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Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

The Watson Institute is a community of scholars whose work aims to help us understand and address the world's most pressing issues, including globalization, economic uncertainty, security threats, environmental degradation, and poverty. Focusing on three main areas – development, security, and governance – the Institute leverages Brown's signature interdisciplinary approach to foster innovative, policy-relevant scholarly activities.

The Institute’s core faculty of anthropologists, economists, historians, political scientists, sociologists, and other specialists work across academic disciplines with Brown faculty colleagues, as well as with an ever-changing cohort of visiting scholars and practitioners from around the world. The Institute collaborates with key organizations, such as the United Nations, national governments, and non-governmental organizations to seek practicable solutions to today's global problems.

Watson administers three undergraduate concentrations, Development Studies, Public Policy and International Relations, and houses several others: Latin American Studies, Middle East Studies, and South Asian Studies. It also administers the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) degree program, which prepares students for careers spanning public service, government, NGOs, foundations, and the private sector, and the Graduate Program in Development, which supports interdisciplinary learning and contextual expertise for doctoral students of the social sciences. The Institute is also home to a thriving postdoctoral fellows program.

The Brown International Advanced Research Institutes (BIARI), an early-career professional development initiative that builds transnational knowledge networks among young leaders from the Global South, is located at Watson, where a two-week residency occurs each year. The Choices Program, which develops secondary level curriculum resources and offers professional development to classroom teachers, is also affiliated with the Institute.

Watson is home to several centers focused on area studies: the Africa Initiative, Brazil Initiative, Center for Contemporary South Asia, Caribbean and Latin American Studies, China Initiative, Humanitarian Innovation Initiative, Middle East Studies and the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy. The co-location of these centers, combined with the Institute's thematically driven research, enables Watson to take an interdisciplinary, comparative approach to research and education. In keeping with Watson's mission, such collaboration leads to a deep understanding of the greatest challenges of our time.

The Institute houses and supports three major academic journals: Studies in Comparative International Development, Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (JHPPL) and the Brown Journal of World Affairs (BJWA). Founded in 1993, BJWA is a highly regarded scholarly publication in the field of international studies, edited and managed entirely by Brown undergraduates.

Finally, a full agenda of seminar series, conferences, lectures, and workshops each year brings leading scholars and public figures to the Institute to put current events into context, explore emerging global issues, develop policy, and publish research. A new podcast, Trending Globally: Politics and Policy, further connects faculty research and visiting scholars with broader news and world events. 

More information about the Institute is available at http://watson.brown.edu/.

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DEVL 0500. Development and the International Economy (ECON 0510).

Interested students must register for ECON 0510.

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DEVL 1000. Sophomore Seminar in Development Studies.

This seminar provides an introduction to the critical study of development. The goal is less to provide an exhaustive overview of the field than it is to help you develop critical thinking skills through group discussion and analytical writing. More specifically, the goal is to develop your understanding of the diversity of understandings of the concept of development, as well as its practical importance in the world. Students will read texts that present pressing questions and issues concerning development practices, policies, and theories. Though classroom discussion and writing, the course encourages you to connect broad theoretical debates to contemporary problems. WRIT

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DEVL 1020. Comparative Development (SOC 1600).

Interested students must register for SOC 1600.

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DEVL 1100. Globalization and Social Conflict (SOC 1620).

Interested students must register for SOC 1620.

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DEVL 1120. Economic Development (ECON 1510).

Interested students must register for ECON 1510.

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DEVL 1130. Explaining China's Rise: Development and Accumulation in Contemporary China (SOC 1870P).

Interested students must register for SOC 1870P.

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DEVL 1500. Methods in Development Research.

An introduction to the various techniques of research in Development Studies, with a focus on qualitative and field methods. Open to all Development Studies concentrators.

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DEVL 1550. The Political Economy of African Development.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to introduce contemporary development issues in Africa. Drawing on literatures from political sciences, economics, sociology, it explores the challenges of development in the continent since independence. It investigates the influences of governance, institutions, conflicts and external forces in African development trajectories. This is an applied course that uses theoretical and policy analytical approaches to examine the political and socioeconomic dynamism in contemporary Africa.

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DEVL 1560. Economic Development in Latin America.

This course covers some of the unique events and characteristics that have shaped the economic development landscape of Latin America since colonial times until the present. Topics include: the historical legacy, why Latin America fell behind, import substitution industrialization, the debt crisis, poverty and income inequality, inflation, trade and financial liberalization and competitiveness. The class exposes students to a number of concepts and tools that can be broadly applied to the understanding of development in other geographic areas.

Fall DEVL1560 S01 17388 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (V. Ingham)
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DEVL 1600. Tools for Development: From Theory to Practice.

Course gives students a platform to define their roles in the field of development, through hands-on skills building, case studies, and conversations with development practitioners and guest lecturers. This course will prepare students to volunteer for small, grassroots development organizations abroad or in the U.S. in a summer experience following the course. Throughout the semester, students will prepare for their summer experiences by working with their host organizations to design their role descriptions, planning their summer travel and living arrangements, gaining appropriate cultural competency, etc. Prerequisite: DEVL 1000 or SOC 1871D (may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 15 Development Studies concentrators. Instructor permission required.

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DEVL 1650. Urbanization in China: Megacities, Mass Migration, and Citizenship Struggles.

With a focus on the post-1978 reform period, we will examine what features of China’s urbanization are in line with historical patterns, as well as the things that make the country’s experience unique. Additionally, the course will consider the relationship between development, broadly conceived, and urbanization. While urbanization has played an important role in poverty alleviation and improving livelihoods, Chinese cities are also engines of massive inequality, political discontent, and ecological destruction. Considering possibilities for a more equitable, just and sustainable Chinese city will be a central concern of the course.

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DEVL 1700. Beyond Sun, Sea and Sand: Exploring the Contemporary Caribbean.

For many people, their image of the Caribbean is the tourist brochure and television advertisement representation of sun, sea and sand. This course challenges that through a broad introduction to the real society, economy and politics of the Caribbean region. Using literature, film and traditional texts, it captures the cultural and linguistic complexity of the region through the exploration of a range of central themes such as ethnicity, color, class, politics, as well as more specific, targeted areas including economic inequality, migration, and tourism. FYS DPLL

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DEVL 1801. Participatory Development.

This core Development Studies seminar will provide students with the opportunity to think critically about power relations within various contexts of development; more specifically, in relation to the condition of how development projects work in practice. The course will take a multilevel approach to the analysis of developmental interactions. We’ll look at the power relations between the global south and the global north. We will examine crucial issues having to do with local communities, gender, the state/citizen paradigm and interaction between NGOs and communities. We will connect PD to other concepts, such as empowerment, civic engagement and inequality. WRIT

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DEVL 1802. The Politics of Food Security (POLS 1822R).

Interested students must register for POLS 1822R.

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DEVL 1802R. The History and Politics of Development in the Middle East.

This course examines from a critical perspective the impact and legacies of development projects in the Middle East. After considering the historical emergence of development as a concept and some general critiques, we will explore its more specific deployment in the context of the Middle East. Readings will address its discursive frameworks as well as the economic, political, environmental, and social dynamics it has shaped through its definition of instrumental categories, objects, and spaces. We will also consider how these dynamics have contributed to the recent uprisings in the region. Priority given to DS seniors. WRIT

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DEVL 1802T. Migration and Development in Theory and Practice.

The primary theme of this course rests on a query standing at the center of a growing debate: in what ways are migrants linked to development? This course examines several theoretical debates and policies and programs focused on the migration-development nexus. Students examine scholarly interpretations of how migration is linked to development. They also employ a transnational lens to further explore what development means and how it is carried out in an increasingly mobile and connected world. The class examines how grassroots organizations have engaged in community development, and the roles states and non-governmental agencies are playing in on-the-ground interventions. WRIT

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DEVL 1803R. Bringing Small States in: How and Why They Matter.

Small states enter the imagination as sites of exoticism. Pristine beaches, flanked by swaying coconut trees are marketed as ideal for honeymooners and others seeking a refuge from stress-filled lives. This course centers small states, in particular, small island states, as a group of countries, with unique and interesting features, meriting academic scrutiny. We explore a wide range of issues introducing students to these diverse and complex states, including historical origins, globalization and effects on development, theoretical approaches to studying small states, issues in governance, migration, climate change, food security, sports and culture, gender and sexuality, among others. WRIT

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DEVL 1803S. The Politics of Health and Disease (POLS 1295).

Interested students must register for POLS 1295.

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DEVL 1810. Information Technology and Governance.

The use of information and technology in governance is a vexed subject. Civil society clamors for release of information about the state (openness) while the State wants more information about its citizens (surveillance). Technology plays a role in amplifying these respective intentions resulting in an unprecedented gathering and release of information, thereby bringing the issue of information, technology and its role in governance to sharp focus. This course provides an intensive introduction to the field of information technology and global development. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to DS juniors and Seniors. WRIT

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DEVL 1980. Thesis Writing in Development Studies.

An integrative seminar designed for concentrators working on senior theses. Others with comparable backgrounds may enroll with written permission. Begins with a review of theoretical and methodological literature on development studies. Written and oral presentations of thesis research will be the central focus of the latter part of the course. Reserved for Development Studies seniors. WRIT

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DEVL 1990. Senior Thesis Preparation.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Reserved for Development Studies seniors.

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DEVL 2000. Theory and Research in Development I.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development, evaluate both the differences and complementarities in disciplinary perspectives and develop a toolkit of interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions.

Fall DEVL2000 S01 17168 Arranged (N. Chorev)
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DEVL 2008. The Political Economy of Public Finance Reform in the Developing World.

This course will introduce students to the fundamental political, institutional, and technical issues associated with public finance reform and sub-national governance in the developing world. The course requires no prior experience with fiscal issues or with intergovernmental finance. The course aims to lay the foundations for a better understanding of how politics and policy shape the way national and subnational governments provide, finance, manage, and regulate public services.

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DEVL 2010. Theory and Research in Development II.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development, evaluate both the differences and complementarities in disciplinary perspectives and develop a toolkit of interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions.

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DEVL 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.

Fall DEVL2990 S01 15117 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr DEVL2990 S01 24064 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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DEVL XLIST. Courses of Interest to Concentrators in Development Studies.

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INTL 1101. China and the Global Political Economy.

Can (or Should) China Save the World? The program features an academic focus on Political Economy through comparative study of China and the US. US students engage with Chinese students throughout the 8 weeks, spending 4 weeks in Hong Kong and 4 weeks at Brown. Courses are taught by CUHK and Brown faculty, resulting in two course credits. Students are required to register for both courses (INTL 1101 and INTL 1102).

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INTL 1102. The US and the Global Political Economy.

Can (or Should) China Save the World? The program features an academic focus on Political Economy through comparative study of China and the US. US students engage with Chinese students throughout the 8 weeks, spending 4 weeks in Hong Kong and 4 weeks at Brown. Courses are taught by CUHK and Brown faculty, resulting in two course credits. Students are required to register for both courses (INTL 1101 and INTL 1102).

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INTL 1280. Global Security After the Cold War.

Analyzes major contemporary issues of global security utilizing current theories of international politics, emphasizing both continuity and change in global security since the end of the Cold War. Issues examined include proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and of conventional weapons, terrorism, recent arms control and disarmament initiatives, and the changing role of alliances and regional and global security institutions. Prerequisite: POLS 0400. This course is open to Senior and Junior concentrators in IR and Political Science, and to other students by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40.

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INTL 1350. History and Theory of International Relations.

Examines the struggles of power and knowledge which have constituted international relations history and theory. This survey stretches from the beginnings of the Western states system and its early exemplar thinkers like Machiavelli, Grotius, and Kant, to the current issues and contemporary theories of international relations. Focuses primarily on the 'classical' and 'post-classical' theories of international relations.

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INTL 1355. Contemporary Global Politics.

This course provides an overview of contemporary topics in international politics and themes related to Irish politics and society. The international system is a complex and constantly evolving environment. Interactions between states and non-state actors, such as multinational corporations and international non-governmental organizations, produce outcomes that we read about in the news every day. This module offers the student a set of theoretical tools to help understand why these outcomes emerge.

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INTL 1400. Religion and Global Politics.

Examines the increasingly visible role of religion in international affairs and global politics. What are the political manifestations of different religious traditions? What kind of a role does religion play in conflict, economic development, peace-building and diplomacy? Why was religion ignored as a political force in the western world? This course reviews multiple ways religion has been affecting world affairs and delves into specific faith traditions and their histories. Not open to first year students.

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INTL 1410. Foreign Policy Analysis and Crisis Decision-Making.

It is not possible to understand international relations without a concrete understanding of decision-making mechanisms. The course covers major themes in foreign policy analysis; it examines past foreign policy decisions of major actors and investigates the dynamics of crisis decision-making in international politics. How do politicians behave when they need to take an important decision in limited time? Which factors influence how political actors choose one policy over another? We will study the possible explanations in the foreign policy analysis literature and we will analyze cases to gain an understanding of mechanisms behind international politics.

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INTL 1420. Globalization and the Rise of Asia.

This course will study the politics and economics of globalization, in particular the spectacular rise of the Asian economies and their impact on the global economy, financial markets, and the balance of power. The analytic goals of the course are twofold. First, to examine the key problems rapidly developing nations have faced and continue to struggle with in an interdependent world economy, and why some nations have succeeded in moving into a period of unprecedented growth while others have not. Second, to analyze how the rise of the Asian economies will affect the U.S. and other developed nations. Enrollment limited to 35.

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INTL 1440. Ethnicity and Inequality in Global Persepectives.

Drawing on literature in sociology, politics, international relations, economics, and development studies, this course will critically examine the institutions, beliefs, ideas and practices that have engendered ethnic inequality in many parts of the world. Our aim is to help students gain a deeper understanding of how ethnicity, identity and religion interact with the institutions of modern societies so as to produce sustained social and economic disparity along group lines. Another goal is to gain an understanding of how ethnic inequality within countries can translate into global threats.

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INTL 1442. Empathy in International Relations: Humanitarianism, Justice and Global Citizenship.

This class draws on classic and recent work in a range of academic disciplines to explore the intellectual roots and political routes of empathy, equity and cosmopolitan thinking. The course examines the phenomenon of empathy as deep-rooted and potentially hard-wired human disposition to imaginatively inhabit the world-view of others, and through case studies from human rights, labor justice and environmentalist movements examines how, why and when humans come to respect the claims of distant strangers for their attention and action, and thus imagine themselves and others as fellow-citizens of the world.

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INTL 1443. History of American Intervention.

This course reviews modern history through the study of invasions, coups, and other interventions carried out by the United States. From the Marine assault on Tripoli in 1805 to the bombing of Tripoli in 2011, there have been scores of these episodes. They have shaped American history and the history of the wider world. We examine a variety of them, and try to answer three questions about each one. (1) Why did the United States decide to carry out a particular intervention? (2) How was the intervention executed? (3) What have been its long-term effects?

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INTL 1444. Comparative Development (SOC 1600).

Interested students must register for SOC 1600.

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INTL 1445. International Political Economy (POLS 1730).

Interested students must register for POLS 1730.

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INTL 1446. Political Research Methods (POLS 1600).

Interested students must register for POLS 1600.

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INTL 1450. Political Economy of the Environment in Latin America.

Introduces students to the political economy of the environment in Latin America. Readings survey topics on resource-based development, environmental conflict, and green governance. Lectures present theoretical accounts of development and the environment and assess their validity in light of the Latin American experience. Relies on history-based analytics and case studies. Topics include conservation of the Amazon, rights of indigenous peoples, mining and environmental well-being in the Andes, and the green revolution in tropical Latin America. Knowledge of Latin American history and politics, political-economy, and environmental studies recommended. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

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INTL 1550. Chinese Foreign Policy.

The objective of the course is to enable students to gain familiarity with the evolution of modern Chinese politics as it related to international relations, as well as a comprehensive understanding of Chinese foreign policy priorities and institutional processes. Exploring various historical explanations, developing critical reading skills, and employing policy analytical tools will enable students to better evaluate the numerous dilemmas confronting academics and policymakers in understanding and responding to China's rise. Students will emerge from the course with a more sophisticated understanding of China's rise and the implications of this momentous development for the international system. Enrollment limited to 40.

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INTL 1700. International Law.

This introduction to public international law covers the nature of legal reasoning in international relations, the interplay of international law and international politics, and the international legal process. Examines selected substantive fields such as state responsibility, the use of force, international human rights, and the U.S. and international law.

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INTL 1750. The International Law and Politics of Human Rights.

The main objective of the seminar is to enable students to understand the different and competing conceptions of human rights present in the contemporary humanitarian agenda. In particular, topics such as the problem of enforcement and the role human rights in foreign policy, genocide, torture, women's rights, humanitarian intervention, and the international criminal court. At the end of the course students will be better equipped to assess critically the potential and shortcomings of the international human rights system.

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INTL 1800D. Survey of Chinese Democracy and Chinese Contemporary History.

Surveys the Chinese democracy movement in the 20th century and up to the present. Examines key leaders, events and development, including the Chinese Democracy Wall movement and the Chinese democratic party. Taught in Chinese. Readings in English and Chinese. Advanced Chinese language skills necessary. Instructor's permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.

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INTL 1800N. Global Media: History, Theory, Production.

Explores the historical and contemporary roles of media in international affairs as a source of information and as an important medium of war and diplomacy. Three tracks: historical, focusing on the dual development of colonial and media empires from early days of print media to the Internet; theoretical, using classical IR and critical theory to examine media as product and instrument of cultural, economic and political struggles; and practical, using biweekly 'Global Media Labs' in which guest media practitioners teamed with media theorists present master classes in print, photography, radio, cinema, television, and online convergences. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT

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INTL 1800R. Post-Soviet States From the Past into the Future.

Examines in historical context the emergence of the new post-Soviet states from the disintegrating USSR, the development of their foreign policies, and the evolution of their mutual relations in the political, economic, security, and environmental spheres. Devotes special attention to the functioning of the Community of Independent States and other multilateral institutions. Instructor's permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.

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INTL 1800V. The United States in World Politics.

Examines major aspects of American foreign policy after the Cold War and 9/11 in terms of domestic and international challenges. Discussions of the United States as 'empire' and 'republic,' with independent research and a foreign policy game. Emphasis is on the connections between the processes of policy making and the substance of policies pursued. Prerequistie: POLS 0400 required; POLS 1560 highly recommended. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and senior concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1801E. War in Anthropological Perspective.

Examines war, peace, and militarization using anthropological frameworks. Centers on case studies from several areas of the world, as well as contemporary theories of violence. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

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INTL 1801H. Amazon Governance.

Studies the political economy of Amazon governance in comparative perspective. Readings trace distinct national and local paths of Amazon governance. Topics include the colonial history of deforestation, the impacts of globalizations and nation-state modernization projects, the evolution of environmentalisms and Amazonian contentious movements, and selected case studies of good governance at the grassroots level. Relies on history-based research and multidisciplinary perspectives. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801I. Public Theologies of Governance and Secularism in World Politics.

Public theology of a particular issue includes human interpretation of what is relevant and to what extent particular religious premises can be experienced in the public arena. In the analyses of international politics, what we call "religion" is usually the sum of clashing or converging public theologies. This course comparatively investigates these different religious perspectives towards issues of political governance with case studies from Islam, Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism. The course also focuses on modes of secularism and the challenges they pose to political theologies of faith traditions. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801J. War and Human Rights.

How nations and their adversaries treat civilians and other non-combatants in wartime has become an increasingly central issue in global politics. This seminar will explore the intersection of war, human rights, and the laws of war (also known as the law of armed conflict or international humanitarian law). It will focus especially on how civilians and other non-combatants are protected (or not) in times of war and the politics and institutions of enforcement. Topics include war crimes, genocide, targeted killings, torture, humanitarian intervention, and the international criminal court. Prerequisite: POLS 0400; prior coursework in human rights or international law desirable. Enrollment limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in International Relations and Political Science. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801K. China and the World.

The rise of China has emerged as one of the most important developments in world politics during the early 21st century. Chinese foreign policy will have an important impact on the U.S. economy as well as on U.S. national security. Moreover, China's influence now touches upon every continent of the globe. This course surveys the cultural underpinnings, modern history, institutional structures, and vital regional contexts for contemporary Chinese foreign policy. Students will emerge from the course with a more sophisticated understanding of China's rise and the implications of this momentous development for the international system. Prerequisite: POLS 0400. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. Instructor permission required.

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INTL 1801L. Religion and Secularism: Affinities and Antagonisms.

Global events in recent years seem to defy simple ideas of the confinement of religion to a wholly private or otherworldly domain. Is secularism a failed ideal? Or was it simply an inadequate concept to understand modern ethics and politics? In what ways are conceptions of the secular being contested and reformulated in Euro-American and postcolonial contexts? We address these questions by taking up key texts of recent religion/secularism debates, in the process returning to canonical texts by Weber, Schmitt, Nietzsche, Thoreau and others, to reexamine the affinities and antagonisms between religious and secular ideas of morality and power. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801M. Globalization and the Rise of Asia.

This course introduces the politics and economics of globalization and, in particular, the spectacular rise of the Asian economies and their impact on the global economy, financial markets, and the balance of power. Course goals are: First, examine the key problems rapidly developing nations have faced, and continue to struggle with, in an interdependent world economy, and why some nations have succeeded in moving into a period of unprecedented growth. Second, analyze how the rise of the Asian economies will affect the U.S. and other developed nations. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1801N. Global Security After 9-11.

Analyzes major contemporary issues of global security utilizing current theories of international politics, emphasizing both continuity and change in global security since the end of the Cold War with emphasis on security issues after the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Issues examined include proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and of conventional weapons, terrorism, role of intelligence, special military forces and covert action, and the changing role of alliances and regional and global security institutions. Senior (followed by Junior) concentrators in IR have enrollment priority. Other students may enroll on a space-available basis by instructor permission. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801P. Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding.

In this seminar, we will study the dynamics of conflicts, causes of violence and the efforts of the individuals/states/institutions to manage conflict and build peace. Moving from contemporary cases such as Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Somalia, Lebanon, Israel/Palestine, we will discuss the lessons that were learnt in conflict management and the policies to be devised in the future. Understanding the frameworks of such conflicts and the accumulated knowledge on peace-building is essential, as any career in today's world will touch upon conflict settings and negotiations at some point. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801R. Natural Resources and the Environment in the Developing World.

Is resource abundance blessing or curse? Are developing countries too poor to be green? This course surveys topics of resource-based development and the modern environmental history of the Global South, with a historically grounded, inter-disciplinary perspective. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1801S. All the News That's Fit to Post: Grappling with Issues for Content Creators in the Global News World.

Journalists operate today in an increasingly global and increasingly digital media environment, confronting new challenges and also seizing new opportunities that simply did not exist a generation ago. The new news world lacks traditional mentoring and editorial frameworks. This seminar focuses on threshold dilemmas that journalists confront, often independently, in newsgathering, writing, and publishing decisions. Through class dialogue and opinion essay writing assignments, the seminar will stress interaction, debate and international sensibilities. It will include real life case studies from Newsweek, newsweek.com and MSNBC. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802A. The Laws of Violence: Lawful Killings in Law Enforcement, Punishment, War and the War on Terror.

This seminar introduces the basic elements of conventional theories of law and state, and explores the centrality that legalized violence plays in both the constitution of law and the state. The goal of the seminar is to identify and examine the constitutive relation between law and violence. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1802B. Korean Politics and Security.

Since 1953, the United States and South Korea have maintained a formal security alliance, and the peninsula remains home to 28,500 U.S. troops. Developments in Korea have an important impact on the region and the world making knowledge of the Koreas and their challenges vital for understanding the dynamics of the region. This course will explore the history, politics, economics, and security of North and South Korea and their role in the larger security context of East Asia. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors concentrating in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802C. Cyber Conflict and Internet Freedom.

This course will examine the problems confronting the United States and its international partners in addressing network and computer insecurity while upholding privacy, civil liberties and other fundamental values. While technical topics will be addressed, it is not a technical course but a course that examines the public policy challenges associated with a major technology issue. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors concentrating in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802D. Religion, Politics and Society: Israel in a Comparative Perspective.

This course explores contemporary dilemmas of religion and politics in Israel, drawing from different theoretical sources and using other case studies it allows a study of Israel in a comparative perspective and hopes to engage in debates relevant to all. During the course we discuss general theories of secularization, religious revival, politics and religion and different models of church and state. We explore the history and institutionalization of religion in Israeli public life, and engage with contemporary dilemmas of religion and/in politics salient in Israel and elsewhere. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802E. Citizenship, Nationalism, Migration.

What are the contemporary parameters of political belonging? How do we make a contract with states regarding our rights and responsibilities to the society? When do we move across borders for alternative arrangements and contracts? Moving from these questions, we will investigate the evolution of nationalism and citizenship in history as well as the challenges immigrants and policymakers face in a world where identities are more fluid than ever. We will also explore political, economic and social implications of the attitudes towards citizenship and immigration. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802F. History of American Intervention.

This course reviews modern history through the study of invasions, coups, and other interventions carried out by the United States. From the Marine assault on Tripoli in 1805 to the bombing of Tripoli in 2011, there have been scores of these episodes. They have shaped American history and the history of the wider world. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802G. Reading Global: International Relations through Fiction.

"Any book thoughtfully read sharpens the mind and improves on an individual's professional potential." So declared U.S. General James Amos when he reinvigorated the Marine Commandant's reading list in October 2012. This capstone course is designed in a similar spirit for Brown IR students, built around 20th century works of fiction from around the world which won recognition for the insights they offer on core issues in international relations and development studies. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802H. Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy.

This course examines the practice and profession of diplomacy and its relationship to the policy process. Focus is on bilateral and multilateral diplomacy; practice focuses on U.S. context, lessons learned apply to other nation states. We review history of inter-state relations, including the international legal basis for diplomatic relations. The practice has evolved over the years and been greatly influenced by modern technology; however, it continues to incorporate such common functions as policy formulation, representation, reporting, negotiation, intercultural contacts and interaction with the media, parliamentary bodies and other external actors. Limited to Jrs, Srs. Priority given to IR Seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802I. Human Security.

In this course, we will engage the definitional debate that challenges traditional notions of national security. We will trace the normative, political and intellectual history of this policy lens, and we will examine its real world implications across several key issue areas. What are the conceptual and practical consequences of a concern with human security, as opposed to national security or human rights? Enrollment limited to 20 seniors concentrating in International Relations. WRIT

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INTL 1802J. Regulation of the International Financial Services Sector.

Course examines from a regulatory perspective the modern international financial services sector, its principal players and activities, concerns which they raise for regulatory authorities and the rationales for the different regulatory responses which such concerns have provoked. Focus will be the US financial services sector as a forceful proponent of change in the context of European and Asian political economies which have not always been accepting of the specific initiatives of US commercial actors. Students must show up 1st day to obtain override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802K. Empathy in International Relations: Humanitarianism, Justice and Global Citizenship.

This class draws on classic and recent work in a range of academic disciplines to explore the intellectual roots and political routes of empathy, equity and cosmopolitan thinking. Seeking to extend Benedict Anderson’s insight, that all communities larger than the face-to-face are distinguished by their style of imagining, the course examines the phenomenon of empathy as deep-rooted and potentially hard-wired human disposition to imaginatively inhabit the world-view of others. Students must show up 1st day for override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802L. Norms of Humanity.

This seminar will explore the origins and impact of four types of international standards of humane conduct: human rights, humanitarian law (also known as the law of war/armed conflict,) accountability and justice for past rights violations or war crimes, and humanitarian intervention. Many commentators increasingly refer to these branches of norms as if they belonged to a single “tree,” comprising a so-called “law of humanity.” Taking a different tack, this course encourages a deeper understanding of these international norms’ related-but-distinct sources, development and effects. Students must show up on 1st day for override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802M. Rwanda Past and Present.

In the mid-1990s, few countries on earth were as devastated as Rwanda. As many as one million people or more had been killed in a 100-day genocide, and the fleeing regime had left the country in ruins. Today, however, Rwanda is not only at peace but full of ambition. Some believe it is poised to rise from poverty and become an example for developing countries everywhere. Others worry that trouble is brewing, and that another apocalypse could lie ahead. Students must show up 1st day for override. Priority given to IR concentrators. WRIT

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INTL 1802N. Arab Revolutions in Comparative Perspective.

This course provides an introduction to one of the greatest locomotives of change in human societies: revolutionary movements. Students will learn the major theoretical perspectives that have been developed to understand these complex phenomena. These tools will be used to analyze a number of different types of revolutionary movements, with a focus on the Arab world. Students must show up first day for override. Priority to IR. WRIT

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INTL 1802O. Global Corporate Accountability: Issues of Governance, Responsibility and NGOs.

How does the international system hold corporations accountable? As the global value chain engages increasingly greater sections of the economy, how do we understand the role of corporations in shaping the ethical and political issues of environment, human rights, labor conditions, equality and opportunity, gender, and community rights. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802Q. Iran and the Islamic Revolution.

Shattering events of 1978-80 in Iran unfolded against the backdrop of the previous decades of Iranian history, knowing that history is essential to understanding the revolution. The revolution cannot be appreciated without studying the enormous effects it's had over the last 35 years. This course places the anti-Shah movement and the rise of religious power in the context of Iran's century of modern history. We conclude by focusing on today's Iran, the upheaval following the 2009 election, reformist president election in 2013, and prospects for reconciliation with the US. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1802Q S01 17279 W 3:00-5:30(17) (S. Kinzer)
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INTL 1802R. After Snowden: Spying in International Relations.

This course examines the special problems of surveillance and spying for democratic societies, with a particular focus on the United States and its experience as the world’s oldest constitutional democracy administering the world’s most pervasive intelligence apparatus. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802S. Politics of International Finance.

The purpose of this course is to present the fundamental variables that shape modern international finance. We will introduce and examine the technical forces that determine international transactions and capital flows, as well as the problems caused by unsustainable imbalances and the subsequent domestic and international political responses. Given the important role that finance plays in international relations, the material will allow the student to establish a conceptual framework to understand the political dynamics and constraints of the global economy. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802T. Nuclear Weapons and International Politics (POLS 1822A).

Interested students must register for POLS 1822A.

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INTL 1802U. International Relations of Russia.

This class provides students with an overview of the sources of contemporary Russian foreign policy (including the legacies bequeathed by the Soviet Union) and from there examines Russia’s position in the international system, the challenges she faces in the global environment of the 21st century, and her relationships with the great powers and with her immediate neighbors. WRIT

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INTL 1802V. Diplomacy, Economics & Influence.

This course examines a dozen diplomatic situations and identifies the players, their interests, and their tools -- and how those produced outcomes.Particular attention is paid to economic factors – pressures, incentives, and influences – that contribute to the outcome. By examining these elements students will understand the economic tools of diplomacy and power, and how to wield them. The course concludes with a close look at China's growing role in the world economy and considers how that will change China's role in world affairs. Enrollment limited to 20 Juniors & Seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1802V S01 17324 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (R. Boucher)
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INTL 1802W. International Journalism.

This seminar is designed to give students direct experience with the job of writing journalistically about world affairs. Through a combination of writing exercises and classroom discussions, we explore the challenges of craft, judgment, and logistics that face foreign correspondents and others who cover international news. We focus on essential writing and reporting skills, and also consider ways in which international reporting is changing as a result of new technology. Limited to Jrs and Srs. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1802X. Global Problems, Global Solutions: From Ebola to Climate Change.

This seminar examines the international responses to the challenges posed by complex global problems like climate change, the Ebola outbreak, migration, poverty, labor conditions, humanitarian crises, and fair trade. Students explore some of the central reasons explaining the international community’s inability to effectively confront global problems and study a series of policy initiatives to solve some of these global problems, initiatives that go beyond the traditional division between international and domestic political spheres and that challenge the idea of an international order formed exclusively by states and international institutions. WRIT

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INTL 1802Y. India in the World.

This course is designed to introduce students to the role of India in the world. From being a newly independent country in the nineteen forties, India is today a globally re-emergent power. The world’s largest democracy and third-largest economy is grappling with linguistic and religious diversity, economic growth and inclusive development, the politics of the Centre-versus-States, uneasy neighborhood relationships, the threat of terror, and the redefinition of her role in the Indo-Pacific world. The Course aims at deepening understanding of the priorities that define India’s global outreach. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803. Risk, Regulation and the Comparative Politics of Finance.

The course introduces students to the comparative history of finance as well as to alternative theories of regulation. It thereby develops students’ ability to compare the role played by financial institutions in different historical periods and national contexts. This comparative perspective puts the recent financial crisis into a broader perspective, allowing students to see the structural as well as more proximate causes of recent financial instability in the industrialized democracies. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR, DS, and Public Policy seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1803 S01 17212 T 4:00-6:30(09) (J. Ziegler)
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INTL 1803A. The International Politics of Organized Crime.

Organized crime and extra-legal actors have established themselves as political actors in every region of the world. Violence has exploded in countries as criminal organizations compete with each other, the state, as well as a variety of other non-state armed groups for control of illicit markets, local dominance, and political influence. This course offers a broad understanding of these organizations, their origins, and the various illegal and violent activities in which they are engaged. This course is comparative and interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from research in criminology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science. Limited to Jrs, Srs. Priority to IR seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1803A S01 17416 T 4:00-6:30(09) (N. Barnes)
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INTL 1803C. Violence in Latin America: Causes, Consequences and Possibilities for Change.

This capstone seminar focuses on the causes, consequences and possible solutions of violence in Latin America. Students will be asked to grapple with the question: What are the sources of violence in Latin America? How much is the drug war to blame? What about economic inequality, legacies of dictatorship, or cultures of violence? What are some possible solutions -- should the international drug control regime be changed? What are other policy and citizen-led alternatives? Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803D. Questioning Growth: Should Nations Get Rich?.

This course examines growth as a guiding ideology of modern economic practice. How is the dream of growth produced? We take a broadly interdisciplinary view, grounding our investigation in anthropological ethnographies and tracing the outlines of the historic social theory that lead to the economic growth models of the mid-20th century. We review neoclassical economic approaches and consider dissidents in the ecological, Marxist, and feminist traditions. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803F. Foreign Policy and the 2016 Presidential Election Campaign.

This seminar focuses on the relationship between national security policy and presidential politics, with a special focus on the 2016 campaign. We survey scholarly and popular literature on the role of foreign policy in American politics. From there we narrow our focus to presidential politics, and then further to the 2016 campaign. Since much of this campaign’s foreign policy debate will be about questions of intervention in foreign conflicts—when, how, and where to intervene—we will give special attention to varying views on this question. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803G. Global Women’s Issues: Investing in women as strategy for sustainable growth and global development.

In this course, we ask and answer the questions: What are women’s issues around the world? What policies and programs are designed to engage the issues and improve outcomes? What role does and can the private sector play in harnessing the untapped potential of 50% of the globe’s population? Is there evidence to support the need for investment—of resources, focus, and political capital—and to quantify the results of its impact? Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803H. Asian Security: Theory and Practice.

This course provides an introduction to problems of contemporary Asian security and the strategies and foreign policies pursued by the four major powers in Asia: India, China, Japan, and the United States. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803I. Richard Holbrooke and the Rise and Fall of American Power.

To an uncanny extent, the life of Brown graduate and American diplomat Richard Holbrooke mirrors the rise and fall of American power in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. After leaving College Hill, Holbrooke worked for every Democratic president since John F. Kennedy. Over the course of the semester, his career will be used to explore three pivotal US military interventions – Vietnam, Bosnia and Afghanistan – and how they revealed the promise and limits of American power. Enrollment limited to juniors, seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803J. Russia's Escape from Communism.

This seminar introduces students to the economic and political transformation of Russia from the early days of Gorbachev to current-day Putin. The course is policy-oriented and empirical, and there are substantial reading assignments each week. Students are expected to participate in classroom discussions, make oral presentations, and prepare several writing assignments. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803K. Media Wars: The Middle East.

In the last fourteen years, the Middle East has occupied a disproportionate degree of attention in news and social media in the United States and Western Europe, in comparison to other regions of the world today. While some of that media have served to elucidate certain aspects of societies and cultures in the Middle East, other media have further simplified the region to cliches. In this course, we address these themes via media: U.S. news production; television; digital media and cyberterrorism; religion; music; and ISIS. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to IR juniors, seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803L. Humanitarianism in Uniform.

The goal of this senior seminar is to explore the relationship between militarism and humanitarianism. When the US Army and Marine Corps released the Counterinsurgency Field Manual in 2006, military officials referred to NGOs as ‘force multipliers’ and soldiers as ‘armed social workers.’ In this course, we will develop a framework to understand military humanitarianism. We will also examine how military humanitarianism exceeds the contemporary geography of terrorism, investigating cases in Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to IR juniors, seniors. WRIT

Fall INTL1803L S01 17417 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Greenburg)
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INTL 1803M. Reassessing Contentious Politics, and Social Movements.

This course introduces the major theories of social movements that explain the origins, dynamics, and consequences of contentious politics. We concentrate on the Middle East, the First and Second Palestinian Intifadas, and Arab Spring uprisings; examining how social movement theory helps us to understand these major episodes of mass mobilization and how these episodes prompt us to change our way of thinking about social movements and contentious politics more generally. We investigate social movement attributes such as movement emergence, member recruitment, leadership, organization, tactics, targets, and goals. Enrollment limited to 20. Priority to IR seniors and juniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803N. The Politics of Food Security.

There is enough food on the planet to feed everyone, and yet currently approximately 875 million people go hungry. Why is this the case? This course explores the politics of international food security, dividing the semester into four sections to examine food through the lens of development, human rights, governance, and security concerns. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors, juniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803O. Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy.

This course examines the practice and profession of diplomacy and its relationship to the policy process. Focus will be on bilateral and multilateral diplomacy; while the practice will focus on a U.S. context, the lessons learned apply to other nation states. We review history of inter-state relations, including international legal basis for diplomatic relations. The practice has evolved over the years; however, it continues to incorporate such common functions as policy formulation, representation, reporting, negotiation, intercultural contacts and interaction with the media, parliamentary bodies and other external actors. Limited to 20 juniors, seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803P. Grey Markets: The Illegal but Legitimate Economy.

This course investigates grey markets – commerce that is technically illegal, yet socially permitted and largely inoffensive. Unauthorized sales, intellectual property crimes (e.g. piracy, bootlegging, counterfeits), and evading customs tariffs and monitoring are constitutive examples of the grey market. These transactions skirt the interests of various actors, including firms, states, and societies. Limited to 20 juniors, seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803Q. Spheres of Influence: A Comparative Analysis.

This seminar exposes students to a concept that has played an important role in the history of international relations, was supposed to fade away when the Cold War ended, and has unexpectedly returned to play a central role in global politics. We study the origin of sphere-of-influence geopolitics and review episodes when it promoted stability or instability. This allows us to compare the ways that great powers have used this concept, and to predict how they may do so in the future. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803R. Minorities, Multiculturalism and Public Policy: Difference, Conflict and Accommodation.

This course explores contemporary dilemmas of multiculturalism in a comparative and theoretical perspective. We examine when differences lead to conflicts and how can schisms be accommodated by political arrangement and policies. The course introduces the concept of multiculturalism and its relevance to politics and policy-making through different models of incorporation and assimilation and different states’ experiences and choices. We discuss different schisms and divisions – national, religious, and ethnic – and their significance to citizenship, as well as different dilemmas, institutional arrangements and policies. Limited to Jrs, Srs. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1803S. U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.

This course explores a range of topics surrounding the U.S.-Mexico border, the borderlands, and local and global processes affecting both the United States and Mexico. Drawing from an interdisciplinary set of readings, documentary films, and lectures, students study and analyze the historical political-economic context under which the U.S.-Mexico border was created, a set of issues that continue to affect the region, its inhabitants, and individuals crossing the physical and metaphorical terrain. Limited to Juniors, Seniors. Priority given to IR seniors. WRIT

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INTL 1804B. Computers, Freedom and Privacy: Current Topics in Law and Policy.

This course puts into context arcane debates about surveillance, privacy and cyber conflict, explaining and critiquing arguments put forward by and intelligence officials, civil liberties and privacy advocates, and companies. Double-listed with CSCI 1951F. Enrollment limited to 10 IR seniors and juniors. WRIT

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INTL 1910. Senior Honors Seminar.

Open only to Senior students accepted into the honors program in international relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

Fall INTL1910 S01 17280 W 6:30-9:00PM (C. Elliott)
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INTL 1920. Senior Honors Thesis.

Open only to Senior students accepted into the honors program in international relations. Instructor permission required. WRIT

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INTL 1970. Individual Research Project.

Limited to juniors and seniors. Section numbers vary by instructor.

Required: A completed proposal form and syllabus, sponsor's and concentration advisor's approval, and written permission from Dr. Elliott (following review of the proposal) prior to registering for any section of this course. Banner overrides will be given by the IR Program manager only, and no overrides will be issued after the Registrar's course add deadline.

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INTL XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in International Relations.

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MPA 2015. Communications and Public Policy.

This course provides hands on experience for sharpening a variety of communication skills: writing, presentation, audio and visual. The goal of this course is to equip students with a diverse set of communication skills that can be used in a wide variety of settings. We begin by focusing on writing. The second part of the course covers presentation skills – from creating an effective visual representation of your policy to communicating this to a specific audience. For the last part of the course, emphasis will be on audio skills (e.g., podcasts, radio interviews) and constructing short 3 -5 minute videos.

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MPA 2020. Public Budgeting and Management.

This course is designed to teach the political, theoretical and administrative aspects of contemporary public budgeting and management in the United States. You will examine the central role of budgeting in policy formulation and implementation and come to an understanding of the budget as a statement of competing for political priorities. In addition, the various roles of key institutions in the budgeting process will be studied.

Fall MPA2020 S01 17421 MW 8:30-9:50(01) 'To Be Arranged'
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MPA 2035. Statistics II for Public Policy Analysis.

The course introduces students to the use of multiple regression analysis and causal inference for analyzing data in the social sciences. We will study a variety of designs for empirical public policy analysis, from random assignment to quasi-experimental evaluation methods, and students will have the opportunity to analyze actual datasets. We will also study the strengths and weaknesses of various causal inference strategies.

Please note that students must be present at the first class meeting in order to be have the option to enroll in this course. They must have downloaded Stata 14 (available free of charge through software.brown.edu) and picked up and registered their iClicker on Canvas (see syllabus for details). Because the class meets once per week and the first assignment will be distributed during the first class, we will be launching directly into substantive material for the course. Week one/meeting one is not only an introduction. It is therefore essential that all students attend beginning from the first class meeting.

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MPA 2040. Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation.

Broad overview of public policy analysis and program evaluation with emphasis on methodological issues involved in the analysis and assessment of government programs. Illustrations are drawn from a variety of substantive policy areas.

Fall MPA2040 S01 16759 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) 'To Be Arranged'
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MPA 2055. The Politics of Policymaking in Comparative Perspective.

This course provides a broad introduction to political forces which policymakers operate. Policymaking and politics are often held as separate spheres. There is a tendency to view politics as something to be recognized and controlled. In reality, policymakers are often faced with unavoidable political issues. Issue areas that relate to the political context of policymaking include: Why do some countries have stable institutions while others are subject to frequent regime change? Why do some institutional arrangements facilitate compromise and negotiation, while others impose obstacles to effective governance? Why do some policies privilege certain groups and marginalize others?

Fall MPA2055 S01 17422 W 3:00-5:30(17) (J. Ziegler)
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MPA 2065. Introduction to Data Science and Programming.

We live in the era of data-driven decision making in all aspects of our lives. The features on your iPhone, the images in an ad campaign, even the background colors on many websites are all carefully tested and chosen against their measurable impact on customer satisfaction, purchasing, clicks, or some other goal. In this course, we will be learning to use and apply those same principles to public policy and government programs. Our goal is to equip MPA students with the tools required to set up experiments, gather data, and begin to evaluate and design public policy and government programs.

Fall MPA2065 S01 16768 T 4:00-6:30(09) 'To Be Arranged'
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MPA 2140. Politics, Public Policy, and Economic Development in Asia.

It is widely accepted that development is not simply an economic phenomenon. Political processes are intimately tied up with economic development. We will compare and contract the various Asian countries and models of development around themes identified above. The heaviest emphasis will be on China, India and South Korea. Economic policy will be the center of our discussion.

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MPA 2160. Management and Implementation in Public and Non-Profit Organizations.

How and when can organizational leaders and staff become engines of policy and social change? How do the policies that elected officials, courts, and bureaucrats promulgate get put into practice? What affects whether those policies get put into practice? What affects whether those policies produce expected changes? This course is designed to help students identify and manage core challenges facing policy development, implementation, and sustainment in public organizations.

Spr MPA2160 S01 25587 MW 3:00-5:30 (S. Moffitt)
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MPA 2230. Skills for Future Diplomats.

Future diplomats, whether they work for governments, corporations or non­profit entities, will find new opportunities and face new challenges in promoting their international goals. They will work in a world where power is more dispersed, where players other than governments have a major role, where issues and organizations are social, cultural, regional and global rather than the sole responsibility of nation states, and where scientific and technological innovations are constantly changing the agenda and paths to influence. This course will introduce students to some of the issues and practices that will prevail as they seek to influence governments and societies.

Fall MPA2230 S01 16771 F 9:00-11:30(01) (R. Boucher)
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MPA 2445. Introduction to Public Policy.

The critical issues addressed in public policymaking involve political and moral choices, along with analytic and administrative aspects. Introduction to Public Policy has long been a signature course of the Brown program in public policy in part because this is where those choices—and the core values of public service and good governance informing them—are confronted most directly.

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MPA 2455. Statistics for Public Policy.

Covers social and economic statistics and their role in public policy research. Among the topics explored are descriptive and inferential statistics, measurement, sampling, and multivariate analysis.

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MPA 2460. Economics for Public Policy.

Examines issues in government spending and tax policy. Conceptual topics include the normative assignment of responsibility with federal systems and the equitable distribution of income. Specific policy applications are covered.

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MPA 2465. Financial Management For Public, Health, and Not-for-Profit Organizations.

This course focuses on financial aspects of not-for-profit organizations. The objectives of this course include helping students (1) learn the basics of not-for-profit accounting and the construction of their financial reports, (2) become more intelligent users of the financial statements of nonprofit organizations such as private colleges, hospitals, charities, and cultural institutions and (3) better understand the factors that affect the financial condition and financial performance of such entities.

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MPA 2475. Policy Problems of the 21st Century: Social Justice and Advocacy, Strategies for Change.

This course examines efforts that work toward social justice in contemporary political and social life. The class begins by evaluating different perspectives on how to define social justice. We consider the special challenges involved in defining social justice across borders or in diverse communities. We then examine strategies and channels used to promote social change.

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MPA 2545. An Introduction to Public Finance in Multilevel Democracies.

This course will introduce students to the fundamental political, institutional, and technical issues associated with sub-national governance and public finance reform multilevel democracies. The course requires no prior experience with either intergovernmental finance or fiscal issues. Its central purpose is to explore how politics and policy shape the way responsibility for regulating, financing, and managing public services get defined and divvied up between levels of government in both federal and unitary states.

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MPA 2555. Environmental Policy, From the Ground Up.

The seminar will examine selected environmental issues at local, national and international (especially Global South) levels which are at the center of widespread public concern. We will give critical consideration to some of the key ideas, concepts, discourses and approaches underlying public solutions to those concerns. The seminar will draw on literature and concepts from the fields of public policy and administration, science and technology studies, feminist theory, Africana Studies, and indigenous knowledge systems, as well as on practitioners’ knowledge.

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MPA 2675. Science and Technology Policy in the Global South.

Using both theoretical ideas and empirical examples, this seminar will explore the relationships among science, technology, society, and public policymaking in the Global South, in places where local science and global science often collaborate and sometimes clash. The class will investigate, from a variety of perspectives, how the governance of science and technology in various parts of the Global South is influenced by their past experiences, forms of public science organization, systems of knowledge, civic epistemologies and regulatory frameworks and strategic agendas for development, as well as the knowledge claims and concerns of social movements, and tensions in power and social relations.

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MPA 2715. Education Governance in Comparative Perspective.

This course will examine some of the governance issues associated with these trends by pairing critical readings with case studies. We will begin by surveying the historical relationship between how education gets defined as a public good, and systems of finance and governance. We will then examine the very particular trajectory of school governance and finance in America.

Course Goals: Robust understanding of how the competing, and hard-to-measure objectives (e.g. civic virtue, economic competitiveness, equal opportunity, personal growth) that people invest in schooling shape how education is defined as public good, and how it is governed and finance.

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MPA 2725. Smart Policy.

The purpose of this course is two-fold. Students will read, analyze and understand the current research literature in the behavioral economics of policy reform. Second, they will continue themes and projects started in the RIIPL Smart Policy Consultancies, and use data collected as well as the RIIPL database to design a Smart Policy Innovation and a test of that innovation. Smart Policy Innovations will be considered for the RIIPL Smart Policy Fellowship for 2016-2017.

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MPA 2730. The Political Economy of Hard Policy Problems.

This class tackles the “hard problems” of public policy. While governments are cajoled and enjoined to produce economic growth, do something about economic inequality and social mobility, and improve the life chances of millions through purposive action, actually delivering in these areas of policy is incredibly hard. These areas constitute ‘“hard problems” for policy for two main reasons. Economically, we don’t have much of a clue about how to do many of these things. Politically, there are powerful interests and entrenched ideas that like these areas of policy just as they are and work hard to keep them “hard problems.”

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MPA 2765. System Dynamics: Policy Analysis for a Complex World.

The course studies why so many public policy problems are challenging and often lead to disappointing results or outright failure. Students learn to conceptualize a social problem as a set of structures and policies that create dynamics and govern performance. The course introduces the tools of system dynamics for modeling and analyzing public policy. Using role playing games, simulation models, and management flight simulators, we develop insights essential to managing in a world characterized by dynamic complexity. Case studies include applications of system dynamics in healthcare, environmental policy, project management, and implementation of improvement programs.

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MPA 2772. Disaster, Displacement and Response: A Practitioner, People-Focused Lens on Urban Policy & Practice.

Applying a practitioner's view and working from scenarios will allow students to examine practical elements of delivery as well as the complexities of coordination in an emergent arena. This class will create both empathy and urgency - fueled by stories the class can explore together. The aim is to examine commonalities in the experiences of displaced people with respect to how cities respond across the world and to create a people-centered lens for examining effective responses.

Assignments will focus on creating convincing presentations – making a case for what works and what cities may learn from one another.

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MPA 2775. U.S. Foreign Policy: The Institutional Basis.

This course will examine the institutions that influence American foreign and development policy. Institutions provide the organizational framework, rules and social structures that in turn impact on the policy positions of those who are part of them. The agencies and bureaus that make up the national security cluster have both professional expertise and bureaucratic qualities. We will delve deeply into these entities to understand better their jurisdictional authorities and professional perspectives. We will use case studies and roll playing exercises to enhance understanding of these orientations and their impact on the policy process.

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MPA 2800. Policy in Action Consultancy.

The Policy in Action experience is designed to provide a rigorous and practical immersion with a client in a domestic or global community-based or institutional setting. The consultancy focuses on experiential learning and creative problem solving. Real world, complex contemporary problems are addressed, policy and practice-based solutions explored, strategies identified and future approaches recommended. Students conduct research to understand contemporary problems and issues and develop policy and practice-related solutions to address these issues and/or enhance an organization’s capacity.

Spr MPA2800 S01 25589 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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PLCY 0100. Introduction to Public Policy.

An overview of policymaking and policy analysis in the contemporary United States. The course begins with an examination of traditional justifications for government action. We will then examine the discipline of policy analysis that has arisen to design and evaluate public policies. We will also consider critiques of the rational method and ask questions about how policy expertise fits into the political system. The course ends with classic works on organizations and implementation. Not open to graduate students. WRIT

Fall PLCY0100 S01 15867 TTh 2:30-3:50(03) (R. Hackey)
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PLCY 0700J. Comparative Policies: Analyzing Policy Making Around the Globe.

In this course, comparative study deliberately diverges from exclusive focus on the more often-explored global sites of the USA, Western Europe and Japan, to look at public policy problems, intended solutions and practices of governments and societies in what some term “the Majority World” , as well as in marginalized and economically-disadvantaged or exploited communities in several regions of the world. Frequently the policy “actors” to be considered will be subjects other than governments. Concerns about full citizenship, equality, diversity, and justice will often be at the fore of our discussions-- as notions to be interrogated, rather than as taken-for-granted prescriptions. FYS

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PLCY 1000. International Environmental Law and Policy.

Our goal will be to examine whether and how well international organizations, national governments from the global north and south, and non-state actors cooperate to address human-environment interactions for the benefit of human societies, nature and the environment. We also examine how treaties, economic assistance, trade agreements and domestic laws affect international environmental governance. Toward the end of the semester, we will negotiate an agreement (NEWORLD) that will hopefully resolve several territorial, environmental and natural resource issues raised by the accelerating rate of ice melt in the Arctic. SOPH

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PLCY 1090. Polarized Politics (POLS 1090).

Interested students must register for POLS 1090.

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PLCY 1130. The American Presidency (POLS 1130).

Interested students must register for POLS 1130.

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PLCY 1150. Comparative Policies: Analyzing Policy Making Around the Globe.

This course is designed to comparatively study policymaking, policy knowledge, and policy intents, actions or inactions, in order to:
Develop a policy imagination through use of less-conventional modes of text.
Broaden and diversify understanding of policymaking by considering bottom-up and horizontal policymaking and policy advocacy—policy concerns, ideas and practices from grassroots organizations, marginalized communities, subaltern groups—and factoring in questions of power, difference and equality.
Provide exposure to international contexts and experiences.
Enhance capability to critique the global relevance of US-based or US-derived theories about public policy.
Provide knowledge of public policy issues and concerns.
Enhance visual literacy and writing capability. DPLL SOPH WRIT

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PLCY 1200. Program Evaluation.

Students in this course will become familiar with the concepts, methods, and applications of evaluation. We will build intuition around the experimental and quasi-experimental method commonly used in practice so that students learn how to interpret evaluation results, read evaluation research critically, and understand the pros/cons of each method. We will draw on illustrations and case studies from a variety of substantive policy areas.students must have completed PLCY 0100. In addition, you must have completed one of the following: POLS 1600, EDUC 1110, SOC 1100, or ECON 1620. If you have not completed these prerequisites, you must receive written permission to enroll in the course.

Spr PLCY1200 S01 25579 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) 'To Be Arranged'
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PLCY 1280. Politics, Economy and Society in India (POLS 1280).

Interested students must register for POLS 1280.

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PLCY 1301A. Values, Policy, and Politics.

How can we ethically evaluate public policy options, proposals, and decisions? In what ways do the policy process, and on-the-ground realities complicate our ability to apply ethical ideals? This sophomore seminar explores these questions in a case-driven manner, designed to equip students to analyze and discuss the ethical implications of policy decisions across an array of topics, and to enable students to bring ethical analysis to bear in policy analysis and appraisal. The course is suitable for sophomores interested in disciplines such as public policy, political science, sociology, and applied ethics. SOPH WRIT

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PLCY 1400. Ethics and Public Policy.

What are the moral foundations of public policy analysis? How should individuals act when faced with ethical dilemmas in public life? This course will engage those questions in depth, beginning with case studies in ethics and policy and moving to cases involving ethical quandaries and moral dilemmas in public life.

Fall PLCY1400 S01 15866 TTh 1:00-2:20(10) 'To Be Arranged'
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PLCY 1490. Building a Better World: Film and Social Change (POLS 1490).

Interested students must register for POLS 1490.

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PLCY 1500. Comparative Policies: Analyzing Policy Making Around the Globe.

Analyzes the institutions and policy-making of several countries. Includes an anlysis of education policy, health policy, and social welfare policy.

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PLCY 1600. Economics for Public Policy.

This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. We begin by exploring when and how the government intervenes in the economy. We also consider the impact of government intervention. We then use this theoretical foundation to examine current issues in expenditure, education, health, retirement, business competition, environment, cybersecurity, crime, financial, and tax policy. The student will acquire analytical skills to better evaluate existing and alternative public policy alternatives. Qualitative and quantitative methods will be used throughout the course. Class sessions require a significant degree of student participation.

Fall PLCY1600 S01 16760 W 3:00-5:30(17) 'To Be Arranged'
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PLCY 1700B. Social Welfare Policy in the United States.

Exposes students to the key challenges for social welfare policy-making in the United States. Particular attention will be given to the formulation and administration of prominent welfare, health, and education policies. Course materials also will explore how demographic and economic trends affect the implementation of social welfare policies. Instructor permission required. This course satisfies the Public Policy Problems requirement. WRIT

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PLCY 1700F. Economics and Public Policy.

An economic analysis of major social programs in the United States. Topics include the possibility of market failure in the private sector, the redistribution of income, and incentive effects created by the programs. Specific policy issues to be examined are welfare reform, Medicaid, school finance reform, and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Enrollment limited to 20. This course satisfies the Public Policy Problems requirement.

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PLCY 1700G. Education Policy Challenges.

This course explores several key challenges facing both educators and policy makers in promoting good citizenship and realizing social justice in education. We will combine both normative and empirical analysis of questions such as how to promote good citizenship in the schooling of future citizens, the role of values in the policy process, and the challenges and opportunities presented by the policy environment. Students will encounter current developments in the study of civic education and empowerment, studies into the lived reality of racial inequality and disempowerment in schooling, and key issues in education reform.

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PLCY 1700H. Family Law and Policy.

A seminar exploring how the family is defined and regulated by the legal system and through public policy. Focuses on how well legal definitions of families coincide with the realities of modern American families, the role of the judiciary in constructing family policy, and the interaction between private family life and public rules. Topics include marriage,divorce, adoption, and reproductive technology.

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PLCY 1700J. GIS and Public Policy.

An introduction to the theory and practice of social science Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as applied to public policy analysis. Topics include: the geographical basis of policy issues, spatial mapping, and the use of ArcView software to study policy problems. This course satisfies the Public Policy Problems requirement.

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PLCY 1700K. Health Policy Challenges.

This course examines the topic of health reform through a variety of lenses – politics, policy, community organizing, and bureaucratic implementation. Specific issues include recent reform efforts at the national and state levels, including the Affordable Care Act and several Rhode Island state legislative campaigns over the past twenty years. During each of these legislative victories (or defeats), the interplay between politics and policy, community organizing and implementation have defined how successful the laws have been in improving people’s access to quality, affordable healthcare.

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PLCY 1700M. Law and Public Policy.

This course will give students an introduction to business organizations – the law that governs corporations and partnerships, how they raise money in the financial markets, and to explore the public policy issues that inform the regulation of business and finance. We will look at business organizations, law that governs how companies raise money, operation of the stock markets, insider trading, and the regulation of institutional investors including mutual funds, hedge funds and private equity funds. We will finish by taking up corporations as persons, their social obligations and the recent Supreme Court cases on corporations and the First Amendment.

Spr PLCY1700M S01 25641 T 4:00-6:30(16) (A. Gabinet)
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PLCY 1700P. Social Science Data Technologies.

Provides advanced training in the principle methods of data analysis across a range of substantive areas. Students will gain technical competence utilizing a variety of online internet research and data mining tools and stand alone software including but not limited to SPSS, Excel, Access, and ArcView (GIS).

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PLCY 1700Q. Urban Policy Challenges: Spatial Inequality in Metropolitan America.

We will read, analyze, and discuss seminal texts within American urban history to examine the historic relationship between social policy and spatial inequality in 20th-century American metropolitan development. Students will have a passing familiarity with how the conflation of federal policies, regional economies, and local politics has constructed metropolitan landscapes with inequitable distributions of both public and private resources. Students will gain experience in oral and written analysis of how housing policies have historically influenced the interaction and engagement of disparate identity groups, including diasporic black, Latinx, Asian-American, and white ethnic communities, with metropolitan American civic institutions. DPLL

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PLCY 1700R. Urban Revitalization: Lessons from the Providence Plan.

Explores policy issues facing cities today and examines how the public, private, and nonprofit sectors have mobilized in selected cities to address these issues. Topics include jobs and economic development, education, public safety, and regional approaches. Focuses on The Providence Plan, a joint city-state revitalization initiative designed to address the problems of urban poverty. Comparisons with similar programs in other cities. This course satisfies the Public Policy Problems requirement.

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PLCY 1700S. Policies Affecting Working Families.

Examines sociological and economic factors and current policies contributing to conflict between caring and earning which affects working families in the U.S. Investigates dynamic landscape of the American family and costs of providing and caring for family members. Considers government's and employers' roles in shaping policies, cross-national comparison of American policies with other leading nations, and links between policies and outcomes. Enrollment limited to 20.

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PLCY 1700T. Good Government.

An applied ethics course specifically for students with backgrounds in Public Policy, it will emphasize the primary themes of good government: openness, deliberation, and integrity. Students will develop an essay on good government and do research for case studies of ethical dilemmas involving public servants. Prerequisite: PLCY 0100 (or equivalent). Instructor permission required. This course satisfies the American Institutions requirement.

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PLCY 1700U. Communications, Advocacy and Public Affairs.

Teaches students about communication strategies and tactics for affecting social change, and examines how individuals and organizations frame issues and execute campaigns in order to change policy.

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PLCY 1700V. Nonprofit Organizations.

Contemporary nonprofits and their role in community building and shaping public policy are central to this course. Topics include how strong coalitions impact housing, welfare and children's policy, organizing empowered communities, the influential and engaged donor and building the value of nonprofits. Case studies will be featured and new nonprofit models will be conceptualized to strategically address critical human need. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students concentrating in Public Policy. This course satisfies the American Institutions requirement.

Spr PLCY1700V S01 25788 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (W. Allen)
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PLCY 1700Y. Crisis Management.

Introduces future policymakers to the multifaceted decision-making process in which governments, businesses, advocacy organizations, and the public are thrust into the throes of a policy crisis. Various crisis management theories, key stakeholders in a crisis situation, and the positive and negative effects of various strategies are analyzed. Enrollment limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in Public Policy. This course satisfies the Public Policy Problems requirement.

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PLCY 1700Z. State and Local Government.

Examines state and local politics and government in the United States. The first part of the course examines the historical underpinning and division of power of the major political actors, institutions, and processes through both institutionalist perspectives. The second part focuses on the role of states in shaping significant policy areas including civil unions, education, healthcare, welfare, and the environment. This course satisfies the American Institutions requirement.

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PLCY 1701B. Public Organization and Management.

The aim of this course is to approach public sector organizations from a theoretical and systematic point of view in order to understand the proper function and role of public organizations in our society, and examine important conditions and factors required for effective public organization management. The boundary between the public and private sector is discussed as well as similarities and differences between the two. Also, challenges originating from the characteristics of our Knowledge-Information Society are discussed, along with potential solutions to address them. There are no specific prerequisites for the course; however, some essential knowledge in microeconomics and American government system is recommended. In case the course is oversubscribed, the enrollment preference would be determined by the student's class standing and the areas of study.

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PLCY 1701D. Global Graying: The Impact of an Aging Society on Public and Private Sector Organizations.

A “silver tsunami” is rolling across the globe. Governmental policy makers and business leaders are scrambling to adapt to a demographic phenomenon. A rapidly aging adult population combined with historically low fertility rates is reshaping the demand for retirement benefits, medical services and consumer products -- and threatens to unravel the social safety net established through governmental services like Social Security and Medicare.

Understanding Aging is critical knowledge – public or private sector. Students seeking roles in public policy will be even more consumed with the issues of an aging population and their impact on government, politics and public finance.

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PLCY 1701G. Science and Technology Policy in the Global South.

Using both theoretical ideas and empirical examples, this seminar will explore the relationships among science, technology, society, and public policymaking in the Global South, in places where local science and global science often collaborate and sometimes clash. The class will investigate, from a variety of perspectives, how the governance of science and technology in various parts of the Global South is influenced by their past experiences, forms of public science organization, systems of knowledge and belief, civic epistemologies and regulatory frameworks, and strategic agendas for development, as well as the knowledge claims and concerns of social movements, and tensions in power and social relations.

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PLCY 1701H. Congressional Leadership, Parties and Public Policy.

Focuses on the Congressional leadership, parties in Congress and their impact on political interactions, and public policy. The course will examine the relationship between the leadership in the Congress and the powerful elements in the House and Senate such as committee chairmen and the party caucuses as well as the media and lobbyists. Emphasis is on the decades long trend toward greater political polarization and its impact on the ability of the institution to respond effectively to address critical national priorities such as the federal debt, health reform immigration, nuclear proliferation and global warming. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students.

Spr PLCY1701H S01 25652 F 9:00-11:30 (R. Arenberg)
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PLCY 1701I. Immigration: The Imaginaries of Race, Space, and Nation.

Immigration in the United States has been and continues to be about delineations of boundaries, of belonging. By definition, immigration delimits American national identity; however, it does so by defining it as a cultural notion. American-ness is a cultural identity, one that is explicitly descriptive about who belongs and who does not belong.

In this course, we will briefly examine the rise of American nationalism vis-à-vis the history of immigration policy in the United States.

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PLCY 1701J. Policy Implementation.

Why do well-intentioned policies sometimes produce unfortunate results? This course will examine how policies designed by elected officials, bureaucrats, and courts are translated into practice through implementation, how and why public policies succeed or fail to produce changes in practice, and how policy implementation bears on democratic governance. The course will consider policy implementation across policy domains, with recurring attention to k-12 education policy. Enrollment is limited to 20.

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PLCY 1701K. Governance in the Academy: A University at Work in the 21st Century.

Focuses on understanding and evaluating the governance of the modern university. Brown will be used as one example to illustrate and illuminate various aspects of university governance. Themes of leadership, effective decision-making, priority-setting, planning, conflict and crisis management, and optimal organizational structure and behavior will be discussed. Students will be well-versed in the language, structure, roles of actors, and general operations of university governance and equipped to analyze and asses the strengths and weaknesses of various models. Students with an interest in pursuing a career in academia or other non-profit organizations will benefit from this course. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

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PLCY 1701L. Comparative Institutional Decision-Making.

Designed to introduce students to issues of bureaucratic politics and policy making in comparative perspective. The premise of this class is that thinking about the role of the bureaucracy is crucial to any theory of how modern democracy should work, as well as to our understanding of how many different modern democracies do work. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students in Public Policy and Political Science.

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PLCY 1701M. Juvenile Justice Institutions and Policy.

Examines the historical and legal development of the juvenile justice system and provides an overview of delinquency theory. These frameworks are used to study the major institutions and current policy issues in the juvenile justice system. Special topics include teen and family courts, age of jurisdiction, racial disparities in juvenile justice, and female delinquency. Students engage in a semester-long project to develop a policy brief addressing a current issue in juvenile justice. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required. This course satisfies the Public Policy Problems requirement. WRIT

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PLCY 1701O. Labor Market Policy.

Students will learn how to use basic economics models to analyze important labor market policy questions. Topics will include minimum wages, payroll tax cuts, training subsidies, unemployment insurance, negative income taxes, and others. Students will also learn how to find and interpret important labor market data (for example, unemployment rates, payroll employment numbers, and wages) which are used by policy analysts to evaluate local and national labor markets. Prerequisite: ECON 1110, ECON 1130, or EDUC 1130; or instructor permission. Enrollment limited to 20.

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PLCY 1701P. Inequality, Poverty, and Public Policy in the United States.

The course uses a multi-disciplinary social science approach to examine the intersections of racial and gender inequality, poverty, and public policy in the United States. The course is an advanced reading seminar that explores various approaches to theorizing, measuring, and researching poverty and inequality. The course also critically examines the role of historic public policies in reinforcing existing inequalities and evaluates policies and strategies to reduce poverty and inequality. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. DPLL

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PLCY 1701Q. Leading Social Ventures - Social Entrepreneurship in Action.

Leading Social Ventures is designed for students who are leading social ventures or aspire to create and lead them. "Action learning" means students will apply educational content to a specific entrepreneurial venture in the early stage of development.

Admission to the course is by application: http://bit.ly/11g7hBc. The course is designed for students who are already developing a venture. You must attend the first and second class to be eligible-no exceptions. Enrollment limited to 25.

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PLCY 1701W. Race, Gentrification, and the Policing of Urban Space.

This seminar focuses on the relationships between structures and processes of racialization, gentrification, and the policing of urban space in the post 1970s United States. Through readings, lectures, and original research, students will develop analyses of a series of linked case studies in North American cities including Baltimore, Ferguson, New York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. Students will develop an inventory of concepts such as race, class, gender, sexuality, neoliberalism, rent, restructuring, scale, and space that are foundational for analyzing the interrelationship between housing and policing policies. DPLL WRIT

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PLCY 1701Y. Public Opinion and Public Policy.

It is hard to turn on the news in the United States today without hearing about the latest poll. Why do we care so much about what the masses think? We will take a comprehensive look at the concept of public opinion and its impact on public policy in the United States. We will examine normative and empirical theories about the nature and origins of public opinion. Next, we will explore how public opinion is measured in practice. The content from this course are designed to position you to have sophisticated conversations about public opinion in the United States. DPLL

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PLCY 1702A. Justice, Gender, and Markets.

This course will explore two main questions: how poor women connect to markets and how philosophical ideas about gender have influenced ideas about gender and justice and consequently, gender, justice and markets. These questions help us explore how justice, gender, and markets interact and create conditions that keep millions of women trapped in poverty. They help us then develop policies and programs that might help women escape entrenched poverty.

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PLCY 1702B. Governing the Seven Seas: Law and Policy for the 21St Century.

This course explores the doctrines, laws and institutions that govern current and future uses of the world’s oceans and seas. We will examine governance of international and U.S. coastal waters with respect to delineation of territory and responsibility; defense, navigation and trade; environmental protection, including fisheries management and the use of coastal and international waters for waste disposal, energy development and commerce; and access and claims to the deep seabed. We will also consider the accomplishments and limits of ocean-related treaties, laws and plans in light of accelerating population growth in the coastal zone, emerging territorial conflicts in the South China Sea and the Arctic, and the effects of global warming-driven climate change on small island states and marine ecosystems. WRIT

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PLCY 1702C. Racial and Ethnic Politics and Policy in America.

Many of the most enduring social divisions, political conflicts, and pubic policy debates in the United States revolve around the issue of race, and to a lesser extent ethnicity. This course will examine the role of race in American politics and its contemporary significance to the nation’s citizens, politicians, and governmental institutions. It will focus on the experiences and activities of African-Americans, Anglo Americans, Latinos and Asian Americans, but will focus most extensively on African-Americans and Latinos, in the political and policy realm. DPLL

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PLCY 1702D. Ethics of Energy Policy.

This class explores ethical problems that arise in the context of energy policy. Topics addressed include: the ethics of climate change and emissions reduction policies; international equity as a central problem of energy policy;intergenerational equity as a central problem of energy policy; the ethics of natural resource depletion and conservation; the ethics of pollution control; standards for the public management of energy demand; energy demand and the ethics of economic growth;the ethics of energy consumption decisions by individuals, households and firms; scope of market forms of regulation in the energy policy arena; conflicts between economic, utilitarian and alternative rights-based frameworks.

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PLCY 1702E. Environmental Law and Policy.

If this course is successful, you will have a comfortable understanding of major federal environmental laws, as well as the complexity of policy formation and the practice of environmental law in the U.S. You will see how legal precedent, differing understandings of risk, and the efforts of government agencies, courts, public and private organizations, scientists and citizens have shaped solutions to environmental problems. You will also have the opportunity to use legal theories and frameworks to explore some contemporary environmental problems.

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PLCY 1702H. Crime and Punishment in the USA.

In matters of crime and punishment, the United States is exceptional. It imprisons a larger share of its population than any comparable society, past or present. It is also, the most violent country in the developed world. These are staggering facts, given that the US is also the richest society in world history. In this course, we sample work from a wide number of disciplines in an effort to understand this America “exceptionalism. We examine the arguments that justify (or reject) state-sanctioned punishment and we discuss what criminal justice reform looks like, today and what it might look like tomorrow. WRIT

Fall PLCY1702H S01 17439 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (A. Usmani)
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PLCY 1703C. Policy Making and Policy Makers in Domestic and International Contexts.

The objective of the class is to encourage a new understanding of the players, approaches, and potential in domestic and international policy making, and to provide students with a "real-world" perspective on how things get done in a variety of public policy contexts. The course will take two broader perspectives on these issues, inviting students to investigate policy making from the “inside out” -- i.e., from the perspective of key stakeholders within the legislative and executive branches -- and from the “outside in” -- i.e., from the perspective of key stakeholders in the media, lobbying organizations, non-governmental organizations, and business interests.

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PLCY 1710. The Theory and Practice of Sustainable Investing.

21st century businesses and investors face a broadening and deepening array of Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) risks and opportunities. Climate change, water scarcity, community conflicts, resource depletion, supply chain breakdowns, worker well-being and economic inequality pose present material challenges that make sustainability an imperative for successful corporations and investors.

We will examine current ESG strategy, trends, future scenarios, players, and frameworks and integrate that theory with practical investment performance analysis, metrics, and study of screens, asset classes, and diversification. The course maximizes student interaction with industry leaders and is taught through a mix of case studies, analyst reports, and lectures.

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PLCY 1771. Education, Inequality, and American Democracy (POLS 1770).

Interested students must register for POLS 1770.

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PLCY 1800. Investigating Modes of Social Change.

This course examines the range of approaches to making social change through democratic institutions and processes in the U.S. These approaches-- direct service, community organizing, policy/politics, philanthropy, social entrepreneurship and research/scholarship-- have different value systems, methodologies, strengths and limitations. There’s no one “right” approach, and the modes often intersect in ways that can be mutually reinforcing or counterproductive. The course will be valuable to students interested in being involved in social change during their time at Brown and in their future careers.

Fall PLCY1800 S01 17048 T 4:00-6:30(09) 'To Be Arranged'
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PLCY 1802. Engaged Research Engaged Publics.

Policy problems are complex. Policy analysis and design is both a science and a craft. Increasingly, policymakers have begun to acknowledge that effective policy research requires not only multiple methods of inquiry, but also interdisciplinary teams of social science researchers, citizens, designers, scientists, artists, consultants, and engineers, among other experts. Generating innovative policy solutions, from this approach, is not a straightforward, linear process, but instead a creative, collaborative, and engaged activity that requires not only iterative and dynamic research methods, but also storytelling, design, and other creative methods.

Fall PLCY1802 S01 17420 Th 5:30-8:00PM (A. Levitas)
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PLCY 1810. Models for Sustaining Social Transformation.

This course explores the dynamics of creating, managing and sustaining social change activities in order to achieve the objective of true social transformation. The course will examine this pathway through the lens of several different social movements that are relevant in both the global and domestic spheres, including: water and sanitation systems, healthcare and public health, and urban planning and resilience.

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PLCY 1821. Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy.

We will examine the practice and profession of diplomacy and its relationship to the policy process. Focus will be on bilateral and multilateral diplomacy; while the practice will focus on a U.S. context, the lessons learned apply to other nation states. We will briefly review the history of inter-state relations, including the international legal basis for diplomatic relations. The practice has evolved over the years and has been greatly influenced by modern technology; however, it continues to incorporate such common functions as policy formulation, representation, reporting, negotiation, intercultural contacts and interaction with the media, parliamentary bodies and other external actors. WRIT

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PLCY 1822. Brown in Washington, D.C. Reflection Seminar.

This course is the required reflection seminar for participants in the Brown in Washington, D.C. program. The course is grounded in the 25 hour/week practicum that each student will complete during the semester. Potential placement sites include: government/public sector agencies (e.g., federal cabinet agencies, Congressional offices, state or municipal executive or legislative offices); not-for-profit organizations; and other organizations with a mission to support a range of types of work/placements for students. The seminar will examine issues in engaged scholarship and civic engagement through readings, case studies, participatory activities, and guest speakers.

Fall PLCY1822 S01 17051 Arranged (A. Hance)
Spr PLCY1822 S01 25638 Arranged (A. Hance)
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PLCY 1823. Brown in Washington, D.C. Practicum.

The Brown in Washington, D.C. practicum course is designed to provide students with a hands-on learning experience to complement their academic work at Brown. The course will feature 25-hour/week internships assigned to students based on their personal interests, policy interests, and post-Brown career objectives.

Students will be able to reflect on this internship experience and how it relates to their academic and post-Brown life during weekly reflection seminar classes that will also include career skill development sessions that can be directly applied to the internship experience and beyond.

Spr PLCY1823 S01 25640 Arranged (A. Hance)
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PLCY 1823Z. Gender and Public Policy (POLS 1823Z).

Interested students must register for POLS 1823Z.

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PLCY 1824. Social Change and Building Powerful Organizations.

This course will explore the dynamics and interplay between social entrepreneurship, social change, and policy. Drawing from the instructor’s experience as a co-founder and leader of The Real Food Challenge, an organization that leverages the power of youth and universities to create a healthy, fair, and green food system, students will explore frameworks for social transformation, and whether stable governance and effective policies are necessary for sustainable change.

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PLCY 1824K. The American Welfare State in Comparative Perspective (POLS 1824K).

Interested students must register for POLS 1824K.

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PLCY 1825. The New National Security: Transnational and Cross-Border Issues.

The objective of the class is to encourage a new understanding of the complexities of national security. The traditional paradigm of players, approaches, influences, and desired outcomes, no longer accommodates the corpus of transnational and cross-border issues that crosscut every policy decision in today’s world. Gender, climate, health, technology, food security, and other “non-traditional” security issues must shape the way we look at security, stability and just governance both as a sovereign nation and as a global actor. This course is only available for students participating in the Brown in DC Program.

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PLCY 1910. Social Entrepreneurship.

This course introduces students to social innovation and social entrepreneurship and engages them in identifying significant issues, problems, tools, strategies and models that drive bold solutions to complex contemporary problems. Enrollment limit is 40. Submit by 5pm on Friday, September 9, 2016 a required application here: http://goo.gl/forms/tjUK5twXc4 You must attend the first class on Thursday, September 8, 2016. Accepted students will be notified on September 12. Students who do not attend the second class on Tuesday, September 13th will forfeit their spot in class.

Fall PLCY1910 S01 17053 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (A. Harlam)
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PLCY 1970. Independent Reading and Research.

Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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PLCY 1971. Independent Reading and Research.

See Independent Reading And Research (PPAI 1970) for course description. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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PLCY 1990. Public Policy Colloquium.

An advanced two-semester research seminar for senior honors candidates in the public policy and American institutions concentration. Participants jointly consider strategies appropriate to researching and writing a senior paper before proceeding to individual research on topics they choose. Each participant is required to present a summary of his or her work to the colloquium.

Fall PLCY1990 S01 17050 Arranged (A. Levitas)
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PLCY 1991. Public Policy Colloquium.

See Public Policy Colloquium (PPAI 1990) for course description.

Spr PLCY1991 S01 25639 Arranged (A. Levitas)
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PLCY 2000. Institutions and Policy Making.

Studies how political, social, and economic institutions structure policymaking. Covers a variety of policy areas such as education, health care, technology policy, welfare, and social policy.

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PLCY 2010. Economics and Public Policy.

Examines issues in government spending and tax policy. Conceptual topics include the normative assignment of responsibility with federal systems and the equitable distribution of income. Specific policy applications are covered.

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PLCY 2030. Statistics.

Covers social and economic statistics and their role in public policy research. Among the topics explored are descriptive and inferential statistics, measurement, sampling, and multivariate analysis. Open to graduate students in Public Policy or Political Science.

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PLCY 2045. Environmental Policy Analysis.

The first half of the course focuses on the economic principles imbedded in the environmental problems facing local, state, and national societies across the globe. Key concepts include common-pool resources, public goods, market failures, and the valuation of costs and benefits across environmental policies. The second half of the course builds upon the economic foundation through the integration of statistical and financial techniques common in the evaluation and management of environmental policies. Throughout the semester the course will require students to accurately apply these quantitative methods to problem sets and case studies drawn from past and present environmental policy debates.

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PLCY 2050. Program Evaluation.

Designed to equip graduate students with the knowledge and tools needed to become critical consumers of evaluation research and to conduct evaluations of various social programs and policies. Following an introduction to the field of program evaluation, the course will address specific topics including: logic models, process evaluations, experimental and quasi-experimental designs for outcome evaluations, and alternative data sources. Class discussions and assignments will utilize evaluation examples from a variety of substantive policy areas. Prerequisite: PPAI 2030. Open to graduate students only.

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PLCY 2125. Competition, Markets, and Not-For-Profit Organizations.

This is an Economics-based general management course which focuses on both “for-profit” and “not- for-profit” entities. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course draws upon concepts from marketing, statistics, economics, management, and finance.

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PLCY 2150. Strategic Communication.

This course provides students with information and insights about strategic communication and public policy: how effective messages are created and framed, why we respond to messages the way we do, and how to employ communications strategies to advance political and public policy goals. In addition, the course will give students practical experience in writing communications tools including press releases, op-eds, letters to the editor, testimony and short speeches. Through guest lecturers, the course seeks to introduce students to the perspectives of different critical actors in the policymaking process: public officials, media, interest group lobbyists, speechwriters and other professional communicators.

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PLCY 2170. Leadership and Organization.

Leadership is an integral part of-and integral to-the policy process. Teaches students how to lead policy organizations effectively and efficiently, giving them the knowledge and skills necessary to conceive, sell, and implement policy. A review of effective leadership gleaned from historical and contemporary examples serves as a reservoir of knowledge from which students will draw throughout their careers.

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PLCY 2300. Educational Policy: Perspectives from Developing Countries.

This graduate-level course will examine substantive education policy issues from a developing country perspective. It also provides advanced training in the tools and methods for conducting impact evaluations of educational policies and programs within the context of developing countries in Asia, Latin America and Africa. Prior coursework in statistics and/or econometrics as well as microeconomics is required. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students. Instructor permission required.

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PLCY 2350. Thinking, Planning and Acting Strategically.

This course will focus on the strategic trends and issues which impact the public and nonprofit sectors and the role of strategic planning and strategic thinking as fundamental tools of public and nonprofit institutions to build high performance organizations, increase the value of their programs and services and enhance problem-solving. This course has been designed to support students in acquiring a mastery of practical skills in strategic planning and strategic thinking.

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PLCY 2400. Cost Benefit Analysis.

An introduction to the theory and practice of cost-benefit analysis (CBA). Topics include valuation of cost and benefits in primary and secondary markets, discounting, existence values, contingent evaluation, sensitivity analyses, and ethical considerations. The course examines federal and state guidelines regarding CBA and the application of CBA in these contexts via case studies. Prerequisites: PLCY 2010 and 2030. Open to MPA and MPP students in PLCY.

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PLCY 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall PLCY2450 S01 15175 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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PLCY 2540. Urban Economic Policy.

This course will introduce students to the economic analysis of urban policy. We will use economic theory to analyze why cities exist, where they develop, how they grow, and how activities are spatially arranged within urban areas. As we ask each of these questions, we will examine how public policy can influence the outcome and review empirical evidence. As time allows, we will also examine the economics of poverty, housing, and other issues within the urban context. Prerequisite: PLCY 2010 or instructor permission.

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PLCY 2550. Managing and Leading in Public Affairs.

Examines issues related to leading and managing in the realm of public affairs, covering foundation topics such as: honor, ethics, and accountability; management and organizational theory; organizational behavior; managerialism, performance, and strategic management; leadership; personnel management and social equity. Examining tools for effective relationship and networking building, cases will be used to apply concepts learned.

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PLCY 2600. Social Science Data Technologies.

Covers the applied use of data sources and computer software programs. Its goals are to teach students how to use common software packages and access policy-relevant data.

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PLCY 2650. Congress and the Federal Budget: Procedure, Politics and Public Policy.

Focus is on the federal budget process, political interactions, and public policy outcomes. The budget represents nearly one-quarter of GDP making those decisions central to the functioning of our democracy and the health of our economy. Emphasis is on the Congressional budget process, appropriations process, and revenue decision-making because the Constitution establishes Congress as the guardian of the nation's purse strings.

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PLCY 2655. Regulation and Compliance.

This course is designed to prepare students for work in heavily regulated policy arenas (which is pretty much all of them). You will receive training in the disciplines necessary to design regulations, evaluate compliance options, and generate regulatory analyses that policymakers will find persuasive. This is a practitioner’s course. As such, it is first and foremost a quantitative class. Familiarity with the basic concepts of microeconomics and statistics is assumed.

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PLCY 2660. Political Advocacy: Interest Groups, Lobbying and Political Influence in the U.S..

Will examine political advocacy by interest groups in the Americal political system. We will review theoretical and empirical research on how groups mobilize, interact with one another, and seek to influence electoral politics and policymaking. Throughout the course, we will ask whether organized interests facilitate or undermine the process of democratic politics. Prerequisite: PLCY 2000. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students in Public Policy.

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PLCY 2665. Corruption in Politics and Policy-Making.

Corruption can distort the behavior of both elected politicians and appointed bureaucrats. In this course, we study how—within a democracy—corruption affects who is elected and appointed to government, what policies they pursue, and how those policies are implemented. Empirical examples are drawn from the US and Europe historically and from the present-day developing world. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students in Political Science and Public Policy.

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PLCY 2700. Advanced Organizational and Management Strategies.

This discussion-intensive graduate-level seminar focuses on a wide range of contemporary theories and practices in organizational and management strategies. Topics include organizational structure and design, communication, culture and diversity, change management, stakeholder relations, long-term strategic planning, as well as workforce development and leadership identification, development and succession strategies. Course assignments include team-developed reports and oral presentations. Enrollment limited to 18 Public Policy graduate students and junior and senior Public Policy concentrators; other students by instructor permission.

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PLCY 2705. Leadership.

This course will examine both the theoretical and practical aspects of leadership. We will begin by gathering information about the different aspects of leadership; gain an understanding of the varying approaches successful leaders have taken; and, raise and discuss moral and ethical questions about the roles of leaders. Throughout the course, you will have the opportunity to interact with leaders in the community as you discover and hone your leadership style.

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PLCY 2710. GIS and Public Policy.

This seminar presents an introduction to the theory and practice of social science Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as applied to public policy analysis. We will cover a variety of topics, such as the geographical basis of policy issues, spatial mapping, and use of ArcGIS software to study a wide range of policy issues. The course will involve discussions, hands-on computer laboratory exercises, take-home problem sets and a Practical Exam.

The goals of the class are: 1) learning how to use GIS software and techniques, 2) database development and editing 3) spatial modeling techniques, and 4) using GIS to study policy issues.

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PLCY 2720. Design, Governance and Urban Futures.

Design, Governance and Urban Futures examines ways of thinking differently about our urban future, from the perspective of public policy. Integrating some of the basic elements of the design process and systems thinking into the policy making process, this course defines a new toolkit for decision making and leadership in government. With a double focus on global and local urban topics, this course offers a hands-on approach to how thinking in design is slowly becoming a must-have skill for those shaping our cities at a time when large scale problems have never been more complex, elusive, and disorienting.

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PLCY 2750. Mediation, Negotiation, and Arbitration Strategies.

This graduate-level seminar is a synthesis of negotiation, arbitration, and mediation theories and practices as applied to public policy professionals. Course topics include interagency negotiation and cooperation, professional and workplace negotiations, agreements in legislative and advocacy environments, using non-governmental bargaining partners, role of government regulators, and international and cross-cultural agreements. Emphasis on analysis of ethical issues and strategies in the planning, formulation, and implementation of negotiated agreements. Enrollment limited to 16. Instructor permission required.

Course usage information

PLCY 2755. Ethical Issues in Policy Analysis.

A greater understanding of the moral dimensions of public policy can improve the assessment of policy alternatives. Course begins with a brief overview of various ethical theories, with particular attention given to distributive justice and utilitarianism. Uses a variety of domestic policy case studies to identify and examine the role of ethics in policy analysis and policy choice. The latter part of the course will discuss the ethical conduct and responsibilities of policy professionals. Open to graduate students only.

Course usage information

PLCY 2780. Food Policy.

This course focuses mostly on domestic food policy, and will build on the conceptual framework of an interconnected food system, which underpins the movement of food from farm to table and back into the ground. We will consider stakeholders involved in the food system and the multiple, at times competing, factors that influence decision-making in this sphere, including economic interests, public health, environment/sustainability, and sociocultural. What are the forces shaping US food policy, politics, and the food environment in the 21st century?

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PLCY 2900. Research Workshop.

Group research projects centering on topics organized by the instructor. Students will be organized into small teams that will undertake research projects such as policy analysis, evaluation studies, organizational assessments, or data projects. Results of these projects will be presented in the seminar.

Course usage information

PLCY 2980. Graduate Independent Study.

Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Director - Watson Institute

Edward S. Steinfeld

Director - Development Studies

Patsy P. Lewis

Director - International Relations

Nina Tannenwald

Director - Public Policy

Anthony D. Levitas

Director - Master of Public Affairs Program

Eric M. Patashnik

Professor

Peter R. Andreas
John Hay Professor of International Studies

Mark M. Blyth
Eastman Professor of Political Economy

Ross E. Cheit
Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science

Nitsan Chorev
Harmon Family Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Justine Hastings
Professor of Economics; Professor of International and Public Affairs

Patrick G. Heller
Lyn Crost Professor of Social Sciences

Jose Itzigsohn
Professor of Sociology

Richard M. Locke
Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs

Glenn C. Loury
Merton P. Stoltz Professor of Social Sciences

Catherine A. Lutz
Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Family Professor of International Studies

Rose McDermott
David and Marianna Fisher University Professor of International Relations

Emily F. Oster
Professor of Economics; Professor of International and Public Affairs

Eric M. Patashnik
Julis-Rabinowitz Professor of Public Policy and Political Science

Christina Paxson
Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs

Andrew M. Schrank
Olive C. Watson Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Kathryn T. Spoehr
Professor of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences; Professor of International and Public Affairs

Edward S. Steinfeld
Dean's Professor of China Studies

Ashutosh Varshney
Sol Goldman Professor of International Studies and Political Science

Margaret M. Weir
Wilson Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science

Kenneth K. Wong
Walter and Leonore Annenberg Professor of Education Policy

Professor Research

Jonathan N. Ziegler
Professor of International and Public Affairs (Research)

Visiting Professor

Patsy P. Lewis
Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs

Associate Professor

Jeffrey D. Colgan
Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies

John N. Friedman
Associate Professor of Economics; Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Susan L. Moffitt
Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science

Assistant Professor

Sarah A. Besky
Charles Evans Hughes 1881 Assistant Professor of Anthropology and International and Public Affairs

Robert A. Blair
Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies

Sreemati Mitter
Kutayba Alghanim Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern History and International and Public Affairs

Jayanti J. Owens
Mary Tefft and John Hazen White, Sr. Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs and Sociology

Prerna Singh
Mahatma Gandhi Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies

Bryce Steinberg
Stephen Robert Assistant Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs

Senior Lecturer

Claudia Elliott
Senior Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Nina Tannenwald
Senior Lecturer in Political Science

Lecturer

Caroline M. Nordlund
Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Senior Fellow

Veronica H. Ingham
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Stephen A. Kinzer
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Anthony D. Levitas
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Alexander M. Nading
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Barbara Stallings
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Fellow

Marc J. Dunkelman
Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Peter B. Evans
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Samuel Ross Wilkin
Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Adjunct Professor

Robert B. Hackey
Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Adjunct Lecturer

William J. Allen
Adjunct Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Research Associate

Mark L. Howison
Research Associate in International and Public Affairs

Development Studies

Development Studies is an interdisciplinary concentration whose mission is to provide students with the knowledge, critical perspectives and skills they need to engage with the issues of economic and social development, especially as they relate to the Global South. The concentration is grounded in the social sciences – anthropology, sociology, political science, and economics – but it also heavily draws from history, art, and other disciplines in the humanities. The requirements are designed with three goals in mind: first, provide concentrators a solid foundation in the question of development; second, allow concentrators to develop expertise in a specific region that is of interest to them; third, give concentrators access to a wide range of courses in a large number of disciplines of interest to them. Concentrators are encouraged to do their own original field research. During the senior year, concentrators complete a capstone experience tailored to their interests in some aspect of international development. Towards this end, they benefit from extensive faculty and peer support.

Requirements

10 Courses + Language + Capstone

CORE
All core courses must be taken prior to senior year
Choose TWO from the following:2
Globalization and Social Conflict
Politics, Markets and States in Developing Countries
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Seminar in Sociology of Development1
Sophomore Seminar in Development Studies (Pre-requisites: sophomore or junior standing, and completion of SOC 1620, POLS 1240, or ANTH 0110)
Development Economics - Choose ONE of the following: (ECON 0510 for students with little to no Econ background, ECON 1510 for students with strong Econ backgrounds or double-concentrating in Econ)1
Development and the International Economy (Prerequisite: ECON 0110 , or AP Microeconomics 4 and AP Macroeconomics 4, or IB HL Economics 6)
Economic Development (Prerequisite: ECON 1110 or ECON 1130; and APMA 1650 or ECON 1620 or ECON 1630)
Research Methods and Design1
Methods in Development Research (junior year)
Regional Courses2
Two courses that focus on the same region of the developing world. Should complement the student's foreign language.
Elective Courses3
Three courses chosen from a list of pre-approved electives or by special approval.
Foreign Language
Equivalent of three full years of university study or above.
Senior Capstone
a. Thesis option: DEVL 1980 (fall senior year) and DEVL 1990 (spring senior year), or
b. Capstone seminar option: approved senior seminar in Development Studies, with seminar-length paper requirement.

 See the Development Studies website for the list of pre-approved elective courses.

International Relations

The objective of the International Relations concentration is to foster creative thinking about pressing global problems and to equip students with the analytic tools, language expertise, and cross-cultural understanding to guide them in that process. To this end, the concentration draws on numerous departments including political science, history, economics, anthropology, sociology, psychology, religious studies, and area studies. The IR concentration is organized around a multidisciplinary core and two sub-themes: security and society, and political economy and society. It has a three-year language requirement that must be linked to the student’s selected region of the world. All concentrators are required to undertake a capstone project using research in a second language. Prospective concentrators should visit the IR site for next steps.

Requirements

The IR concentration requires 14 courses and the equivalent of 3 years study of a second language. Regardless of track, all IR concentrators must take all five core courses, research methods, regional focus, and capstone courses.

Security and Society track

Core Courses5
Students must take all 5 core courses, preferably during freshman or sophomore year. AP credit does not count toward the concentration.
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Principles of Economics
Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present
The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits
Introduction to International Politics
Track Requirements (five courses distributed between the sub-themes):5
Governance and Diplomacy (two or three courses):
Cybersecurity and International Relations
La France en guerre
Law, Nationalism, and Colonialism
History of American Intervention
International Law
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Computers, Freedom and Privacy: Current Topics in Law and Policy
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe
Ethnic Politics and Conflict
The International Law and Politics of Human Rights
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
War in Film and Literature
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
War and Human Rights
Technology and International Politics
Global Justice
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Society (two or three courses):
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law
Violence and the Media
Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols
La France en guerre
Refugees: A Twentieth-Century History
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Law and Religion
International Journalism
Media Wars: The Middle East
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Reassessing Contentious Politics, and Social Movements
Ethnic Politics and Conflict
International Relations of Russia, Europe and Asia
Research Methods1
Prior to 7th semester. Quantitative or qualitative course from the following approved list.
Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East
Ethnographic Research Methods
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Methods
Introduction to Econometrics
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Introductory Statistics for Education Research and Policy Analysis
Political Research Methods
Methods of Social Research
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Regional Focus2
Both courses must be on the same area. Students are required to link these to language study.
Language
Three years university study or equivalent. Must correspond to region.
Capstone Course, from the following options:1
Must be taken senior year. Must incorporate language skills. Students may choose from the following:
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols
La France en guerre
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Law and Religion
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
International Journalism
India in the World
Global Women’s Issues: Investing in women as strategy for sustainable growth and global development
Media Wars: The Middle East
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Reassessing Contentious Politics, and Social Movements
The Politics of Food Security
International Relations of Russia, Europe and Asia
Senior Honors Seminar
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
War and Human Rights
Technology and International Politics
Urban Politics and Policy
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Total Credits14

Political Economy and Society Track

Core Courses5
Students must take all 5 core courses, preferably during freshman or sophomore year. AP credit does not count toward the concentration.
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Principles of Economics
Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present
The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits
Introduction to International Politics
Track Requirements (five courses from distributed between the sub-themes):5
Economics (two or three courses): All students MUST take Micro and Macro
Intermediate Microeconomics
Intermediate Macroeconomics
Plus an International Economics course:
Development and the International Economy
Current Global Macroeconomic Challenges
Economic Development
International Trade
International Finance
The Economy of China since 1949
Financial Institutions
Finance, Regulation, and the Economy: Research
Political Economy (two or three courses):
Anthropology and International Development: Ethnographic Perspectives on Poverty and Progress
Environmental Economics and Policy
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Global Women’s Issues: Investing in women as strategy for sustainable growth and global development
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Prosperity: The Ethics and Economics of Wealth Creation
Politics, Economy and Society in India
Money and Power in the International Political Economy
Building a Better World: Film and Social Change
Politics of Globalization
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Capitalism: For and Against
Culture, Identity and Development
Economic Development and Social Change
Research Methods1
Prior to 7th semester. Quantitative or qualitative course from the following approved list.
Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East
Ethnographic Research Methods
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Methods
Introduction to Econometrics
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Introductory Statistics for Education Research and Policy Analysis
Political Research Methods
Methods of Social Research
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Regional Focus2
Both courses must be on the same area. Students are required to link these to language study.
Language
Three years university study or equivalent. Must correspond to region.
Capstone Course, from the following options:1
Must be taken senior year. Must incorporate language skills. Students may choose from the following:
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols
La France en guerre
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Law and Religion
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
International Journalism
India in the World
Global Women’s Issues: Investing in women as strategy for sustainable growth and global development
Media Wars: The Middle East
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Reassessing Contentious Politics, and Social Movements
The Politics of Food Security
Senior Honors Seminar
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
International Relations of Russia, Europe and Asia
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
War and Human Rights
Technology and International Politics
Global Justice
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Culture, Identity and Development
Total Credits14

The program has a director, an associate director/concentration advisor, and two faculty advisors for each track to assist students in planning their academic programs.

Public Policy

Housed in the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, the public policy concentration is dedicated to the study of health care and social welfare policy, education policy, urban policy, law and criminal justice, and media and technology. Public policy refers to societal initiatives to remedy social problems. Because social problems typically emerge from complex, multi-faceted social conditions, the study of public policy requires students to become familiar with the insights of diverse academic disciplines into how institutions facilitate or inhibit societal problem-solving. The study of public policy is an excellent framework for integrating ideas drawn from several disciplines around issues of real world significance. Concentrators with a particular interest in such applications should consider the Engaged Scholars Program. All concentrators emerge with a sound understanding of institutional change and are well-equipped to contribute to processes of social change.  

Required Courses: 10 courses + capstone

Core Courses:
PLCY 0100Introduction to Public Policy1
Ethics and Public Policy1
Ethics and Public Policy
Good Government
Economics for Public Policy1
Intermediate Microeconomics
Intermediate Microeconomics (Mathematical)
Economics of Education I
Statistics for Public Policy1
Political Research Methods
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
Introduction to Econometrics
Econometrics I
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation1
Program Evaluation
Evaluating the Impact of Social Programs
Elective Courses: 1, 2
Three Broad Elective Courses: May be taken in any policy area3
Two more electives in one of the areas you have already studied2
Sample electives may include the following:
Health Policy
Comparative Health Care Systems
Emergency Medical Systems: An Anatomy of Critical Performance
Case Studies in Public Health: The Role of Governments, Communities and Professions
Health Policy Challenges
Technology Policy
Cybersecurity and International Relations
GIS and Public Policy
Technology and International Politics
Science and Technology Policy in the Global South
Environmental Policy
Environmental Economics and Policy
Environmental Law and Policy
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
Current Topics in Environmental Health
Governance, Law, and Ethics
State and Local Government
Congressional Leadership, Parties and Public Policy
City Politics
Topics in American Constitutional Law
Social Policy
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Social Welfare Policy in the United States
Policies Affecting Working Families
Juvenile Justice Institutions and Policy
Human Needs and Social Services
Urban Policy
Urbanization in China
Urban Policy Challenges: Spatial Inequality in Metropolitan America
Urban Revitalization: Lessons from the Providence Plan
Comparative Development
Housing and Homelessness
Modes of Social Change
Nonprofit Organizations
Leading Social Ventures - Social Entrepreneurship in Action
Investigating Modes of Social Change
Social Entrepreneurship
Investing in Social Change
Senior Capstone: The capstone may take the form of an Honors Thesis, Independent Study, a Public Policy internship, research Assistantship, UTRA Assistantship, or designated Senior Seminar
Total Credits10

Honors

Candidates for honors should apply in the Spring term of their third year. Successful candidates will enroll in the Public Policy Colloquium and prepare a senior honors paper.

Master of Public Affairs

The Brown MPA - Change the World

The Brown Master of Public Affairs (MPA) at the Watson Institute is a one-year (summer – fall – spring) full-time program that provides students with the analytical foundation and management tools they need to tackle the policy problems of today. The program prepares students for careers spanning public service, all levels of government, NGOs, foundations, and the private sector.

Our unique, accelerated program offers:

  • Small class size and engaged faculty composed of world-renowned researchers and experienced practitioners
  • An interdisciplinary curriculum - take advantage of course offerings across the University
  • A two-week international policy immersion experience
  • A 12-week consultancy that ensures students are career-ready

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/public-affairs-and-public-policy

Required Courses
Summer Sequence I ( 4 Weeks)
Economics and Public Policy
Statistics
Summer Sequence 2 (4 Weeks)
Introduction to Public Policy
Communications and Public Policy
Global Policy Experience (2 Weeks)
Fall Semester (Regular Semester)
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation
MPA 2055
The Politics of Policymaking
Specialization Elective 1
Specialization Elective 2
Spring Sequence 1 (12 Weeks)
Policy in Action Consultancy
Spring Sequence 2 (7 Weeks)
Management and Implementation in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Policy Problems of the 21st Century: Social Justice and Advocacy, Strategies for Change
System Dynamics: Policy Analysis for a Complex World
Specialization Elective 3

Dual Degree Program: Master of Public Health (MPH) and Master of Public Affairs (MPA)

The School of Public Health and the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs  also offer a dual-degree Master of Public Health (MPH) and Master of Public Affairs (MPA) program.  Emphasizing a learning by doing approach, this rigorous, program will offer highly qualified applicants the opportunity to gain training in public health and public policy to prepare them to address the critical health policy issues in the United States and throughout the world.  The dual-degree degree program includes 19 courses as well as a Masters level thesis.  Students will benefit from the rich academic resources at the Watson Institute and the School of Public Health, as well as their extensive applied learning programs in Rhode Island, as well as throughout the United States and the world.

Interested students should apply separately to the MPH and MPA program. Applicants will indicate interest in the joint degree program on the application form. 

For more information on admission to the MPH program and it's requirements, please visit the following website:

https://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/public-health