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Center for Language Studies

The Center for Language Studies fosters a community of like-minded individuals interested in researching and exploring other cultures in a way that is only possible through a deep knowledge of the language of these cultures.  The Center encompasses two unique units - the Center for Languages Studies (CLS) and World Languages and Cultures (WLC). CLS supports and promotes the work done by all language faculty and students at Brown whereas WLC is the home department for Arabic, ASL, English for International Graduate Students, Hindi, Nahuatl, Persian, Turkish, Swahili, Urdu, and Yoruba.

The Center supports the teaching and learning of all languages at Brown and promotes the importance of intercultural competence in our global society. By offering opportunities to reflect on teaching practices, to develop professionally and to stay updated regarding research in language pedagogy, we remain committed to helping faculty and graduate students excel. We foster a community of undergraduates who are invested in a sincere and critical dialogue with others by learning languages that represent a variety of cultures and traditions. We coordinate events and professional development for faculty and graduate students as well as co-curricular learning opportunities for undergraduates.

For additional information please visit the Center’s website at: https://cls.brown.edu/ 

Course usage information

SIGN 0100. American Sign Language I, II.

An immersive approach using authentic communication inside and outside of the classroom will be used to develop introductory communicative skills in American Sign Language. Authentic materials from diverse sources will provide an overview of the American Deaf community. Basic media literacy skills will be taught.
This is the first half of a year-long course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade at the end of the course work in SIGN 0200 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters.

Fall SIGN0100 S01 16378 MWF 11:00-11:50(18) (T. Riker)
Fall SIGN0100 S02 16379 MWF 12:00-12:50(18) (H. Nowicki)
Fall SIGN0100 S03 16380 MWF 2:00-2:50(18) (H. Nowicki)
Course usage information

SIGN 0200. American Sign Language I, II.

Introduces basic ASL conversation. Features core vocabulary, common signing phrases, non-manual components (facial expression, body postures), signing space, fingerspelling, numbers, loan signs, cultural protocols, rules of ASL grammar and structure. Deaf cultural behavior is introduced in the classroom and through readings, videotapes, and Deaf community events.
This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken SIGN 0100 to receive credit for this course. If SIGN 0100 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing.

Spr SIGN0200 S01 26394 MWF 11:00-11:50(12) (T. Riker)
Spr SIGN0200 S02 26395 MWF 12:00-12:50(12) (H. Nowicki)
Spr SIGN0200 S03 26396 MWF 2:00-2:50(12) (T. Riker)
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SIGN 0300. American Sign Language III.

This course will use an immersive approach incorporating authentic communication to develop intermediate communicative skills in American Sign Language. Through authentic materials from diverse sources, students will engage in classroom discussion and produce media to explore Deaf cultural topics related to family dynamics, language and literacy, and education. Prerequisite SIGN 0200 or placement interview. Additional 1 hour session held through Zoom every week to discuss cultural topics.

Fall SIGN0300 S01 16957 MWF 12:00-12:50(03) (T. Riker)
Fall SIGN0300 S02 16958 MWF 1:00-1:50(03) (H. Nowicki)
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SIGN 0400. American Sign Language IV.

Intensive use of expressive and receptive skills in complex grammatical structures, advanced classifiers, dialogues, and storytelling techniques. Discussion of social factors that give rise to code-switching; regional and ethnic sign variations; social, political, and cultural evolution of U.S. Deaf community. Interaction with Deaf community in directed and non-directed activities. Prerequisite SIGN 0300 or placement interview. Additional 1 hour session held through Zoom every week to discuss cultural topics.

Spr SIGN0400 S01 26397 MWF 12:00-12:50(17) (T. Riker)
Spr SIGN0400 S02 26398 MWF 1:00-1:50(17) (H. Nowicki)
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SIGN 0500. American Sign Language V.

This courses increases American Sign Language skills by introducing advanced vocabulary and grammar in various registers and settings, including informal and formal discussions, presentations, and storytelling. Through authentic materials from diverse sources, students will explore American Sign Language literature and oral traditions. Prerequisite SIGN 0400 or placement interview. Additional 1 hour session held through Zoom every week to discuss cultural topics.

Fall SIGN0500 S01 16959 MWF 2:00-2:50(01) (T. Riker)
Fall SIGN0500 S02 19490 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (T. Riker)
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SIGN 0900. Introduction to Deaf Studies.

Introduction to the Deaf Community and Deaf Culture. Discussion of similarities to, and differences from, mainstream hearing culture. Supplemental videotapes focus on aspects of the culture including Deaf education and history, autobiographical sketches, Deaf norms and values, and Deaf literature, art and folklore. Theoretical issues of culture and linguistics applied to Deaf culture, American Sign Language, and the variety of cultural perspectives of the Deaf community. Students also engage in a research project related to course content. Voice interpreter will be provided; all students are welcome; no previous knowledge of American Sign Language or Deaf Studies is needed.

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SIGN 1910. Independent Study in Sign Language/Deaf Studies.

Independent study in an area of special interest to the student, with close guidance by a member of the faculty, and leading to a major paper/project. Required of candidates for honors, and recommended for third year students. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Prerequisite: SIGN 0500 or instructor permission.

Course usage information

ARAB 0100. First-Year Arabic.

Builds basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, introducing the Arabic language in its cultural environment. Four contact hours per week, with an emphasis on grammar and communication, plus written, audio, and video assignments outside of class. This is the first half of a two-semester sequence course whose first semester grade is normally a temporary one. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade at the end of the course work in ARAB 0200 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters. If course is full, please request an override.  Enrollment limited to 18.

Fall ARAB0100 S01 16373 TTh 10:30-11:50(11) (A. Hassan)
Fall ARAB0100 S01 16373 MW 11:00-11:50(11) (A. Hassan)
Fall ARAB0100 S02 16374 MW 1:00-1:50(11) (A. Hassan)
Fall ARAB0100 S02 16374 TTh 1:00-2:20(11) (A. Hassan)
Fall ARAB0100 S03 16375 TTh 9:00-10:20(11) (A. Hassan)
Fall ARAB0100 S03 16375 MW 10:00-10:50(11) (A. Hassan)
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ARAB 0110. Egyptian Arabic.

This course will introduce students to one of the major colloquial variants of contemporary Arabic. The native language of Egyptian citizens, used predominantly in everyday communication, has long since become widely understood throughout the Arab world, since popularized by the media and pop culture. The beginning oral proficiency that students will acquire in this course, by examining a range of sources, from textbooks to short stories, movies, social media posts and personal accounts by guest-speakers, and by practicing conversation in class, will facilitate their communication with native speakers of Arabic in a variety of informal situations. Prerequisite: ARAB 200. Enrollment limited to 18.

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ARAB 0120. Intensive Summer Arabic.

This intensive summer course (Equal to ARAB 0100 and ARAB 0200) is an introductory course designed to build basic listening, speaking, writing, and reading skills in Arabic. MSA is the medium of formal oral and written communication used throughout the Arab world, and the course will mainly focus on this form of the language. This course will introduce essential colloquial vocabulary and grammar necessary for understanding and conducting simple acts of communication with native speakers.

Course usage information

ARAB 0200. First-Year Arabic.

Builds listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, at the low intermediate level of Arabic proficiency. Five contact hours per week, with an emphasis on grammar and communication, plus written, audio, and video assignments outside of class. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken ARAB 0100 to receive credit for this course. If ARAB 0100 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing. Enrollment limited to 18.

Spr ARAB0200 S01 25466 TTh 10:30-11:50(12) (A. Hassan)
Spr ARAB0200 S01 25466 MW 11:00-11:50(12) (A. Hassan)
Spr ARAB0200 S02 25467 MW 1:00-1:50(12) (A. Hassan)
Spr ARAB0200 S02 25467 TTh 1:00-2:20(12) (A. Hassan)
Spr ARAB0200 S03 25468 TTh 9:00-10:20(12) (A. Hassan)
Spr ARAB0200 S03 25468 MW 10:00-10:50(12) (A. Hassan)
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ARAB 0300. Second-Year Arabic.

Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the intermediate level of language proficiency through extensive use of various texts and multimedia. Promotes better understanding of Arabic cultural traditions. Five contact hours weekly, plus written, audio, and video assignments outside of class. Prerequisite: ARAB 0200. This is the first half of a year-long course. Neither semester may be elected independently without special written permission. The final grade at the end of the course work in ARAB 0400 covers the entire year and is recorded as the final grade for both semesters.

Fall ARAB0300 S01 16376 TTh 10:30-11:50(04) (M. Faiza)
Fall ARAB0300 S01 16376 MW 11:00-11:50(04) (M. Faiza)
Fall ARAB0300 S02 16377 MW 1:00-1:50(04) (M. Faiza)
Fall ARAB0300 S02 16377 TTh 1:00-2:20(04) (M. Faiza)
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ARAB 0320. Intermediate Arabic.

This course (equal to ARAB 0300 and ARAB 0400) builds on the skills acquired in ARAB 0100 and ARAB 0200. In addition to al-Kitaab, Parts One and Two, coursework will incorporate poetry, prose, music, and films, to broaden your vocabulary, underpin complex grammatical norms, and increase your understanding of contemporary Arab culture. Colloquial usages are naturally integrated in conversation practice. This course will also introduce you to important figures and ideas associated with the cultural history and present of Arab societies. Elements of classical Arabic will be presented, preparing you to access the literary and cultural heritage of the Arab peoples.

Course usage information

ARAB 0400. Second-Year Arabic.

Develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the intermediate level of language proficiency through extensive use of various texts and multimedia. Promotes better understanding of Arabic cultural traditions. Five contact hours weekly, plus written, audio, and video assignments outside of class. Prerequisite: ARAB 0300. This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken ARAB 0300 to receive credit for this course.

Spr ARAB0400 S01 25487 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (M. Faiza)
Spr ARAB0400 S01 25487 MW 11:00-11:50(13) (M. Faiza)
Spr ARAB0400 S02 25488 MW 1:00-1:50(13) (M. Faiza)
Spr ARAB0400 S02 25488 TTh 1:00-2:20(13) (M. Faiza)
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ARAB 0450A. Beginning Levantine Colloquial.

Parting from the solid foundation built in MSA during the first two years of Arabic studies, this course will accelerate students’ advancement toward language proficiency by introducing them to Levantine Colloquial, one of the major varieties of Arabic. In preparation for class meetings, we will view and read a variety of media from the Levant. Oral communication and understanding Levantine cultures and contemporary societies will be the focus of our meetings. At the end of the semester, students will gain confidence to function in an ample variety of social and cultural environments and access a wider range of media.

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ARAB 0500. Third-Year Arabic.

This course offers comprehensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing at the advanced proficiency level. It will accelerate students’ advancement toward language and cultural proficiency by integrating the study of Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Arabic, the latter of which will be the main form of oral communication in class discussions. Thematic units will include selections from the classical and modern traditions of Arabic writing, contemporary film and media, and various art forms with the goal of broadening students’ understanding of Arab societies and their cultures. Through this integrated approach, students will gain confidence to function in an ample variety of social and cultural environments and access a wider range of media. Prereq: ARAB0400 or equivalent

Fall ARAB0500 S01 16953 MTWTh 12:00-12:50(03) (E. Belmont Flores)
Fall ARAB0500 S02 17123 MTWTh 10:00-10:50(03) (E. Belmont Flores)
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ARAB 0600. Third-Year Arabic.

Offers comprehensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with grammar review as needed. Broadens students' perspective of Arabic culture with selections from the classical and modern traditions of Arabic writing and various art forms. Four contact hours weekly. Prerequisite: ARAB 0500.

Spr ARAB0600 S02 25521 MTWTh 12:00-12:50(16) (M. Faiza)
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ARAB 0700. Advanced Arabic: Tales of the City.

The Arab city, current site of a major political upheaval, is the central theme of this integrated-skill language and culture course. Images of cities, as multifaceted as the people who inhabit them, animate cinema screens and daily news reports, inspire masters of writing, artists, and musicians, arouse political activism. By engaging the complex representation of the urban theme in contemporary discursive and art forms, this course will enhance students' understanding of the dynamics of urban politics and culture in the Middle East, while building a content-specific lexicon and advanced communicative ability. Prerequisite: ARAB 0600, or an equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12.

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ARAB 0750. Arab Women Poets.

This course aims to introduce students to some of the most prominent Arab women poets of the latter 20th century through the 21st century. Students will strengthen their language skills while reading and discussing texts by major contemporary women poets from the Middle East and North Africa, including Dunya Mikhail, Lamia Makaddam, Iman Mersal, Maram Mesri, Aicha Belhaj, Asmaa Azaizeh and Mona Kareem. Through the works of these poets, students will explore a range of themes from wars and exile, to love, longing and even “family problems and washing dishes” (as Tunisian poet Lamia Makaddam describes in a poem/manifesto about the role of poetry in our lives). Arab women poets will be invited every two weeks to discuss various themes about their poetry and lives with the class.

Fall ARAB0750 S01 19565 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (M. Faiza)
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ARAB 0800. Advanced Arabic: Language & Culture through Cinema.

This integrated-skill language and culture course stresses oral interaction in class. We will view and discuss films from the Arab World as vehicles to understanding the cultural and linguistic diversity of Arabic-speaking countries. Our selection of films will focus on issues of economic inequality, family dynamics, and gender, as well as the effects of war and immigration on society. By engaging the complex representation of these themes in contemporary cinema, this course will enhance students' understanding of Middle Eastern culture, while building a content-specific lexicon and advanced communicative ability. Prerequisite: ARAB0600, or an equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12.

Spr ARAB0800 S01 25489 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (E. Belmont Flores)
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ARAB 0850. Advanced reading and composition in Arabic: Kalila wa-Dimna.

This course aims to introduce students with advanced proficiency in Arabic to Classical Arabic exemplified by the stories of Kalila wa-Dimna, one of the most popular medieval Arabic folk tales, told through a cast of personified animals. While written originally in Sanskrit in the fourth century CE, the Arabic translation of Ibn al-Muqaffa’—one of the most influential prose writers in the history of Arabic literature—is what made it a classic in Arabic. It also allowed it to travel to other parts of the globe through various translations based on Ibn al-Muqaffa’s.

Students will also have an opportunity to engage with a modern version of the stories, by Munther Younes, developing further their ability to read critically authentic Arabic texts of different historical periods, sharpening their analytical skills, and expanding their perspective of the language evolution through the ages. Advanced level in Arabic is required.

Fall ARAB0850 S01 18768 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (M. Faiza)
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ARAB 0950. Advanced Reading and Composition: Arabic Fiction in the West.

This course explores themes of exile, nostalgia, and identity in works written in Arabic by Arab authors living in the West. The course aims to improve the students’ skills in critical reading and writing through studying and analyzing original texts in their linguistic, cultural and historical contexts. Students read short stories and novels in Arabic by writers including Houda Barakat, Hassouna Mosbahi and Abdul Hadi Saadoun. All readings and discussions in Arabic.

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ARAB 1100. Love, Revolution and Nostalgia in Modern Arabic Poetry.

This course aims to introduce students to the most prominent Arabic poets of the 20th and 21st century. Students will strengthen their language skills while reading and discussing texts by major modern poets from the Middle East and North Africa, including Nizar Qabbani, Darwish and Adonis. Through the works of these poets, they will explore a range of themes from politics and oppression, to love and eroticism, personal freedom and women’s liberation.

Conducted in Modern Standard Arabic; designed for students with advanced language skills. Prerequisite: Four years of Arabic, or by instructor permission.

Course usage information

ARAB 1990. Special Topics in Arabic Language, Literature, and Culture.

Advanced level integrated skill course focusing on specific reading and writing topics derived from the traditions and arts of the Arabic language. Course prerequisites include advanced capacity in Arabic grammar and reading comprehension. Enrollment limited to 10.

Course usage information

ARAB 1990B. Advanced Egyptian Arabic: Displacement and Diaspora in a Modernizing Egypt.

This is a course offered to students with at least six semesters of language study experience. Students must be comfortable with the script, sounds, structure and grammar of the language. The course will familiarize students with one of the major colloquial variants of contemporary Arabic. Egyptian Arabic is the dialect of Egyptian citizens and is used predominantly in everyday communication. Students will acquire proficiency by examining content-based sources related to its theme of displacement. Sources will range from books and articles to video clips, social media posts and accounts by speakers and guests.

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ARAB 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Fall ARAB2450 S01 16081 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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CATL 0100. Introduction to Catalan.

CATL100 will provide students with a basic foundation in Catalan through the practice of the four fundamental communicative skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing, but also by mediating and interacting in class. Students can expect to be able to maintain simple conversations by the end of the course. Additionally, the subject will provide an exploration of the Catalan culture, which will be carried out through cinema, performance art, architecture, design, literature and sociopolitical contents. Additionally, academic bibliography on various subjects will be available, opening the doors to the fascinating artistic heritage and current production in the Catalan-speaking areas.

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CATL 0200. Catalan Language and Culture.

An intermediate course which introduces students to Catalan culture and allows them to review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g. grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, socicultural norms) of the language. Students will develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They will work with texts and audio-visual material that will provide them with a deeper understanding of Catalan literature, culture, and contemporary society. Classes will be conducted in Catalan. Therefore a basic knowledge of Catalan literature is a prerequisite or students may request the instructor's permission to take the course.

Course usage information

CATL 0300. Catalan Language and Culture.

This course continues to develop and strengthen students' proficiency in the Catalan language. The cultural component plays a central role in these classes, as a means to access diverse uses of the language within a cultural context. Varied cultural sources will be explored, such as Catalan cinema, music, artistic expressions, sociocultural elements and literature. These will play a role in enhancing the student’s confidence in their knowledge of the Catalan language and the context in which it is inserted. Students can expect to develop their language skills further, and to be active agents in their learning process.

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CATL 1910. Independent Study in Catalan.

An open content course, which may be offered each semester. Offered as an Independent Study, this course will be adapted to students' needs that are not currently covered by our curricular offerings.

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EINT 2100. Academic Discourse for Internationals.

This course develops the English skills of first-year international graduate students who are preparing to be teaching assistants. Students improve their listening comprehension and fluency in conversational interactions typical of academic settings. Areas of spoken English that are addressed include pronunciation, stress patterns, intonation, vocabulary, and structure. Instructor permission required.

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EINT 2200. Academic Interactions.

This course develops the English language skills of first-year international graduate students who are preparing to be teaching assistants. Students improve their fluency and expression of complex ideas in a variety of linguistic situations typical of classroom interactions. Students also increase their control of vocabulary, pronunciation and listening comprehension when communicating with American undergraduates. Instructor permission required.

Fall EINT2200 S01 16383 MTWTh 12:00-12:50(15) (M. Leuchak)
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EINT 2300. Negotiating an American Classroom.

In this course, international graduate students increase their abilities to communicate accurately and fluently in English with American undergraduates. International students develop their ability to interact, in culturally appropriate ways, in a variety of teaching situations common to an institution of higher education, where they are responsible for expressing and explaining complex information and ideas in English. Instructor permission required.

Fall EINT2300 S01 16279 MTWTh 12:00-12:50(15) (B. Gourlay)
Spr EINT2300 S01 25093 MTWTh 12:00-12:50(01) (B. Gourlay)
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EINT 2400. Speaking Professionally for Internationals.

This course develops the English communication skills of international graduate students with an emphasis on intelligibility of speech and clarity of expression in a variety of teaching and professional situations (e.g. presenting material, responding to questions, directing discussions). Students develop increased facility of English in extended discourse when they are the authority in a teaching or other professional context. Instructor permission required.

Fall EINT2400 S01 16381 MW 9:00-9:50(03) (M. Leuchak)
Fall EINT2400 S02 16382 TTh 9:00-9:50(03) (M. Leuchak)
Spr EINT2400 S01 25464 MW 9:00-9:50(15) (M. Leuchak)
Spr EINT2400 S02 25465 TTh 9:00-9:50(15) (M. Leuchak)
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EINT 2500. Advanced Articulation Tutorial.

This course is an advanced pronunciation tutorial for international graduate students who have achieved a near-native speaker level of fluency in English, but who require greater precision of English articulations, pronunciation, fluency and/or expression. Instructor permission required.

Fall EINT2500 S01 16280 MTWTh 11:00-11:50(11) (B. Gourlay)
Fall EINT2500 S02 17099 MTWTh 11:00-11:50(11) (M. Leuchak)
Spr EINT2500 S01 25508 MTWTh 11:00-11:50(13) (B. Gourlay)
Spr EINT2500 S02 25509 MTWTh 11:00-11:50(13) (M. Leuchak)
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HNDI 0100. Beginning Hindi or Urdu.

Introduces conversation, reading, and writing of modern standard Hindi and the Devanagari script. Those who already know Devanagari but have rusty conversation skills may join the class second semester; obtain instructor's permission during the first semester. Those who prefer to learn Urdu and the Persian script should contact the instructor.

Fall HNDI0100 S01 16277 MTWThF 12:00-12:50(15) (A. Koul)
Fall HNDI0100 S01 16277 F 12:00-12:50(15) (A. Koul)
Fall HNDI0100 S01 16277 MTWTh 12:00-12:50(15) (A. Koul)
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HNDI 0200. Beginning Hindi or Urdu.

Introduces conversation, reading, and writing of modern standard Hindi and the Devanagari script. Those who already know Devanagari but have rusty conversation skills may join the class second semester; obtain instructor's permission during the first semester. Those who prefer to learn Urdu and the Persian script should contact the instructor. Prerequisite: HNDI 0100.

Spr HNDI0200 S01 25091 MTWThF 12:00-12:50(01) (A. Koul)
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HNDI 0300. Intermediate Hindi-Urdu.

A continuation of HNDI 0100-0200, which is a prerequisite. Introduces the variation of the Arabic script used for Urdu. Prepares students to communicate in written and spoken language. Activities are conducted in Hindi/Urdu. Meets four hours weekly.

Fall HNDI0300 S01 16278 MTWThF 1:00-1:50(08) (A. Koul)
Fall HNDI0300 S01 16278 F 1:00-1:50(08) (A. Koul)
Fall HNDI0300 S01 16278 MTWTh 1:00-1:50(08) (A. Koul)
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HNDI 0400. Intermediate Hindi-Urdu.

A continuation of HNDI 0100-0200. Introduces the variation of the Persian script used for Urdu. Prepares students to communicate in written and spoken language. Activities are conducted in Hindi/Urdu. Meets four hours weekly. Prerequisite: HNDI 0300.

Spr HNDI0400 S01 26342 TTh 1:00-1:50(06) (A. Koul)
Spr HNDI0400 S01 26342 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (A. Koul)
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HNDI 1080. Advanced Hindi-Urdu.

Each student follows an independent reading list determined in consultation with the instructor. The readings may include folk tales, journalistic prose, 20th-century literature, classical Urdu poetry of the 17th to 19th centuries, or subjects in nonfiction. The class meets together three hours weekly for discussion. Each student also spends one hour weekly with the instructor. Prerequisite: HNDI 0400.

Fall HNDI1080 S01 16281 MWF 9:00-9:50(09) (A. Koul)
Spr HNDI1080 S01 25505 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (A. Koul)
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LANG 0150S. Swahili I.

Students successfully completing this beginner's course in Swahili Language and Culture will be able to communicate in Swahili in a culturally-appropriate way. Students will practice skills in an integrated fashion in order to reach some proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Course content includes language, culture, history and music. Heritage speakers may place into the course depending on their language level. Like English, Swahili is not a tonal language, and considered to be one of the easier African languages to learn. Whether you are interested in Swahili in order to study and work in Africa or to engage with Swahili speakers in other parts of the world, this beginners course will prepare you well!

Fall LANG0150S S01 17673 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (J. Sokolosky)
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LANG 0250S. Beginning Swahili II.

Students successfully completing the second semester of this beginner's course in Swahili Language and Culture will be able to communicate in Swahili in a culturally-appropriate way. Students will practice skills in an integrated fashion in order to reach an intermediate low level of proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Course content includes language, culture, history, music and children's literature. Heritage speakers may place into the course depending on their language level. Like English, Swahili is not a tonal language, and considered to be one of the easier African languages to learn. Knowledge of Swahili will assist you in order to study and work in Africa (Kenya and Tanzania) and to be able to engage with Swahili speakers in other parts of the world.

Spr LANG0250S S01 26037 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (J. Sokolosky)
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LANG 0710. Protest and Dissidence in Iran.

The anti-authoritarian Woman, Life, Freedom movement arose as a reaction to protests, incarceration and death in Iran in the fall of 2022. In this first-year seminar, you will learn about Iran, a country of 87 million people bordered by Iraq and Afghanistan. We will discuss historical events such as the 1979 Iranian Revolution and how they still affect Iran’s relationship to the West. Through a broad selection of texts, film and art, we will explore topics that include corruption, authoritarianism, multiculturalism, race, social class, religion and gender relations in today’s Iranian culture and society. In English.

Fall LANG0710 S01 19293 M 3:00-5:30(03) (M. Quay)
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LANG 0750. Identity and Languages in Contemporary Africa.

When you think of contemporary Africa, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? IS it a megacity? Africa is the most rapidly urbanizing continent in the world. It is home to three of the world’s megacities (populations of 10 million). It is also home to one-third of the world’s languages and over 2000 languages are spoken in Africa. What is daily life within them like, and what kinds of linguistic, cultural, economic, and political roles do they play in our world? In this interdisciplinary class, we’ll look for answers to these questions in articles and mixed media, including Instagram posts, op-eds, TED Talks, YouTube music videos, sci-fi short stories, documentary photography, and more. What we’ll find might surprise you. Along the way, we’ll also do some critical reflection and self-examination: what shapes the ways we think about Africa and why?

Fall LANG0750 S01 17104 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (V. Alabi)
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LANG 0760. Language and Film Discourse in Africa.

This course will focus largely on Nollywood films (the Nigerian film industry), one of the biggest film industries in the world. We will watch the films Ẹ̀ẹ̀dà (Duplicate) 1-2 (2010) and Alágbo Òru (Midnight Herbalist) 1-4 (2012) to examine the language used in films to express speech acts (that is, an utterance considered an action) such as greetings, apologies, refusals, requests, compliments, and advice. We will furthermore analyze the linguistic, contextual, and social phenomena in African films made in African languages within the past twenty years. In addition, we will also consider the pragmatics (that is, language use in context) of power relations, proverbs, political discourse, interjections, and medical discourse.

Spr LANG0760 S01 26373 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (V. Alabi)
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LANG 0800. Theory and Practice of Intercultural Competence.

What is intercultural competence? What are its benefits in our globalized society? Through readings, discussions, videos and visuals students will learn the theory behind intercultural competence as well as practical aspects about gaining and honing the skills needed for IC. Students will experience how the implementation of IC enhances study, work and internships carried out both globally and domestically. Limited to 40 students. This course is open to all students. It is also the foundational course required of students participating in Brown’s Certificate of Intercultural Competence.

Fall LANG0800 S01 17215 W 3:00-5:30(10) (J. Sokolosky)
Spr LANG0800 S01 25504 W 3:00-5:30(10) (E. Ozdemir)
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LANG 1000A. Living in Translation: Trans/national Mobilities and Multilingualism.

Current and historical voluntary, forced, and induced migrations demand we reflect on how we think about languages, as well as the persistent changes we make to language. Translation is one of the changes we encounter daily. This course discusses the ways that thinking in/of translation alters and facilitates our reading, writing, and interpretation. It considers multilingualism alongside the cannibal, a disruptor and figure of linguistic alterity. Our aim is to think about the authors’ and texts’ trans/national movements as we generate questions about mobilities, language, and decoloniality, as well as how they manifest in cultural productions. Materials include novels, short stories, essays, musical recordings, visual art, and film. Authors include Edwidge Danticat, Haruki Murakami, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Binyavanga Wainaina, and Gloria Anzaldúa among others, with texts in transit between Brazil, Germany, Haiti, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Puerto Rico, Turkey, etc.

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LANG 1200. Archipelagic Thinking with Global Literatures.

Islands and archipelagos have long been disparaged for their openness, blending, and fluidity. Around the globe today, this form of continental thinking continues to provoke nationalist policies and efforts to curb human migrations and refugee movements. This course reconsiders these ideas. In learning to think archipelagically, we will read and watch work by Edwidge Danticat, Rosario Ferré, Isaac Julien, Craig Santos Perez, Ai Weiwei and more. This will include discussing how practices of language, translation, and multilingualism are lived and theorized archipelagically.

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LANG 1800. Capstone Seminar in Intercultural Competence.

This course serves as the final capstone course for the Certificate in Intercultural Competence. Students will connect the skills, attitudes and knowledge developed throughout the course work and experiential learning component of the Certificate to their future goals. Students will work on synthesizing all components of the Certificate through weekly discussions, simulations and case studies. Research topics and group discussions are designed to continue conversations that extend the work that began in the required foundation course LANG0800 The Theory and Practice of Intercultural Competence. Students will prepare a multi-modal presentation, and have the option of presenting a portfolio in a digital format, a podcast or a video, of the work they have completed along their journey towards intercultural competence. Students will participate in a public presentation session in order to share their work and engage the wider language-learning community on-campus.

Spr LANG1800 S01 25507 TTh 2:30-3:50(11) (E. Belmont Flores)
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LANG 1900. Independent Study in Languages.

This course will meet the needs of students who are not studying one of the languages offered by the CLS faculty. Beginner, Intermediate or Advanced integrated skill course focusing on specific reading and writing topics selected by the faculty advisor and the student. Enrollment limited to 10.

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LANG 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

Spr LANG2450 S01 24885 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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LANG 2900. Seminar in Language Pedagogy and Second Language Acquisition.

This course prepares graduate students in modern languages to understand theories of language pedagogy and second language acquisition. Students will gain both practical knowledge to incorporate into everyday teaching as well as an understanding of which approaches to teaching might be more effective than others in various classroom contexts and why. Undergraduates may enroll with permission of the instructor.

Spr LANG2900 S01 25506 Th 9:30-12:00(09) (J. Sokolosky)
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LANG XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students pursuing the Certificate in Intercultural Competence.

Fall 2023
The following courses may count as Area Perspective Courses for the Certificate in Intercultural Competence (CIC). Any course in a language department that is above and beyond the two required for the certificate may also count as the area perspectives course. Courses in English or in the target language may count toward this elective. This list only includes courses offered this semester. New courses may be added upon consultation with a CIC advisor. Please refer to the certificate website for more information.

Anthropology
ANTH 1150 Middle East in Anthropological Perspective
Cognitive, Linguistic, Psychological Sciences
CLPS 0300 Introduction to Linguistics
CLPS 1370 Pragmatics
Education
EDUC 1665 Reimagining Humanities Education: Curriculum Development for Secondary Schools
History
HIST 0233 Colonial Latin America
HIST 0552A A Textile History of Atlantic Slavery
HIST 0558C Latinx Social Movement History
HIST 0577B The US-Mexico Border and Borderlands: A Bilingual English-Spanish Seminar
HIST 0623C Americans in the USSR
HIST 1360 Amazonia from the Prehuman to the Present
HIST 1620 Resisting Empire: Gandhi and the Making of Modern South Asia
HIST 1968A Approaches to the Middle East
International and Public Affairs
IAPA 1401 Economic Development in Latin America
IAPA 1801 Science and Technology Policy in the Global South
IAPA 1802M Rwanda Past and Present
Music
MUSC 0640 Ghanaian Drumming and Dancing Ensemble
MUSC 0642 World Music Ensemble
Political Science
POLS 1440 Security, Governance and Development in Africa
Religious Studies
RELS 0090M Religion Violence and Media
RELS 0100 Buddhist Thought, Practice, and Society
RELS 0140 Food, Religion and Politics in South Asia
RELS 0145 Karma, Rebirth and Liberation: Life and Death in South Asian Religions
Slavic Studies
CZCH 1000 Dimensions of Czech Animation: Contexts, Interpretations, and Dialogs with the East
Turkish
TKSH 0720A Understanding Modern Turkey Through Film and Literature
Course usage information

NAHU 0100. Beginning Nahuatl.

Once the lingua franca of the Aztec Empire, Nahuatl is the most widely spoken indigenous language in Mexico and in North America as a whole, with 1.7 million speakers and 30 variants. As the vehicle of centuries-old knowledge transmitted orally, Nahuatl offers an entry point into the cultures and worldviews of various indigenous communities today, both in Mexico and its diaspora. This online course offers an introduction to Nahuatl (Huasteca variant) through an immersive methodology focused on developing your speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing, while fostering your cultural sensibility and competence. Ability to understand Spanish is desirable. Language of instruction is Nahuatl and Spanish.

Fall NAHU0100 S01 18826 TTh 10:00-12:00(13) (E. de la Cruz Cruz)
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NAHU 0200. Beginning Nahuatl II.

Once the lingua franca of the Aztec Empire, Nahuatl is the most widely spoken indigenous language in Mexico and in North America as a whole, with 1.7 million speakers and 30 variants. As the vehicle of centuries-old knowledge transmitted orally, Nahuatl offers an entry point into the cultures and worldviews of various indigenous communities today, both in Mexico and its diaspora. This online course offers an introduction to Nahuatl (Huasteca variant) through an immersive methodology focused on developing your speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing, while fostering your cultural sensibility and competence.

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NAHU 0300. Intermediate Nahuatl.

Intermediate Nahuatl offers students the opportunity to learn new themes and cultural practices of the Nahua communities of Chicontepec after NAHU 0100 and NAHU 0200. The approach is geared towards developing communication skills at an intermediate level. These skills will also allow students to explore colonial documents written in classical Nahuatl. The teaching method employs a communicative and cultural approach designed to develop both language proficiency and cultural competence. This is achieved through activities related to specific functions, contexts, grammar, and vocabulary relevant to everyday life situations in an indigenous community. Sessions are highly participatory and interactive, and small group work is often used. The course is mostly taught in Nahuatl to encourage its use and practice in classes.

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NAHU 0400. Nahuatl II.

Nahuatl II or intermediate offers students the opportunity to learn new themes and cultural practices of the Nahua communities of Chicontepec after NAHU 0100, NAHU 0200 and NAHU 0300. The approach is geared towards developing communication skills at an intermediate level. These skills will also allow students to explore colonial documents written in classical Nahuatl. The teaching method employs a communicative and cultural approach designed to develop both language proficiency and cultural competence. This is achieved through activities related to specific functions, contexts, grammar, and vocabulary relevant to everyday life situations in an indigenous community. Sessions are highly participatory and interactive, and small group work is often used. The Nahuatl II course is mostly taught in Nahuatl, to encourage its use and practice in classes.

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NAHU 0500. Advanced Nahuatl.

Nahuatl III or advanced is a course that offers students the opportunity to learn new themes and cultural practices of the Nahua communities of Chicontepec after NAHU 0100, NAHU 0200, NAHU 0300 and NAHU 0400. The approach is geared towards developing communication skills at an advanced level. These skills will also allow students to explore colonial documents written in classical Nahuatl. The teaching method employs a communicative and cultural approach designed to develop both language proficiency and cultural competence. This is achieved through activities related to specific functions, contexts, grammar, and vocabulary relevant to everyday life situations in an indigenous community. Sessions are highly participatory and interactive, and small group work is often used. The Nahuatl III course is mostly taught in Nahuatl, to encourage its use and practice in classes.

Fall NAHU0500 S01 18829 TTh 8:00-10:00(05) (E. de la Cruz Cruz)
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NAHU 0600. Advanced Nahuatl II.

Advanced Nahuatl II offers students the opportunity to learn new themes and cultural practices of the Nahua communities of Chicontepec after NAHU 0100, NAHU 0200, NAHU 0300, NAHU 0400 and NAHU 0500. The approach is geared towards developing communication skills at an advanced level. These skills will also allow students to explore colonial documents written in classical Nahuatl. The teaching method employs a communicative and cultural approach designed to develop both language proficiency and cultural competence. This is achieved through activities related to specific functions, contexts, grammar, and vocabulary relevant to everyday life situations in an indigenous community. Sessions are highly participatory and interactive, and small group work is often used. The Advanced Nahuatl II course is mostly taught in Nahuatl to encourage its use and practice in classes.

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PRSN 0100. Basic Persian.

Persian (Farsi) is a Middle Eastern language spoken by millions of people across Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. This fast-paced course for beginners stresses the acquisition of Persian alphabet and basic grammatical patterns, beginning levels of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Strong emphasis on the links between language and culture. One additional hour completed asynchronously by enrolled students.

Fall PRSN0100 S01 16441 MWF 9:00-9:50(09) (M. Quay)
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PRSN 0105. Accelerated Persian.

Persian (also called Farsi, Dari, or Tajiki) is a thriving modern language spoken by over 110 million people across Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. This course is designed for beginners in Persian who are already familiar with the script from other Middle Eastern languages, or who have some basic proficiency in the language. It may also be suitable for heritage speakers – please consult the instructor. The materials are taken from the free online course textbook, Persian of Iran Today. Students do not need to purchase any materials for the course. After this course, students should be prepared to move directly to PRSN 0400 Intermediate Persian Language and Culture in the Spring. Total beginners with no background in Persian or another Middle Eastern / South Asian language (such as Arabic, Urdu, Turkish or Punjabi) should enroll in PRSN 0200 Basic Persian. Students with no prior background to enroll in Basic Persian PRSN 0100, not 0200.

Spr PRSN0105 S01 27309 Th 1:00-1:50(06) (M. Quay)
Spr PRSN0105 S01 27309 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (M. Quay)
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PRSN 0200. Basic Persian.

Fast-paced course for beginners. Course stresses acquisition of Persian alphabet and basic grammatical patterns, beginning levels of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Strong emphasis on the links between language and culture.
This is the second half of a year-long course. Students must have taken PRSN 0100 to receive credit for this course. If PRSN 0100 was taken for credit then this course must be taken for credit; if taken as an audit, this course must also be taken as an audit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by both the academic department and the Committee on Academic Standing.
One additional hour in consultation with instructor and enrolled students.

Spr PRSN0200 S01 25510 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (M. Quay)
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PRSN 0300. Intermediate Persian Language and Culture.

Expands students' proficiency in modern Persian language and culture; develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the intermediate level through various texts and multimedia. Prerequisite: PRSN 0200. One additional hour in consultation with instructor and enrolled students.

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PRSN 0400. Intermediate Persian Language and Culture.

Expands students' proficiency in modern Persian language and culture; develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the intermediate level through various texts and multimedia. Prerequisite: PRSN 0300. One additional hour in consultation with instructor and enrolled students.

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PRSN 0500. Advanced Persian Language and Culture I.

For students who have completed PRSN 0400 or have acquired language skills above the intermediate level through contact with Persian in other ways. The main goal of this course is to improve speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and promote exposure to the culture. It will enable students to expand their knowledge of the language by studying samples of modern and classical Persian literature in order to advance toward mastery of contemporary literature. The course will motivate students to communicate both in written and spoken Persian by utilizing the adequate grammatical order and correct vocabulary. Prerequisite: PRSN 0400.

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PRSN 0600. Advanced Persian Language and Culture II.

Designed for students who have completed PRSN 0500 or have acquired language skills above the advanced level through other means. The main goal of the course is to improve speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and promote exposure to the language and culture through in depth study of samples of Persian literature, history, journals, newspapers, radio and TV material to advance toward mastery of contemporary literature. Students will be motivated to communicate both in written and spoken Persian by utilizing adequate grammatical order and vocabulary. Activities will include poetry reading, informal gatherings and translation from and into Persian. Prerequisite: PRSN 0500.

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PRSN 0720. Modern Iran: Literature, Media & Pop Culture.

From the world-famous novels of Shahrnoush Parsipour to the subversive rap lyrics of Hichkas; from the Oscar-winning films of Asghar Farhadi to state-sponsored TV propaganda of the Islamic Republic – this course takes a wide-ranging approach to understanding contemporary Iranian culture and society. Through a broad selection of sources translated into English, students will familiarize themselves with recent historical events in Iran and become more acquainted with various aspects of Iranian culture. The chronological focus will be from the 1979 Iranian Revolution to the present and will be organized around a number of social and political themes, including corruption, authoritarianism, multiculturalism, race, social class, religion and gender relations. No proficiency in Persian (Farsi) is required to enroll; however a separate discussion will be offered for students with Persian proficiency. No prior knowledge of the Middle East needed to enroll.

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PRSN 1100. Reading Persian for Research.

Through a broad range of historical and academic texts in Persian, students will prepare to read and interpret Persian with the help of a dictionary at a level sufficient for carrying out academic research. In this course, students will engage with great thinkers, jurists, poets, and chroniclers of the Persian-speaking world: from the bold, multivalent poems of Jahan Malek Khatun, to the philosophical insights of Ghazali, the Machiavellian stylings of Hossein Va’ez Kāshefi, and the surprisingly candid memoirs of Qajar princess Taj al-Saltaneh. As the course is focused on preparing students for graduate language exams and research, it will not be actively working on students’ speaking or listening skills in Persian. It is designed for students who have completed the Intermediate Persian language sequence at Brown, or who have attained a similar proficiency level elsewhere.

Fall PRSN1100 S01 19292 F 3:00-5:30(11) (M. Quay)
Fall PRSN1100 S02 19507 F 12:30-3:00 (M. Quay)
Spr PRSN1100 S01 25512 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (M. Quay)
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PRSN 1100A. Reading Persian for Research.

Through a broad range of historical and academic texts in Persian, students will prepare to read and interpret Persian with the help of a dictionary at a level sufficient for carrying out academic research. In this course, students will engage with great thinkers, jurists, poets, and chroniclers of the Persian-speaking world: from the bold, multivalent poems of Jahan Malek Khatun, to the philosophical insights of Ghazali, the Machiavellian stylings of Hossein Va’ez Kāshefi, and the surprisingly candid memoirs of Qajar princess Taj al-Saltaneh. As the course is focused on preparing students for graduate language exams and research, it will not be actively working on students’ speaking or listening skills in Persian. It is designed for students who have completed the Intermediate Persian language sequence at Brown, or who have attained a similar proficiency level elsewhere.

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PRSN 1150. Persian Historical Texts & Codicology.

Through a broad range of historical texts in Persian, students will prepare to read and interpret Persian at a level sufficient for carrying out academic research (with the help of a dictionary). In this course, students will engage with historical chronicles, literary texts, philosophical treatises and other documents of historical interest from the Persian-speaking world. Where possible, students will also grapple with the original manuscript tradition for the texts in question, learning to decipher handwriting and the general standards for creating a critical edition of a premodern text. As the course is focused on preparing students for graduate language exams and research, it will not be actively working on students’ speaking or listening skills in Persian. It is designed for students who have completed the Intermediate Persian language sequence at Brown, or who have attained a similar proficiency level elsewhere.

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PRSN 1200. Iranian Cinema: Before and After the Islamic Revolution.

This course provides an overview of Iranian Cinema in general and explores in detail Iranian cinema after the Iranian revolution. It explores the politics, history, techniques and the art of cinema of the past several decades in Iran. Classes consist of screenings, discussions and lectures. Conducted in English, open to all students. Enrollment limited to 25.

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PRSN 2980. Reading and Research.

Work with individual students in connection with special readings, problems of research, or preparation of theses. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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TKSH 0100. Introduction to Turkish Language and Culture I.

This is a proficiency oriented introductory course to Turkish Language and Culture. It adopts and integrated skills approach and is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Turkish. The course combines an emphasis on the development of communicative competences with an understanding of language structures and grammar as well as insights into Modern Turkish society and culture. The aim is to introduce students to basic linguistic structures and develop the ability to comprehend and produce text, as well as to speak and understand speech, in a variety of contexts and registers. Graduate students should contact the instructor to register.

Fall TKSH0100 S01 16384 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (E. Ozdemir)
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TKSH 0110. Intensive Elementary Turkish Language and Culture.

This intensive elementary Turkish course is designed for students who have no prior familiarity with Turkish. It introduces students to the grammar and vocabulary of the Turkish language via speaking, listening, reading, and writing, with a special focus on speaking and listening. Students will also learn about Turkish-speaking cultures. They will be exposed to adapted Turkish audio-visual materials, situational survival phrases, and some authentic reading and audio-visual materials, and will be able to produce basic narratives and texts in the language. This course will be equivalent to one academic year of Turkish. Students will be able to continue to the 300 level Turkish course upon completion of this intensive Turkish course.

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TKSH 0200. Introduction to Turkish.

This is the second semester of a proficiency oriented introductory course to Turkish Language and Culture. It adopts an integrated skills approach and is designed for students who have taken Turkish 0100 or have placed into the class after consultation with the instructor or a placement exam.The course combines an emphasis on the development of communicative competences with an understanding of language structures and grammar as well as insights into Modern Turkish society and culture.

Spr TKSH0200 S01 25515 MWF 12:00-12:50(01) (E. Ozdemir)
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TKSH 0300. Intermediate Turkish.

This course focuses on both communicative skills and the language structures of modern Turkish. Students will learn about Turkish society, culture, and traditions. Course materials include Turkish films, podcasts, radio programs, as well as authentic and adapted Turkish written texts. New students can place into the course depending on their language level. Class will be scheduled for three times a week synchronously in consultation with students and the instructor.  There will also be one hour of asynchronous instruction.

Fall TKSH0300 S01 16960 MWF 11:00-11:50(16) (E. Ozdemir)
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TKSH 0400. Intermediate Turkish II.

TKSH 0400 is designed for students who have taken TKSH 0300 and already studied Turkish language to develop proficiency at an advanced level. New students can place into it, after special arrangements with the instructor. The course places equal emphasis on further developing four skills (reading, listening, speaking, and writing) at an advance proficiency level as well as advanced compound and subordinate structures in grammar. It combines an emphasis on the development of communication skills with an understanding of the language and insights into Modern Turkish society and culture. There will be one additional hour TBD in consultation with the instructor and students.

Spr TKSH0400 S01 25518 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (E. Ozdemir)
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TKSH 0500. Advanced Turkish I.

This course builds upon the linguistic and communicative points covered in TKSH 0400, and it is designed for students who are interested in Turkish language and culture. New students can place into it, after special arrangements with the instructor. The course is based on the development of four integrated skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will learn about modern Turkey, Turkish society and culture by reading, watching, and listening to authentic and adapted Turkish texts including articles, news pieces, short stories, poems, movie clips, and songs.

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TKSH 0600. Advanced Turkish II Online.

This course builds upon the linguistic and communicative points covered in TKSH 0500, and it is designed for students who are interested in Turkish language and culture. New students can place into it, after special arrangements with the instructor. The course is based on the development of four integrated skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will learn about modern Turkey, its political and cultural issues by reading authentic Turkish articles and literary work, and watching and listening to authentic Turkish texts such as news, podcasts, video clips etc.

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TKSH 0720A. Understanding Modern Turkey Through Film and Literature.

This course will introduce students to modern Turkey and offer a wide range of perspectives on the society and its culture. Each week, we will focus on a single theme such as: family and gender; social classes and their interaction with each other; Istanbul and its neighborhoods; Turkey’s role within Europe; ethnic identities and their recognition by Turkish society; Turkish media and entertainment; modernism and political Islam; important events in the very recent history of Turkey including the Hrant Dink assassination, terror attacks, and the 2016 coup d’état attempt; education and academic freedom; modern literature; specific cultural practices and rituals; foreigners’ perspectives on Turkish society; and modern Turkish sensory experiences including music and cuisine.

Fall TKSH0720A S01 17103 W 3:00-5:30(10) (E. Ozdemir)
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TKSH 0720B. Istanbul, Global Metropolis.

This course will introduce Istanbul as a global metropolis, by examining a wide range of issues and challenges facing the city and its people. Each week, we will focus on a single aspect such as: a brief historical outline of the city; the Istanbulites of the past and today; the power distribution between elites and underdogs; the struggles of the city’s minorities and refugees; the effects of urbanization and rapid economic development; the uniqueness and interconnection of Istanbul’s neighborhoods; cultures and their politicization; social movements and city squares as symbols of social resistance; architecture of the everyday and the city’s architectural masterpieces; the representation of Istanbul in cinema and Turkish TV Series; and imagining Istanbul in modern Turkish literature.

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TKSH 1100. Introductory Ottoman Turkish I.

This course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. This introductory course aims to develop learners’ Ottoman Turkish reading and understanding skills written in the Ottoman Turkish (Arabo-Persian) alphabet. Students will practice reading Ottoman Turkish starting with simple separate words, and they will gradually move to studying longer texts. Simultaneously, students will review the main grammatical features of Ottoman Turkish including simple Arabic and Persian grammatical elements in the texts. Students will also practice how to solve problems encountered in the texts with use of dictionaries. In this introductory course students will mainly study the printed Ottoman Turkish texts published after the Second Constitutional Era (1908), and then they will be introduced to the texts of the ‘New Ottoman Turkish’ era (1839-1908). Minimum B2 level of Turkish is required for this class. Please email me if you have any questions about your Turkish language level.

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TKSH 1100A. Understanding Modern Turkey Through Film, Literature, and Media.

This course introduces students to modern Turkey and offers a wide range of perspectives on its society and culture. Themes include family and gender in Turkish society; Turkish social classes; Istanbul and its neighborhoods; Turkey’s role within Europe; ethnic identities and their recognition by Turkish society; Turkish media and entertainment; modernism and political Islam; important events in the very recent history of Turkey including the Hrant Dink assassination, terror attacks, and the 2016 coup d’état; education and academic freedom; modern literature; specific cultural practices and rituals; foreigners’ perspectives on Turkish society; and modern Turkish sensory experiences including music and cuisine.

Course usage information

YORU 0100. Introduction to Yoruba I.

Students successfully completing this beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture will have the facility to speak in proper tones and patterns and to understand Yoruba used in common everyday situations. Students will practice skills in an integrated fashion in order to reach some proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, and writing.  Course content includes Yoruba culture, literature, theater and music. Heritage speakers may place into the course depending on their language level.

Fall YORU0100 S01 16385 MWF 2:00-2:50(01) (V. Alabi)
Fall YORU0100 S01 16385 T 12:00-12:50(01) (V. Alabi)
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YORU 0200. Introduction to Yoruba II.

Students successfully completing this beginner's course in Yoruba Language and Culture will have the facility to speak in proper tones and patterns and to understand Yoruba used in common everyday situations. Students will practice skills in an integrated fashion in order to reach some proficiency in speaking, reading, listening, and writing.  Course content includes Yoruba culture, literature, theater and music. Heritage speakers may place into the course depending on their language level.

Spr YORU0200 S01 25513 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (V. Alabi)
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YORU 0300. Intermediate Yoruba I.

Students will learn to speak, read and write Yorùbá at an intermediate level. Classroom time focuses on speaking; homework includes work with the textbook and vocabulary learning. Texts include a variety of materials from BBC including films and audio materials. Learners will also be introduced to some current affairs, social, artistic and cultural events and issues in Nigeria. Learners will work on a paper in Yorùbá about their exposure to the language and culture as a final project.

Fall YORU0300 S01 16386 MWF 1:00-1:50(08) (V. Alabi)
Fall YORU0300 S01 16386 Th 12:00-12:50(08) (V. Alabi)
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YORU 0400. Intermediate Yoruba II.

This intermediate course expands on the work done in YORU0300. Focus continues to be on speaking while also learning to write longer texts in Yorùbá with tones. Students will become more familiar with the tradition of Yorùbá proverbs. Themes of the course include aspects of African culture such as education, fashion, music, business, film, and politics.

Spr YORU0400 S01 25514 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (V. Alabi)

Intercultural Competence

The Center for Language Studies' (CLS) Certificate in Intercultural Competence acknowledges that in an ever more interconnected world and society, with more opportunities for collaboration as well as situations of conflict, students need to understand and respect other cultures.  By approaching language study, area studies courses and experiential learning through a critical lens focused on developing intercultural competence, students prepare themselves for a future after Brown working with people from all over the world, be it in industry, business, the university or in social justice work, anywhere where multicultural and multilingual groups work together.

Certificate Requirements: 

Core Courses1.5
Theory and Practice of Intercultural Competence
LANG 1800 Prerequisite
To be completed alongside the internship or study away experience. The experiential learning component must focus on the same language community as the elective coursework. All prerequisite assignments are made available for asynchronous completion in Canvas.
Capstone Seminar in Intercultural Competence
Language Study: Choose 2 courses taught in the same language and in the language needed for the experiential learning component from the list of electives. Courses listed below represent the minimum level required to fulfill the language requirement. Courses at higher levels must be taught in the target language.2
Second-Year Arabic (and above*)
Intermediate Czech (and above including independent studies*)
Intermediate German I (and above*)
Advanced Spanish II (and above*)
Intermediate Hindi-Urdu (and above*)
Swahili I (and above*)
Beginning Nahuatl (and above*)
Intermediate Polish (and above*)
POBS 0600 Topics in Portuguese-Speaking Cultures (and above*)
Intermediate Persian Language and Culture (and above*)
Intermediate Russian (and above*)
American Sign Language IV (and above*)
Intermediate Turkish (and above*)
Intermediate Vietnamese (and above*)
Introduction to Yoruba II (and above*)
Independent Studies related to language learning. These may be in various languages and students must take two semesters of the same language. Please consult with the CIC Advisor for initial approval.
Area Perspectives Course: Please choose 1 course to deepen your knowledge of one area and/or to bring together your interest in languages with other relevant academic interests. This course can be in any language.1
Sound and Symbols: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
Language and Migration
Indian Issues in Anthropological Perspective
Language and Power
ARAB 0700 and above
Linguistic Variation and Universals
Information Theory in Language
Pragmatics
Learning Compositional Language
Language Processing in Humans and Machines
Logic in Language and Thought
Dimensions of Czech Animation: Contexts, Interpretations, and Dialogs with the East
GRMN 0500 and above
Berlin: Architecture, Politics and Memory
Modern Middle East Roots: 1492 to the Present
'Neither of the East nor West': The Ottoman Empire
America and the Middle East: Histories of Connection and Exchange
Rwanda Past and Present
Iran and the Islamic Revolution
Identity and Languages in Contemporary Africa
Language and Film Discourse in Africa
The Middle East in Berlin: Urban Spaces and Voices
Pathology to Power: Disability, Health and Community
Polish Cinema: Uneven Histories, Uneasy Aesthetics
Early Modern Global History at the John Carter Brown Library: A Research Workshop
Modern Iran: Literature, Media & Pop Culture
Iranian Cinema: Before and After the Islamic Revolution
Russian Culture: From Peter The Great to Putin
Central Europe: An Idea and its Literature
Sociolinguistics (with Case Studies on the Former USSR and Eastern Europe)
Understanding Modern Turkey Through Film and Literature
Istanbul, Global Metropolis
Introductory Ottoman Turkish I
Berlin: Global Metropolis (1945-2020)
Additional courses may count towards the area perspectives requirement, please see the CIC faculty advisor for approval.
Experiential Learning Component
Students are encouraged to consult with the CIC Faculty Advisor to gain approval before the start of the Experiential Learning Component. Students may however gain credit after completion with appropriate approval. Students will need to keep track of time and present documentation from a supervisor of hours completed. Students choose one of the following experiential learning opportunities:
International internships require use of the language students are studying for the language study elective and must include engagement with the community. The internship must be of at least 4 weeks and equal a total of 60 hours.
Study Abroad in a country in which a language other than English is used, must be at a university where courses are offered in the language the student has chosen for their language study elective, must include enrollment in at least one course taught in the language the student has chosen for their elective and must be for a period of one semester or at least 4 weeks in the summer.
Domestic internships require use of and significant exposure to the language the student is studying for their language study elective. Students will intern for one semester or at least 4 weeks in the summer for a minimum of 60 hours.
Total Credits4.5

For a list of languages currently participating in the certificate, please see the CLS Website. Students may not pursue this certificate in the same language as their concentration.