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Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

The Watson Institute is a community of scholars whose work aims to help us understand and address the world's most pressing issues, including globalization, economic uncertainty, security threats, environmental degradation, and poverty. Focusing on three main areas – development, security, and governance – the Institute leverages Brown's signature interdisciplinary approach to foster innovative, policy-relevant scholarly activities.

The Institute’s core faculty of anthropologists, economists, historians, political scientists, sociologists, and other specialists work across academic disciplines with Brown faculty colleagues, as well as with an ever-changing cohort of visiting scholars and practitioners from around the world. The Institute collaborates with key organizations, such as the United Nations, national governments, and non-governmental organizations to seek practicable solutions to today's global problems.

Watson administers three undergraduate concentrations, Development Studies, Public Policy and International Relations, and houses several others: Latin American Studies, Middle East Studies, and South Asian Studies. It also administers the Master of Public Affairs (MPA) degree program, which prepares students for careers spanning public service, government, NGOs, foundations, and the private sector, and the Graduate Program in Development, which supports interdisciplinary learning and contextual expertise for doctoral students of the social sciences. The Institute is also home to a thriving postdoctoral fellows program.

The Brown International Advanced Research Institutes (BIARI), an early-career professional development initiative that builds transnational knowledge networks among young leaders from the Global South, is located at Watson, where a two-week residency occurs each year. The Choices Program, which develops secondary level curriculum resources and offers professional development to classroom teachers, is also affiliated with the Institute.

Watson is home to several centers focused on area studies: the Africa Initiative, Brazil Initiative, Center for Contemporary South Asia, Caribbean and Latin American Studies, China Initiative, Humanitarian Innovation Initiative, Middle East Studies and the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy. The co-location of these centers, combined with the Institute's thematically driven research, enables Watson to take an interdisciplinary, comparative approach to research and education. In keeping with Watson's mission, such collaboration leads to a deep understanding of the greatest challenges of our time.

The Institute houses and supports three major academic journals: Studies in Comparative International Development, Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (JHPPL) and the Brown Journal of World Affairs (BJWA). Founded in 1993, BJWA is a highly regarded scholarly publication in the field of international studies, edited and managed entirely by Brown undergraduates.

Finally, a full agenda of seminar series, conferences, lectures, and workshops each year brings leading scholars and public figures to the Institute to put current events into context, explore emerging global issues, develop policy, and publish research. A new podcast, Trending Globally: Politics and Policy, further connects faculty research and visiting scholars with broader news and world events. 

More information about the Institute is available at http://watson.brown.edu/.

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IAPA 0100. Global Health, Humanitarianism, and Inequality.

The term “global health” refers to an aspiration and a set of problems. An aspiration to global health has potential to unite biosecurity, humanitarian, and philanthropic efforts to rid the world of infectious disease, improve sanitation, and address malnutrition. As a set of problems, global health is less unifying than unruly. Deciding when a local epidemic becomes a global emergency or calculating the economic value of healthy childbirth are not straightforward processes. This course takes a multidisciplinary, critical approach to global health. Focus will be on “bottom-up” perspectives—how projects and policies play out in the lives individuals and communities.

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IAPA 0110. Introduction to Public Policy.

An overview of policymaking and policy analysis in the contemporary United States. The course begins with an examination of traditional justifications for government action. We will then examine the discipline of policy analysis that has arisen to design and evaluate public policies. We will also consider critiques of the rational method and ask questions about how policy expertise fits into the political system. The course ends with classic works on organizations and implementation. Not open to graduate students.

Fall IAPA0110 S01 16697 TTh 6:40-8:00PM(02) (R. Hackey)
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IAPA 0200. Foundations of Development.

This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to the study of development. The course examines what constitutes development from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives, and the course examines how and in what context the term “development” itself has evolved over time. The goal of this course is to provide students an intellectual and conceptual grounding for study a variety of issues surrounding development, whether in the global North or South.

Fall IAPA0200 S01 16699 MW 11:00-11:50(16) (A. Varshney)
Fall IAPA0200 C01 18495 Th 12:00-12:50 (A. Varshney)
Fall IAPA0200 C02 18552 F 11:00-11:50 (A. Varshney)
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IAPA 0300. Costs of War.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the consequences of contemporary war in human, economic, political and social terms. We primarily take up the examples of the post-9/11 wars in the Middle East and Southwest Asia but we also look at comparative examples from Africa and Southeast Asia.

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IAPA 0400. Fiscal Plumbing 101: The American Tax State in Comparative and Historical Perspective.

This IAPA Gateway course explores the origins and development of the American Tax State in comparative and historical perspective. It's designed as an interdisciplinary introduction to the welter of problems associated with the raising and spending of public revenue –the life blood of contemporary nation-states. It should be of use to students interested in the political and institutional development of the welfare state, and in the origins, fault lines and prospects of American federalism. We explore the origins and development of the American Tax State in comparative and historical perspective. It is designed as an interdisciplinary introduction to the welter of problems associated with the raising and spending of public revenue –the life blood of contemporary nation-states.

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IAPA 0500. Nationalism, Ethnicity, and the State.

This course explores two of the important group identities across the world over time - nationalism and ethnicity - and the relationship between the two. Contrary to the hopeful expectations of many scholars, these categorical identities remain highly salient today. Most of the earth’s land and the people who inhabit them are apportioned across, and governed by nation states. Nation states exercise this power, as the nomenclature betrays, on the basis of nationalism. In as much as nationalism remains the legitimizing ideology of political rule, it is also the basis on which claims to sovereign statehood are made.

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IAPA 0600. Governance and the City in Comparative Perspective.

Urban areas, which now comprise over half of the world’s population, combine dynamic economies, diverse populations, and stark inequalities. This course will examine the governance of metropolitan areas, focusing on cities in the developed world with comparisons to cities in low and middle-income countries. The central question we ask is how do urban areas govern inequalities by income, by race and ethnicity, and migration status? The first part of the class explores the diverse range of powers and resources that characterize cities in different national settings and assesses the strength and representativeness of urban governing institutions. The second part of the class examines policymaking and policy delivery in cities. Topics include housing, infrastructure, policing, and policies that aim to address poverty.

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IAPA 0700. The Political Economy of Hard Policy Problems.

This class tackles some of the “hard problems” that governments and global firms routinely face. That is, while governments are cajoled and called upon to produce economic growth, do something about economic inequality and social mobility, and improve the life chances of citizens through purposive action, actually delivering these things is incredibly hard. Likewise firms are supposed to police their supply chains, decarbonize their operations, raise their wages, and pay more taxes, all at once. These areas constitute ‘hard problems’ for two main reasons. Economically, we don’t really have much of a clue about how to do many of these things. Politically, there are powerful interests and entrenched ideas out there that want to keep things just as they are.

Fall IAPA0700 S01 16856 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (M. Blyth)
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IAPA 1010. Borders and Bodies.

Whose maps, whose stories? This seminar begins by asking: what is a border? And where is it? How do particularly gendered, sexualized, raced, and classed bodies experience borders and mobility across them? Why are borders important sites of political, socio-cultural, economic, and religious contestation? How do borders and border-crossers matter to nation-states and global flows of capital and commodities? How do people living in border zones relate to the geopolitical reality of the border and the sociocultural and historical connections that often run across them? How do ideas about belonging and identity structure competing visions of justice, community, and citizenship?

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IAPA 1020. Pathologies of the Rich (Countries): Liberal Capitalism and its Discontents.

Advanced capitalist economies face challenges from a number of different sources. Economic inequality is increasing, austerity and welfare reforms have undermined social protections. Globalization and decades of permissive merger policies have resulted in private companies of unprecedented size and in possession of extraordinary market power and political influence. Climate change has called into question economic foundations and social compromises of post-war capitalism, while threatening to unleash destabilizing catastrophes. Populist parties are on the rise across Europe and North America, posing a direct challenge to the liberal order and creating new uncertainty about the future of liberal democracy and global capitalism.

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IAPA 1021. Experiments on Race, Class, and Gender Diversity, Power, and Identity Course Series.

Open expressions of bias are becoming less socially acceptable. Inequalities along lines of race, class, and gender, however, persist. This raises a challenge for social scientists: to study unequal treatment without prompting research subjects to modify their behavior. Social scientists are increasingly turning to experiments in order to unobtrusively identify causal effects on attitudes and behaviors. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of experimentation through exemplary studies on bias. As part of a semester-long project, student will be involved in the design and implementation of an experiment conceived by the instructors.

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IAPA 1040. Nationalism and the Nation-State.

From Brexiteers in the United Kingdom and independence activists in Catalonia to members of the Hindu right-wing in India, nationalism seems to be everywhere today. We live in a world of nation-states whose boundaries are legitimized by the shared identities of their populations. But what is nationalism, and how does it relate to the nations whose borders structure both the affairs of states and the details of our everyday lives?

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IAPA 1050. Punishment and School Discipline: Historical Insights on the School to Prison Pipeline.

School discipline and specifically racially disproportionate school discipline practices have been a major focus of researchers and educators aiming to equalize educational settings. This course explores how discipline, punishment and sometimes criminalizing students have been central themes in the history of U.S. education reform. Discipline is a central focus on educators seeking to create ordered classrooms but discipline has also played a key function in the broader efforts to maintain social order. We will use an interdisciplinary body of literature in education, history and the social sciences to ask questions about the link between schooling, reform and the practices of discipline.

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IAPA 1200. Foundations of Security.

This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to the study of security. This means we examine the notion of what constitutes security from a variety of disciplinary perspectives that may not always agree or overlap. Specifically, in addition to political science, the course draws on recent work in evolutionary psychology, biological anthropology and behavioral economics to examine existing problems, issues and questions in security studies. The goal of this course is to investigate the extent to which various disciplinary models and methods can help to further inform or develop the study of security. Substantive applications include a wide variety of empirical methods.

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IAPA 1201A. Cyber Security: Strategy & Policy.

This course examines the challenges of cyber security from a strategy and policy perspective. Our main focus: challenges to achieving cyber security; and of building cyber security capacity in national security (including cyber war and critical infrastructure security), economic development, and international security contexts. We incorporate global, as well as corporate, government, and non-governmental organizational perspectives. We start by working toward what “cyber,” “security,” “strategy,” and “power” mean; and develop an understanding of the policy issues faced by public and private sector stakeholders. Students should be familiar with international relations theory, but no technical background is needed.

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IAPA 1203. History of American Intervention.

Fall IAPA1203 S01 16704 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (S. Kinzer)
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IAPA 1204. The Political Economy of Strategy: From the Financial Revolution to the Revolution in Military Affa.

This is a course about how major powers make, maintain and potentially undermine themselves using several recent examples -- Great Britain, the United States, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan. We make no claims that this course will reveal clues about the end of the American Empire, or the Pax Americana, but we do argue that only through an honest accounting of the history of the political economy of strategy can students understand both the costs and benefits of hegemony.

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IAPA 1205. International Law.

This introduction to public international law covers the nature of legal reasoning in international relations, the interplay of international law and international politics, and the international legal process. Examines selected substantive fields such as state responsibility, the use of force, international human rights, and the U.S. and international law.

Fall IAPA1205 S01 16702 MW 3:00-4:20(10) (N. Berman)
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IAPA 1206. War.

This course introduces students to modern and contemporary war—its nature, its technology, its philosophers, its variations, and its evolution—across five domains: on land, at sea, in the air, and across cyber space. The course is divided into three parts: unpacking the nomenclature of violence; “old war”; and “new war. Students who complete the course will gain sufficient military literacy to critically engage in important questions and ongoing debates about the use of armed force to pursue national political interests.

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IAPA 1401. Economic Development in Latin America.

This course covers some of the unique events and characteristics that have shaped the economic development landscape of Latin America since colonial times until the present. Topics include: the historical legacy, why Latin America fell behind, import substitution industrialization, the debt crisis, poverty and income inequality, inflation, trade and financial liberalization and competitiveness. The class exposes students to a number of concepts and tools that can be broadly applied to the understanding of development in other geographic areas.

Fall IAPA1401 S01 15844 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (V. Ingham)
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IAPA 1402. Beyond Sun, Sea and Sand: Exploring the Contemporary Caribbean.

For many people, their image of the Caribbean is the tourist brochure and television advertisement representation of sun, sea and sand. This course challenges that through a broad introduction to the real society, economy and politics of the Caribbean region. Using literature, film and traditional texts, it captures the cultural and linguistic complexity of the region through the exploration of a range of central themes such as ethnicity, color, class, politics, as well as more specific, targeted areas including economic inequality, migration, and tourism.

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IAPA 1403. Development's Visual Imaginaries: Still and Moving Images That Shaped the Field.

Using primarily paintings and films, this seminar explores the visual imaginaries created and circulated between 17th and early 20th centuries especially in the Americas but also in Europe, which came to underpin prominent mid- to late-19th century and early 20th-century development theories and resultant legislation and public policies in the United States, and which were deployed both internally and abroad. The course will argue that development policies domestically and abroad often drew from the same set of ideas and imaginaries about categories of humans, land, nature, work, gender, race, capacity for self-definition and political self-representation, and who should wield power.

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IAPA 1500. Methods in Development Research.

An introduction to the various techniques of research in Development Studies, with a focus on qualitative and field methods.

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IAPA 1700. Economics for Public Policy.

This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. We begin by exploring when and how the government intervenes in the economy. We also consider the impact of government intervention. We then use this theoretical foundation to examine current issues in expenditure, education, health, retirement, business competition, environment, cybersecurity, crime, financial, and tax policy. The student will acquire analytical skills to better evaluate existing and alternative public policy alternatives. Qualitative and quantitative methods will be used throughout the course. Class sessions require a significant degree of student participation.

Fall IAPA1700 S01 16712 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (N. Fraccaroli)
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IAPA 1700A. Program Evaluation.

Students in this course will become familiar with the concepts, methods, and applications of evaluation. We will build intuition around the experimental and quasi-experimental method commonly used in practice so that students learn how to interpret evaluation results, read evaluation research critically, and understand the pros/cons of each method. We will draw on illustrations and case studies from a variety of substantive policy areas.students must have completed IAPA 0110. In addition, you must have completed one of the following: POLS 1600, EDUC 1110, SOC 1100, or ECON 1620. If you have not completed these prerequisites, you must receive written permission to enroll in the course.

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IAPA 1700B. Investigating Modes of Social Change.

This course examines the range of approaches to making social change through democratic institutions and processes in the U.S. These approaches-- direct service, community organizing, policy/politics, philanthropy, social entrepreneurship and research/scholarship-- have different value systems, methodologies, strengths and limitations. There’s no one “right” approach, and the modes often intersect in ways that can be mutually reinforcing or counterproductive. The course will be valuable to students interested in being involved in social change during their time at Brown and in their future careers.

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IAPA 1700C. Political Communication.

This course will focus on the importance of written and oral communication in public decision-making, particularly in the congressional context. The course will examine the impact on political interactions, and the influencing of public policy decisions and outcomes. The course will emphasize some of the practical tools for producing relevant, useful material in the professional policy and the political communications arenas. The course requires several writing assignments focusing on different public policy analyses and political communications tools as well as active class participation including oral presentation.

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IAPA 1700D. Law and Public Policy.

This course will give students an introduction to business organizations – the law that governs corporations and partnerships, how they raise money in the financial markets, and to explore the public policy issues that inform the regulation of business and finance. We will look at business organizations, law that governs how companies raise money, operation of the stock markets, insider trading, and the regulation of institutional investors including mutual funds, hedge funds and private equity funds. We will finish by taking up corporations as persons, their social obligations and the recent Supreme Court cases on corporations and the First Amendment.

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IAPA 1700E. Nonprofit Organizations.

Contemporary nonprofits and their role in community building and shaping public policy are central to this course. Topics include how strong coalitions impact housing, welfare and children's policy, organizing empowered communities, the influential and engaged donor and building the value of nonprofits. Case studies will be featured and new nonprofit models will be conceptualized to strategically address critical human need. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students concentrating in Public Policy. This course satisfies the American Institutions requirement.

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IAPA 1700F. Engaged Research Engaged Publics.

Policy problems are complex. Policy analysis and design is both a science and a craft. Increasingly, policymakers have begun to acknowledge that effective policy research requires not only multiple methods of inquiry, but also interdisciplinary teams of social science researchers, citizens, designers, scientists, artists, consultants, and engineers, among other experts. Generating innovative policy solutions, from this approach, is not a straightforward, linear process, but instead a creative, collaborative, and engaged activity that requires not only iterative and dynamic research methods, but also storytelling, design, and other creative methods.

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IAPA 1701. Drug War Politics.

This seminar examines the politics, practice, and consequences of government efforts to regulate mind-altering substances since the early 20th century. Although much of the focus is on the contemporary United States and Latin America, the coverage is broadly historical, comparative, and global. The main drugs focused on are cocaine, opium, and cannabis, but will include alcohol, tobacco, and synthetics. The course also evaluates policy alternatives and the obstacles to policy reform. The course draws on readings from fields such as political science, anthropology, criminology, and history. The seminar is reading intensive, and is designed to cultivate critical writing and presentation skills.

Fall IAPA1701 S01 17825 M 3:00-5:30(03) (P. Andreas)
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IAPA 1701A. Technology and Development.

A “smart” global order is currently being created, where information and communication technologies dominate public arenas and private lives. Much of the debates on new technologies have focused on the global North, yet the impact on the global South is equally significant. In this course, we will explore the history, present and possible futures of the use of technologies for transforming economic, social and political lives. The technologies discussed will range from the steam power leading to the first industrial revolution to today’s mobile phone technologies, workforce automation, as well as facial-recognition and other surveillance technologies.

Fall IAPA1701A S01 18158 W 3:00-5:30(10) (N. Chorev)
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IAPA 1701B. Cyber Security: Strategy & Policy.

This course examines the challenges of cyber security from a strategy and policy perspective. Our main focus: challenges to achieving cyber security; and of building cyber security capacity in national security (including cyber war and critical infrastructure security), economic development, and international security contexts. We incorporate global, as well as corporate, government, and non-governmental organizational perspectives. We start by working toward what “cyber,” “security,” “strategy,” and “power” mean; and develop an understanding of the policy issues faced by public and private sector stakeholders. Students should be familiar with international relations theory, but no technical background is needed.

Fall IAPA1701B S01 18230 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (I. Arreguin-Toft)
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IAPA 1701C. Power and Knowledge: The “Muslim World” in the Social Sciences.

The global Muslim community totals nearly 2 billion people, or nearly one in every four people on the planet. With a few notable exceptions, most Muslim majority countries face significant obstacles to economic and political development. Scholars have long argued that it is impossible to understand these challenges without a greater understanding of religious doctrine and Islamic institutions. Are these scholars correct? Or does this emphasis on religious doctrine obscure more than it illuminates? This course draws on a wide range of social sciences literature on the Muslim World to better understand how religion shapes economic and political development.

Fall IAPA1701C S01 18229 M 3:00-5:30(03) (G. Koehler-Derrick)
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IAPA 1701E. Gender and Capitalism.

This course considers the intertwined relationship between capitalism---its development and the various forms it takes---and gender. The course travels across more than two centuries investigating how gender relations and women’s roles in them are embedded in processes of industrialization, battles for workers’ rights, state-market relations, colonialism, and how societies care for their young and old. Investigating both historical and contemporary topics will give students new insight into how gender structures society today, including how and why various inequalities exist. Throughout the course students will learn how to think critically about gender in order to gain new understandings of gender relations, gender inequality, and the economy.

Fall IAPA1701E S01 18221 T 4:00-6:30(07) (C. Tudor)
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IAPA 1701F. Wealth and Poverty in the New Metropolis.

Metropolitan areas contain extremes of wealth and poverty, which take expression in spatial inequalities. In American metros, spatial inequalities mark lines of racial and ethnic divisions. This course will examine how economic shifts combine with national and local governance choices to exacerbate metropolitan inequalities. We will examine how recent economic shifts in technology combine with our long history of racial segregation to create protected spaces of wealth as well as disinvested communities of poverty. We pay special attention to the way housing policies, climate change mitigation strategies, and infrastructure investments have reinforced inequalities in the recent past. The course concludes by considering new strategies for building wealth in disinvested communities and analyzing new patterns of mobilization that seek to provide local communities with the tools to build wealth and opportunity.

Fall IAPA1701F S01 18219 W 3:00-5:30(10) (M. Weir)
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IAPA 1702. Sex and War.

The course explores biological and social determinants of participation in aggression, violence, and war; along with how and why sex differences become gendered. Some topics include gender biases in international relations theories, women in combat, LGBTQs in the military, discourse, attitudes towards war, rape, and female and male roles in the conduct of war. The course also assesses the ongoing evolution of the roles of women as leaders, actors, and agenda-setters in, and objects of, foreign policy. Some familiarity with international relations theory is helpful, but there are no prerequisites.

Fall IAPA1702 S01 17826 W 3:00-5:30(10) (I. Arreguin-Toft)
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IAPA 1801. Science and Technology Policy in the Global South.

Using both theoretical ideas and empirical examples, this seminar will explore the relationships among science, technology, society, and public policymaking in the Global South, in places where local science and global science often collaborate and sometimes clash. The class will investigate, from a variety of perspectives, how the governance of science and technology in various parts of the Global South is influenced by their past experiences, forms of public science organization, systems of knowledge and belief, civic epistemologies and regulatory frameworks, and strategic agendas for development, as well as the knowledge claims and concerns of social movements, and tensions in power and social relations. Priority given to IAPA seniors and juniors.

Fall IAPA1801 S01 18136 T 4:00-6:30(07) (G. Augusto)
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IAPA 1801A. History of American Intervention.

This course reviews modern history through the study of invasions, coups, and other interventions carried out by the United States. From the Marine assault on Tripoli in 1805 to the bombing of Tripoli in 2011, there have been scores of these episodes. They have shaped American history and the history of the wider world. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors.

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IAPA 1802A. Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy.

This course examines the practice and profession of diplomacy and its relationship to the policy process. Focus is on bilateral and multilateral diplomacy; practice focuses on U.S. context, lessons learned apply to other nation states. We review history of inter-state relations, including the international legal basis for diplomatic relations. The practice has evolved over the years and been greatly influenced by modern technology; however, it continues to incorporate such common functions as policy formulation, representation, reporting, negotiation, intercultural contacts and interaction with the media, parliamentary bodies and other external actors. Limited to Jrs, Srs. Priority given to IR Seniors.

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IAPA 1802C. Infrastructure!.

Infrastructure! It’s the hardware and software that undergirds transportation, energy, water, and health systems. This course asks what we can learn about infrastructure when we approach it not as a neutral set of technologies but as a context-dependent social and political force. Taking a critical approach to (among others) natural resources, global health, and development, the course will trace how infrastructures have both served and obstructed colonial and contemporary projects for social change. The course will also take up the question of the future of infrastructure, including “green,” modular, and “off the grid” technologies.

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IAPA 1803. Humanitarian Response in Modern Conflict.

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to exploring challenges and opportunities related to conflict from both a human and national security perspective – with a special focus on putting people and communities, as opposed to national interests, at the center of attention. Students will gain a deep understanding of humanitarian crises caused by conflict, including impacts on food and water security, healthcare, mass displacement of civilians, and protection of civilians and humanitarian aid workers.

Fall IAPA1803 S01 16710 T 4:00-6:30(07) (D. Polatty)
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IAPA 1803A. Rwanda Past and Present.

In the mid-1990s, few countries on earth were as devastated as Rwanda. As many as one million people or more had been killed in a 100-day genocide, and the fleeing regime had left the country in ruins. Today, however, Rwanda is not only at peace but full of ambition. Some believe it is poised to rise from poverty and become an example for developing countries everywhere. Others worry that trouble is brewing, and that another apocalypse could lie ahead.

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IAPA 1803C. The History and Politics of Development in the Middle East.

This course examines from a critical perspective the impact and legacies of development projects in the Middle East. After considering the historical emergence of development as a concept and some general critiques, we will explore its more specific deployment in the context of the Middle East. Readings will address its discursive frameworks as well as the economic, political, environmental, and social dynamics it has shaped through its definition of instrumental categories, objects, and spaces. We will also consider how these dynamics have contributed to the recent uprisings in the region. Priority given to DS seniors.

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IAPA 1803E. Social Entrepreneurship.

Social Entrepreneurship, engages students in the process of exploring significant global problems and developing innovative solutions that drive transformative social change. The course helps students understand the strategies that social entrepreneurs employ to tackle complex and entrenched social problems with transformative approaches that work and impact systems. Students will learn about real organizations and interact with entrepreneurs leading this work. Case studies, complemented by articles and guest speakers, will show different approaches to social entrepreneurship and illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of various models and strategies. Enrollment in the class is determined by application: http://goo.gl/forms/tjUK5twXc4

Fall IAPA1803E S01 16629 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (A. Harlam)
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IAPA 1804. Diplomacy, Crisis, War in the Modern Era.

This seminar examines war and peace after 1945 through the context of international relations (IR) theory. It teaches students theoretical perspectives on IR and to critically evaluate the changing ways in which states have interacted with one another since the end of World War II. Was the Cold War inevitable? Did nuclear weapons change the way that states negotiated with one another? How much did individuals make a difference during diplomatic crises? Why did states sometimes fail to reach peaceful settlements with one another? How have social and economic institutions changed international politics in the twenty-first century?

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IAPA 1804A. Iran and the Islamic Revolution.

Shattering events of 1978-80 in Iran unfolded against the backdrop of the previous decades of Iranian history, knowing that history is essential to understanding the revolution. The revolution cannot be appreciated without studying the enormous effects it's had over the last 35 years. This course places the anti-Shah movement and the rise of religious power in the context of Iran's century of modern history. We conclude by focusing on today's Iran, the upheaval following the 2009 election, reformist president election in 2013, and prospects for reconciliation with the US. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1804B. Global Megaprojects.

Megaprojects are costly, complicated, risky, and laborious. They include power plants, pipelines, ports, and petrochemical complexes; take years—or even decades—to finish; and owe their successes and failures to social and organizational—and not merely technical—considerations. This class addresses the origins, design, management, and consequences of megaprojects in contemporary and historical perspective. Our goal is to learn not only about specific projects—like the Panama Canal, Tennessee Valley Authority, Trans-Amazon Highway, and Belt and Road Initiative being undertaken by China—but about theories and methods that will help us understand the origins and fates of large-scale organizations more generally.

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IAPA 1804C. Migration and Development in Theory and Practice.

The primary theme of this course rests on a query standing at the center of a growing debate: in what ways are migrants linked to development? This course examines several theoretical debates and policies and programs focused on the migration-development nexus. Students examine scholarly interpretations of how migration is linked to development. They also employ a transnational lens to further explore what development means and how it is carried out in an increasingly mobile and connected world. The class examines how grassroots organizations have engaged in community development, and the roles states and non-governmental agencies are playing in on-the-ground interventions.

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IAPA 1804D. Legal Methods for Public Policy.

This course uses both traditional lecture and interactive, mock-trial to give public policy students with the tools to understand, interpret and apply the law as expressed in judicial opinions, particularly the opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States. The end-product for the course will be a capstone public policy paper on a subject of the student’s choice involving timely or complex legal issues. For the first three weeks, we’ll have an introduction to civil procedure, examining how cases are brought, the requirements for valid claims, including what affects parties’ right to bring a lawsuit, emergency relief, disposition with and without trial, appeals and the principles that the Supreme Court uses in deciding cases. If the seminar is oversubscribed, admission will be by lottery, comprised of students who turn in the first assignment and attend the first class session.

Fall IAPA1804D S01 16708 T 4:00-6:30(07) (A. Gabinet)
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IAPA 1804E. Health Policy Challenges.

This course examines the topic of health reform through a variety of lenses – politics, policy, community organizing, and bureaucratic implementation. Specific issues include recent reform efforts at the national and state levels, including the Affordable Care Act and several Rhode Island state legislative campaigns over the past twenty years. During each of these legislative victories (or defeats), the interplay between politics and policy, community organizing and implementation have defined how successful the laws have been in improving people’s access to quality, affordable healthcare.

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IAPA 1804F. The Politics of Crime and Violence in Latin America.

Latin America ranks first in the world in both violent and common crime, and more than one in three people in the region believe insecurity is the most important problem facing their country. In this course we explore the causes and consequences of crime and violence in regional perspective, with a focus on better understanding the current political moment. Some of the motivating questions of this course are: What are the legacies of dictatorship and civil war on violence today? How do organized criminal groups govern, and what consequences do these modes of governance have for public life? How do state responses to crime affect different populations and overall public safety? Under what conditions do citizens resist crime and impunity, or conversely, further contribute to cycles of violence?

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IAPA 1804H. Early History of the CIA.

This seminar traces the establishment, rise, and spreading ambition of the Central Intelligence Agency in its first fifteen years, from 1947 to 1962. During this period the CIA was on the front line of the Cold War, which was then in its most intense phase. It carried out dozens of covert operations, setting off chains of events that that would shape the history of the United States and many other countries. We will examine the events that led to the creation of the CIA, study its Cold War battles, and trace its growth into a powerful global force.

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IAPA 1804I. National Security Decision Making.

This undergraduate seminar examines theories of individual and group decision-making in the context of national security policy. It connects analytical perspectives from political science, social psychology, and organizational theory with a wide variety of historical cases featuring the United States, Soviet Union, China, India, Pakistan, Iraq, and Vietnam. What constitutes an “effective” decision-making process? What types of individuals, groups and institutions foster more effective processes? When are individuals or groups prone towards risky decisions? Do decision-making processes matter in “high-stakes” issues, such as war and peace? The last third of the course will examine these questions in the context of the 2018 US-China Trade War.

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IAPA 1804J. Policing in Global Perspective.

Debates about policing seem to be everywhere: in the news, in politics, in activist circles, in TV shows and movies. Around the world, from the Arab Spring movements to the Movement for Black Lives, condemnations of police brutality, racial bias, and police impunity have become pervasive. The solutions proposed range from implicit bias training and the generalization of body-worn cameras, to defunding and abolishing the police. This course engages with these debates by examining policing in global and comparative perspective.

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IAPA 1804K. Political Violence.

In this course, students will learn how social scientific tools can be used to understand political violence, including inter-state conflict, civil war, genocide, and terrorism. While the course will focus on why and when these forms of violence occur, students will also develop and understanding for when and why violence does not occur. The course will also cover a number of emerging topics in the field of political violence, including rebel governance, technology and conflict, and the legacies of violence. The course will familiarize students with the basic research tools employed by scholars of political violence, including case studies, survey research, and the quantitative analysis of cross- national datasets, and apply concepts and tools in diverse regional contexts in the Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

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IAPA 1804L. Africa’s Colonization in Comparative Perspective.

This course provides an advanced introduction to the social sciences literature on colonialism through an interdisciplinary lens. This course has three goals. The first is to familiarize students with key authors, texts, and concepts that emerged from the study of colonialism from authors in history, historical sociology, development economics, and comparative politics. The second objective is to familiarize students with the theoretical and conceptual mechanisms linking the colonial period and the present. Finally, this course provides an introduction to an interdisciplinary approach to studying a complex topic like colonialism and give students a practical introduction to how academics generally explore complex and controversial issues.

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IAPA 1804M. Overcoming Threats to Human Security.

This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to exploring challenges and opportunities related to global challenges from both a human and national security perspective – with a special focus on putting people and communities, as opposed to national interests, at the center of attention. Students will gain a deep understanding of key issues including humanitarian crises caused by natural disasters, and the impacts of climate change, food and water security, urbanization, mass migration, and infectious disease/pandemics on vulnerable people around the world.

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IAPA 1804N. Democracy and Capitalism in the Post-colonial World.

The literature on democracy has largely been dominated by work on Western democracies. The goal of this class is to closely examine democracies in the post-colonial world and in doing so to re-examine dominant theories of democracy. Drawing on theoretical, critical and empirical writings, we examine the origins, trajectories and current challenges of democracies in Africa, South Asia and Latin America. We examine the core institutions of democracy, but also the array of social forces and civil society actors that have shaped post-colonial democracies. The course draws on both the sociology and political science literatures. All students will be expected to develop and write a research paper on a topic of their choice.

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IAPA 1804O. Life and Violence.

Violence in human societies has been at the center of social science scholarship for decades. Yet, how violence is conceptualized, written, and represented in the social science record varies from discipline to discipline. In this course, we dig deep into the study of violence in its many forms (e.g., political, ethnic, bodily, and religious), focusing specifically on how it affects the everyday lives of people. Reading and watching content produced by academics and nonacademics in a broad range of social contexts such as India, Sri Lanka, Haiti, Rwanda, Kenya, Northern Ireland, and the United States, we will critically assess how the past and present violence inform our ways of thinking and writing about places and people that might be unfamiliar to us.

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IAPA 1804P. Discrimination and Public Policy.

This course examines structural discrimination and interpersonal discrimination as possible drivers of race, gender, and social class inequalities primarily within the U.S. but also in other parts of the world. Key questions involve: What is (and what is not) discrimination? How do social scientists measure discrimination? What do differing methods allow us (and not allow us) to say about the existence and mechanisms of discrimination? What are the consequences of discrimination? What are possible policy approaches to addressing discrimination?

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IAPA 1804Q. French Colonialism in Global Perspective, 19th-20th Centuries.

In this seminar we examine how French colonial power deployed itself in different parts of the world both through self-legitimizing discourses and the imposition of political and economic systems of domination. We read classic and more recent scholarship on colonial wars and violence, the ideology of the French “civilizing mission”, legal and economic discrimination and how colonialism transformed local ecologies. Colonial power was constantly debated, resisted, and subverted across metropole and colonies. We pay close attention to these voices and trace the emergence of political anti-colonialism in the aftermath of the First World War. We will examine how French colonialism was fought and eventually (partially) dismantled towards the middle of the 20th century. The course will end with an examination of current debates about the legacies of French colonialism in France and in formerly colonized countries.

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IAPA 1804S. Critical Study of Development.

This seminar provides an introduction to the critical study of development. The goal is less to provide an exhaustive overview of the field than it is to help you develop critical thinking skills through group discussion and analytical writing. More specifically, the goal is to develop your understanding of the diversity of understandings of the concept of development, as well as its practical importance in the world. Students will read texts that present pressing questions and issues concerning development practices, policies, and theories. Though classroom discussion and writing, the course encourages you to connect broad theoretical debates to contemporary problems.

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IAPA 1804T. Rethinking Development's Archive.

This seminar will explore the idea and practice of development, thought otherwise, taking the format of a humanities/social sciences laboratory whose objective is to research and draft an annotated, brief critical bibliography of intellectual resources on development as set of concepts and field of study. It will be a bibliography which can, borrowing from one of the key objects of library sciences, also serve as a Finders’ Aid. It is especially recommended for IAPA students who want to think about a conceptual framework for honors theses and capstone essays.

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IAPA 1805. Inequality, Sustainability, and Mobility in a Car-Clogged World AKA: Two Billion Cars.

With the possible exception of the computer or antibiotics, the car is arguably the most significant invention of the last two centuries. It has fundamentally reshaped the environment, social landscapes, lives, and economies, and its impact will only increase as the global vehicle population doubles, as predicted, to two billion by the year 2030. This class will explore the immense social, political, health, and environmental consequences, as well as cultural and political economic explanations for the car population explosion. Alternative forms and futures for transit will be considered throughout the course.

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IAPA 1805A. Politics of International Finance.

The purpose of this course is to present the fundamental variables that shape modern international finance. We will introduce and examine the technical forces that determine international transactions and capital flows, as well as the problems caused by unsustainable imbalances and the subsequent domestic and international political responses. Given the important role that finance plays in international relations, the material will allow the student to establish a conceptual framework to understand the political dynamics and constraints of the global economy. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors & seniors. Priority given to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1805C. Caribbean and Pacific Small States: On the Margins of Development.

Small states enter the imagination as sites of exoticism. Pristine beaches, flanked by swaying coconut trees are marketed as ideal for honeymooners and others seeking a refuge from stress-filled lives. This course centers small states, in particular, small island states, as a group of countries, with unique and interesting features, meriting academic scrutiny. We explore a wide range of issues introducing students to these diverse and complex states, including historical origins, globalization and effects on development, theoretical approaches to studying small states, issues in governance, migration, climate change, food security, sports and culture, gender and sexuality, among others.

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IAPA 1806A. Diplomacy, Economics & Influence.

This course examines a dozen diplomatic situations and identifies the players, their interests, and their tools -- and how those produced outcomes.Particular attention is paid to economic factors – pressures, incentives, and influences – that contribute to the outcome. By examining these elements students will understand the economic tools of diplomacy and power, and how to wield them. The course concludes with a close look at China's growing role in the world economy and considers how that will change China's role in world affairs. Enrollment limited to 20 Juniors & Seniors. Priority given to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1806C. Information Technology and Governance.

The use of information and technology in governance is a vexed subject. Civil society clamors for release of information about the state (openness) while the State wants more information about its citizens (surveillance). Technology plays a role in amplifying these respective intentions resulting in an unprecedented gathering and release of information, thereby bringing the issue of information, technology and its role in governance to sharp focus. This course provides an intensive introduction to the field of information technology and global development. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to DS juniors and Seniors.

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IAPA 1807A. International Journalism: Foreign Reporting in Practice.

This seminar gives students direct experience with the job of being a foreign correspondent. Classes focus on two themes: the practice of international journalism and the history and contemporary reality of Costa Rica. Our semester culminates with a reporting trip to Costa Rica during spring break. The seminar is valuable to students interested in the possibility of a career in international journalism and those who are not pursuing a career in journalism but want to learn journalistic skills. Limited to Jrs and Srs. Priority given to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1807C. Individual Research Project.

Section numbers vary by instructor.
Required: A completed proposal form and syllabus and faculty sponsor's and concentration advisor's approval prior to registering.

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IAPA 1808A. Risk, Regulation and the Comparative Politics of Finance.

The course introduces students to the comparative history of finance as well as to alternative theories of regulation. It thereby develops students’ ability to compare the role played by financial institutions in different historical periods and national contexts. This comparative perspective puts the recent financial crisis into a broader perspective, allowing students to see the structural as well as more proximate causes of recent financial instability in the industrialized democracies. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR, DS, and Public Policy seniors.

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IAPA 1808C. Thesis Writing in Development Studies.

An integrative seminar designed for concentrators working on senior theses. Others with comparable backgrounds may enroll with written permission. Begins with a review of theoretical and methodological literature on development studies. Written and oral presentations of thesis research will be the central focus of the latter part of the course. Reserved for Development Studies seniors.

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IAPA 1809A. The International Politics of Organized Crime.

Organized crime and extra-legal actors have established themselves as political actors in every region of the world. Violence has exploded in countries as criminal organizations compete with each other, the state, as well as a variety of other non-state armed groups for control of illicit markets, local dominance, and political influence. This course offers a broad understanding of these organizations, their origins, and the various illegal and violent activities in which they are engaged. This course is comparative and interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from research in criminology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science. Limited to Jrs, Srs. Priority to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1809C. Senior Thesis Preparation.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Reserved for Development Studies seniors.

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IAPA 1810. Democratization as Metaphor.

Oilfields and greenhouses. Pendulums and waves. Pacts, fault lines, and backsliding. These are some of the metaphors used to describe and explain the democratic transitions as well as enlighten our understanding of new and emerging threats to democracies across the globe. Since the 1970s studies of democratization have shifted from a “global resurgence of democracy” to an “authoritarian resurgence.” This course covers the conceptual tools and theories for understanding these developments. We pay particular attention to the assumptions, biases, knowledge structures, and inferences produced by language and imagery in our understanding of democratization and consider their implications for policy. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors.

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IAPA 1810A. Perspectives in Human Capital: Investing in Women as a Strategy for Global Growth.

In this course, we ask and answer the questions: What are women’s issues around the world? What policies and programs are designed to engage the issues and improve outcomes? What role does and can the private sector play in harnessing the untapped potential of 50% of the globe’s population? Is there evidence to support the need for investment—of resources, focus, and political capital—and to quantify the results of its impact? Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Priority given to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1811A. Humanitarianism in Uniform.

The goal of this senior seminar is to explore the relationship between militarism and humanitarianism. When the US Army and Marine Corps released the Counterinsurgency Field Manual in 2006, military officials referred to NGOs as ‘force multipliers’ and soldiers as ‘armed social workers.’ In this course, we will develop a framework to understand military humanitarianism. We will also examine how military humanitarianism exceeds the contemporary geography of terrorism, investigating cases in Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to IR juniors, seniors.

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IAPA 1812A. Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy.

This course examines the practice and profession of diplomacy and its relationship to the policy process. Focus will be on bilateral and multilateral diplomacy; while the practice will focus on a U.S. context, the lessons learned apply to other nation states. We review history of inter-state relations, including international legal basis for diplomatic relations. The practice has evolved over the years; however, it continues to incorporate such common functions as policy formulation, representation, reporting, negotiation, intercultural contacts and interaction with the media, parliamentary bodies and other external actors. Limited to 20 juniors, seniors. Priority given to IR seniors.

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IAPA 1813A. Revolutions that Changed the World.

The Bolshevik and Chinese Communist Party revolutions significantly changed the world. Studying the two revolutions helps us understand Russia’s and China’s contemporary roles. Alongside the framework of sociology of revolution, this course compares the two historical processes over their ideology, leadership, repression, international opening, mobilization, strategy, and outcome. Students will not only learn detailed historical knowledge of the two movements, but also master general perspective to understand how revolution occurs, succeeds, and changes society. Limited to Jrs and Srs. Priority to IR Srs.

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IAPA 1814A. Roots of Crisis in Central America.

The five countries of Central America comprise a comparatively little-studied region. From time to time they burst into the world’s consciousness, usually because of political upheaval, foreign intervention, or refugee flows. The forces that set off these crises are rarely explored. This seminar surveys and analyzes Central America from social, cultural, political, and historical perspectives. Restricted to seniors and juniors only. Priority given to IR seniors.

Fall IAPA1814A S01 16709 W 3:00-5:30(10) (S. Kinzer)
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IAPA 1815A. Computers, Freedom and Privacy: Current Topics in Law and Policy.

This course puts into context arcane debates about surveillance, privacy and cyber conflict, explaining and critiquing arguments put forward by and intelligence officials, civil liberties and privacy advocates, and companies. Double-listed with CSCI 1951F. Enrollment limited to 10 IR seniors and juniors.

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IAPA 1816A. Senior Honors Seminar.

Open only to Senior students accepted into the honors program in international relations. Instructor permission required.

Fall IAPA1816A S01 18032 W 6:30-9:00PM(17) (C. Elliott)
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IAPA 1817A. Senior Honors Thesis.

Open only to Senior students accepted into the honors program. Instructor permission required. This course is the second of the two required courses for students writing a thesis in International and Public Affairs, Development Studies, International Relations, or Public Policy. It is taught as an independent study.

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IAPA 1818A. Individual Research Project.

Limited to students doing independent study work for Development Studies, International and Public Affairs, International Relations, or Public Policy. Banner overrides will be given by the Undergraduate Concentrations Manager.

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IAPA 1820. Brown in Washington, D.C. Practicum.

This course is a required 2-credit course for students participating in the Brown in Washington, D.C. program. The course is centered around a challenging 20-25 hour/week internship in a public-sector or not-for-profit organization in Washington, D.C., which provides an immersive experiential learning opportunity at an organization or agency involved in the public policy process. Seminar sessions, workshops, field trips, and reading and writing assignments enable students to reflect on their internship experiences, contextualize their work and organization within the broader DC policy environment, and develop academic and professional skills.

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IAPA 1821. The New National Security: Transnational and Cross-Border Issues.

The objective of the class is to encourage a new understanding of the complexities of national security. The traditional paradigm of players, approaches, influences, and desired outcomes, no longer accommodates the corpus of transnational and cross-border issues that crosscut every policy decision in today’s world. Gender, climate, health, technology, food security, and other “non-traditional” security issues must shape the way we look at security, stability and just governance both as a sovereign nation and as a global actor. This course is part of the Brown in DC program.

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IAPA 1821M. War in Film and Literature.

This course introduces students to a study of warfare, and some of the central issues raised in war, through the use of movies and novels. Central themes include civil-military relations, leadership, the role of women in war, managing the homefront as well as issues related to battlefield tactics and strategy. Students will be encouraged to address these topics in applications related to World War I, World War II, and Vietnam in particular. This course will take place in a seminar format which stresses discussion of the relevant materials. Enrollment limited to 19 juniors and seniors.

Fall IAPA1821M S01 18231 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (R. McDermott)
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IAPA 1822. Social Policy and Social Justice: Contestation and Compromise.

This seminar is for students in the Brown in Washington, DC program. This seminar is designed to allow interdisciplinary examination of domestic politics and policy, and of the relationship of scholarship to public engagement and governance, by focusing on enduring questions of social justice and their expression in contemporary social policy. Issues to explore include poverty, inequality, freedom, rights, race, gender, community, class, citizenship, paternalism, and the roles of government (federal, state and local), markets, capital, labor, philanthropy, and voluntary organizations. Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students participating in the Brown in Washington Program.

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IAPA 1850. Senior Honors Seminar.

An advanced two-semester research seminar for senior honors candidates in the public policy and American institutions concentration. Participants jointly consider strategies appropriate to researching and writing a senior paper before proceeding to individual research on topics they choose. Each participant is required to present a summary of his or her work to the colloquium.

Fall IAPA1850 S01 17880 M 3:00-5:30(03) (A. Levitas)
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IAPA 1851. Senior Honors Thesis.

See Senior Honors Seminar (IAPA 1850) for course description.

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IAPA 1852. Individual Research Project.

Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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IAPA 2000. Theory and Research in Development I.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development, evaluate both the differences and complementarities in disciplinary perspectives and develop a toolkit of interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions.

Fall IAPA2000 S01 17951 W 1:00-3:30(06) (P. Heller)
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IAPA 2010. Theory and Research in Development II.

Explores a range of substantive debates in development by drawing on empirical and theoretical work from the disciplines of economics, political science, sociology and anthropology. The course aims to provide students with a broad understanding of current debates and research on development, evaluate both the differences and complementarities in disciplinary perspectives and develop a toolkit of interdisciplinary analytic skills that can be applied to concrete research questions.

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MPA 2015. Communications and Public Policy.

This course provides hands on experience for sharpening a variety of communication skills: writing, presentation, audio and visual. The goal of this course is to equip students with a diverse set of communication skills that can be used in a wide variety of settings. We begin by focusing on writing. The second part of the course covers presentation skills – from creating an effective visual representation of your policy to communicating this to a specific audience. For the last part of the course, emphasis will be on audio skills (e.g., podcasts, radio interviews) and constructing short 3 -5 minute videos.

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MPA 2020. Public Budgeting and Management.

This course is designed to teach the political, theoretical and administrative aspects of contemporary public budgeting and management in the United States. You will examine the central role of budgeting in policy formulation and implementation and come to an understanding of the budget as a statement of competing for political priorities. In addition, the various roles of key institutions in the budgeting process will be studied.

Fall MPA2020 S01 17919 M 3:00-5:30(03) (K. Rogers)
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MPA 2035. Statistics II for Public Policy Analysis.

The course introduces students to the use of multiple regression analysis and causal inference for analyzing data in the social sciences. We will study a variety of designs for empirical public policy analysis, from random assignment to quasi-experimental evaluation methods, and students will have the opportunity to analyze actual datasets. We will also study the strengths and weaknesses of various causal inference strategies.

Please note that students must be present at the first class meeting in order to be have the option to enroll in this course. They must have downloaded Stata 14 (available free of charge through software.brown.edu) and picked up and registered their iClicker on Canvas (see syllabus for details). Because the class meets once per week and the first assignment will be distributed during the first class, we will be launching directly into substantive material for the course. Week one/meeting one is not only an introduction. It is therefore essential that all students attend beginning from the first class meeting.

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MPA 2040. Statistics for Program Evaluation.

Broad overview of public policy analysis and program evaluation with emphasis on methodological issues involved in the analysis and assessment of government programs. Illustrations are drawn from a variety of substantive policy areas.

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MPA 2055. The Politics of Policymaking in Comparative Perspective.

This course provides a broad introduction to political forces which policymakers operate. Policymaking and politics are often held as separate spheres. There is a tendency to view politics as something to be recognized and controlled. In reality, policymakers are often faced with unavoidable political issues. Issue areas that relate to the political context of policymaking include: Why do some countries have stable institutions while others are subject to frequent regime change? Why do some institutional arrangements facilitate compromise and negotiation, while others impose obstacles to effective governance? Why do some policies privilege certain groups and marginalize others?

Fall MPA2055 S01 16841 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (J. Ziegler)
Fall MPA2055 S02 17865 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (D. Rezvani)
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MPA 2065. Introduction to Data Science and Programming.

We live in the era of data-driven decision making in all aspects of our lives. The features on your iPhone, the images in an ad campaign, even the background colors on many websites are all carefully tested and chosen against their measurable impact on customer satisfaction, purchasing, clicks, or some other goal. In this course, we will be learning to use and apply those same principles to public policy and government programs. Our goal is to equip MPA students with the tools required to set up experiments, gather data, and begin to evaluate and design public policy and government programs.

Fall MPA2065 S01 17866 T 4:00-6:30(07) (P. Stey)
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MPA 2066. Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning.

This course is a highly applied introduction to statistical machine learning. In particular, the key aim of this course is to give students the knowledge and tools to incorporate statistical machine learning methods to answer policy-related research questions. This course will also explore the philosophical differences that exist between traditional methods of statistical inference and the more recent statistical machine learning methods. Finally, throughout this course, we will emphasize the importance of reproducibility in science.

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MPA 2140. Politics, Public Policy, and Economic Development in Asia.

It is widely accepted that development is not simply an economic phenomenon. Political processes are intimately tied up with economic development. We will compare and contract the various Asian countries and models of development around themes identified above. The heaviest emphasis will be on China, India and South Korea. Economic policy will be the center of our discussion.

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MPA 2160. Management and Implementation in Public and Non-Profit Organizations.

How and when can organizational leaders and staff become engines of policy and social change? How do the policies that elected officials, courts, and bureaucrats promulgate get put into practice? What affects whether those policies get put into practice? What affects whether those policies produce expected changes? This course is designed to help students identify and manage core challenges facing policy development, implementation, and sustainment in public organizations.

Spr MPA2160 S01 26909 Th 4:00-6:30(17) (S. Moffitt)
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MPA 2222. Introduction to Health Policy.

The United States health care system is responsible for delivering high-quality care to millions of people. It is also a major and growing part of the national economy, employing many workers while commanding an ever-growing share of government budgets and employee paychecks. For decades, Americans have debated the best ways to reform the system to get better care for more people for the same or lower spending levels. This course will focus on developing a strong understanding of the system’s dynamics as well as its players, both government and private so that students will be able to develop policy recommendations for how these players can best work toward their goals.

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MPA 2224. Race, Policy and Politics of Asian Americans.

Examination of the historical and contemporary political experiences of Asian Americans and how policy systems shaped their pursuit of immigration, equality, citizenship, political identity, racial justice, cross-racial/ethnic coalition-building, and incorporation into the U.S. political system. The course will also explore the effectiveness of the “pan-ethnic” identity in contemporary US politics.

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MPA 2225. Climate Diplomacy and International Negotiations.

Building on the Paris agreement, adopted in 2015, this course aims at enhancing the participants' understanding of the global climate change framework in international relations. It will give students the tools to navigate climate COPs and beyond, building on the theoretical basis in science, history, and international relations, putting in practice the art of negotiations in the context of climate governance, and attempting to honestly address possible ways forward.

Fall MPA2225 S01 18394 M 3:00-5:30(03) (A. Plane)
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MPA 2226. Educational Equity, Environmental Justice, and Police Reform”.

Education, Equity, Environmental Justice, and Police Reform is an advanced course about racial bias in U.S. public policy, and the impacts of that bias on both practitioners and subjects of public agency activities. You will learn about the process of policy formation, and review several important critiques of conventional policy analysis. Substantively, we focus on three key areas: education policy, environmental justice, and police-community relations. During the semester you will engage in small- and large-group discussion, complete two research assignments, and prepare a final “Race and Policy Project” on a subject of your choosing. Attendance, class participation, and extensive reading are required.

Fall MPA2226 S01 18449 W 3:00-5:30(10) (A. Affigne)
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MPA 2230. Skills for Future Diplomats.

Future diplomats, whether they work for governments, corporations or non­profit entities, will find new opportunities and face new challenges in promoting their international goals. They will work in a world where power is more dispersed, where players other than governments have a major role, where issues and organizations are social, cultural, regional and global rather than the sole responsibility of nation states, and where scientific and technological innovations are constantly changing the agenda and paths to influence. This course will introduce students to some of the issues and practices that will prevail as they seek to influence governments and societies.

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MPA 2445. Policy Analysis and Problem Solving.

This course introduces students to concepts and tools relevant to making public decisions informed by social values. It equips students to define problems and to systematically develop and compare policy options available to public actors. In short, the course teaches students to “think like a policy analyst” and reason in the public interest. In addition, the course is attentive to the political and institutional context in which policy decisions are made.

Fall MPA2445 S01 16842 MW 8:30-9:50(09) (J. James)
Fall MPA2445 S02 17864 MW 8:30-9:50(09) (K. Meyer)
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MPA 2450. Economics of Government Intervention.

This course considers the cases for and implications of government intervention in the economy. When is government intervention desirable? Why is it desirable? What are its consequences?

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MPA 2451. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall MPA2451 S01 18460 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr MPA2451 S01 26483 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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MPA 2455. Statistics for Public Policy.

Covers social and economic statistics and their role in public policy research. Among the topics explored are descriptive and inferential statistics, measurement, sampling, and multivariate analysis.

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MPA 2460. Economics for Public Policy.

Examines issues in government spending and tax policy. Conceptual topics include the normative assignment of responsibility with federal systems and the equitable distribution of income. Specific policy applications are covered.

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MPA 2465. Financial Management For Public, Health, and Not-for-Profit Organizations.

This course focuses on financial aspects of not-for-profit organizations. The objectives of this course include helping students (1) learn the basics of not-for-profit accounting and the construction of their financial reports, (2) become more intelligent users of the financial statements of nonprofit organizations such as private colleges, hospitals, charities, and cultural institutions and (3) better understand the factors that affect the financial condition and financial performance of such entities.

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MPA 2475. Policy Problems of the 21st Century: Social Justice and Advocacy, Strategies for Change.

This course examines efforts that work toward social justice in contemporary political and social life. The class begins by evaluating different perspectives on how to define social justice. We consider the special challenges involved in defining social justice across borders or in diverse communities. We then examine strategies and channels used to promote social change.

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MPA 2545. An Introduction to Public Finance in Multilevel Democracies.

This course will introduce students to the fundamental political, institutional, and technical issues associated with sub-national governance and public finance reform multilevel democracies. The course requires no prior experience with either intergovernmental finance or fiscal issues. Its central purpose is to explore how politics and policy shape the way responsibility for regulating, financing, and managing public services get defined and divvied up between levels of government in both federal and unitary states.

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MPA 2555. Environmental Policy, From the Ground Up.

The seminar will examine selected environmental issues at local, national and international (especially Global South) levels which are at the center of widespread public concern. We will give critical consideration to some of the key ideas, concepts, discourses and approaches underlying public solutions to those concerns. The seminar will draw on literature and concepts from the fields of public policy and administration, science and technology studies, feminist theory, Africana Studies, and indigenous knowledge systems, as well as on practitioners’ knowledge.

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MPA 2601. Envisioning and Building Prosperous, Inclusive Communities.

Great communities do not happen by accident. Great communities take vision, thoughtful planning, participation and an inclusive civic engagement plan. The top communities in our country engage diverse leaders, acknowledge the complex and inextricable tie between community and economic development, are accountable – measuring their progress, and are fiercely competitive. This course will focus on the planning, creation, and implementation of successful community development plans from across the country. Specific topics that will be covered include: Collective Impact, the utilization of data, the role of sustainability, health, education, art, transportation, and parks, evaluation methodology, communication, and working with local governments.

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MPA 2602. Poverty, Redistribution, and the Future of Work.

A changing economy is providing fewer paths to a middleclass existence. Worldwide, absolute poverty has declined, , yet most people around the globe still subsist on living standards most Americans would consider to be near-poverty levels. What can be done? Is it true that the poor we shall have with us always? Are governmental actions, economic evolution, or technological changes the cause – or the cure? We will be particularly interested in the future: Will jobs still exist, what will they look like, and what will that mean for the structure and distribution of wealth and income?

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MPA 2603. Leadership and Social Change.

Our societies, organization, communities often face pressures and challenges that require acts of leadership. If you have ever felt or are currently feeling “called” to fix a specific problem on behalf of a specific community or social group, this course will help answer some of your questions. Based on Dr. Ron Heifetz and Dr. Marty Linsky’s theory of leadership called Adaptive Leadership, this seminar will not only allow you to get acquainted with its main theoretical concepts but also give you the opportunity to apply them, in a large class and small group settings.

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MPA 2604. The Corporation and Public Policy.

This course examines corporations as instruments of government policy and as significant policy setters in their own right. Rather than taking a fixed viewpoint about the proper location of executive authority, the course will examine the changing boundaries of private and public decision-making. Through selected readings paired with case studies, the course investigates a range of critical policy problems: the underlying purpose of corporate organization; climate change and environmental sustainability; consumer safety in the gig economy; labor standards in transnational supply chains; corporate responsibility and health in developing regions.

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MPA 2605. How do you conduct research that changes Public Policy?.

This course is a hands-on exploration of how evidence is used—and not used—in the real-world trenches of day-to-day government, with the aim of teaching you how to conduct and use research in ways more likely to have a meaningful impact on public affairs. We’ll explore by way of applied exercises and contributing work on real projects. Projects span from the world’s largest field experiment of a police body-worn camera program, to algorithms that predict the location of city rats, to a Form-a-Palooza that seeks to systematically redesign all government forms based on insights from the behavioral sciences.

Fall MPA2605 S01 17867 W 3:00-5:30(10) (D. Yokum)
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MPA 2606. Public Policy and Politics in Partisan Times.

This course explores the causes and consequences of partisan polarization, focusing on the impact of polarization on the development and implementation of American national policy. The course examines both historical and contemporary examples of successful and unsuccessful policy-making in such a climate, as well as the role of effective leadership and political entrepreneurship in the promotion of policy that can build wide support and overcome the barriers to adoption.

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MPA 2675. Science and Technology Policy in the Global South.

Using both theoretical ideas and empirical examples, this seminar will explore the relationships among science, technology, society, and public policymaking in the Global South, in places where local science and global science often collaborate and sometimes clash. The class will investigate, from a variety of perspectives, how the governance of science and technology in various parts of the Global South is influenced by their past experiences, forms of public science organization, systems of knowledge, civic epistemologies and regulatory frameworks and strategic agendas for development, as well as the knowledge claims and concerns of social movements, and tensions in power and social relations.

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MPA 2710. GIS and Public Policy.

This seminar presents an introduction to the theory and practice of social science Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as applied to public policy analysis. We will cover a variety of topics, such as the geographical basis of policy issues, spatial mapping, and use of ArcGIS software to study a wide range of policy issues. The course will involve discussions, hands-on computer laboratory exercises, take-home problem sets and a Practical Exam.
The goals of the class are: 1) learning how to use GIS software and techniques, 2) database development and editing 3) spatial modeling techniques, and 4) using GIS to study policy issues.

Fall MPA2710 S01 17868 Th 4:00-6:30(04) (J. Lucht)
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MPA 2715. Education Governance in Comparative Perspective.

This course will examine some of the governance issues associated with these trends by pairing critical readings with case studies. We will begin by surveying the historical relationship between how education gets defined as a public good, and systems of finance and governance. We will then examine the very particular trajectory of school governance and finance in America.

Course Goals: Robust understanding of how the competing, and hard-to-measure objectives (e.g. civic virtue, economic competitiveness, equal opportunity, personal growth) that people invest in schooling shape how education is defined as public good, and how it is governed and finance.

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MPA 2725. Smart Policy.

The purpose of this course is two-fold. Students will read, analyze and understand the current research literature in the behavioral economics of policy reform. Second, they will continue themes and projects started in the RIIPL Smart Policy Consultancies, and use data collected as well as the RIIPL database to design a Smart Policy Innovation and a test of that innovation. Smart Policy Innovations will be considered for the RIIPL Smart Policy Fellowship for 2016-2017.

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MPA 2730. The Political Economy of Hard Policy Problems.

This class tackles the “hard problems” of public policy. While governments are cajoled and enjoined to produce economic growth, do something about economic inequality and social mobility, and improve the life chances of millions through purposive action, actually delivering in these areas of policy is incredibly hard. These areas constitute ‘“hard problems” for policy for two main reasons. Economically, we don’t have much of a clue about how to do many of these things. Politically, there are powerful interests and entrenched ideas that like these areas of policy just as they are and work hard to keep them “hard problems.”

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MPA 2735. Women and Nations.

See the linkage between the security and situation of women and the security and situation of the nations in which they live. Understand the roles women play in world society as producers, reproducers, agents of cultural continuity and change, and to render women "visible" in international and national affairs. Explore in greater depth women's choices about education, family, and work in the developing world, and how these affect and are affected by national and international forces and influences.

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MPA 2765. System Dynamics: Policy Analysis for a Complex World.

The course studies why so many public policy problems are challenging and often lead to disappointing results or outright failure. Students learn to conceptualize a social problem as a set of structures and policies that create dynamics and govern performance. The course introduces the tools of system dynamics for modeling and analyzing public policy. Using role playing games, simulation models, and management flight simulators, we develop insights essential to managing in a world characterized by dynamic complexity. Case studies include applications of system dynamics in healthcare, environmental policy, project management, and implementation of improvement programs.

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MPA 2772. Disaster, Displacement and Response: A Practitioner, People-Focused Lens on Urban Policy & Practice.

Applying a practitioner's view and working from scenarios will allow students to examine practical elements of delivery as well as the complexities of coordination in an emergent arena. This class will create both empathy and urgency - fueled by stories the class can explore together. The aim is to examine commonalities in the experiences of displaced people with respect to how cities respond across the world and to create a people-centered lens for examining effective responses.

Assignments will focus on creating convincing presentations – making a case for what works and what cities may learn from one another.

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MPA 2775. U.S. Foreign Policy: The Institutional Basis.

This course will examine the institutions that influence American foreign and development policy. Institutions provide the organizational framework, rules and social structures that in turn impact on the policy positions of those who are part of them. The agencies and bureaus that make up the national security cluster have both professional expertise and bureaucratic qualities. We will delve deeply into these entities to understand better their jurisdictional authorities and professional perspectives. We will use case studies and roll playing exercises to enhance understanding of these orientations and their impact on the policy process.

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MPA 2800. Policy in Action Consultancy.

The Policy in Action experience is designed to provide a rigorous and practical immersion with a client in a domestic or global community-based or institutional setting. The consultancy focuses on experiential learning and creative problem solving. Real world, complex contemporary problems are addressed, policy and practice-based solutions explored, strategies identified and future approaches recommended. Students conduct research to understand contemporary problems and issues and develop policy and practice-related solutions to address these issues and/or enhance an organization’s capacity.

Spr MPA2800 S01 26671 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (D. Bahar)
Spr MPA2800 S02 26672 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (D. Bahar)
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MPA 2981. Independent Graduate Study.

This is an independent study course for the MPA program.

Director - Watson Institute

Edward S. Steinfeld

Director - Master of Public Affairs Program

Eric M. Patashnik

Professor

Nadje S. Al-Ali
Robert Family Professor of International Studies, Professor of Anthropology and Middle East Studies

Peter R. Andreas
John Hay Professor of International Studies and Political Science

Mark M. Blyth
William R. Rhodes Professor of International Economics, Professor of International and Public Affairs

Ross E. Cheit
Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs

Nitsan Chorev
Harmon Family Professor of Sociology, Professor of International and Public Affairs

John N. Friedman
Professor of Economics; Professor of International and Public Affairs

Patrick G. Heller
Lyn Crost Professor of Social Sciences, Professor of International and Public Affairs and Sociology

Jose Itzigsohn
Professor of Sociology

Richard M. Locke
Schreiber Family Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs

Susanna Loeb
Professor of Education; Professor of International and Public Affairs

Glenn C. Loury
Merton P. Stoltz Professor of Social Sciences, Professor of Economics, Professor of International and Public Affairs

Rose McDermott
David and Marianna Fisher University Professor of International Relations

Emily F. Oster
Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence and Professor of Economics, Professor of International and Public Affairs

Eric M. Patashnik
Julis-Rabinowitz Professor of Public Policy and Political Science

Christina Paxson
Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs

Andrew M. Schrank
Olive C. Watson Professor of Sociology and International and Public Affairs

Edward S. Steinfeld
Dean's Professor of China Studies, Professor of Political Science, Professor of International and Public Affairs

Ashutosh Varshney
Sol Goldman Professor of International Studies and Political Science

Kay B. Warren
Charles C. Tillinghast, Jr. '32 Professor Emerita of International Studies

Margaret M. Weir
Wilson Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science

Kenneth K. Wong
Walter and Lenore Annenberg Professor of Education Policy, Professor of International and Public Affairs, Professor of Political Science

Professor Research

J. Nicholas Ziegler
Professor of International and Public Affairs (Research)

Visiting Professor

Anthony D. Affigne
Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs

Associate Professor

Jeffrey D. Colgan
Richard Holbrooke Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies

Ieva Jusionyte
Watson Family University Associate Professor of International Security and Anthropology

Susan L. Moffitt
Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science

Prerna Singh
Mahatma Gandhi Associate Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs, Associate Professor of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Assistant Professor

Robert A. Blair
Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs

Jonathan E. Collins
Assistant Professor of Education; Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Tyler Jost
Watson Institute Assistant Professor of China Studies and Political Science

Sreemati Mitter
Kutayba Alghanim Assistant Professor of Social Science

Jayanti J. Owens
Mary Tefft and John Hazen White, Sr. Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs and Sociology

Reid Pauly
Dean's Assistant Professor of Nuclear Security and Policy and Political Science

Bryce Steinberg
IJC Assistant Professor of Economics and International and Public Affairs

Neil Thakral
Nancy Donohue and Diane Elam Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs and Economics

Visiting Assistant Professor

Kalaiyarasan Arumugam
Visiting Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Senior Lecturer

Claudia Elliott
Senior Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Lecturer

Ivan Arreguin-Toft
Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Senior Fellow

William J. Allen
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Geri M. Augusto
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Angela Blanchard
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Richard A. Boucher
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Zairo Cheibub
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Timothy H. Edgar
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Chas W. Freeman
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Ari Gabinet
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Deborah Gordon
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Keith Harper
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Veronica H. Ingham
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Jim Yong Kim
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Stephen A. Kinzer
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Anthony D. Levitas
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Patsy P. Lewis
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Kakenya Ntaiya
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Thomas E. Perez
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

David Pierce Polatty
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Arvind Subramanian
Senior Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Fellow

Marc J. Dunkelman
Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Adjunct Professor

Romano Prodi
Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs

Adjunct Associate Professor

David V. Yokum
Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs

Adjunct Lecturer

Kelly J. Rogers
Adjunct Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Paul C. Stey
Adjunct Lecturer in International and Public Affairs

Visiting Fellow

Hugh Clements
Visiting Fellow in International and Public Affairs

Visiting Scholar

Paulo Abrao
Visiting Scholar in International and Public Affairs

Jo-Anne Hart
Visiting Scholar in International and Public Affairs

Hongkyu Kim
Visiting Scholar in International and Public Affairs

Theodore Shanks
Visiting Scholar in International and Public Affairs

Senior Research Associate

Stephanie A. Savell
Senior Research Associate in International and Public Affairs

Research Associate

Carissa Tudor
Research Associate in International and Public Affairs

International and Public Affairs

The concentration in International and Public Affairs equips students with the knowledge and skills necessary to be engaged global citizens. This concentration offers three tracks: Development, Policy & Governance, and Security. All students take a common core of five classes, beginning with a choice of thematic gateway lecture courses (ideally taken during freshman or sophomore year), and then building through a required junior seminar and a required senior seminar (eligible students may choose to write an honor's thesis to satisfy the senior seminar requirement). All students choose one of three tracks of substantive specialization: Development, in which students explore issues of human development in local and global contexts, and across both the developing world and advanced industrial settings; Security, which allows students to explore issues of security in both local and global contexts; and Policy and Governance, in which students explore the design, implementation, and evaluation of public policies to resolve societal challenges, as well as the governing structures that yield those policies. The concentration is committed to engaging students in the classroom, enabling research opportunities with faculty and in the field, and supporting experiential learning opportunities. Advisors' office hours and an online appointment scheduler are available here

Development Track Concentration Requirements

Gateway course (choose 1) 1
Global Health, Humanitarianism, and Inequality
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Junior Seminar (choose 1)1
Economic Development in Latin America
Infrastructure!
Revolutions that Changed the World
Engaged Research Engaged Publics
Senior Seminar (choose 1 from either a Senior Thesis Seminar or a Senior Capstone Seminar)1
Thesis Seminars:
Senior Honors Seminar
Thesis Writing in Development Studies
Senior Honors Seminar
Capstone Seminars:
Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Disaster, Displacement and Response: A Practitioner, People-Focused Lens on Urban Policy & Practice
Roots of Crisis in Central America
Methods courses: Choose 2 (one must be qualitative and one quantitative)2
Qualitative:
Methods in Development Research
Quantitative:
Introduction to Econometrics
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Language Study Option: One of the two methods requirements, either the qualitative or quantitative course, can be substituted by four semesters of the study of a language other than English
IAPA 0200Foundations of Development1
5 Electives (for example):5
Development and the Global Economy
Development and the International Economy
International Trade
International Finance
African Experiences of Empire
Africa and the Transatlantic Slave Trade
Resisting Empire: Gandhi and the Making of Modern South Asia
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Money and Power in the International Political Economy
Globalization and Social Conflict
Development and Inequality
Anthropology of Homelessness
Race and Inequality in the United States
Inequality of Opportunity in the US
Cradle of Inequality: The Role of Families, Schools, and Neighborhoods
Prosperity: The Ethics and Economics of Wealth Creation
Legacies of Inequality: The U.S. and Beyond
Development and Health
African American Health Activism from Emancipation to AIDS
AIDS in Global Perspective
International Health: Anthropological Perspectives
Health, Hunger and the Household in Developing Countries
Medicine and Public Health in Africa
Global Burden of Disease
Comparative Health Care Systems
Pathology to Power: Disability, Health and Community
Intersectionality and Health Inequities
Development in National and Regional Contexts
Caribbean and Pacific Small States: On the Margins of Development
The Economics of Latin Americans
History of Brazil
The Making of the Modern Middle East
In the Shadow of Revolution: Mexico Since 1940
Politics, Economy and Society in India
The Rise of China
Development and the Environment
Ecological (De)colonization: North American Environmental History, Justice, and Sovereignty
Environmental Issues in Development Economics
Equity and the Environment: Movements, Scholarship, Solutions
Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
Engaged Climate Policy in the U.S.: Rhode Island and Washington, DC
Environmental Stewardship and Resilience in Urban Systems
From the Columbian Exchange to Climate Change: Modern Global Environmental History
Development, Race, and Gender
Afro Latin Americans and Blackness in the Americas
Global Black Radicalism
Afro-Brazilians and the Brazilian Polity
Indians, Colonists, and Africans in New England
Chinese Women, Gender and Feminism from Historical and Transnational Perspectives
Latina Feminisms
Gender, Slavery, and Freedom
Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World
Total Credits11

Security Track Concentration Requirements

Gateway course (choose 1) 1
Global Health, Humanitarianism, and Inequality
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Junior Seminar (choose 1)1
Infrastructure!
Economic Development in Latin America
Revolutions that Changed the World
Engaged Research Engaged Publics
Senior Seminar (choose 1 from either a Senior Thesis Seminar or a Senior Capstone Seminar)1
Thesis Seminars:
Senior Honors Seminar
Thesis Writing in Development Studies
Senior Thesis Preparation
Capstone Seminars:
Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Roots of Crisis in Central America
Methods courses: Choose 2 (one must be qualitative and one quantitative)2
Qualitative:
Methods in Development Research
Quantitative:
Introduction to Econometrics
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Language Study Option: One of the two methods requirements - either the qualitative or quantitative course, can be substituted by four semesters of the study of a language other than English
Foundations of Security
Five Electives (for example:5
Geopolitics and Conflict
Cybersecurity and International Relations
A Global History of the Atomic Age
Japan's Pacific War: 1937-1945
Politics of Violence in 20C Europe
Consuming the Cold War in the Caribbean
Introduction to International Politics
War and Politics
Nuclear Weapons and International Politics
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Intrastate and Intrasocietal Conflict
Reading and Righting Histories of Violence
Spanish Civil War in Literature and the Visual Arts
American Literature and the Civil War
The American Civil War in Global Perspective: History, Law, and Popular Culture
Humanitarianism and Conflict in Africa
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples I
Palestine versus the Palestinians
Human Security and Humanitarian Response: Increasing Effectiveness and Accountability
Ethnic Politics and Conflict
Security, Governance and Development in Africa
Islam, Violence and Media
Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World
Globalization and Social Conflict
Empire, Imperialism, and Conflict
African Experiences of Empire
An Empire and Republic: The Dutch Golden Age
The Rise of the Russian Empire
The Collapse of Socialism and the Rise of New Russia
Resisting Empire: Gandhi and the Making of Modern South Asia
Imperialism and Environmental Change
History of American Intervention
Domestic Security and Policing
Contesting the Carceral State
Locked Up: A Global History of Prison and Captivity
State Surveillance in History
Conflict, Displacement, and Refugees
War and Society
Refugees: A Twentieth-Century History
Migration and Borders in a Time of Climate Crisis
Conflict and Human Rights
The International Law and Politics of Human Rights
Just War Theory
War and Human Rights
Total Credits10

Policy and Governance Concentration Requirements

Gateway course (choose 1) 1
Global Health, Humanitarianism, and Inequality
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Junior Seminar (choose 1)1
Economic Development in Latin America
Infrastructure!
Revolutions that Changed the World
Engaged Research Engaged Publics
Senior Seminar (choose 1 from either a Senior Thesis Seminar or a Senior Capstone Seminar)1
Thesis Seminars:
Senior Honors Seminar
Thesis Writing in Development Studies
Senior Honors Seminar
Capstone Seminars:
Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Roots of Crisis in Central America
Methods courses: choose 2 (one must be qualitative and one must be quantitative)2
Qualitative:
Methods in Development Research
Quantitative:
Introduction to Econometrics
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Language Study Option: One of the two methods requirements - either the qualitative or quantitative course, can be substituted by four semesters of the study of a language other than English
IAPA 0110Introduction to Public Policy1
Five electives, for example: 5
Health Policy
Health Inequality in Historical Perspective
AIDS in Global Perspective
Comparative Health Care Systems
Intersectionality and Health Inequities
Health Policy Challenges
Sociology of Medicine
Public Policy and Gender
Gender, Race, and Medicine in the Americas
Women and Politics
Gender and Public Policy
Education and Policy
Economics of Education I
Controversies in American Education Policy: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Politics and Public Education
Policy Implementation in Education
Policy and Inequality
Race and Inequality in the United States
Inequality of Opportunity in the US
Legacies of Inequality: The U.S. and Beyond
Policy, Social Movements, and Social Action
The Organizing Tradition of the Southern Civil Rights Movement
Law and Transformative Social Change
Immigrant Social Movements: Bridging Theory and Practice
Investigating Modes of Social Change
Engaged Research Engaged Publics
Social Entrepreneurship
Public Policy and Social Welfare
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Welfare States and a History of Modern Life
The American Welfare State in Comparative Perspective
Urban Policy
Environmental Stewardship and Resilience in Urban Systems
Power and Prosperity in Urban America
Remaking the City
The Political Foundations of the City
Policy Evaluation and Measurement
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation for Education
Program Evaluation
Economics for Public Policy
Total Credits11

Development Studies

Development Studies is an interdisciplinary concentration whose mission is to provide students with the knowledge, critical perspectives and skills they need to engage with the issues of economic and social development, especially as they relate to the Global South. The concentration is grounded in the social sciences – anthropology, sociology, political science, and economics – but it also heavily draws from history, art, and other disciplines in the humanities. The requirements are designed with three goals in mind: first, provide concentrators a solid foundation in the question of development; second, allow concentrators to develop expertise in a specific region that is of interest to them; third, give concentrators access to a wide range of courses in a large number of disciplines of interest to them. Concentrators are encouraged to do their own original field research. During the senior year, concentrators complete a capstone experience tailored to their interests in some aspect of international development. Towards this end, they benefit from extensive faculty and peer support. The Development Studies concentration will only accept new declarations through the class of 2023. Students in any class year can learn more about the new concentration in International and Public Affairs: Development Track.

Requirements

The Development Studies concentration will be available to students graduating through the class of 2023.

10 Courses + Language + Capstone

CORE
All core courses must be taken prior to senior year
Choose TWO from the following:2
Globalization and Social Conflict
Politics, Markets and States in Developing Countries
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Seminar in Sociology of Development1
Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development (Pre-requisites: sophomore or junior standing, and completion of SOC 1620, POLS 1240, or ANTH 0110)
Development Economics - Choose ONE of the following: (ECON 0510 for students with little to no Econ background, ECON 1510 for students with strong Econ backgrounds or double-concentrating in Econ)1
Development and the International Economy (Prerequisite: ECON 0110 , or AP Microeconomics 4 and AP Macroeconomics 4, or IB HL Economics 6)
Economic Development (Prerequisite: ECON 1110 or ECON 1130; and APMA 1650 or ECON 1620 or ECON 1630)
Research Methods and Design1
Methods in Development Research (junior year)
Regional Courses2
Two courses that focus on the same region of the developing world. Should complement the student's foreign language.
Elective Courses3
Three courses chosen from a list of pre-approved electives or by special approval.
Foreign Language
Equivalent of three full years of university study or above.
Senior Capstone
a. Thesis option: DEVL 1980 (fall senior year) and DEVL 1990 (spring senior year), or
b. Capstone seminar option: approved senior seminar in Development Studies, with seminar-length paper requirement.

 See the Development Studies website for the list of pre-approved elective courses.

International Relations

The objective of the International Relations concentration is to foster creative thinking about pressing global problems and to equip students with the analytic tools, language expertise, and cross-cultural understanding to guide them in that process. To this end, the concentration draws on numerous departments including political science, history, economics, anthropology, sociology, psychology, religious studies, and area studies. The IR concentration is organized around a multidisciplinary core and two sub-themes: security and society, and political economy and society. It has a three-year language requirement that must be linked to the student’s selected region of the world. All concentrators are required to undertake a capstone project using research in a second language. The International Relations concentration will only accept new declarations through the class of 2023. Students in any class year can learn more about the new concentration in International and Public Affairs. 

Requirements

The IR concentration will be available to students graduating through the class of 2023.

The IR concentration requires 14 courses and the equivalent of 3 years study of a second language. Regardless of track, all IR concentrators must take all five core courses, research methods, regional focus, and capstone courses.

Security and Society track

Core Courses5
Students must take 5 core courses, preferably during freshman or sophomore year. AP credit does not count toward the concentration.
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Principles of Economics
Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Globalization and Social Conflict
Plus 1 History course from the following:
History of Capitalism
Modern Africa: From Empire to Nation-State
The Making of Modern East Asia
Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present
From the Columbian Exchange to Climate Change: Modern Global Environmental History
The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits
Track Requirements (five courses distributed between the sub-themes):5
Governance and Diplomacy (two or three courses):
War, Anti-War, Postwar: Culture and Contestation in the Americas
Cybersecurity and International Relations
Migration and Borders in a Time of Climate Crisis
Engaged Climate Policy at the UN Climate Change Talks
La France en guerre
Sense and Scientific Sensibility: Beyond Vision, From the Scientific Revolution to Now
Locked Up: A Global History of Prison and Captivity
A Global History of the Atomic Age
State Surveillance in History
Culture and U.S. Empire
U.S. Human Rights in a Global Age
Law, Nationalism, and Colonialism
History of American Intervention
International Law
International Journalism: Foreign Reporting in Practice
History of American Intervention
Bilateral and Multilateral Policy and Diplomacy
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Roots of Crisis in Central America
Computers, Freedom and Privacy: Current Topics in Law and Policy
When Leaders Lie: Machiavelli in International Context
From Dictatorship to Democracy in the Iberian Peninsula: Transformations and Current Challenges
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe
Maps and Politics
U.S. Gender Politics
Ethnic Politics and Conflict
Global Governance
International Security in a Changing World
Roots of Radical Islam
Security, Governance and Development in Africa
War and Peace
Theory of International Relations
Global Justice
The International Law and Politics of Human Rights
War and Politics
American Foreign Policy
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
International Relations in Europe
War in Film and Literature
Political Psychology of International Relations
Nuclear Weapons and International Politics
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Ethics of War and Peace
Laws of Violence
Comparative Constitutional Law
The Politics of Food Security
War and Human Rights
Technology and International Politics
War and Peace in International Society
Market Democracy in Chile
Between Colonialism and Self-Determination: A History of the International Order
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Global Governance
The International Politics of Climate Change
US-China Relations
Populations in Danger
20th Century World – A Sociology of States and Empires
Society (two or three courses):
The Anti-Trafficking Savior Complex: Saints, Sinners, and Modern-Day Slavery
Anthropology of Gender and Globalization
Human Trafficking, Transnationalism, and the Law
Democracy and Difference: Political Anthropology, Citizenship and Multiculturalism
Political Anthropology
War and Society
Ethnographies of Global Connection: Politics, Culture and International Relations
Religion and Secularism: Affinities and Antagonisms
Violence and the Media
International Health: Anthropological Perspectives
Nations within States
Anthropology of State Power and Powerlessness
Media and the Middle East
Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols
1948 Photo Album: From Palestine To Israel
Collective Struggles and Cultural Politics in the Global South
Literature and Revolutions, 1640-1840
La France en guerre
Refugees: A Twentieth-Century History
Humanitarianism and Conflict in Africa
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples I
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Law and Religion
Global Health, Humanitarianism, and Inequality
Rwanda Past and Present
Senior Thesis Preparation
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Revolutions that Changed the World
History of the Holocaust
Faking Globalization: Media, Piracy and Urbanism
Nation and Identity in Cinema
The Birth of the Modern World: A Global History of Empires
Ethnic Politics and Conflict
Gender, Slavery, and Freedom
Democratic Erosion
International Relations of Russia, Europe and Asia
Social Movements and Struggles for Justice
Women and War
Nationalism: Problems, Paradoxes and Power
Politics of Ethnic Conflict
Political Violence
Religion and Torture
Faith and Violence
Radical Islam (?)
Far-Right Religious Terrorism
Law and Religion
Sacred Sites: Law, Politics, Religion
Research Methods1
Prior to 7th semester. Quantitative or qualitative course from the following approved list.
Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East
Ethnographic Research Methods
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Methods
Introduction to Econometrics
Mathematical Econometrics I
Foundations of Political Analysis
Political Research Methods
Methods of Social Research
Methods of Research in Organizations
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Regional Focus2
Both courses must be on the same area. Students are required to link these to language study.
Language
Three years university study or equivalent. Must correspond to region.
Capstone Course, from the following options:1
Must be taken senior year. Must incorporate language skills. Students may choose from the following:
Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols
La France en guerre
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Law and Religion
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Perspectives in Human Capital: Investing in Women as a Strategy for Global Growth
Risk, Regulation and the Comparative Politics of Finance
The International Politics of Organized Crime
Humanitarianism in Uniform
International Relations of Russia, Europe and Asia
Women and War
Senior Honors Seminar
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
War and Human Rights
Technology and International Politics
Urban Politics and Policy
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Total Credits14

Political Economy and Society Track

Core Courses5
Students must take all 5 core courses, preferably during freshman or sophomore year. AP credit does not count toward the concentration.
Anthropology and Global Social Problems: Environment, Development, and Governance
Principles of Economics
Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to Comparative Politics
Globalization and Social Conflict
Plus 1 History course from the following:
History of Capitalism
Modern Africa: From Empire to Nation-State
The Making of Modern East Asia
Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present
From the Columbian Exchange to Climate Change: Modern Global Environmental History
The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits
Track Requirements (five courses from distributed between the sub-themes):5
Economics (two or three courses): All students MUST take Micro and Macro
Intermediate Microeconomics
Intermediate Macroeconomics
Plus an International Economics course:
Development and the International Economy
The Economics of Gender Equality and Development
Economic Organizations and Economic Systems
Current Global Macroeconomic Challenges
Economic Development
Health, Hunger and the Household in Developing Countries
International Trade
International Finance
Economic Growth
The Economics of Latin Americans
The Economy of China since 1949
Financial Institutions
Theory of Economic Growth
Political Economy (two or three courses):
Inequality, Sustainability, and Mobility in a Car-Clogged World
AIDS in Global Perspective
Anthropology and International Development: Ethnographic Perspectives on Poverty and Progress
Money, Work, and Power: Culture and Economics
Environmental Economics and Policy
International Environmental Law and Policy
Environmental Economics and Policy
Environmental Issues in Development Economics (ECON 1355)
Environmental Justice: The Science and Political Economy of Environmental Health and Social Justice
Globalization and the Environment
Energy Policy and Politics
Business, Culture, and Globalization: An Ethnographic Perspective
History of Capitalism
International Perspectives on NGOs, Public Health, and Health Care Inequalities
Economic Development in Latin America
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
The Political Economy of Strategy: From the Financial Revolution to the Revolution in Military Affa
Politics of International Finance
Risk, Regulation and the Comparative Politics of Finance
Perspectives in Human Capital: Investing in Women as a Strategy for Global Growth
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
Prosperity: The Ethics and Economics of Wealth Creation
Reimagining Capitalism
Latin American Politics
Politics, Markets and States in Developing Countries
Politics, Economy and Society in India
Classics of Political Economy
Money and Power in the International Political Economy
Development in Theory and Practice
International Political Economy
Introduction to Political Economy
Building a Better World: Film and Social Change
Politics of Nuclear Weapons
Politics of Globalization
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
Politics of Economic Development in Asia
The Politics of Social Welfare in the Middle East
Social Movements and Struggles for Justice
Corruption and Governance Across Democracies
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
Capitalism: For and Against
Politics of Health in the Global South
The Political Economy of Renewable Energy
Culture, Identity and Development
Comparative Development
Unequal Societies
Demographics and Development
The Economic Foundations of Everyday Life
Knowledge Networks and Global Transformation
Sociology of Money
Research Methods1
Prior to 7th semester. Quantitative or qualitative course from the following approved list.
Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East
Ethnographic Research Methods
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Methods
Introduction to Econometrics
Mathematical Econometrics I
Foundations of Political Analysis
Political Research Methods
Methods of Social Research
Methods of Research in Organizations
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Regional Focus2
Both courses must be on the same area. Students are required to link these to language study.
Language
Three years university study or equivalent. Must correspond to region.
Capstone Course, from the following options:1
Must be taken senior year. Must incorporate language skills. Students may choose from the following:
Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols
La France en guerre
Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II
Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World
Law and Religion
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Diplomacy, Economics & Influence
Risk, Regulation and the Comparative Politics of Finance
The International Politics of Organized Crime
Perspectives in Human Capital: Investing in Women as a Strategy for Global Growth
Humanitarianism in Uniform
Senior Honors Seminar
Contraband Capitalism: States and Illegal Global Markets
International Relations of Russia, Europe and Asia
Geopolitics of Oil and Energy
War and Human Rights
Technology and International Politics
Market Democracy in Chile
Women and War
Democratic Theory and Globalization
Post Conflict Politics
Culture, Identity and Development
Total Credits14

The program has a director/concentration advisor and two faculty track advisors to assist students in planning their academic programs.

Public Policy

Housed in the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, the concentration in public policy is organized around the interdisciplinary and comparative study of human societies, but with a particular focus on the rules and norms by which we govern ourselves. The concentration is grounded in the analysis of pressing social problems and the design, implementation, and evaluation of better policies and practices. This commitment to using knowledge to improve the life chances of people who occupy different positions of wealth and power, and who have competing and contentious ideas of about the common good, makes public policy a value-laden and political enterprise that is as much an art as it is a science. It is also a team sport that requires players with different skills and talents to work together across a wide variety of settings.

Students will learn how social, economic, and political issues become the object of public policy, how policy decisions are crafted, made and implemented, as well as different strategies for evaluating their impact. The concentration draws its instructors from a wide variety of disciplines and offers students opportunities for engaged scholarship at the local, national, and global levels. With the support of the advisory team, students develop their own curriculum of study, integrating core courses with electives, internships, independent research, and a capstone experience. The Public Policy concentration will only accept new declarations through the class of 2023. Students in any class year can learn more about the new concentration in International and Public Affairs: Policy and Governance Track.

Required Courses: 10 courses + capstone

The Public Policy concentration will be available to students graduating through the class of 2023.

Core Courses:
IAPA 0110Introduction to Public Policy1
Ethics and Public Policy1
Ethics and Public Policy
Economics for Public Policy1
Intermediate Microeconomics
Statistics for Public Policy1
Political Research Methods
Introduction to Econometrics
Mathematical Econometrics I
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation1
Program Evaluation
Elective Courses: 1, 2
Three Broad Elective Courses: May be taken in any policy area3
Two more electives in one of the areas you have already studied2
Sample electives may include the following:
Health Policy
Comparative Health Care Systems
Health Policy Challenges
Technology Policy
Cybersecurity and International Relations
Technology and International Politics
Science and Technology Policy in the Global South
Environmental Policy
Environmental Economics and Policy
Environmental Law and Policy
From Locke to Deep Ecology: Property Rights and Environmental Policy
Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
Current Topics in Environmental Health
Governance, Law, and Ethics
City Politics
Topics in American Constitutional Law
Social Policy
Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory
Human Needs and Social Services
Urban Policy
Comparative Development
Housing and Homelessness
Modes of Social Change
Nonprofit Organizations
Investigating Modes of Social Change
Social Entrepreneurship
Investing in Social Change
Senior Capstone: The capstone may take the form of an Honors Thesis, Independent Study, a Public Policy internship, research Assistantship, UTRA Assistantship, or designated Senior Seminar
Total Credits10

Honors

Candidates for honors should apply in the Spring term of their third year. Successful candidates will enroll in the Public Policy Colloquium and prepare a senior honors paper.

Master of Public Affairs

The Brown MPA - Change the World

The Brown Master of Public Affairs (MPA) at the Watson Institute is a one-year (summer – fall – spring) full-time program that provides students with the analytical foundation and management tools they need to tackle the policy problems of today. The program prepares students for careers spanning public service, all levels of government, NGOs, foundations, and the private sector.

Our unique, accelerated program offers:

  • Small class size and engaged faculty composed of world-renowned researchers and experienced practitioners
  • An interdisciplinary curriculum - take advantage of course offerings across the University
  • A two-week international policy immersion experience
  • A 12-week consultancy that ensures students are career-ready

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/public-affairs-and-public-policy

Required Courses
Summer Sequence I ( 4 Weeks)
Statistics for Public Policy
Economics for Public Policy
Summer Sequence 2 (4 Weeks)
Statistics for Program Evaluation
Economics of Government Intervention
Global Policy Experience (2 Weeks)
Fall Semester (Regular Semester)
Policy Analysis and Problem Solving
The Politics of Policymaking in Comparative Perspective
Specialization Elective 1
Specialization Elective 2
Spring Sequence 1 (12 Weeks)
Policy in Action Consultancy
Spring Sequence 2 (7 Weeks)
Management and Implementation in Public and Non-Profit Organizations
Policy Problems of the 21st Century: Social Justice and Advocacy, Strategies for Change
System Dynamics: Policy Analysis for a Complex World
Specialization Elective 3

Dual Degree Program: Master of Public Health (MPH) and Master of Public Affairs (MPA)

The School of Public Health and the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs  also offer a dual-degree Master of Public Health (MPH) and Master of Public Affairs (MPA) program.  Emphasizing a learning by doing approach, this rigorous, program will offer highly qualified applicants the opportunity to gain training in public health and public policy to prepare them to address the critical health policy issues in the United States and throughout the world.  The dual-degree degree program includes 19 courses as well as a Masters level thesis.  Students will benefit from the rich academic resources at the Watson Institute and the School of Public Health, as well as their extensive applied learning programs in Rhode Island, as well as throughout the United States and the world.

Interested students should apply separately to the MPH and MPA program. Applicants will indicate interest in the joint degree program on the application form. 

For more information on admission to the MPH program and it's requirements, please visit the following website:

https://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/public-health