work with faculty to find appropriate placements and negotiate a semester's or summer work, in general a specific project. Available only to students in the Public Humanities M.A. program.

Spr AMST2670 S01 26124 M 9:00-10:00(02) 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 2680. Practicum in Public Humanities.

Practicums in public humanities provide practical, hands-on training that is essential for careers in museums, historic preservation, and cultural agencies. Students will work with faculty to find appropriate placements and negotiate a semester's or summer work, in general a specific project. Available only to students in the Public Humanities M.A. program.

Fall AMST2680 S01 17080 M 9:00-10:00(01) (R. Potvin)
Spr AMST2680 S01 25814 M 9:00-10:00(02) (R. Potvin)
Course usage information

AMST 2690. Management of Cultural Institutions.

This course explores public humanities institutions as an organizational system interacting with broader community systems. Students gain an understanding of the managerial, governance and financial structures of public humanities organizations and how those structures relate to mission, programming and audience. The course is designed to help those who work on the program side of public humanities and cultural non-profits(as educators, librarians, curators, interpreters, exhibit designers, public programming coordinators, and/or grant makers) engage more strategically with planning, organizational behavior, revenue generation, finance, marketing, and governance.

Course usage information

AMST 2691. Poetry in Service to Schools and the Community.

Poetry in service to the community honors a connection between poetry and wisdom, assumes that poetry is a wisdom medium (vehicle, vessel, conveyance) toward more enlightened thinking and practice. In this way, it is also an ideal medium for extending our study and practice beyond Brown, conducting workshops in schools, community centers, youth detention facilities and elsewhere. The class emphasizes community building, in teaching pairs and classes and workshops throughout Providence, in Renga and workshop groups. Poetry is the connective tissue; building relationships is at the heart of the practice. Students will write and teach. Enrollment limited to 16.

Course usage information

AMST 2692. Digital Public Humanities.

What is “digital humanities” and how does it impact and intersect with the field of public humanities? Digital humanities work involves new approaches to reading, writing, research, publication, and curation: digital tools help us examine digital and non-digital material in innovative ways, and digital modes of communication help us reach new and wider ranges of audiences. This course provides students with the opportunity to create digital projects and utilize digital tools to further their academic and professional interests.

Course usage information

AMST 2693. Community Arts with Young People.

Blurring the boundaries between artist and audience, practitioners of community arts have engaged underrepresented audiences who have traditionally relegated to more passive forms of participation, including young people with little access to arts education. This class provides students the opportunity to research and/or to conduct their own community arts projects with young people in Providence. Students will develop a deeper and more critical understanding of theorizing and implementing community arts projects with youth; will examine how to create pedagogic conditions with youth through the arts and humanities, as well as ways to systematically observe, document, and analyze these pedagogies. Enrollment limited to 15.

Course usage information

AMST 2694. Decolonizing Public Humanities: Intersectional Approaches to Curatorial Work + Community Organizing.

This course will decenter experiences and cultural expectations attendant to whiteness, cis-maleness, able-bodiedness, heterosexuality, and middle/upper-classness in the public humanities,and thereby explore the contemporary problems and possibilities of intersectional approaches in the field. What do contemporary paradigms of “diversity,” “public engagement,” and “cultural organizing” have to teach us about effective and ethical public humanities approaches? Do different, multiply marginalized communities of affinity practice entirely different public humanities? How are cultural interventions changing to accommodate the demands of an increasingly segmented public sphere?

Fall AMST2694 S02 17353 TTh 6:40-8:00PM(05) (M. Salkind)
Course usage information

AMST 2695. Museum as Idea.

What should museums be in the 21st ce? Are museums of today relevant to cultural historical, scientific, artistic, political and educational purposes? How can they provide more meaningful encounters with objects to inspire curiosity and to honor their creators? How can museums relate to their diverse communities today? Must they own objects to be museums? Growing from the historical basis for museum theory, We'll suggest alternative directions, create platforms for new perspectives. We'll rely on readings, discussion, and meetings with museum leaders, and on independent creative research. All will be challenged to invent their own concept of "museum". Enrollment limited to 12.

Course usage information

AMST 2696. The Promise of Informal Learning.

The course will take as its focus "Facilitated informal learning" - learning that happens outside of formal learning environments but is facilitated by an educator. It will explore facilitated informal learning within cultural institutions - museums, historic houses, zoos, libraries, science centers, children's museums. The course will explore the pedagogical methods, underlying philosophies and learning theories, audience, debates, and goals of facilitated informal learning today.

Course usage information

AMST 2697. Museum Interpretation Practices.

This course examines current interpretive practices and offers students the opportunity to participate in creating gallery interpretation for the museum context. Questions of material and form; models of attention and perception, the relationship between language and vision; the role of description in interpretation; and what constitutes learning through visual experience will be considered. Throughout the semester students will develop their interpretive practice through a series of workshops, exercises, site visits, and critical discussions. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spr AMST2697 S03 25913 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

AMST 2699. Digital Storytelling.

This course surveys the current state of digital storytelling, examining topics ranging from digital curation to data journalism to social media activism (and beyond). We will consider the narrative conventions, multimodal dimensions, and mechanics of a wide range of digital stories, carefully examining both the tools available to creators and the theoretical perspectives that motivate their authors. Students will determine best practices for digital storytelling projects through their engagement with course readings, their participation in in-class workshop sessions where we experiment with particular tools and publishing platforms, and their implementation of a digital storytelling project. Enrollment limited to 15.

Spr AMST2699 S02 26109 TTh 1:00-2:20 (J. McGrath)
Course usage information

AMST 2760Z. African American Literature After 1965: Nationalism and Dissent (ENGL 2760Z).

Interested students must register for ENGL 2760Z.

Course usage information

AMST 2920. Independent Reading and Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Search Banner by instructor name to find the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. You will need instructor permission to register and the course may be repeated with different instructors. Open to American Studies graduate students only. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 2921. Independent Reading and Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Search Banner by instructor name to find the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. You will need instructor permission to register and the course may be repeated with different instructors. Open to American Studies graduate students only. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 2922. Independent Reading and Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Search Banner by instructor name to find the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. You will need instructor permission to register and the course may be repeated with different instructors. Open to American Studies graduate students only. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 2923. Independent Reading and Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Search Banner by instructor name to find the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. You will need instructor permission to register and the course may be repeated with different instructors. Open to American Studies graduate students only. S/NC

Course usage information

AMST 2950. Independent Reading and Research in Public Humanities.

For MA in Public Humanities Students who wish to do independent reading and research.

Course usage information

AMST 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Fall AMST2990 S01 14697 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr AMST2990 S01 23797 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

ETHN 0066L. Beyond World Music: Singing and Language (ANTH 0066L).

Interested students must register for ANTH 0066L.

Course usage information

ETHN 0090A. The Border/La Frontera.

We will examine the historical formation, contemporary reality and popular representation of the U.S.-Mexico border from a bilingual (English-Spanish), multicultural (U.S., Mexican, and Latino), and transnational perspective within the framework of globalization. We will explore the construction of border communities, lives and identities on both sides of the international divide, and pay particular attention to the movement of peoples in both directions. We will read materials, watch films, and conduct class discussions in English and Spanish. Comfort and reasonable proficiency in Spanish is required, but native command is not necessary. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT

Spr ETHN0090A S01 24204 W 3:00-5:30(14) (E. Hu-Dehart)
Course usage information

ETHN 0090B. Critical Mixed Race Studies in the Twenty-First Century.

This course will guide students through an understanding of the historical, contemporary, and ideological rationale behind the constructions of mixed race, and how mixed race theory plays out in history, art, and contemporary media. This course aims to expand the conversations of mixed race beyond the stereotypes of tragic mulattos and happy hapas, instead interrogating what mixed race looks like in the twenty-first century and what historical precedents can explain current phenomena. DPLL FYS

Course usage information

ETHN 0091. An Introduction to Africana Studies (AFRI 0090).

Interested students must register for AFRI 0090.

Course usage information

ETHN 0100. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 0100).

Interested students must register for ANTH 0100.

Course usage information

ETHN 0100V. Inventing Asian American Literature (ENGL 0100V).

Interested students must register for ENGL 0100V.

Fall ETHN0100V S01 16876 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

ETHN 0130. American Heritage: Democracy, Inequality, and Public Policy (SOC 0130).

Interested students must register for SOC 0130.

Course usage information

ETHN 0190C. American (Mass)culinities: Sexuality, Race and Aesthetics (AMST 0190C).

Interested students must register for AMST 0190C.

Course usage information

ETHN 0190E. It's the End of the World As We Know It: Zombie and Apocalypse Narratives in Pop Culture (AMST0190E).

Interested students must register for AMST 0190E.

Course usage information

ETHN 0190F. Beyond the Tourist Trap: The Past, Present, and Future of Asian American Urban Spaces (AMST 0190F).

Interested students must register for AMST 0190F.

Course usage information

ETHN 0190G. The Fringe is the Fabric: Anti-Immigrant Movements in the United States (AMST 0190G).

Interested students must register for AMST 0190G.

Course usage information

ETHN 0190X. Gendered Mobility: Migrant Women Workers in a Globalized Economy (AMST 0190X).

Interested students must register for AMST 0190X.

Course usage information

ETHN 0191P. Beyond Chinatown: The Past, Present, and Future of Asian American Spaces (AMST 0191P).

Interested students must register for AMST 0191P.

Course usage information

ETHN 0201G. Killing them Softly: Satire and Stereotype in African-American Literature (ENGL 0201G).

Interested students must register for ENGL 0201G.

Course usage information

ETHN 0210. Blacks in Latin American History and Society (AFRI 0210).

Interested students must register for AFRI 0210.

Course usage information

ETHN 0270. Introduction to Latino/a History.

The Latino/a population in the United States continues to be mischaracterized in popular culture, political debates, and in the media. How can one discuss a group as diverse as Mexican Americans, Dominican Americans, Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and, most recently, Americans from Central America? This course will introduce key moments of racial formation for Latinos/as. Students will explore state policies, social phenomena, and social revolutions that influence the daily life of Latinos/as in the US and in US territories. Students will analyze cultural texts and social policies and will develop a facility with key concepts in the field. DPLL

Course usage information

ETHN 0271. Introduction to Latina/o History.

The Latino/a population in the United States continues to be mischaracterized in popular culture, political debates, and in the media. How can one discuss a group as diverse as Mexican Americans, Dominican Americans, Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and, most recently, Americans from Central America? This course will introduce key moments of racial formation for Latinas/os. Students will explore state policies, social phenomena, and social revolutions that influence the daily life of Latinas/os in the US and in US territories. Students will analyze cultural texts and social policies and will develop a facility with key concepts in the field. DPLL WRIT

Spr ETHN0271 S01 25773 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (M. Martinez)
Course usage information

ETHN 0290D. Women, Sex and Gender in Islam (RELS 0290D).

Interested students must register for RELS 0290D.

Course usage information

ETHN 0300. Ethnic Writing.

This course will explore the idea of "ethnic writing" in both theory and practice. Students will examine how writers draw upon race and ethnicity (not always their own) to produce creative works and will then put these ideas in practice in their own writing, including but not limited to fiction, poetry, memoir, and inter-genre work. Interested students should attend the first session prepared for an in-class exercise that will determine attendance. Enrollment limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.

Course usage information

ETHN 0301. Culture and Health (ANTH 0300).

Interested students must register for ANTH 0300.

Course usage information

ETHN 0500. Introduction to American/Ethnic Studies.

Considers the U.S. as a society whose unifying identity is rooted in ethnic and racial diversity. Explores the historical and contemporary experiences of racial and ethnic groups in this country and analyzes different forms of representation of those experiences, as well as representations of the racial and ethnic stratification in the U.S. imagination. DPLL

Fall ETHN0500 S02 16281 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (E. Hoover)
Course usage information

ETHN 0510F. Che Guevara, The Man and the Myths (COLT 0510F).

Interested students must register for COLT 0510F.

Course usage information

ETHN 0512. Introduction to Latina/o Cultural Studies.

This course serves as an introduction to the many discourses that structure and challenge Latinidad -- the feeling of being Latina/o. Through historically situated critical analysis of Latina/o cultural production, including theoretical essays, literature, and film, we will meditate on the major issues that shape the Latino/a U.S. experience. We will study how Latinidad is constructed as an identity and how that identity varies across origin, place, and time. Major themes we will explore include include the legacies of U.S. colonialism; cultural nationalism, citizenship, immigration and exile; labor and class; race and ethnicity; and gender and sexuality. WRIT

Fall ETHN0512 S01 15462 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (L. Alvarado)
Course usage information

ETHN 0700E. Postcolonial Literature (ENGL 0700E).

Interested students must register for ENGL 0700E.

Course usage information

ETHN 0710B. Ethics of Black Power (AFRI 0710B).

Interested students must register for AFRI 0710B.

Course usage information

ETHN 0710F. Being There: Bearing Witness in Modern Times (ENGL 0710F).

Interested students must register for ENGL 0710F.

Course usage information

ETHN 0710J. Introduction to Asian American Literature (ENGL 0710J).

Interested students must register for ENGL 0710J.

Course usage information

ETHN 0750B. Hispanics in the United States (HISP 0750B).

Interested students must register for HISP 0750B.

Course usage information

ETHN 0790A. Latina/o Literature.

This course will introduce students to a broad array of Latina/o literature- fiction, poetry, drama, and graphic novels. While there is a long tradition of Latina/o literature in the United States, we will focus primarily on a period from 1970 to the present. Aimed to familiarize students with debates in the field, the readings will also include critical essays. Enrollment limited to 20.

Spr ETHN0790A S01 24197 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (R. Rodriguez)
Course usage information

ETHN 0790B. Native Americans and the Media.

This course explores the ways in which Indigenous Americans have been constructed in the White American imagination and through self-representation from Frontier phase of American history, through contemporary images in American popular culture and media. Through films created about, and later by, Native people we will explore the evolution of the image of Native American in America culture.

Course usage information

ETHN 0790C. Theory Into Practice: Service Learning at a Dual Language Charter School.

Students will explore Dual Language (Two-Way Immersion; Bilingual) education through a variety of activities, using the service-learning model. Students will contribute at least 2 hours per week at the International Charter School (K-5), and another two hours in seminar at Brown University in conversation about readings, service, and politics pertaining to Two-Way Immersion education.

Course usage information

ETHN 0790D. Race and Remembering.

This course will explore struggles for power over narrating history and engages current tensions in public history and national memory. Together students will consider ongoing struggles to reckon with the violent histories of slavery, empire, colonialism, nationalism, and democracy in the US. Students will engage questions regarding remembering, forgetting, memorializing, and reckoning with histories of racial formation and violence. What are the methodological and narrative pitfalls of representing these histories? What are the possibilities for reckoning with violent histories? This course will concentrated on the Americas, but will also incorporate global understanding of legacies of narrative and memory. WRIT DPLL SOPH

Course usage information

ETHN 0810. Belonging and Displacement: Cross-Cultural Identities (POBS 0810).

Interested students must register for POBS 0810.

Course usage information

ETHN 0820G. Race and Political Representation (POLS 0820G).

Interested students must register for POLS 0820G.

Course usage information

ETHN 0880. Hip Hop Music and Cultures.

Interested students must register for AFRI 0880 S01 (CRN 27044).

Course usage information

ETHN 0900. Introduction to Deaf Studies (SIGN 0900).

Interested students must register for SIGN 0900.

Course usage information

ETHN 0901I. Body Count: Technologies of Life and Death (MCM 0901I).

Interested students must register for MCM 0901I.

Course usage information

ETHN 0901L. African American Media Visibility: Image, Culture, Crisis (MCM 0901L).

Interested students must register for MCM 0901L.

Course usage information

ETHN 0980. The Research Process: Qualitative and Ethnographic Methods.

Paying attention to methodology and research design can enhance the capacity of research in any field and contribute to knowledge production. The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to a variety of social science research methods with an emphasis on ethnographic, mixed-methods research (research-design, data-collection, and data analysis). Social science research is a craft, and like any other craft, it takes practice to do it well. This seminar emphasizes a "hands-on," "applied," and/or practical approach to learning. The course is suited to students who have an on-going research project they plan to pursue throughout the semester. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 0990. Black Lavender: Black Gay/Lesbian Plays/Dramatic Constructions in the American Theatre (AFRI 0990).

Interested students must register for AFRI 0990.

Course usage information

ETHN 1020. Race and Language in the United States.

This course will examine the role of language in the social construction of race, racism and racial identity. We will address the different language issues facing African Americans, Latinos/as, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and speakers of "accented" English. We will explore current issues such as the Oakland Ebonics case, English- Only legislation, bilingualism, and hate speech vs. free speech.

Course usage information

ETHN 1020C. The Afro-Luso-Brazilian Triangle (AFRI 1020C).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1020C.

Course usage information

ETHN 1038. Contemporary Indigenous Education in North America.

This course examines education in contemporary contexts for Indigenous students in North America . DPLL

Spr ETHN1038 S01 25849 M 3:00-5:30(13) (A. Keene)
Course usage information

ETHN 1039. History and Resistance in Representations of Native Peoples.

Throughout history, Native peoples have been portrayed through a stock set of stereotypes such as savage warriors, Indian princesses, or mystical shamans. These images surround us in advertising, news media, Hollywood, sports mascots, and Halloween costumes. This course will examine the foundations of these representations and their connections to colonization, with a focus on contemporary and ongoing examples, from Johnny Depp’s Tonto, Urban Outfitters’ “Navajo” products, to JK Rowlings’ “History of Magic in North America,” with a focus on the ways Native peoples are taking back and reshaping Native representations through activism, social media, art, design, film, and other realms. DPLL SOPH

Fall ETHN1039 S01 17025 W 12:20-2:50(12) (A. Keene)
Course usage information

ETHN 1050. Race in the Americas.

This class will explore issues of race, racial identity construction, and racism throughout Central and Latin America (including the Caribbean). This is a class in comparative race relations that covers peoples of African, Asian, Native, and European descent. Topics covered include: miscegenation, diaspora, space, socioeconomic inequality, and nation building. Previous coursework in Ethnic Studies or similar suggested.

Course usage information

ETHN 1051. History of African-American Education (EDUC 1050).

Interested students must register for EDUC 1050.

Course usage information

ETHN 1060E. West African Writers and Political Kingdom (AFRI 1060E).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1060E.

Course usage information

ETHN 1060I. Africana Philosophy of Religion (AFRI 1060I).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1060I.

Course usage information

ETHN 1070. Ethnic Studies Practicum: Strategy, Tactics and Tools for Social Change.

This is an academic and reflective practicum on the politics and processes of social justice organizing. Students will learn about the historical and political evolution of organizing, the connection between organizing and ideology/vision, concrete tools and tactics used in the strategies of social justice organizing, and elements of running non-profit organizations. This course will require, equally, academic vigor, personal leadership and involvement, and introspective analysis. Students will be required to intern at a local organization in Providence, and reflect on their involvement utilizing the theories and discussions gained through the classroom. This course will also explore connections between local, national, and international movement-building. In keeping with this course's commitment to real-life organizing examples and experience, course instructors and guest speakers are themselves experienced organizers and Executive Directors of social change organizations. This will be a small class with preference given to students with some experience in community, student/youth, and/or or labor organizing. Permission of instructors required: contact sara@daretowin.org or koheiishihara@gmail.com.

Course usage information

ETHN 1071. China Modern: An Introduction to the Literature of Twentieth-Century China (EAST 1070).

Interested students must register for EAST 1070.

Course usage information

ETHN 1090. Black Freedom Struggle Since 1945 (AFRI 1090).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1090.

Course usage information

ETHN 1100. Korean Culture and Film (EAST 1100).

Interested students must register for EAST 1100.

Course usage information

ETHN 1110. Voices Beneath the Veil (AFRI 1110).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1110.

Course usage information

ETHN 1111. African Issues in Anthropological Perspective (ANTH 1110).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1110.

Course usage information

ETHN 1123. Native North Americans in the Twenty-first Century (ANTH 1123).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1123.

Course usage information

ETHN 1133. Ethnonationalism- The Asian Arena (ANTH 1133).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1133.

Course usage information

ETHN 1170. African American Women's History (AFRI 1170).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1170.

Course usage information

ETHN 1201C. Imagined Networks, Glocal Connections (MCM 1201C).

Interested students must register for MCM 1201C.

Course usage information

ETHN 1210. Afro-Brazilians and the Brazilian Polity (AFRI 1210).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1210.

Course usage information

ETHN 1250. Twentieth-Century Western Theatre and Performance (TAPS 1250).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1250.

Course usage information

ETHN 1251. Violence and the Media (ANTH 1251).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1251.

Course usage information

ETHN 1255. Anthropology of Disasters (ANTH 1255).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1255.

Course usage information

ETHN 1260. The Organizing Tradition of the Southern Civil Rights Movement (AFRI 1260).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1260.

Course usage information

ETHN 1270. Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World (SOC 1270).

Interested students must register for SOC 1270.

Course usage information

ETHN 1271. Performances in the Asias (TAPS 1270).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1270.

Course usage information

ETHN 1310. African American Politics (POLS 1310).

Interested students must register for POLS 1310.

Course usage information

ETHN 1311. International Health: Anthropological Perspectives (ANTH 1310).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1310.

Course usage information

ETHN 1320. Anthropology and International Development: Ethnographic Perspectives on Poverty/Progress (ANTH1320).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1320.

Course usage information

ETHN 1360. Africana Studies: Knowledge, Texts and Methodology (AFRI 1360).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1360.

Course usage information

ETHN 1411. Nations within States (ANTH 1411).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1411.

Course usage information

ETHN 1421. Ethnic American Folklore: Continuity and the Creative Process (ANTH 1421).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1421.

Course usage information

ETHN 1430. The Psychology of Race, Class, and Gender (EDUC 1430).

Interested students must register for EDUC 1430.

Course usage information

ETHN 1440. Theorizing the Black Diaspora (AFRI 1440).

Interested students must register for AFRI 1440.

Course usage information

ETHN 1500. Mellon Mays Research Seminar.

This seminar is a required course for Mellon Mays Fellows with Junior standing. Topics will include research methods; health and wellness in the pursuit of scholarship; barriers to success; and cohort peer review. The outcome of this course will be a completed research plan, literature review and thesis proposal. Open to juniors who have already been accepted into the MMUF program. Instructor permission. Grade option S/NC. DPLL WRIT

Fall ETHN1500 S01 17449 F 12:00-1:50 (S. Delalue)
Course usage information

ETHN 1600C. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Education: Education and the Portuguese-Speaking World (POBS 1600C).

Interested students must register for POBS 1600C.

Course usage information

ETHN 1611M. Trauma and the Shame of the Unspeakable: The Holocaust, Slavery, Childhood Sexual Abuse (AMST 1611M).

Interested students must register for AMST 1611M.

Course usage information

ETHN 1611W. Asian Americans and Popular Culture (AMST 1611W).

Interested students must register for AMST 1611W.

Course usage information

ETHN 1611Z. The Century of Immigration (AMST 1611Z).

Interested students must register for AMST 1611Z.

Course usage information

ETHN 1623. Archaeology of Death (ANTH 1623).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1623.

Course usage information

ETHN 1624. Indians, Colonists, and Africans in New England (ANTH 1624).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1624.

Course usage information

ETHN 1625. Questions of Remembrance: Archaeological Perspectives on Slavery in the New World (ANTH 1625).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1625.

Course usage information

ETHN 1630. Performativity and the Body: Staging Gender, Staging Race (TAPS 1630).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1630.

Course usage information

ETHN 1670. Latino/a Theatre and Performance (TAPS 1670).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1670.

Course usage information

ETHN 1700. The Asian American Experience in Higher Education (EDUC 1700).

Interested students must register for EDUC 1700.

Course usage information

ETHN 1710I. Harlem Renaissance: The Politics of Culture (ENGL 1710I).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1710I.

Course usage information

ETHN 1710J. African Literature in Globalization Time (ENGL 1710J).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1710J.

Course usage information

ETHN 1710M. Nationalizing Narratives: Race, Nationalism, and the 20th-C. American Novel (ENGL 1710M).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1710M.

Course usage information

ETHN 1750A. Immigrant Social Movements: Bridging Theory and Practice.

What is the impact of legal status on the potential for undocumented individuals' participation in a social movement? Relatedly, how is the heterogeneity of movement participants represented in campaigns and political protest? In this course we will examine the undocumented immigrant movement in the United States today through readings, films and guest lectures from local immigrant rights activists. As part of the course students will be partnered with local community based organizations where they will complete a semester-long internship. DPLL

Spr ETHN1750A S01 24201 T 4:00-6:30(16) (K. Escudero)
Course usage information

ETHN 1760P. "Extravagant" Texts: Experiments in Asian American Writing (ENGL 1760P).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1760P.

Course usage information

ETHN 1761V. The Korean War in Color (ENGL 1761V).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1761V.

Course usage information

ETHN 1805. First Nations: the People and Cultures of Native North America to 1800 (HIST 1805).

Interested students must register for HIST 1805.

Course usage information

ETHN 1810. Language and Power (ANTH 1810).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1810.

Course usage information

ETHN 1810G. Fiction and History (COLT 1810G).

Interested students must register for COLT 1810G.

Course usage information

ETHN 1811D. Reading Revolution, Representations of Cuba, 1959-The Present (COLT 1811D).

Interested students must register for COLT 1811D.

Course usage information

ETHN 1812V. War, Anti-War, Postwar: Culture and Contestation in the Americas (COLT 1812V).

Interested students must register for COLT 1812V.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870A. Ethnic Los Angeles.

This course will focus on the historical and contemporary struggles of people of color in Los Angeles, California, throughout the twentieth century. We will take an interdisciplinary approach, examining films, literature, and history pertaining to the city. There are no prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870B. Latino/a Communities Seminar.

This seminar's first goal is to introduce students to the social and economic issues that affect contemporary Latino communities. The second goal is to train the students in empirical fieldwork research methods in Ethnic Studies. The seminar searches for ways to link the academy and communities through empirical research that addresses the needs and demands of Latino/a urban communities.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870C. Native North Americans in the Media: Representations and Self Representations in Film.

How have Native North American peoples been represented and self-represented in film from the early 1900s to today? Filmmaking is employed to explore the construction and stereotyping of Indigenous peoples of North America in American popular culture, as well as the recent (re)construction of Native identities by American Indian peoples. Specific topics including identity, race, gender, violence, religion and spirituality, cultural appropriation, and Native humor frame the analysis and comparison of American popular and Native representations of Native Americans. The course centers on the screening and discussion of selected movies, complemented by academic and non-academic literature in the form of books, articles, reviews, and other media materials. Completion of introductory courses on Native American peoples and cultures is strongly recommended.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870D. Chicana/o Fiction.

This course is a survey of Chicana/o fiction from the 1950s to the present. We will be reading novels as well as stories, with the occasional inclusion of poetry. Our literary texts will be supplemented with secondary sources--history, literary criticism, cultural studies, and the like. The course will also ask students to consider the relationship between Chicana/o literature and other writing in the Americas.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870E. Queer Latina/o Literature and Theory.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870F. Eating Cultures.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1870G. Reading Race: Advanced Seminar in Critical Race Theory.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890A. Seminar on Latino Politics in the United States.

Advanced seminar on the politics of Latino communities in the United States.Considers the history of Latino politics; participation, partisanship and office-holding; immigration and citizenship; social movements; public policy; gender and race; and pan-ethnic identity. Advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Includes optional community research project. Some familiarity with Latino studies, U.S. politics, Latin American politics, or ethnic studies would be helpful. DPLL

Course usage information

ETHN 1890B. Native American and European Contact in Early North America, ca. 1600-1750.

This course will consider contact between Native Americans and Europeans in the early Americas with particular attention to interactions in the greater New England area. Readings stress the diversity of Native lifeways and how contact changed both Natives and Europeans. An equally important theme is to examine the ways in which the history of Native peoples has often been ignored, changed, appropriated, and distorted, as well as reclaimed and re-evaluated over time. Therefore, while the focus is on the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the class will also consider how the histories of that time have been told and retold in later eras, including our own. We will also pay attention to the way in which different historians undertake the study of the past. This seminar has no prerequisites, but please be advised that the workload is substantial. If the class is oversubscribed, preference will be given to Ethnic Studies concentrators. DPLL

Course usage information

ETHN 1890C. Business, Culture, and Globalization: An Ethnographic Perspective.

The exchange of goods, resources, or commodities is commonly understood as business transactions. Business transactions have always been global, but in the new information age, it seems that many can take part in this exchange system. What is termed as "globalization" has become increasingly popular, yet efforts to clearly define what the term actually means continue to change. This course aims at complicating, rather than simplifying, the term and to understand how business transactions unfold in a "global" economy.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890D. Indigenous Music of the Americas.

Introduces students to music of indigenous communities in North, Central, and South America, with particular attention to the relation between performance, cultural identity, and social change. We will focus especially on indigenous societies in the Andes, Brazil, and the United States and Canada. The course is designed to explore common links between indigenous history, worldview, and performance throughout the hemisphere, while simultaneously illuminating how distinct experiences of colonization and recovery have fostered unique musical practices.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890E. Johnny, Are You Queer: Narratives of Race and Sexuality.

This course is intended as a wide-ranging romp through the fields of queer theory and narratives of race and sexuality. It will move from the 1980s through the present looking at representations of queerness and race in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, music, etc. We will investigate the convergences and divergences in the discourses of race and sexuality.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890F. Bad Boys and Bad Girls in Asian American Literature and Culture.

From the angry Asian men of the "Aiiieeeee!" anthologies to Margaret Cho's raucous comedy acts, bad boys and bad girls in Asian American literature and culture have been interpreted as helping to shatter the model minority stereotype. This course examines bad subjects, especially in their relations to popular culture, gender, and sexuality. We will investigate what puts the "bad" in bad boys and bad girls, how ideas of "bad" change, and what the bad subject does for readers and writers. Readings and viewings to include Frank Chin, John Okada, Gish Jen, Margaret Cho, Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, Better Luck Tomorrow. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890G. Native Americans in the Media: Representation and Self-Representation on Film.

How have Native North American peoples been represented and self-represented in film? Specific topics include identity, race, gender, violence, religion and spirituality, cultural appropriation, and Native humor frame the analysis and comparison of American popular and Native representations of Native Americans. The course centers on screening and discussing selected movies, complemented by academic and non-academic literature such as books, articles, and reviews. Completion of introductory courses on Native American cultures is recommended, but not necessary. All students are welcome. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890H. Introduction to American Indian Studies.

Introduces students to both historical and contemporary issues in North America. Issues of identity, sovereignty, representation and self-representation are key components. Because this course is inter-disciplinary, we will use texts from anthropology, cultural studies, history, film and literature as tools to understand and appreciate the ways in which American Indian cultures survive, flourish and shape the United States. No special background is required. All students are welcome. Enrollment limited to 30.

Spr ETHN1890H S01 25833 TTh 9:00-10:20(08) (N. Laluk)
Course usage information

ETHN 1890J. Native American Environmental Health Movements.

American Indian reservations are home to countless sources of environmental contamination, which impact residents' health and ability to maintain cultural practices. In response to this assault, and the numerous scientific studies that often follow, Native communities are taking charge of the research process, and partnering with scientists to explore health affects and remediation possibilities. Through case studies, we will examine how Native communities are pushing to "indigenize" the research process. This class is broadly interdisciplinary, and will be useful for students interested in contemporary issues in Native American communities, and students intending to conduct scientific research in minority communities. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890K. Engendering Empire.

This class studies the ways in which empire is a gendered construct. We will also keep in mind that gender never exists in isolation, but on the contrary is always on the crossroads with race, class, and ethnicity. How have brown and black women's bodies borne the mark of empire? This class will closely examine the relationship between empire and gender, specifically this class will discuss this relationship as it has developed in the Americas.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890L. (De)Colonizing Women: Writing the Third Space.

As women of color, we are in the intersections of race, gender, and class. A feminist movement that does not incorporate analyses of race and class cannot meet our needs. A civil rights movement that does not address gender cannot meet our needs; therefore, we create our own space -- a third space. This course reads the literature, poetry, film and theory of third space feminism in the United States. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

Course usage information

ETHN 1890M. Treaty Rights and Food Fights: Eating Local in Indian Country.

In many Native American communities the push to "eat local" is often based on reviving a traditional food culture as well as a way of promoting better health. This class explores the disparate health conditions faced by Native communities, and the efforts by many groups to address these health problems through increasing community access to traditional foods, whether by gardening projects or a revival of hunting and fishing traditions. We will examine the ways in which Native food movements have converged and diverged from general American local food movements, and the struggles they often face in reviving treaty-guaranteed food ways.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890N. Thawing the "Frozen Indian"; American Indian Museum Representation.

This course examines the role of museums as sites where issues of identity, memory, place, and power intersect. We will review the histories, theories and paradigms that have influenced collecting processes and exhibitions, focusing on representations of Native American Indian peoples. We will explore the ways in which Native people have spoken out against conventional museum practice and have sought to reshape it as a means of decolonizing their history, as well as utilizing museums to their benefit to both preserve and promote Native art and culture. How can non-Native scholars and museum professionals contribute to this effort? Enrollment limited to 15. DPLL

Course usage information

ETHN 1890O. The Latina/o Novel.

This course is an advanced seminar in the study of the contemporary Latina/o Novel. Close attention will be paid to the social and historical context of the work with a particular attention to the form and style of the novel. We will read about eight to ten novels over the course of the semester. Rigorous participation is expected in class discussion. The class aims to hone your written and oral communication skills in the analysis of the Latina/o novel.

Fall ETHN1890O S01 16052 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (R. Rodriguez)
Course usage information

ETHN 1890P. Introduction to Native American Literature.

This survey course introduces several prominent genres of Native American literary production, including oral traditions, nonfiction essay, novel, short story, and stand-up comedy/performance. Selections are drawn primarily from Native American/Aboriginal writers and performers in the United States and Canada from the nineteenth century to present, including indigenous women from Pacific Islander communities. In addition to genre considerations, particular attention will be given to the social, cultural, and political contexts in which these works were produced.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890Q. The Hispanic Caribbean and its Diasporas.

The purpose of this course is to examine the history and cultures of the Hispanic Caribbean. An enduring feature of the region as a whole is its cultural diversity and vitality. Perhaps to a degree unsurpassed among world regions, the Caribbean is a set of immigrant societies, shaped by successive waves of European, Africa and Asian settlers. Through art, music, and literature Caribbean people have not just borrowed from but added to Western civilization and the pan-African heritage. Increasingly, Hispanic Caribbean people are making their voices heard as immigrants in the U.S. and the former colonial metropoles of Europe.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890R. Latina Feminisms.

This course will serve as a focused and rigorous exploration of Latina feminist cultural production. Our analysis driven seminar discussions will include critical consideration of novels, short stories, film, and performance and visual art largely by an about Latina women. Their work will address topics that include: gendered expectations, non-normative sexuality, race hierarchies, labor, reproductive justice, and gendered violence. Together we will query how cultural objects come to function as salient social and political texts in order to ascertain the contributions and challenges that Latina feminists bring to dominant discourses of race, gender, sexuality, and nationalism, among others.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890S. Youth, Art, Engagement and Social Justice.

This course is designed for students concerned with the challenges, theoretical models, and best practices of academic research and advocacy relationships. The goals of this course are to navigate the challenges of bridging the gap between the academy, community-based organizations, and social justice research and to accrue experience forging these partnerships. This course has a practice component where students develop a project with a non-profit organization and a portion of each course session is devoted to discussion about progress and challenges of each students project.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890T. Race, Gentrification, and the Policing of Urban Space (PLCY 1701W).

Interested students must register for PLCY 1701W.

Course usage information

ETHN 1890U. Extravagant Texts: Reading the World Through Asian American Literature.

In this course we study a body of writings that self-consciously move beyond the topics and genres with which Asian American literature has traditionally been associated—that are, in Maxine Hong’s Kingston’s formulation, “extravagant.” We explore works that adopt a transnational or diasporic perspective and that are written in such genres as magical realism, speculative fiction, graphic novels, and plays. In addition to more conventional concerns like racism or immigration, these works also address such issues as empire, war, mixed-race identity, adoption, and sexuality. Writers we examine include: Theresa Cha, Jessica Hagedorn, David Henry Hwang, Adrian Tomine and Karen Tei Yamashita. DPLL

Spr ETHN1890U S01 24397 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) (D. Kim)
Course usage information

ETHN 1890V. Asian Americans and the Struggle for Social Justice.

In 1868, in the largest strike that America had ever seen, ten thousand Chinese workers struck Central Pacific Railroad. One hundred years later, Asian Americans, now stereotyped as the “model minority,” are rendered invisible in current struggles for social justice. Yet as railroad workers, laundrymen, farmworkers, draft resistors, sewing women and nurses, Asian Americans have left us a rich legacy of legal, social and political activism. Particular attention will be paid to solidarity across racial, gender, and national boundaries. DPLL

Fall ETHN1890V S01 17067 MWF 9:00-9:50(01) (R. Lee)
Fall ETHN1890V S01 17067 W 9:00-9:50(01) (R. Lee)
Course usage information

ETHN 1892. Race, Class and Gender in Latino Communities.

Examines the roles of racial, class, and gender identities, in the emergence and consolidation of Latino political power in the United States. We look at Latino racial attitudes and racial hierarchies, as "inherited" from Latin American social systems, and as developed here in the U.S. We explore class politics as they shape Latino social movements, economic conditions, and communities, and we analyze the impact of Latino immigration and union membership on organized labor. We consider gender roles and patriarchy in Latino families, and the roles of intersectionality and feminism in Latino politics. Enrollment limited to 40. DPLL

Course usage information

ETHN 1900A. Alien Nation: US Immigration in Comparative Perspectives.

Latina/o immigration to the United States has reshaped the meaning of "America" over the last hundred years. We will study Latina/os in comparison to other immigrants and examine how US immigration policy has created a nation partly composed of "alien" residents--some citizens, others not--who have constructed alternative notions of belonging.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900B. Community, Language and Literacy: A Practicum.

This course examines adult language and literacy learning and approaches to teaching in community settings. It is designed to support students’ work teaching language and literacy to immigrant adults. Working with the Swearer Center and its community partners students will explore theories informing educational practice, and will gain skills and practice in providing language and literacy instruction to adult learners in the community. This practicum specifically addresses issues of language acquisition, acculturation, and broader contexts framing adult education. Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900C. Contemporary Latino/a Education in the United States.

Latino/as are now the second largest group of students in United States schools and, in aggregate, among the most troubled as measured by drop-out rates and grade-level retentions. Yet Latino/a students also perform well in some settings. This course reviews contemporary Latino/a education, focusing on the multiple educational contexts Latino/as encounter, including how non-Latino/a educators regard Latino/a students.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900D. Latino Communities Seminar.

Enrollment limited to: 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900E. Senior Seminar in Ethnic Studies.

No description available.

Spr ETHN1900E S01 25772 M 3:00-5:30(13) (M. Martinez)
Course usage information

ETHN 1900F. Theory, Creativity, Activism.

This class will bring together much of the literature and discussions conducted throughout your education as an Ethnic Studies major and prepare you for the application of Ethnic Studies in your post-graduate life. I have chosen to emphasize three themes that have been dominant in your Ethnic Studies curriculum: Theory, Creativity, and Activism. We will begin by critically exploring the democratic principles and imperial practices that underlie the "American system" and the political formation of The Third World. Our discussions and readings will include an examination of the contributions and limitations of multiculturalism, postmodernism, anti-colonialism and feminism, and the relevance of (ethnic) "experience" in interpreting and addressing the problems we face as a planetary civil society. The majority of the class will be dedicated to the praxis of Ethnic Studies as a creative and political force within our world today. We will read fiction and non-fiction and view films that articulate the complexities of life in North America and beyond.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900G. Race and Immigration in the Americas.

Enrollment limited to: 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900H. What is Ethnic Studies?.

No description available. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and graduate students.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900I. To Be Determined.

Enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

ETHN 1900N. Transpacific Asian American Studies.

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar that is also open to American Studies and other graduate students for graduate credit. It is designed to help us think about the Pacific as a historical space where the Asian American formation is constructed, as goods, people and ideas circulate across the Pacific. We will explore ways which these historical circuits and exchanges have shaped questions of identity and belonging, taking China and the Americas as our principal points of connection. We will read across a number of fields, including: Asian Studies, American Studies, Asian American Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Fall ETHN1900N S01 16979 W 3:00-5:30(17) (E. Hu-Dehart)
Course usage information

ETHN 1901. American Empire Since 1890 (HIST 1900).

Interested students must register for HIST 1900.

Course usage information

ETHN 1903G. Oral History and Community Memory (AMST 1903G).

Interested students must register for AMST 1903G.

Course usage information

ETHN 1903P. Please, Please Me (AMST 1903P).

Interested students must register for AMST 1903P.

Course usage information

ETHN 1903V. Asian and Latino Immigration (AMST 1903V).

Interested students must register for AMST 1903V.

Course usage information

ETHN 1903X. Style and the Man: Masculinity in Fashion and U.S. History (AMST 1903X).

Interested students must register for AMST 1903X.

Course usage information

ETHN 1904J. The Asian American Movement: Communities, Politics and Culture (AMST 1904J).

Interested students must register for AMST 1904J.

Course usage information

ETHN 1910. Independent Study.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

ETHN 1910D. Faces of Culture (ANTH 1910D).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1910D.

Course usage information

ETHN 1920. Senior Thesis.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

ETHN 1940. Ethnographic Research Methods (ANTH 1940).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1940.

Course usage information

ETHN 1950G. Contemporary Chinese Culture and Media (EAST 1950G).

Interested students must register for EAST 1950G.

Course usage information

ETHN 1960D. Feminist Theory/Feminist Activism (GNSS 1960D).

Interested students must register for GNSS 1960D.

Course usage information

ETHN 1981C. Minority News: Radical Reporting and Reading (HMAN 1970L).

Interested students must register for HMAN 1970L.

Course usage information

ETHN 2070. Music and Identity (MUSC 2070).

Interested students must register for MUSC 2070.

Course usage information

ETHN 2220. Urban Politics (POLS 2220).

Interested students must register for POLS 2220.

Course usage information

ETHN 2340. Human Development and Urban Education (EDUC 2340).

Interested students must register for EDUC 2340.

Course usage information

ETHN 2970C. Rethinking the Civil Rights Movement (HIST 2970C).

Interested students must register for HIST 2970C.

Course usage information

SCSO 0020. The Digital World (CSCI 0020).

Interested students must register for CSCI 0020.

Fall SCSO0020 S01 17468 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0050C. Reproductive Health: Science and Politics (GNSS 0090C).

Interested students must register for GNSS 0090C.

Course usage information

SCSO 0050E. Crossing the Consumer Chasm by Design (ENGN 0120A).

Interested students must register for ENGN 0120A.

Course usage information

SCSO 0050F. Crossing the Space Chasm through Engineering Design (ENGN 0120B).

Interested students must register for ENGN 0120B.

Course usage information

SCSO 0070E. The Anthropology of Gender and Science (ANTH 0077N).

Interested students must register for ANTH 0077N.

Spr SCSO0070E S01 25325 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0120. Culture and Health (ANTH 0300).

Interested students must register for ANTH 0300.

Course usage information

SCSO 0121. Foragers, Farmers, Feasts: An Anthropology of Food (ANTH 0680).

Interested students must register for ANTH 0680.

Course usage information

SCSO 0251. Ancient Philosophy (PHIL 0350).

Interested students must register for PHIL 0350.

Fall SCSO0251 S01 16707 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0270. Poetic Cosmologies (ENGL 0700Q).

Interested students must register for ENGL 0700Q.

Fall SCSO0270 S01 16779 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0280. Transforming Society-Technology and Choices for the Future (ENGN 0020).

Interested students must register for ENGN 0020.

Spr SCSO0280 S01 25998 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0290. Humans, Nature, and the Environment (ENVS 0110).

Interested students must register for ENVS 0110.

Fall SCSO0290 S01 16962 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0292. Introduction to Environmental Social Science (ENVS 0495).

Interested students must register for ENVS 0495.

Course usage information

SCSO 0293. Environmental Science in a Changing World (ENVS 0490).

Interested students must register for ENVS 0490.

Fall SCSO0293 S01 16963 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0380. A Global History of the Atomic Age (HIST 0276).

Interested students must register for HIST 0276.

Fall SCSO0380 S01 16781 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0381. The Philosophers' Stone: Alchemy From Antiquity to Harry Potter (HIST 0150B).

Interested students must register for HIST 0150B.

Course usage information

SCSO 0392. The Phoenix and the Hummingbird: Natural History from Antiquity to Evolution.

Scientists love to solve mysteries. From the philosophers of antiquity to pioneers of Biology, the study of nature has focused on the creatures that have most puzzled humankind. These have inspired natural histories: encompassing studies covering everything that could be known about an animal –from what it symbolized and how it behaved to its place in the natural order. By looking at issues of truth and its relationship to myth, direct experience, and nature’s systematization, this course provides an introduction to the history of science through what naturalists have written about the more mystifying creatures in the natural world. DPLL

Course usage information

SCSO 0470. Digital Media (MCM 0230).

Interested students must register for MCM 0230.

Course usage information

SCSO 0511. Biology of Hearing (NEUR 0650).

Interested students must register for NEUR 0650.

Spr SCSO0511 S01 26000 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 0520. Modern Science and Human Values (PHIL 0060).

Interested students must register for PHIL 0060.

Course usage information

SCSO 0700B. Science and Social Controversy.

In this course we examine the institution of science and its relations to the social context in which it is embedded. Scientific objectivity, scientific consensus, scientific authority, and the social and moral accountability of scientists will be considered in the context of discussing such controversies as: the AIDS epidemic, climate change, science and religion, the Manhattan Project, the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, genetic and pharmacological enhancement, the role of drug companies in science and medicine, psychiatric diagnosis and medication, robotics, and the implications of neuroscience for free will and moral responsibility. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students and sophomores.

Fall SCSO0700B S01 17038 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (J. Poland)
Course usage information

SCSO 0700C. Gender, Nature, the Body (ANTH 1223).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1223.

Course usage information

SCSO 0700D. The Social Lives of Dead Bodies in China and Beyond (HIST 0685A).

Interested students must register for HIST 0685A.

Course usage information

SCSO 0700E. Bodies of Knowledge: Gender, Race and Science (AMST 0150C).

Interested students must register for AMST 0150C.

Course usage information

SCSO 0700F. Science and Society in Darwin's England (HIST 0582B).

Interested students must register for HIST 0582B.

Fall SCSO0700F S01 16956 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1000. Introduction to Science and Society: Theories and Controversies.

What is "science"? How do scientific ideas become knowledge? What is the nature of scientific objectivity, how can it be compromised? What is a scientific community, scientific consensus, and scientific authority? What roles does science play in our culture, and how is science related to other social institutions and practices? The interdisciplinary field of science studies is introduced through exploration of topics that include: gender and race, psychiatric classification, the drug industry, science and religion, and the use of nuclear weapons during World War II. Enrollment limited to 30 sophomores, juniors, seniors; others may enroll with permission of instructor. LILE WRIT

Spr SCSO1000 S01 25630 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (J. Richards)
Course usage information

SCSO 1110. Health and Healing in American History (AMST 1601).

Interested students must register for AMST 1601.

Fall SCSO1110 S01 16703 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1120. International Health: Anthropological Perspectives (ANTH 1310).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1310.

Course usage information

SCSO 1121. AIDS in Global Perspective (ANTH 1020).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1020.

Course usage information

SCSO 1122. Bioethics and Culture (ANTH 1242).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1242.

Fall SCSO1122 S01 16961 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1152. Astronomy, Divination and Politics in the Ancient World (ASYR 1700).

Interested students must register for ASYR 1700.

Course usage information

SCSO 1160. Human Population Genomics (BIOL 1465).

Interested students must register for BIOL 1465.

Course usage information

SCSO 1270. Zoopoetics (ENGL 1900J).

Interested students must register for ENGL 1900J.

Spr SCSO1270 S01 25610 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1290. Environmental Law and Policy (ENVS 1410).

Interested students must register for ENVS 1410.

Course usage information

SCSO 1340. Health and Healing in American History (GNSS 1960B).

Interested students must register for GNSS 1960B.

Course usage information

SCSO 1385. History of Medicine I: Medical Traditions in the Old World Before 1700 (HIST 0286A).

Interested students must register for HIST 0286A.

Course usage information

SCSO 1386. History of Medicine II: The Development of Scientific Medicine in Europe and the World (HIST 0286B).

Interested students must register for HIST 0286B.

Course usage information

SCSO 1389. The Science of Life: Biology, 1790 to Present (HIST 1825R).

Interested students must register for HIST 1825R.

Course usage information

SCSO 1390. Science at the Crossroads (HIST 1825M).

Interested students must register for HIST 1825M.

Spr SCSO1390 S01 25609 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1391. From Medieval Bedlam to Prozac Nation (HIST 1830M).

Interested students must register for HIST 1830M.

Course usage information

SCSO 1392. Science, Medicine, Technology (HIST 1825H).

Interested students must register for HIST 1825H.

Fall SCSO1392 S01 16760 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1393. Nature on Display (HIST 1820G).

Interested students must register for HIST 1820G.

Fall SCSO1393 S01 16780 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1394. The Roots of Modern Science (HIST 1825L).

Interested students must register for HIST 1825L.

Fall SCSO1394 S01 16957 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1395. Feathery Things: An Avian Introduction to Animal Science (HMAN 1972F).

Interested students must register for HMAN 1972F.

Fall SCSO1395 S01 16959 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1520. Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics (PHIL 1620).

Interested students must register for PHIL 1620.

Course usage information

SCSO 1522. Philosophy of Science (PHIL 1590).

Interested students must register for PHIL 1590.

Fall SCSO1522 S01 16379 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1523. Time (PHIL 1670).

Interested students must register for PHIL 1670.

Course usage information

SCSO 1524. Aristotle (PHIL 1250).

Interested students must register for PHIL 1250.

Spr SCSO1524 S01 25327 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1700C. Science and Technology Policy in the Global South.

Junior-senior seminar exploring the relationships among science, technology, society, and public policymaking in the Global South. Exemplar countries are South Africa, Brazil, India, and China. Biotech, nanotech, public health, environment, and science training policies are among those closely examined. Three writing assignments, plus electronic conversations with counterparts in the Global South.

Course usage information

SCSO 1700F. Health Inequality in Historical Perspective (BIOL 1920B).

Interested students must register for BIOL 1920B.

Spr SCSO1700F S01 25516 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1700H. Native American Environmental Health Movements (ETHN 1890J).

Interested students must register for ETHN 1890J.

Course usage information

SCSO 1700N. Race, Science, and Society: Genomics and Beyond.

Why are drugs being marketed as racial saviors? What does biotechnology have to do with race? This course introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches to the study of race in science and society as an integrated natural and social scientific endeavor. Using a team-based pedagogy, interdisciplinary groups of natural and social science concentrators will explore real-world problems like validating knowledge about racial difference, the relationship between politics and science, and the newest findings in such scientific fields as anthropology, epidemiology, and cognitive science. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC DPLL

Course usage information

SCSO 1700P. Neuroethics.

In this course, we will examine ethical, social, and philosophical issues raised by developments in the neurosciences. Topics will include: neurodevelopment and the emergence of persons; the impact of child abuse on brain development; aging, brain disease, and mental decline; life extension research; strategies and technologies for enhancement of human traits; "mind-reading" technologies; agency, autonomy, and excuse from responsibility; error and bias in memory; mind control; neuroscientific and evolutionary models of religious belief and moral judgement. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. LILE

Spr SCSO1700P S01 25504 T 4:00-6:30(16) (J. Poland)
Course usage information

SCSO 1700R. Community Engagement with Health and the Environment (AMST 1700I).

Interested students must register for AMST 1700I.

Course usage information

SCSO 1700S. Environmental Change: Ethnographic Perspectives (ANTH 1552).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1552.

Course usage information

SCSO 1700V. The Changing Arctic Environment: Science, Society and Politics.

The Arctic has become a lens through which to understand the world. An unstable Arctic poses threats not only to the future of the Arctic but the world itself. This seminar will explore the Arctic as a region and the challenges it faces due to climate change, the rising conflicts over its vast mineral reserves, and the competing interests within the nations. The course is intended for students who are interested in Science, Technology and Society, Environmental Studies, Environmental Policy, and International Relations. There are no prerequisites for this class.

Course usage information

SCSO 1700X. The Recent History of Life on Earth: The Anthropocene (HIST 1970G).

Interested students must register for HIST 1970G.

Course usage information

SCSO 1700Z. Science and Performance (TAPS 1450).

Interested students must register for TAPS 1450.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701B. Techno-Ecologies: Health, Environment and Culture in the Digital Age (ANTH 1551).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1551.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701C. The First Scientific Americans: Exploring Nature in Latin America, 1500-1800.

Who were the “first scientists” in the Americas?, what exactly do we mean by “science” in this context?, and what has amounted to “America” in the past? Focusing on present-day Latin America, this seminar analyses the links between the exploration of the New World and scientific discovery in the early modern period. We will explore issues of primacy (why have both empires and scientists cared about “arriving first”); the nature of science (what kind of knowledge has been considered “scientific” in different periods); and locality in knowledge production (was there something special about the New World in fostering scientific thinking).

Course usage information

SCSO 1701D. Political Economy: Intellectual History of Capitalism (HIST 1976N).

Interested students must register for HIST 1976N.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701E. Race, Difference, and Biomedical Research: Historical Considerations (BIOL 1920D).

Interested students must register for BIOL 1920D.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701F. The Nuclear Age (HIST 1974S).

Interested students must register for HIST 1974S.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701G. War and the Mind in Modern America (AMST 1905N).

Interested students must register for AMST 1905N.

Fall SCSO1701G S01 16380 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1701H. The Anthropocene: Climate Change as Social History (HIST 1976E).

Interested students must register for HIST 1976E.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701I. The World of Isaac Newton (HIST 1976I).

Interested students must register for HIST 1976I.

Course usage information

SCSO 1701J. Picturing Paradise: Art and Science in the Americas (HMAN 1972C).

Interested students must register for HMAN 1972C.

Fall SCSO1701J S01 16958 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1701K. Anthropology of Climate Change (ANTH 1112).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1112.

Fall SCSO1701K S01 16960 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1701L. Gender, Nature, the Body (ANTH 1223).

Interested students must register for ANTH 1223.

Fall SCSO1701L S01 17540 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1701M. Nature, Society and Culture (ENVS 1927).

Interested students must register for ENVS 1927.

Fall SCSO1701M S01 17473 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 1900. Senior Seminar in Science and Society.

This is an advanced seminar that uses a Problem Based Learning style pedagogy to explore real-world problems in STS. To solve assigned problems students will want to explore critical scholarship in areas such as laboratory studies, feminist science and technology studies, the rhetoric and discourse of science and technology, expertise and the public understanding of science. Course is intended for Science and Society senior concentrators, but is open to others with appropriate background. Enrollment limited to 20.

Fall SCSO1900 S01 16122 T 4:00-6:30(09) (J. Poland)
Course usage information

SCSO 1970. Independent Study in Science and Society.

Independent reading and research work in Science and Society is available to students who have completed introductory and intermediate level work in Science and Society. A decision to enroll must be made via consultation with the concentration advisor and the faculty advisor for the course. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Prerequisite: SCSO 1400. Open to junior and senior concentrators in Science and Society; instructor permission required.

Course usage information

SCSO 1971. Independent Study in Science and Society.

Independent reading and research work in Science and Society is available to students who have completed introductory and intermediate level work in Science and Society. A decision to enroll must be made via consultation with the concentration advisor and the faculty advisor for the course. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Prerequisite: SCSO 1400. Open to junior and senior concentrators in Science and Society; instructor permission required.

Course usage information

SCSO 2700A. The Politics of Knowledge (HIST 2981F).

Interested students must register for HIST 2981F.

Spr SCSO2700A S01 25804 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

SCSO 2700B. Environmental History (HIST 2981E).

Interested students must register for HIST 2981E.

Course usage information

SCSO 2700E. Plato's Theaetetus (PHIL 2150I).

Interested students must register for PHIL 2150I.

Fall SCSO2700E S01 16522 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'

Chair

Matthew Guterl

Professor

Mari Jo Buhle
Professor Emerita of American Studies

Matthew Guterl
Professor of Africana Studies and American Studies

Evelyn Hu-Dehart
Professor of American Studies; Professor of History

Steven D. Lubar
Professor of American Studies; Professor of History; Professor of History of Art and Architecture

Patrick M. Malone
Professor Emeritus of American Studies

Richard Alan Meckel
Professor of American Studies

Susan Smulyan
Professor of American Studies

Visiting Professor

Jeffrey S. Poland
Visiting Professor of Science and Technology Studies

Associate Professor

Daniel Kim
Associate Professor of English and American Studies

Robert George Lee
Associate Professor of American Studies

Ralph E. Rodriguez
Associate Professor of American Studies; Associate Professor of English

Naoko Shibusawa
Associate Professor of History; Associate Professor of American Studies

Samuel Zipp
Associate Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies

Assistant Professor

Leticia Alvarado
Assistant Professor of American Studies

Elizabeth M. Hoover
Manning Assistant Professor of American Studies

Adrienne J. Keene
Assistant Professor of American Studies

Monica M. Martinez
Stanley J. Bernstein '65 P'02 Assistant Professor of American Studies

Elena Shih
Assistant Professor of American Studies

Debbie Weinstein
Assistant Professor of American Studies

Visiting Assistant Professor

Caroline B. Frank
Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies

Hilary L. Levey Friedman
Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies

Senior Lecturer

Robert P. Emlen
Senior Lecturer in American Studies

Beverly Haviland
Senior Lecturer in American Studies

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Dianne P. Quigley
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Science and Technology Studies

Visiting Scholar

Mitsushige Sato
Visiting Scholar in American Studies

American Studies

The concentration in American Studies seeks to understand American society and cultures as emerging from historical and contemporary processes at work in local, national, and global contexts. Concentrators study four broad themes: social structure and the practices of identity, space and place, production and consumption of culture, and science, technology, and everyday life. The concentration is predicated on the ideal of scholarly engagement with the public, so students take junior seminars that engage some aspect of the public humanities such as public policy, memorialization, community studies or civic engagement. Study abroad is supported and encouraged.

Interested students may contact Professor Haviland, the director of undergraduate studies.

A concentrator in American Studies will be able to:

  • Analyze texts, contexts, and data from multiple disciplinary and historical perspectives
  • Synthesize research as verbal, visual and/or digital presentations
  • Explore the theory and/or practice of the engagement of scholarship with a broader public
  • Understand how American society and cultures have been and are being shaped by global flows of people, goods and ideas
  • Experiment with new media as critical tools for scholarship

Concentrators have gone on to a vast variety of careers, including law, public humanities, politics, public service, academics, business, creative arts, and medicine.

Requirements:

Each concentrator will take 10 upper-level courses, four of which must be seminars, including a Junior Seminar and a Senior Seminar.  In addition, students who wish to graduate with honors are required to take two semesters of AMST 1970 for a total of 12 credits. 

Each concentrator will create an individual FOCUS consisting of at least three courses in consultation with the Concentration Advisor.  The focus is the flexible core of the concentration.  Here each student builds a coherent and dynamic interdisciplinary structure of related courses that develops his or her compelling interest in some aspect of American experience. 

All seniors in the class of 2013 forward will be required to do a capstone electronic portfolio.

Some concentrators may elect to do an Honors Thesis and are encouraged to take AMST 1800, the Honors Seminar, in the Spring of their Junior year.  Students pursuing honors are required to take two independent study courses in their senior year, in addition to the regular concentration requirements, in order to write their honors thesis.  

Requirements for the American Studies Concentration

Junior Seminar: A course from the AMST 1700 Series, for example: 11
Death and Dying in America
Slavery in American History, Culture and Memory
Race and Remembering
American Publics
Public Memory: Narratives of 9/11
Community Engagement with Health and the Environment
The Teen Age: Youth, Society and Culture in Early Cold War America
Senior Seminar: A course from the AMST 1900 series taken during the senior year, for example: 11
The Problem of Class in America
America and the Asian Pacific: A Cultural History
Narratives of Slavery
America as a Trans-Pacific Culture
Transnational Popular Culture
Movements, Morals, and Markets
Latina/o Cultural Theory
Race, Immigration and Citizenship
China in the American Imagination
Cold War Culture The American Culture in the Cold War
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture in 20th Century New York City
Filipino American Cultures
Essaying Culture
From Perry to Pokemon: Japan in the United States, the United States in Japan
Gender, Race, and Class in the United States
Green Cities: Parks and Designed Landscapes in Urban America
Immigrant Radicals: Asian Political Movements in the Americas 1850-1970
Immigrants, Exiles, Refugees, and Citizens in the Americas
Latina Literature: The Shifting Boundaries of Identity
Latina/o Religions: Encounters of Contestations and Transformations
Latino New York
Latinos and Film
Two additional upper-level seminars taken from the AMST 1700, AMST 1800, or AMST 1900 series 12
Six upper-level lectures or seminars numbered between AMST 1000 and AMST 1900, including those AMST 1900s listed above 16
Topics in Material Culture Studies: The Arts and Crafts Movement in America 1880-1920
Education Beyond the Classroom Walls: Teaching and Learning in Cultural Institutions
Sports in American Society
Health and Healing in American History
Trauma and the Shame of the Unspeakable: The Holocaust, American Slavery, and Childhood Sexual Abuse
Motherhood in Black and White
Radio: From Hams to Podcasts
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Transpacific Popular Culture
War and the Mind in Modern America
Laboring Women: Work, Reproduction, and Leisure since Reconstruction
Beauty Pageants in American Society
Collecting Culture: Indigenous Objects, Colonialism, and Museums
Ungraded Capstone ePortfolio
Total Credits10
1

 Additional criteria concerning the FOCUS:

  • Three of the ten (10) required upper-level courses must fit into the FOCUS
  • Up to four (4) courses from other departments can be counted toward the concentration IF and ONLY IF they fit into the FOCUS

Honors

Independent Reading and Research (Students pursuing honors in the concentration are required to take two semesters of Independent Study to produce the Honors Thesis)

WHAT we study

American Studies at Brown is concerned with four broad themes:

  • Social Structures and the Practices of Identity: How do communities and individuals come to define themselves, and how do others define them, in terms of, among other categories, nation, region, class, race, ethnicity, gender, sex, religion, age and sexuality? How do organizations and institutions function socially and culturally? What are the roles of social movements, economic structures, politics and government?
  • Space and Place: How is space organized, and how do people make place? This includes the study of natural and built environments; local, regional, national and transnational communities; and international and inter-regional flows of people, goods, and ideas.
  • Production and Consumption of Culture: How do people represent their experiences and ideas as culture? How is culture transmitted, appropriated and consumed? What is the role of artists and the expressive arts, including literature, visual arts and performance?
  • Science, Technology, and Everyday Life: How does work and the deployment of science and technology shape American culture? How do everyday social practices of work, leisure and consumption provide agency for people?

HOW we study

American Studies at Brown emphasizes four intersecting approaches that are critical tools for understanding these themes:

  • Cultural and Social Analysis: Reading and analyzing different kinds of texts, including literary, visual, aural, oral, material objects and landscapes. Examining ethnic and racial groups, institutions, organizations and social movements.
  • Global/International Contextualization: Comprehending the United States as a society and culture that has been shaped by the historical and contemporary flows of people, goods and ideas from around the world and in turn, learning about the various ways in which America has shaped the world.
  • New Media Understandings: Understanding the creation of new forms of discourse, new ways of knowing and new modes of social organization made possible by succeeding media revolutions. Using new media as a critical tool for scholarship.
  • Publicly Engaged Scholarship: Connecting the theory and the practice of publicly-engaged research, understanding and presentation, from community-based scholarship to ethnography, oral history, and museum exhibits. Civic engagement might include structured and reflective participation in a local community or communities or the application of general theoretical knowledge to understanding social issues.

Ethnic Studies

Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary, comparative concentration that examines the construction of race and ethnicity in social, cultural, historical, political, and economic contexts. Concentrators develop individual programs based on areas of focus in consultation with faculty advisors, drawing from courses in the humanities and social sciences. Typical areas of focus are social issues (such as inequality, education, or health), cultural production and the representation of racial groups, processes of racialization, the historical formation of transnational communities and of diaspora, and the history of particular ethnic or racial groups.

The Ethnic Studies concentration at Brown emphasizes the histories of diverse racial groups within and across the borders of the United States, including examining issues of diaspora, migration, social movements, and the political economies of social inequality and racial formation.  Concentrators strive for intellectual fluency in a range of critical approaches to race and ethnicity across disciplines, and demonstrate this fluency through the composition or creation of a significant piece of original research or creative work.

Brown University established an Ethnic Studies concentration in 1996, originally within the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA). In the Fall of 2013, as part of changes to the CSREA and to better support students, Ethnic Studies joined a long established Brown department, American Studies.  Many American Studies faculty members work in the areas of race and ethnicity and have held joint appointments in Ethnic and American Studies while American Studies PhD students have done some of the most exciting Ethnic Studies research on campus.  Faculty and students in Ethnic Studies and American Studies are eager to see how the two programs move forward together.

As an academic field, Ethnic Studies is rooted in the protests of the 1960s and 1970s, out which emerged the very first Latino/a Studies, Asian American Studies, African American Studies, and Native American studies programs.  Organized around straightforward political goals – the enrichment through diversification of the curriculum and the systematic, multi-disciplinary, and the often comparative study of racial and ethnic inequality – Ethnic Studies has become an important feature of major research universities.

Faculty, both core and affiliated, create and participate in groundbreaking Ethnic Studies scholarship. Areas of faculty research include borderlands history, Latina/o literary studies, and indigenous movements.  Students can focus in Native American, Asian American, or Latino Studies and choose a thematic interest including such current examples as: "social issues affecting racialized groups" (students have looked at health disparities or educational inequality); "the study of cultural production or cultural representations;" "the history of a particular racial or ethnic group;" and "the study of comparative processes of racialization."

Requirements:

ETHN 0500Introduction to American/Ethnic Studies1
Any two introductory courses in Latino/a, Africana, Asian-Amerian, or Native American Studies. The courses in the list below are exaples of these courses. Other courses may be approved by the Advisor.2
An Introduction to Africana Studies
A course from the AMST 1610 series, as approved by the concentration advisor
From Coyote to Casinos: Native North American Peoples and Cultures
Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World
Race, Culture, and Ethnic Politics
Ethnicity, Race, and Gender in the Americas
Courses taught by core Ethnic Studies faculty may be recognized in consultation with concentration advisor.
Any three courses in Ethnic Studies that address the student's focus area (as approved by the concentration advisor), for example: 3
The Border/La Frontera
Critical Mixed Race Studies in the Twenty-First Century
Introduction to Latino/a History
Ethnic Writing
Introduction to Latina/o Cultural Studies
Latina/o Literature
Native Americans and the Media
Theory Into Practice: Service Learning at a Dual Language Charter School
Race and Remembering
Hip Hop Music and Cultures
The Research Process: Qualitative and Ethnographic Methods
Race and Language in the United States
Race in the Americas
Ethnic Studies Practicum: Strategy, Tactics and Tools for Social Change
Immigrant Social Movements: Bridging Theory and Practice
Ethnic Los Angeles
Latino/a Communities Seminar
Native North Americans in the Media: Representations and Self Representations in Film
Chicana/o Fiction
Queer Latina/o Literature and Theory
Eating Cultures
Reading Race: Advanced Seminar in Critical Race Theory
Seminar on Latino Politics in the United States
Native American and European Contact in Early North America, ca. 1600-1750
Business, Culture, and Globalization: An Ethnographic Perspective
Indigenous Music of the Americas
Johnny, Are You Queer: Narratives of Race and Sexuality
Bad Boys and Bad Girls in Asian American Literature and Culture
Native Americans in the Media: Representation and Self-Representation on Film
Introduction to American Indian Studies
Native American Environmental Health Movements
Engendering Empire
(De)Colonizing Women: Writing the Third Space
Treaty Rights and Food Fights: Eating Local in Indian Country
Thawing the "Frozen Indian"; American Indian Museum Representation
The Latina/o Novel
Introduction to Native American Literature
The Hispanic Caribbean and its Diasporas
Latina Feminisms
Youth, Art, Engagement and Social Justice
Extravagant Texts: Reading the World Through Asian American Literature
Race, Class and Gender in Latino Communities
Any three courses drawn from a list of related courses (as approved by the concentration advisor). 3
A course from the ETHN 1900 series. 11
Alien Nation: US Immigration in Comparative Perspectives
Community, Language and Literacy: A Practicum
Contemporary Latino/a Education in the United States
Latino Communities Seminar
Senior Seminar in Ethnic Studies
Theory, Creativity, Activism
Race and Immigration in the Americas
What is Ethnic Studies?
Transpacific Asian American Studies
Students in the concentration should also take a WRIT course from within the concentration, from a list of cross-listed courses, or from a course approved by their advisor.
Students should also be sure to take a methods course.
Total Credits10
1

To be taken in the first semester of the student's final year.  The senior seminar is the capstone course and is required of all concentrators.

Honors

Candidates for honors must have at least a B+ average in the concentration and be approved by the Concentration Committee. Honors candidates will propose a thesis project to be completed by the end of their final semester. The development of a thesis project will begin during the sixth semester. Honors candidates will have two readers, at least one of whom must be Ethnic Studies core faculty.

Concentrators who choose not to request consideration for honors will be required to complete a major essay or project by the end of their final semester. The essay or project can be the result of major work completed in the senior seminar.

Students seeking information about the Ethnic Studies Program or in need of advising should contact  (401-863-7034).

American Studies

The department of American Studies offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts (A.M.) in American Studies, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in American Studies.

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/american-studies

In collaboration with the JNBC, who administers the degree program, the department of American Studies also offers the Master of Arts (A.M.) in Public Humanities.

For more information regarding admission and Public Humanities program requirements please visit: http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/public-humanities