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Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences

Students in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences develop a comprehensive grasp of principles as well as an ability to think critically and creatively. Formal instruction places an emphasis on fundamental principles, processes, and recent developments, using lecture, seminar, laboratory, colloquium, and field trip formats. Undergraduates as well as graduate students have opportunities to carry out research in current fields of interest.

The principal research fields of the department are geochemistry, mineral physics, igneous petrology; geophysics, structural geology, tectonophysics; environmental science, hydrology; paleoceanography, paleoclimatology, sedimentology; and planetary geosciences. Emphasis in these different areas varies, but includes experimental, theoretical, and observational approaches as well as applications to field problems. Field studies of specific problems are encouraged rather than field mapping for its own sake. Interdisciplinary study with other departments and divisions is encouraged.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/earth-environmental-planetary-sciences/

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EEPS 0010. Face of the Earth.

Study of Earth's surface (e.g., mountains, rivers, shorelines) and processes which have created and modify it (e.g., glaciation, floods, volcanism, plate tectonics, earthquakes). The goals are to increase appreciation and enjoyment of our natural surroundings and provide a better understanding of environmental problems, natural resources, land use, and geologic hazards. Four labs, plus a field trip. For nonscience concentrators (science concentrators should take EEPS 0220). Students MUST register for both components of this course (the lecture and one of the labs) during the SAME registration session. Enrollment limited to 100.

Spr EEPS0010 S01 26145 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (S. Parman)
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EEPS 0011. Geology in the Real World: Intersections Between Geology and Society.

Do you know how the Earth and its processes affect you? If you want to learn how geology influences the lives of everyone on Earth, this is the class for you. We will use case studies, like the Tohoku earthquake that displaced 200,000 people, to guide our exploration. Along the way, you will learn to critically evaluate how science is presented in the media. Ten years from now you might not remember how to tell gneiss from schist, but because of this class you should be able to tell your neighbor how geology affects the lives of everyone in the world.

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EEPS 0030. Climate and Climate Change.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the climate system on Earth, changes in Earth's climate over time, and interactions between climate change and human society. Topics will include: global energy balance; the structure, composition and role of the atmosphere and oceans; the influence of the global carbon cycle on climate; the social, economic and political drivers of human perturbations to the carbon cycle; and societal vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity in the face of environmental changes. No prerequisites; course open to all levels.

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EEPS 0050. Mars, Moon, and the Earth.

Space exploration has revealed an astonishing array of surface features on the planets and their satellites. Why are atmospheres on the planets different from Earth's atmosphere? Do other planets represent our past or future environment? Is there life on other planets? The planets and their histories are compared to gain insight and a new perspective on planet Earth.

Fall EEPS0050 S01 17585 MWF 2:00-2:50(01) (J. Mustard)
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EEPS 0070. Introduction to Oceanography.

Examines the ocean's role in Earth's global environment, emphasizing the dynamical interaction of the ocean with the atmosphere, biosphere, cryosphere, and lithosphere. Focus on physical/chemical/biological systems' interconnections needed to understand natural and anthropogenic variability on various time and space scales, from El Niño to global warming. Three lectures, written exercises on oceanographic problems; two field trips to study estuarine and coastal processes.

Fall EEPS0070 S01 17627 MWF 1:00-1:50(08) (S. Clemens)
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EEPS 0160B. Global Change: Ecology and Climate.

Examines ways in which global change will affect ecosystems, considering how temperature, rainfall, and land use can modify the distribution of organisms in the future, and reduce biodiversity. Examine how biotic feedbacks to global change can modify climate change through their effects on the carbon cycle, absorption of sunlight at the land surface, and retention of water in soils. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160C. Global Environmental Change.

Examination of evidence that supports or refutes various perspectives on global environmental change, with a foundation in the principles that govern the fundamental underlying processes. Example topics include climate change (warming, cooling, neutral), population growth (how many, how fast), and loss of natural resources (diversity). Topics explored through selected readings from the natural and social sciences. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160D. Living Within the Landscape.

Physical processes that shape the Earth's surface provide an inescapable context for human activity. We will examine the physical principles that govern erosion and sedimentation, slope stability, river and coastal flooding, and groundwater flow, and analyze how these processes affect land-use philosophies and decision-making. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160E. Volcanos, Windows into the Deep Earth.

Examines the physical and chemical principles controlling the generation of volcanoes and their different styles of eruption. Investigates where and why volcanoes occur, and what volcanic lavas can tell us about the composition and evolution of the Earth and other planets. Evaluates volcanic hazards and their environmental impacts and the economic benefits and cultural aspects of volcanism. Two-day field trip. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160F. Patterns: in Nature, in Society.

The shapes of plants and animals, of mountains and shorelines arise because nature dissapates energy as rapidly as possible. These morphological patterns allow description of the "energy" landscape that produced them. Societies and economies show temporal and spatial patterns as well; does the "flow rate" of ideas and of money cause these patterns? We will explore just how "entropy rules." CAP course. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160G. Energy Resources.

Most of our energy comes directly from the Earth - predominantly as fossil fuels, but also from geothermal, wind, and hydro sources. Developing technologies for alternative energy such as solar, nuclear, biomass and fuel cells also rely on Earth resources. The potential for these energy sources will be discussed. The science behind their utilization and environmental impact (e.g. carbon sequestration and nuclear waste disposal) will be introduced and the trade-offs in making decisions for the future will be explored. CAP course. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160H. Chicken Little or Armageddon? Past and Future Cosmic Threats.

Explore the probability of the next impact on the Earth and assess the possible consequences through historic times (incidents), folklore/legends, examples in recent geological time (last 10 million years), and the catastrophic consequences 65 million years ago. Strategies for searching and possible mitigation of the next "big one" will be considered. This seminar will explore the realities of various predictions, consider public policy, investigate strategies for prevention, and assess the role of the press in shaping perceptions. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160I. Diamonds.

Examines both the science and human history of diamonds, and shows how they have interacted over the years. Investigates how and where diamonds are formed in nature and what they tell us about the Earth. At the same time, explores the role diamonds have played in our history and culture. Enrollment limited to 12 first year students.

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EEPS 0160J. The Natural History of Great Writers: From Goethe to Steinbeck.

Many great and influential writers have also been natural historians. This course examines selections from the writing of such authors as the romantic and naturalist Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the rationalist Benedict de Spinoza, the intuitive thermodynamicist William Blake, the naturalist novelist John Steinbeck, the lepidopterist novelist Vladimir Nabokov, the amateur paleontologist Arthur Conan Doyle, the proto-ecologist Henry David Thoreau, and the philosopher and sociologist Herbert Spencer. We will examine in a modern scientific context how facts and theories of natural history informed their writing and influenced their worldviews. Specific topics in this seminar will include: man’s place in nature and the importance of the discovery of this deep time perspective, Darwinian evolution and its impact on sociology, and the emerging science of ecology in 19th century American literature. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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EEPS 0160L. Apocalypse Now: Fact or Fiction?.

This FYS will focus on major concepts in earth and planetary sciences as depicted through the destruction of Earth and other worlds, both real and fictional, in media. Focus on depictions of apocalypses and assess their feasibility based on lectures, readings, and discussions of the evolution of Earth ,the Solar System, and the Universe. Types of apocalypses covered may include planetary collisions and impacts, disturbance of planetary magnetic fields, alien biological warfare, supernovae, catastrophic climate change, ice ages, lithospheric rifting, and other phenomena. Learning and Teaching Goals • Basic introduction to Solar System and Universe formation and evolution • Basic introduction to earth and planetary sciences, including some simple calculations • Ability to scientifically evaluate depictions of earth and planetary sciences in the media • Understanding of realistic events that could destroy planetary bodies and their host civilizations • Collaboration and team-building skills • Presentation and observation-backed argument skills • Execution and evaluation of good communication

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EEPS 0160M. Natural Disasters.

This First Year Seminar will explore natural disasters: the physical processes that cause them, and their effects on human life. Types of natural disasters covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods. We will explore how and why natural disasters disproportionately affect low-income and minority communities. The focus of the course will be case studies of specific disasters, allowing us to discuss both the science of natural hazards and the vulnerability of human populations to those hazards.

Spr EEPS0160M S01 26604 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (C. Dalton)
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EEPS 0160N. Monsters of the Abyss: Oceanography and Sea Tales.

We will read from the logbooks of Cook, Darwin, Wallace, and Nansen. Their discoveries and expeditions inspired and were inspired by fiction that we will also read, including Moby Dick and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The daring successes and cannibalistic dooms of the Essex, Beagle, Terror, Challenger, and Fram inspired 19th century writers to imagine what lay far across and deep beneath the oceans. These retellings--fictional, narrative, and scientific--helped formulate and fund further research. Who risks their life for a bird, a map, a widow, or an eclipse? How would these scientists and their ideas do today? Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

Fall EEPS0160N S01 17610 TTh 1:00-2:20(06) (B. Fox-Kemper)
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EEPS 0160S. Assembling Rhode Island.

Rhode Island has existed as a state in the U.S. for over 200 years, but the land itself is the product of hundreds of millions of years of rich geologic history. As a participant in this First Year Seminar, you will engage with introductory principles of geology toward an understanding of the tectonic history of Rhode Island as well as the geological processes that presently influence and modify its landscape. The basis of our investigation of Rhode Island geology will come from observations made over a series of afternoon-long field trips to geological points of interest in the state and nearby.

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EEPS 0220. Understanding Earth and Environmental Processes.

How does plate tectonics create mountains, earthquakes and volcanoes? What processes drive climate change? How do humans exacerbate flooding? This course provides an introduction to the processes that shape the Earth’s surface, govern the structure of its interior, cause natural hazards, contribute to climate change and affect the human environment. Topics include interior processes (plate tectonics, mountain building, volcanism, earthquakes, flow of solid rocks), environmental processes (climate change, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, flow of rivers, glaciers, groundwater, water and energy resources), and the connections between them. Lectures are complemented by three labs, informal small-group study sessions, and field trips. Collaborative learning is encouraged. Enrollment is limited to 100.

Fall EEPS0220 S01 17590 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (K. Fischer)
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EEPS 0230. Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes.

This course is an introduction to the formation of minerals and rocks, and the physico-chemical processes acting during planetary evolution. Topics include: Earth formation and differentiation, determination of age and origin of volcanic, crustal and mantle rocks using their elemental compositions and radiogenic and stable isotopes. Weekly laboratory. Intended for science concentrators. Lab times TBD, Prerequisites: no prerequisites

Spr EEPS0230 S01 26146 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (A. Saal)
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EEPS 0240. Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet.

Introduces Earth's surface environment evolution - climate, chemistry, and physical makeup. Uses Earth's carbon cycle to understand solar, tectonic, and biological cycles' interactions. Examines the origin of the sedimentary record, dating of the geological record, chemistry and life on early Earth, and the nature of feedbacks that maintain the "habitable" range on Earth. Two field trips; five laboratories arranged.

Spr EEPS0240 S01 26152 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (T. Herbert)
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EEPS 0250. Computational Approaches to Modelling and Quantitative Analysis in Natural Sciences: An Introduction.

Application of numerical analysis to mathematical modelling in the natural sciences including topics such as ground water and glacier flow, earthquakes, climate models, phase equilibrium, and population dynamics. Numerical methods will include the solution of linear algebraic systems of equations, numerical integration, solution of differential equations, time series analysis, statistical data analysis tools. Development of computer programming skills in the Matlab programming environment. Suggested prerequisites: MATH 0090, 0100; PHYS 0030, 0040, or 0050, 0060.

Fall EEPS0250 S01 17591 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (C. Huber)
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EEPS 0300. Sustainability of Earth Resources.

Fossil fuels are not the only Earth resource we rely on in great quantities. Over 1.5 billion cell phones are made yearly; each using 64 different elements, at least 12 of which are currently irreplaceable. Iron, copper, nickel, rare earth elements, and even sand, are all key components of our modern world that we extract from the Earth. How much are left? How environmentally damaging is it to extract them? Are there alternative extraction methods, or alternative materials? Can they be recycled? What part of your world would you be willing to give up to reduce environmental impacts?

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EEPS 0310. Fossil Record.

Integrated view of the history of life: biogeochemical cycles, biodiversity, evolution by natural selection, ecology, and physiology along a multiplicity of scales from the microbial to the planetary, as recorded in the fossil record. Attention is given to how biotic systems, in contrast to just physical systems, have changed through time maintaining the chemical and thermodynamic non-equilibrium state of the Earth's surface. Two lectures per week; several labs including dissections for paleobiological comparisons and one field trip to fossil localities and museum collections in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Prerequisites: EEPS 0220 or 0230 or 0240, BIOL 0200, or instructor permission.

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EEPS 0350. Mathematical Methods of Fluid.

Intended for undergraduates concentrating in geological and physical sciences or engineering, especially those interested in the quantitative study of Earth. Problem sets will cover common approaches to quantify the dynamics and chemistry of solids and fluids in nature. Mathematical topics to be introduced include linear algebra, vectors and tensors, differential equations, dynamical systems, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, empirical orthogonal functions, fractals, chaos, and statistics. Applications include waves in the oceans, atmosphere, and solid earth, convective and conductive heat flow, reaction rates, gravitational potential energy, Newton’s laws on a rotating planet, measuring coastlines and ranges, and dating errors in stratigraphy.

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EEPS 0580. Foundations of Physical Hydrology.

Qualitative introduction to the dynamics of watersheds and groundwater flow from an intuitive perspective. Lays the foundations for understanding the physical mechanisms by which water is transported throughout a hydrologic system. Provides background for future studies, but is primarily designed to enable informed citizens to thoughtfully critique water management practices and public policy. Pre-college math and physics background is expected.

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EEPS 0810. Planetary Geology.

This introductory level course will examine the evolution of our Solar System and the geology of planetary bodies, including Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. We will discuss the origin of the Solar System from a geological perspective and explore how scientists combine observations from extraterrestrial samples such as meteorites with data returned by satellites and rovers to develop and test hypotheses related to planetary evolution. Emphasis will be on comparing geologic processes on these bodies to well-understood processes on Earth, results from past, current, and upcoming planetary missions, and the future of human and robotic exploration of space.

Spr EEPS0810 S01 26143 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (R. Milliken)
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EEPS 0830. Water in Our World.

This course will focus on understanding natural and societal dimensions of the water cycle. The coming century will see substantial pressure on global water resources owing to increasing human demand, alteration of river systems, and climate change. The first half of the course introduces fundamental concepts in physical hydrological science, and the second explores human modifications and environmental problems associated with a perturbed water cycle. The topical sequence of the class will progress first through different components of the water cycle (e.g. precipitation, evaporation, runoff), followed by different ways in which humans use and depend upon freshwater resources.

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EEPS 0850. Weather and Climate.

Weather phenomena occur on short time scales, and form the basis for understanding climate, the study of changes over longer time scales. This course aims to provide an understanding of the processes that drive weather patterns, the general circulation of the atmosphere, and climate on Earth. Topics include the structure and composition of the atmosphere, sources of energy that drive atmospheric processes, weather forecasting, the hydrological cycle, forces that create severe weather, the influence of humans on the atmosphere, and factors that influence climate, climate variability and climate change. Recommend courses or equivalent: MATH 0090, MATH 0010, PHYS 0050.

Spr EEPS0850 S01 26155 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (M. Hastings)
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EEPS 1110. Descriptive Coastal and Estuarine Oceanography.

An introduction to coastal and estuarine oceanography, focusing on ocean environments landward of the continental shelf/slope break. These environments are of significant value, both environmentally and economically. They are under pressure and strongly impacted by human activities, both directly (e.g. commercial fishing) and indirectly (urbanization within the adjacent river drainage basins). The extent to which these waters continue to be economically valuable is intimately linked to their environmental health. As such, an understanding of coastal and estuarine processes is critical to their management. This course will address the coastal and estuarine circulation context as well as the environmental context. Coastal and estuarine oceanography will be addressed in class lectures, discussions, and exercises while the environmental concerns will be addressed in the context of individual student research projects culminating in a research paper and in-class presentation.

Spr EEPS1110 S01 26156 MWF 1:00-1:50(06) (S. Clemens)
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EEPS 1120. Paleoceanography.

An examination of the Cenozoic history of the world ocean with attention to the processes which have acted to change its circulation, climate, geometry, and biology. Develops a strategy to use marine sediments and microfossils to identify and understand past variations in the oceans. Class projects analyze and interpret various types of paleoceanographic data. Laboratory arranged. Offered alternate years.

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EEPS 1130. Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles.

A quantitative treatment of the cycling of biologically important elements in the world ocean. Special attention paid to the carbon system in the ocean and the role that organisms, in conjunction with ocean circulation, play in regulating the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere through exchange with the surface ocean. For science concentrators. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CHEM 0330 or equivalent, or instructor permission.

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EEPS 1150. Limnology: The Study of Lakes.

This course will provide an interdisciplinary overview of the physics, chemistry, biology, and geology of lakes. Areas of emphasis will include the origin of lake basins, water circulation patterns, heat and water budgets, biogeochemical processes, lake ecosystems, and the stratigraphic record of lakes. We will also discuss human and climatic impacts on lakes. Prerequisites: EEPS 0220 and 0240, or instructor permission. Enrollment limited to 20.

Spr EEPS1150 S01 26153 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (J. Russell)
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EEPS 1240. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation.

Introduction to depositional environments and processes responsible for formation of sedimentary rocks. Major sedimentary environments in the Recent are discussed, general models are proposed, and stratigraphic sequences in older sediments are examined in the light of these models. The Phanerozoic stratigraphic record is examined from the perspective of Earth system history. Laboratory arranged. Prerequisites: EEPS 0220 or 0240, or instructor permission.

Fall EEPS1240 S01 17623 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (J. Russell)
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EEPS 1310. Global Water Cycle.

The goal of this class is to understand the physical principles and processes of the global water cycle. Topics include the climatic importance of water, circulation of atmospheric water vapor, formation of rain and snow, availability of soil water, plant-water relations, mass balance of glaciers, and ongoing and expected changes in the water cycle. Additional goals: become familiar with the current research literature, practice clear and concise science writing, and to use simple programming in Python to plot and analyze actual data sets.

Students are expected to have taken at least one geology-related course. Programming experience recommended, but not necessary.

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EEPS 1320. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications.

An introduction to basic geographic information system (GIS) concepts, and the utilization and application of geospatial data for analysis. Topics will include data structures and management, coordinate systems and projections, data creation, obtaining spatial data from outside sources, georeferencing and address-matching, model building and batch geoprocessing, and performing fundamental spatial analysis techniques such as overlay, extraction, and interpolation, viewsheds, and hot spot analysis among others. Concepts are presented via online videos (Canvas) and put into practice through weekly hands-on laboratory exercises utilizing the GIS software product ArcGIS 10.x and ArcGIS Pro (ESRI, Inc.). Two presentations by each student are required - a case study, and an original research project employing the methods learned. A public poster session on the original research project culminates the term. If unable to pre-register, a wait list will be used to fill openings on a first come, first serve basis. S/NC.

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EEPS 1330. Global Environmental Remote Sensing.

Introduction to physical principles of remote sensing across electromagnetic spectrum and application to the study of Earth's systems (oceans, atmosphere, and land). Topics: interaction of light with materials, imaging principles and interpretation, methods of data analysis. Laboratory work in digital image analysis, classification, and multi-temporal studies. One field trip to Block Island. Recommended preparation courses: MATH 0090, 0100; PHYS 0060; and background courses in natural sciences.

Spr EEPS1330 S01 26144 MWF 2:00-2:50(07) (J. Mustard)
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EEPS 1370. Environmental Geochemistry.

The course will examine the biogeochemical cycling, fate and transport of chemicals in the atmospheric and aquatic environments. Topics such as chemical weathering, natural water pollution and remediation, acid deposition, global warming and air pollution will be examined through natural ecosystem examples from rivers, lakes, estuaries, and ocean. Field trips and laboratory arranged. Prerequisites: CHEM 0100 or 0330, or instructor permission.

Fall EEPS1370 S01 17624 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (Y. Huang)
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EEPS 1380. Environmental Stable Isotopes.

Introduction to the concepts, analytical methods, theory and environmental applications of stable H, O, C, N and S isotopes. Emphasis will be placed on theory and applications of light isotopes in paleoclimate studies, environmental hydrogeology and biogeochemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 0100, EEPS 0220 or 0230 recommended, or instructor permission.

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EEPS 1390. Planetary Surface Processes.

This course is designed to introduce students a variety of physical and chemical processes that shape and sculpt the surfaces of solid planetary bodies (asteroid, comets, moons, & terrestrial planets). We will learn the ways mountains can form and how their topography is supported (Is Venus’ 11 km high Maxwell Montes the result of a rising mantle plume? among other questions). This course will cover the processes of faulting, tectonics, volcanism, impact cratering, landslides, and weathering from wind, and water. These processes will be explored from a physical quantitative perspective.

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EEPS 1410. Mineralogy.

Introduction to mineralogical processes on Earth and the terrestrial planets. Topics include: crystallography; crystal chemistry; fundamentals of mineralogical thermodynamics and kinetics; mineral defects and their dynamics; physicochemical properties of minerals and magmas. Laboratory study devoted to analytical techniques for minerals/materials analysis: X-ray and electron diffraction; reflectance spectrometry; transmitted optical microscopy; electron microscopy; X-ray spectrometry. In addition to Earth scientists, the course should be of interest to chemical/materials engineering and chemistry concentrators. Prerequisites: EEPS 0230, CHEM 0100 or 0330 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

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EEPS 1420. Petrology.

Introduction to the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. Topics include: physical properties of magma, thermodynamics and phase equilibria, igneous rocks and their classification, magmatic processes, trace elements and isotopes, basalts and layered intrusions, survey of lunar and planetary petrology. Prerequisites: EEPS 1410, or instructor permission.

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EEPS 1430. Principles of Planetary Climate.

This course provides the physical building blocks for understanding planetary climate. Topics include thermodynamics applied to planetary atmosphere, basic radiative transfer, energy balance in the atmosphere, and climate variability. In-class exercises and homework problems are designed to strengthen the understanding of basic concepts and to improve problem-solving skills.

Fall EEPS1430 S01 17625 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (J. Lee)
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EEPS 1450. Structural Geology.

Introduction to the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of rocks deformed by brittle fracture or faulting and ductile solid state flow, on scales from microscopic to mountain ranges. The emphasis is on using concepts to interpret the formation, strain history and rheology of deformed rocks in terms of the operative grain-scale processes, material properties and environmental conditions. Weekly 2 hour lab involving hands-on experience closely related to class topics. Two field trips. Prerequisites: EEPS 0220 or instructor permission.

Spr EEPS1450 S01 26150 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (G. Hirth)
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EEPS 1510. Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics.

The objective of EEPS 1510 is to understand the fundamental physical principles that govern the motion of the atmosphere. Students will explore the dynamics of the atmosphere and the mathematical laws governing weather and climate. Topics include the fundamental equations of motion in rotating fluids, hydrostatic, geostrophic and thermal wind balance, and vorticity, as applied to phenomena, including sea breezes, planetary waves, midlatitude cyclones, fronts, and the global general circulation. The emphasis will be on physical interpretation of the equations but facility with vector calculus is critical. Enrollment limited to 30.

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EEPS 1520. Ocean Circulation and Climate.

Examines physical characteristics, processes, and dynamics of the global ocean to understand circulation patterns and how they relate to ocean biology, chemistry, climate change. Assignments address ocean's role in the climate system; ocean observations and models; the origin, distribution, and dynamics of large-scale ocean circulation and water masses; energy and freshwater budgets; and variability of the coupled system on seasonal to centennial timescales e.g. El Niño. Intended for geological and physical sciences undergraduate and graduate students with quantitative skills and an interest in oceans, climate, paleoclimate. Pre-requisites: EEPS 0250, EEPS 0350, PHYS 0720, or APMA 0180. Offered alternate years.

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EEPS 1560. Global Tectonics.

Plate tectonic theory and the evolution of continents and the seafloor. Emphasis on the structure and tectonics of western U.S. considering geological, geophysical, and geochemical constraints as well as direct geodetic observations of plate motions from GPS measurements. Prerequisite: EEPS 0220 and 0230. Three or more of EEPS 0220, 0230, 1240, 1410, 1420, 1450 and 1610 are recommended.

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EEPS 1580. Quantitative Elements of Physical Hydrology.

Physical hydrology with emphasis on fundamental physical principles and mathematical tools. Topics include precipitation, surface runoff, groundwater flow, water quality and contaminate transport. Prerequisites: APMA 0340; and ENGN 0510 or PHYS 0470; ENGN 0810 is recommended; or instructor permission.

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EEPS 1590. Quantitative Modeling of Hydrologic Processes.

A quantitative overview of selected topics at the advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate student level of analytical and numerical models for simulating surface runoff, groundwater flow and contaminant migration. While participants will employ computers and scientific visualization to implement the material, no prior computing experience is expected. Non-concentrators encouraged. No exams. Prerequisites: PHYS 0470, or ENGN 0510.

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EEPS 1590A. Quantitative Modeling of Hydrologic Processes.

A quantitative overview of selected topics at the advanced undergraduate, beginning graduate student level of analytical and numerical models for simulating surface runoff, groundwater flow and contaminant migration. While participants will employ computers and scientific visualization to implement the material, no prior computing experience is expected. Non-concentrators encouraged. No exams. Prerequisites: PHYS 0070, or ENGN 0510.

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EEPS 1600. Environmental and Engineering Geophysics.

A hands-on introduction to non-invasive geophysical methods applied to subsurface investigations of soil and bedrock conditions, groundwater, geotechnical engineering, forensics, archaeology and other environmental applications. Students will use ground penetrating radar, seismic, gravity resistivity, electromagnetic and magnetic methods in the field one afternoon a week to investigate relevant environmental and geotechnical problems. A background in geology is not expected. Prerequisites: APMA 0340 and PHYS 0470, or ENGN 0510, or instructor permission.

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EEPS 1610. Solid Earth Geophysics.

A survey of basic geophysical techniques for determining the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior. Topics include: global structure from seismic waves; gravity, magnetic field, and shape of the Earth; thermal processes within the Earth; structure of continental and oceanic lithosphere. Recommended courses: EEPS 0220, PHYS 0470, APMA 0330. No prerequisites.

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EEPS 1615. Making Connections: The Environmental Policy Process.

The diminishing quality of Earth’s systems and resources carries profound implications for the fulfillment of human rights and aspirations. But even as Western knowledge systems understand better the intrinsic interdependencies between humans and the non-human, policy gridlock persists. Indeed, scientific findings are regularly contested on political grounds. The purpose of this course is to learn how to apply diverse knowledges from Indigenous to Modern to map the relevant policy in problems at the intersection of human rights and environmental integrity, and to develop approaches to address them in ways that are creative, effective, responsible and just. Students are admitted in the following order: capstone fulfillment, core requirements, EEPS or ENVS concentrator, and others, in the order received in each category.

Fall EEPS1615 S01 17626 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (A. Lynch)
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EEPS 1620. Continuum Physics of the Solid Earth.

Physics of the Earth with emphasis on fundamental physical principles and mathematical tools. Topics include application of: conductive and convective heat transfer to cooling of the Earth; potential theory to interpretation of gravity anomalies; solid mechanics to deformation of Earth's lithosphere; fluid mechanics to flow in the Earth's interior and in porous media. Recommended courses: EEPS 0220; APMA 0340; PHYS 0470 or ENGN 0510.

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EEPS 1650. Earthquake Seismology.

This course is an introduction to seismology that focuses on the seismic waves generated by earthquakes, and how the information contained in these waves can be used to understand earthquake processes and the structure of the Earth. We will discuss applications of seismology that address earthquake hazards and other societal issues. Recommended courses: EEPS 1610; or EEPS 0220 and experience with differential equations; or the equivalent. Offered in alternate years.

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EEPS 1690. Introduction to Methods in Data Analysis.

This class will be an overview of different ways one can quantitatively analyze data. Topics will include linear regression, least squares inversion, principal component analysis, and Bayesian methods. Emphasis will be on both a theoretical understanding of these methods and on practical applications to geophysical and earth science problems. Exercises will include using MATLAB to analyze data.

Fall EEPS1690 S01 18177 TTh 1:00-2:20(06) (V. Tsai)
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EEPS 1710. Remote Sensing of Earth and Planetary Surfaces.

Geologic applications of remotely sensed information derived from interaction of electromagnetic radiation (X-ray, gamma-ray, visible, near-IR, mid-IR, radar) with geologic materials. Applications emphasize remote geochemical analyses for both terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. Several spectroscopy and image processing labs. EEPS 1410 (Mineralogy), PHYS 0060, or equivalent recommended.

Fall EEPS1710 S01 17583 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (R. Milliken)
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EEPS 1730. Isotope Geochemistry.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to radiogenic and stable isotope geochemistry. Beginning with a brief overview of nuclear physics and nucleosynthesis, it then reviews radioactive decay schemes including and their use in geochronology. Subsequent classes cover nucleosynthetic anomalies in meteorites and early solar system chronology and the use of radiogenic isotopes (including Uranium-series) in understanding the evolution of the Earth’s mantle, crust, and oceans. Attention then turns to stable isotopes reviewing the basic principles involved in controlling stable isotopes during both equilibrium and kinetic fractionation, followed by their application on diverse topics but particularly on climate evolution. Finally, the course explores recent developments including unconventional stable isotopes, mass-independent fractionation, isotopic ‘clumping’, noble gasses isotopes and their applications.

Fall EEPS1730 S01 18176 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (A. Saal)
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EEPS 1745. Planetary System Design: A Team Project Course.

Introduction to the research process for planetary systems. This upper-level undergraduate course includes a lecture phase that covers an overview of planetary science, the research project(s) to be pursued, problem-solving, scientific writing, communications, and diversity and bias in the field of planetary science. Subsequently, students experience the latest practices in planetary research by forming sub-project teams and collectively designing and planning a research project. Effective team and communication skills are emphasized. Scientific writing and presentations are required throughout, culminating in the final paper and public presentation. This course has been submitted for special designations in writing (WRIT), race, gender, and inequality (DIAP), and collaborative research & scholarly experiences (COEX). The following courses are recommended (and/or permission of the Professor): MATH 0090, MATH 0100; PHYS 0030, PHYS 0040 or PHYS 0050, PHYS 0060 or PHYS 0070; and, EEPS 0250, EEPS 0220,EEPS 1610, EEPS 1810, or EEPS 1950H.

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EEPS 1810. Physics of Planetary Evolution.

The course will explore and expose students to the fundamental physics necessary to understand how planetary bodies evolve. The evolution of planetary bodies will be discussed on the basis of geological and geophysical evidence derived from exploration of the Solar System. This course will study the physical processes responsible for and that occur as a consequence of differentiation and deformation of planetary bodies. Includes the study of physical processes responsible for volcanism and deformation on the surface as well as the state and structure of the interior of planets.

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EEPS 1820. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Rotating, Stratified Turbulence Edition.

Explores theories of the large-scale ocean and atmosphere, including quasigeostrophic, planetary geostrophic, and shallow water equations. Topics will vary to focus on features of the general circulation and climate system (e.g. thermocline, westward intensification, jet stream dynamics, polar vortex, meridional overturning circulations), instabilities and waves (e.g. gravity, Rossby, and Kelvin), or rotating stratified turbulence. May be repeated with permission of instructor. Pre-requisites: EEPS 0350 or PHYS 0720 or APMA 0340 and EEPS 1510 or EEPS 1520.

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EEPS 1950B. Atmospheric Chemistry.

Earth’s atmosphere touches everything on the surface of our planet has evolved, from the first signs of life on land and in the oceans to today’s This seminar course will provide students with an understanding of the chemical and physical processes that determine the composition of the atmosphere and its implications for climate, ecosystems, and human welfare. Topics to be covered include basic measures of the atmosphere; photolysis and reaction kinetics; atmospheric transport of trace species; stratospheric ozone chemistry; tropospheric hydrocarbon chemistry; oxidizing power and nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and carbon cycles; chemistry-climate-biosphere interactions; aerosols, smog, and acid rain.

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EEPS 1950C. Planetary Materials.

A comparative planetology course that examines the origin and evolution of materials on the Earth, Moon, and Mars through sample analyses, spacecraft observations, and modeling approaches. Recommended courses: EEPS 1410, 1420. No prerequisites.

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EEPS 1950D. Field and Tectonics Seminar.

Development of field mapping and interpretive skills used in the evolution of complex orogenic terranes. Structural field mapping is carried out in highly deformed metamorphic and igneous rocks in the New England Appalachians, the site of a continental collision associated with the formation of the supercontinent Pangea. Expected: EEPS 0230 and EEPS 1450, or equivalent, and field mapping experience (generally a summer geological mapping course). Students are required to arrive one week prior to the start of classes for the beginning of field work. Instructor permission required.

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EEPS 1950F. Geomicrobiology.

Microbes were the predominant form of life for most of Earth's history and continue to drive many of the elemental cycles that sustain life in our contemporary biosphere. By taking this course students will learn about the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of microbes in the environment and their influence on global biogeochemical cycles. Students will gain hands-on experience with molecular and environmental microbiological techniques and the bioinformatics tools required to analyze and interpret the resulting data. There are 2 sections or topical areas: Phylogenetic and ecological diversity of microbes; Microbial and metabolic diversity of biogeochemical cycling. Prerequisite: BIOL 0415 or 1460 or 1480 or EEPS 1130. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required.

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EEPS 1950G. Astrophysical and Dynamical Processes in Planetary Sciences.

Astrophysical and Dynamical Processes in Planetary Sciences is a course that challenges students to use physical and geophysical analysis to construct a quantitative understanding of the formation and evolution of the Sun, the solar system’s planets and small bodies, and extrasolar planets. The goal is to provide senior undergraduate and first-year graduate students with core knowledge of facts and current theories in the planetary sciences. Through lectures, problem sets, and exams, the students will construct quantitative framework on which to evaluate, and place into context, hypotheses and theories discussed in upper-level graduate courses. Prerequisites: MATH 0100; and one of EEPS 0050, PHYS 0210, 0220, or 0270. APMA 0330 is desirable but not required.

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EEPS 1960A. Earthquakes and the Rheology of the Crust and Mantle.

Introduces the principles of rock mechanics and uses them to describe brittle and ductile deformation processes in the crust and mantle and their consequences for earthquakes. Focus will be on the primary literature and discussion of these papers. Each topic will review observed field and experimental constraints on deformation mechanisms and introduce the theories that support their application to geological conditions and specifically to earthquakes. Analysis of microstructural observations in real rocks will link what is learned in the lab to what actually is seen in the Earth. Topics to be covered include: brittle fracture and crack propagation, frictional sliding, the brittle/plastic transition, viscous deformation mechanisms, microstructural analysis of deformed rocks, and the scaling and extrapolation of laboratory flow laws. The class will also feature a field trip to well-exposed crustal faults and shear zones. A class project will focus on microstructural observations of rocks collected during the field trip.

Spr EEPS1960A S01 26530 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (V. Tsai)
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EEPS 1960B. Special Topics in Geological Sciences: Physical Hydrology.

Physical Hydrology is the description of processes that involve the transport of aqueous fluids in the subsurface of the Planets. We will learn about the principle that govern the motion of these fluids and the common approaches to describe their dynamics in terms of governing equations. The goal of the course is to be introduced to flows in porous media, as well as transport of heat, chemical species and multiphase flows (unsaturated aquifers). We will discuss applications from geothermal energy extraction, CO2 geological sequestration strategies and reactive transport, such as those encountered for pollutant remediation and sediment diagenesis.

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EEPS 1960D. Machine Learning for the Earth and Environment.

This course introduces science students to modern data science tools for exploratory data analysis, predictive modeling with machine learning, and scalable algorithms for big data. Familiarize students with a cross-section of common machine learning models and algorithms emphasizing developing practical skills for working with data. Topics covered may include dimensionality reduction, clustering, time series modeling, linear regression, regularization, linear classifiers, ensemble methods, neural networks, model selection and evaluation, scalable algorithms for big data, and data ethics. The course will present case studies of these tools applied to problems in the Earth sciences. Intended audience is advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences or other physical science disciplines. Students will practice and develop their skills in data science through a hands-on project on a topic of their choice. This course is taught using the Python programming language.

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EEPS 1960F. Patterns in Nature, in Society.

The shapes of plants and animals, of mountains and shorelines arise because nature dissipates energy as rapidly as possible. These morphological patterns allow description of the energy "landscape" that produced them. Societies and economies show temporal and spatial patterns as well: does the "flow rate" of ideas and of money cause these patterns? These societal patterns are statistically identical to the natural (i.e., non-human) ones. Does this fact challenge ideas of free will? Does it affect one’s development of a personal philosophy? From a perspective grounded in natural philosophy, we will explore just how "entropy rules.” Enrollment limited to 16. Instructor permission required.

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EEPS 1960G. Earth Science Curriculum Design and Teaching Practicum for Elementary School.

This course is a practical introduction to Earth Sciences curriculum design and teaching with a strong “learning by teaching” component. Students will learn about the principles and best practices of science education and communication and will teach a theme-driven ten-lesson Earth Science module previously designed by DEEPS students in collaboration with participating teachers from Providence Public Schools in two elementary public schools. After each lesson students will receive feedback and will analyze and discuss their teaching process during class meetings. In the second part of the course students will apply the experience they gained to design a new module outline.

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EEPS 1960H. The Early Earth.

Primary focus on evolution of the solid Earth (core, mantle, crust) but will also include discussion of the Archean hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Reading and discussing current literature, with lectures. Intended for graduate students and upper level undergraduates with advanced petrology and/or geophysics. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EEPS 1960J. Reactions and Rheology: Chemical and Mechanical Kinetics in Mineral Systems.

Characterization of atomic diffusion and dislocation motion responsible for chemical and physical reactions and plastic rheology in ionic solids. Topics include: point-defect thermodynamics; atomic diffusion (physical and mathematical); solid-solution formation; solid-state compound formation; dislocation structures; grain boundary structure and chemical segregation; plastic rheology. Recommended three or more of EEPS 1410, EEPS 1420, or EEPS 0410, ENGN 1410, or CHEM 0330, CHEM 1060. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EEPS 1960K. Carbon Cycle Seminar.

Consideration of quantitative models of the cycling of carbon between various reservoirs near Earth's surface. Topics include: mass balance models of carbon sedimentation; carbon chemistry in the ocean; exchange of carbon between atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere; and consumption of carbon in weathering reactions with rocks. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of isotopic tracers (d13C, 14C) to estimate present and past dynamics of the carbon cycle. Instructor's permission required. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EEPS 1960L. Foundational Readings in the Earth Sciences.

This class focuses on the reading and discussion of a number of foundational and highly influential papers in the Earth sciences. Topics of papers will cover all aspects of Earth science, including the age of the Earth, plate tectonics, the discovery of planets, climate change, and chaos. The focus of writing assignments and discussion will be on gaining an appreciation for what sets these contributions apart from other science of that time and will include brief discussions about why the authors of the papers are not representative of a diverse world population. Specific Learning Goals: (A) Improving critical thinking and evaluation of groundbreaking ideas; (B) Understanding the scientific context in which breakthroughs are made; (C) Improving communication (written and oral); (D) Understanding the changing diversity of scientists in historical context.

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EEPS 1960M. Lab and Field Methods in Hydrology.

A series of hands-on opportunitites for students to characterize the hydrologic properties of soils and simple hydrologic systems in the lab, combined with selected outdoor exercises using standard hydrologic tools in the field. High school math and physics recommended. Enrollment limited to 20.

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EEPS 1960X. Ocean, Cryosphere, and Sea Level Change.

Or IPCC and you can, too! Interested in finding out how big climate science gets done? This graduate and undergraduate reading and writing seminar will emphasize study of the breakthrough science that has been published in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Reports. Focus will be on the physical science basis: past and future changes in the overall earth system, ocean circulation and properties, ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice, and sea level; evaluation of models and projection methods; detection and attribution; projections; abrupt change and long-term commitment; and extremes. Pre-requisite: any of EEPS 0850, EEPS 1430, EEPS 1510, EEPS 1520, EEPS 1820, or permission of instructor.

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EEPS 1960Z. Physical Volcanology.

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EEPS 1970. Individual Study of Geologic Problems.

One semester is required for seniors in Sc.B. and honors program. Course work includes preparation of a thesis. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates only.

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EEPS 2300. Mathematical and Computational Earth Sciences.

For graduate students interested in quantitative study of the Earth in geological, physical, or engineering sciences. Mathematical topics to be introduced include tensor analysis, asymptotic and per turbation analysis of differential equations, numerical integration of differential equations, basis functions and pattern recognition, fractals and multifractals, and statistics. Applications will vary by offering, but examples include: statistics of turbulence and earthquakes, advection-reaction-diffusion systems, boundary layers, development of shocks and singularities, climate change, carbon sensitivity, and dimensional reduction of geophysical data. Intensive review of introductory mathematical methods through leading discussions in a lower level class. Earth, fluid, or solid science background recommended.

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EEPS 2330. Advanced Remote Sensing.

Strategies and the physical principles behind the quantitative extraction of geophysical and biophysical properties from remotely sensed data. Emphasis on radiative transfer theory and modeling of spectra and spectral mixtures from optical constants. Advanced methods of digital image processing. Methods of integrating remotely sensed data into a GIS framework will be introduced. Recommended preparation course: EEPS 1330 or 1710; MATH 0100; PHYS 0600.

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EEPS 2350. Quaternary Climatology Seminar.

Discussion of current problems in paleoclimatology and global climate change. Students analyze the primary literature, and do original analyses of their own on published data. Topics include: theories of ice ages, millennial-scale climate variability, the influence of greenhouse gases and radiative forcing on climate, and historical and future climate changes. Prerequisites: graduate student status; or EEPS 0240 and 1240; or instructor permission.

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EEPS 2410. Kinetics of Geochemical Processes.

Emphasizes kinetic theories and their geological applications. Topics include: rate laws of chemical reaction, rates of chemical weathering; fundamentals of diffusion, nucleation, crystal growth, and dissolution; transport theory. Recommended prerequisite: EEPS 2460 or equivalent.

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EEPS 2430. Igneous Petrology.

Study of mineral equilibria in igneous rocks in relation to theoretical and experimental studies in silicate systems. Principles of the origin and evolution of igneous rocks in space and time. Offered alternate years.

Fall EEPS2430 S01 17586 TTh 10:00-11:20 (S. Parman)
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EEPS 2440. Petrogenesis Metamorphic Rocks.

Study of metamorphic rocks with emphasis on mineral equilibria, metamorphic facies, and metamorphic facies series. Topics include: metasomatism, mobile components, partial anatexis, and petrogenetic grids. Prerequisite: EEPS 2460. Offered alternate years.

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EEPS 2450. Exchange Scholar Program.

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EEPS 2460. Phase Equilibria.

Principles of thermodynamics and phase equilibria in unary, binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems using analytical and graphical methods. Other topics include: solution theory, equations of state, and thermodynamics of surfaces.

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EEPS 2520. Numerical Geodynamics.

Numerical methods for the solution of continuum physics problems arising in geophysics and geology: Basic theoretical formulations and algorithms implementing finite element, finite difference, and boundary element methods are developed. Applications include problems in viscous and plastic flow, elasticity, and heat and mass transport discussed within a geological framework. Course consists of lectures and a computer project applying the methods and concepts considered to a scientifically significant problem. Recommended: APMA 0330, 0340; ENGN 1750. Offered alternate years.

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EEPS 2630. Interpretation Theory in Geophysics.

Use basic statistical theory and its matrix algebra representation and modern approaches for the optimum design of experiments, constructing model solutions to measurements, and describing nonuniqueness in models, with particular emphasis on generalized linear-inverse techniques. Introduction to stochastic processes and prediction. Recommended courses: EEPS 1610; MATH 0290, 0520, or APMA 0330, 0340, and computer programming skills. Offered alternate years.

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EEPS 2650. Advanced Seismology.

The theory of modern seismology will be applied to imaging of Earth structure (from local to global scales) and determination of earthquake source models. Topics include elastic wave propagation, representation theorems, seismic tomography, moment tensors, source-time functions, and models of fault rupture. Offered alternate years.

Fall EEPS2650 S01 18410 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (C. Dalton)
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EEPS 2730. Isotope Geochemistry.

A survey course emphasizing fundamental principles in isotope geochemistry, including nuclear systematics, nucleosynthesis, geochronological and stable isotope systems, and the application of radiogenic and stable isotopic tracers to geological problems.

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EEPS 2800. The Chemistry and Mineralogy of Mars.

Examination of the chemical and mineralogical composition of Mars as revealed from meteorites and spacecraft missions. Example topics include: SNC meteorites, origin and evolution of the crust, alteration processes, remote near- and thermal-infrared observations, remote gamma-ray and neutron measurements, and petrology of surface materials. Recommended courses: EEPS 1410, 1420, 1710, or equivalent. No prerequisites.

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EEPS 2810. Planetary Science Seminar.

New data for the Moon and Mercury from recent missions (including Chanrayaan-1, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, GRAIL and MESSENGER) permit new insights into “The Crater to Basin Transition on the Moon and Mercury”. In this seminar course we will examine this transition using these new data and recent developments in cratering theory and modeling. The course will feature research from the NASA SSERVI activity. Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

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EEPS 2840. Asteroids and Meteorites.

Compositional and petrographic characteristics of meteorites are examined along with the physical and compositional diversity of asteroids and other small bodies of the solar system. Possible links between specific types of asteroids and meteorite groups will be evaluated in the context of early solar system evolution. Data from spacecraft encounters with asteroids will be critically reviewed.

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EEPS 2850. Regolith Processes.

Particulate material (regoliths) and soils develop on every planetary surface. Physical and chemical alteration of the uppermost surface results from interwoven active processes of specific environments. Understanding these processes and products is central to interpreting data returned from planetary surfaces. Regoliths reflect surface history over a variety of time scales. Several planetary environments are examined in detail. Prerequisites: EEPS 1410, 1710, 2880, or instructor permission.

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EEPS 2860. Planetary Volcanology.

An examination of volcanism using observations of features and deposits on planetary bodies, comparing them to predictions from the theory of magma ascent and emplacement. Attention to the influence of different variables (e.g. gravity, composition, temperature, pressure, and atmospheric effects). The history of planetary volcanism, its relation to thermal evolution, and comparative planetary volcanology are also addressed. Offered alternate years.

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EEPS 2870. Planetary Evolution – Origin/Evolution of the Moon: Touchstone for Understanding Planets.

The Moon forms a fundamental baseline for our understanding of the origin of planets and their early evolution, in terms of primary and secondary crustal formation, core and mantle formation and evolution, magnetism, impact basins, and global tectonics. A major goal of this course is to identify major outstanding questions and scientific and exploration goals for future robotic and human exploration missions to the Moon. Sponsored by NASA SSERVI, the lecture series is jointly organized by SSERVI teams at Brown University and the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston with many affiliated SSERVI institutes participating.

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EEPS 2880. Planetary Cratering.

Impact cratering is arguably the most pervasive geologic process in the solar system. This course will study the physical process of impact cratering and its place in planetary science. The course will take a process oriented approach to understanding impact cratering with firm foundations in geologic observation and impact experiments. To explore the extreme process of impact cratering, we will use continuum/rock mechanics, thermodynamics, numerical modeling, experiments, and observations. Principal topics will include the formation of craters from contact of the projectile to final crater morphology; shock metamorphism; impact ejecta and products; cratered terrains; impacts and planetary evolution; and impact hazards.

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EEPS 2910A. Problems in Antarctic Dry Valley Geoscience.

The Antarctic Dry Valleys represent an extreme hyperarid polar desert environment. Their geomorphology records the range of processes operating in these environments, preserving a record of climate change of millions of years. Major microenvironments are studied at the micro-, meso-, and macro-scale through literature review, field analyses, and research projects. Exobiological themes and climate change on Mars will be assessed.

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EEPS 2910B. Advanced Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS).

Strategies and the physical principles behind the quantitative extraction of geophysical and biophysical measurements from remotely sensed data. Advanced methods of digital image processing and data integration. Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and methods of integrating remotely sensed data into a GIS framework. Prerequisites: EEPS 1330 or 1710; MATH 0100; PHYS 0060; or permission of the instructor.

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EEPS 2910C. The Global Nitrogen Cycle.

This seminar course will survey the literature and discuss aspects of the marine, atmosphere, biosphere and geologic cycles of reactive nitrogen. Topics include general evaluation of the N cycle in these systems and records of changes in the N cycle through time, particularly on relevant climate change timescales.

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EEPS 2910E. Miocene: Prelude to the Ice Ages and Analogue to Future Climate Change.

The Miocene Epoch (~23 to 5 Ma) was characterized by a variety of interconnected changes including the tectonic evolution of various ocean gateways, changes in surface and deep-ocean circulation patterns and evolving ocean and atmospheric chemistry. In the Middle Miocene, these conditions resulted in reduced pole-to-equator temperature gradients and global mean annual surface temperatures of ~18°C, equivalent to warming predicted for the next century. These evolving conditions in the Late Miocene set the stage for the initiation of high amplitude northern hemisphere glacial cycles. Study of Miocene climate will yield insight into mechanisms relevant to past and future climate change.

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EEPS 2910F. Earthquake Mechanics, Rheology and Rock Friction.

Reading current literature, class discussion, lectures to explore current research in fault mechanics and rheology. Time in the lab examining microstructures in both experimental and natural samples. Topics will include: (1) Deformation mechanisms associated with slow slip and tremor; (2) Grain-size evolution processes and their geophysical implications; (3) Grain-size sensitive deformation processes and their geophysical implications. Prior to each class, students will submit (via email) at least 2 questions about the assigned reading. After class, there will be 3 or 4 questions to answer on topics covered in the reading and during class discussion.

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EEPS 2910G. Dynamics of Ice Sheets and Glaciers.

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EEPS 2910H. Geophysical Phenomena Across the Solar System.

This graduate level course will survey the current state of knowledge for geophysical processes and mechanisms related to the formation and evolution of terrestrial bodies within the inner Solar System and will incorporate case study investigations of outer Solar System worlds (excluding gas giants). The course will apply fundamental science concepts in physics and chemistry to examine key topics within planetary geophysics, including planet-wide magma oceans, planetary collisions and impacts, volcanism, tectonics, and magnetism. Course is formatted to allow for lecture content and presentation and discussion of relevant themes and concepts. No prior background in the geological sciences is required.

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EEPS 2910I. Marine Geophysical Techniques.

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EEPS 2910J. Early Evolution of the Solar System.

The so-called NC-CC dichotomy describes the fundamental difference in the genetic make-up of inner (‘non-carbonaceous’) and outer (‘carbonaceous’) Solar System materials, and is one of the most influential discoveries in modern cosmochemistry. In this seminar, we will follow a series of scientific studies that ultimately led to its full recognition and use recent publications to discuss how it revolutionized our understanding of the early evolution of the Solar System. This includes diverse topics such as (i) the origin, processing, and transport of material in the protoplanetary disk, (ii) the timescales and processes of planetesimal/planet formation and migration, as well as (iii) the nature of Earth’s building blocks and origin of its habitability. No prior courses required; basic knowledge of cosmochemistry and isotope geochemistry is recommended. Intended for graduate students, but upper-level undergraduates may register with permission of the instructor.

Fall EEPS2910J S01 18280 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (G. Budde)
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EEPS 2910L. Planetary Crusts.

What are planetary crusts? How do they form? What mineralogic, petrologic, and structural characteristics are shared among the terrestrial planets, moons and asteroids and what are unique to a single body? We will examine the characteristics of crusts of the terrestrial planets, the Moon, Vesta, Ceres and several satellites of the giant planets. We will explore questions such as when and how do planets and moons develop primary crusts? How have they been characterized (samples, remote sensing, geophysics and in-situ)? What are the major processes that affect planetary crusts and their formation,? We will consider data from spacecraft missions like MESSENGER to Mercury, orbiter and lander for data from Mars, and the Dawn mission to Vesta and Ceres, as well as a host of other missions to bodies across the solar system.

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EEPS 2910M. The Changing Arctic.

What is the fate of the Arctic and high latitude regions in a warming world? This course explores how the Arctic is changing and its implications to the physical, natural, and social systems. This class will provide a comprehensive overview of the Arctic and synthesize the latest scientific findings from an array of readings/reports. Topics covered will include changes in: snow, freshwater, ice, permafrost, sea level rise, shipping routes, Arctic policy and governance, and identify how these changes are impacting Arctic-dwelling communities and adaptation strategies available. Instructor override required. Email samiah_moustafa@brown.edu with a statement of interest, year and concentration.

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EEPS 2910P. Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to our current understanding of how planetary systems form and evolve. We will focus on the physical theories describing how the structures of planetary systems develop and how planets, moons, and other heavenly bodies form. We will also consider the relationship between these theories and observations (astronomical, geophysical, cosmochemical) of the Solar System and extrasolar planetary systems. This will include some discussion how the Solar System fits into our understanding of the veritable menagerie of planetary systems.

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EEPS 2910W. The Ice Ages: How We Got Here.

This seminar-style course will examine how the earth's climate evolved from a mild late Miocene and Pliocene when Greenland really was green, into a state with repeated glaciations of the northern hemisphere. These ice ages have sculpted mountain ranges, beveled much of the land surface, shaped our coastlines and produced crustal deformations that continue to the present day. Major theories that offer explanations of this evolution will be supplemented by detailed consideration of relevant data sets. Technical approaches such as time series analysis will be developed through exercises using R, Python, and Matlab codes. The course will culminate in final projects of their choice focusing on a particular aspect of ice age evolution.

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EEPS 2920B. Special Topics: Ocean Worlds.

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EEPS 2920C. The Sedimentary Rock Cycle of Mars and Earth.

This course consists of a mixture of instructor and student-led discussions on topics related to the sedimentary rock cycle on Mars as viewed through the lens of how we understand such processes on Earth. Topics:sediment transport and deposition, erosion processes and rates, lithification + diagenesis, water-rock interaction, and cyclicity in strata. Major goal: Assess how the sedimentary rock record of Mars can be used to understand changes in depositional processes and environmental conditions through time. Results from Mars satellite and rover data will be discussed, with an emphasis on fundamental processes as understood from detailed studies of Earths sedimentary rock record. Prerequisite: Undergraduate level sedimentology/stratigraphy, or permission of instructor.

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EEPS 2920D. Introduction to Geochemical Modeling.

Continuum descriptions of mass transfer in geochemical cycles. Topics include: fundamentals of diffusive and advective mass transfer, kinetics of weathering and early diagenesis, fluid flow in the Earth's crust and mantle, trace elements and isotopes in magmatic processes. Recommended: CHEM 0330, EEPS 1610 and APMA 0330, 0340.

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EEPS 2920E. Introduction to Organic Geochemistry.

Mainly literature critiques and seminars, supplemented by introductory lectures. Topics include organic biomarkers, analytical methodologies, natural macromolecules, stable isotope ratios of biomarkers, application of organic geochemistry in studies of climatic and environmental change, fossil fuel exploration, and applied environmental research.

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EEPS 2920F. Kinetics of Mineralogical and Petrological Processes.

Emphasizes kinetic theories and their geological applications. Topics include: fundamentals of diffusion in crystals and melts, theories of nucleation and crystal growth, kinetics of melting and dissolving, theory of phase transformation. Prerequisite: EEPS 2460 or equivalent.

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EEPS 2920G. Special Topics in Geological Sciences:Exoplanet Seminar.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the study of planets orbiting other stars. Learning outcomes:
Recognize the methods for detection and characterization of exoplanets, and the information these methods provide about exoplanetary systems
Discuss planet properties that can be derived from observational methods
Summarize our understanding of exoplanet populations
Recognize cutting edge work being done in the field of exoplanets – such as the search for exomoons, habitability, and biosignatures
Recall updated facilities (both ground and space based) for future exoplanet studies
Assessment of journal articles and synthesizing material across sources
Completion of an independent project on an outstanding question in exoplanet science

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EEPS 2920H. Past Variations in the Global Carbon Cycle.

This course will examine variations in the earth's carbon cycle over multiple time scales. We will examine geological tools that measure rates of carbon storage and release, especially over the past one million years. Special emphasis will be given to monitoring rates of past biological carbon storage.

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EEPS 2920I. Special Topics: Dynamics of Tropical Climate and Ecosystem.

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EEPS 2920J. The Source of Liquid Water in the Nochian History of Mars.

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EEPS 2920K. Special Topics in Geological Sciences: The Hydrological Cycle on Mars: Evidence for Oceans.

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EEPS 2920L. Evolution of the Moon II.

A seminar on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Moon. In this part II of lunar seminar, we will focus more on petrological and geochemical observations of lunar samples, terrestrial layered intrusions, related geophysical observations, and lunar petrogenesis. Prerequisite: EEPS 1420, 2730, or 2920K.

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EEPS 2920N. Problems Antartic Dry Valley Geoscience.

The Antarctic Dry Valleys represent an extreme hyperarid polar desert environment. Their geomorphology records the range of processes operating in these environments, preserving a record of climate change over millions of years. Major microenvironments are studied at the micro-, meso-, and macro-scale through literature review, field analyses, and research projects. Exobiological themes and climate change on Mars will be assessed.

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EEPS 2920O. Physics of Melt Migration.

A seminar course focusing on the physical processes and geochemical consequences of melt migration in the mantle. Topics include, but are not limited to: flow in porous media; compaction; adiabatic melting and melt-rock reaction; instabilities in melt migration; melt generation beneath mid-ocean ridge; and melt migration in other tectonic environments. Recommended course: EEPS 1620. Enrollment limited to 15. S/NC

Course usage information

EEPS 2920P. Special Topics in Geological Sciences:Geological History of Mars.

In many ways, Mars is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System and may have once had a climate conducive to the origin and evolution of life. We will trace the geologic history of Mars (atmospheric, climatic, eolian, fluvial, lacustrine, oceanic, volcanic, impact crater, tectonic, interior evolution) from the present back through the Amazonian, Hesperian, Noachian and pre-Noachian to the origin of Mars, examining the main themes in its evolution in order to provide a comparative framework for the other terrestrial planets and satellites.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920Q. Rheological Boundaries in the Earth.

The properties of lower crust control the coupling of mantle convection to shallow crustal dynamics, post-seismic creep and the chemical evolution of the Earth. On Earth we have xenolyths and exhumed lower crustal rocks to study and relate to geophysical, experimental and theoretical investigations. We will explore these avenues of research with the goal of synthesizing our understanding of the behavior of lower crust on Earth as well as other terrestrial planets.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920R. Evolution of the Moon.

Petrological, geochemical, and geophysical observations, physical and chemical processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Moon.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920S. Continental Cratons.

The focus of this course is the formation, evolution, and structure of continental cratons. These topics will be explored through a survey of the observational constraints on cratons, including seismology, gravity, heat flow, geochemistry, and petrology. The use of dynamical models to investigate the assembly, destruction, and long-term stability of cratons will also be considered.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920T. Science Applications of Lunar Spectroscopy.

This course will focus on current science issues that are addressed with new lunar orbital or laboratory spectroscopy data. Each participant must identify a specific science topic (and data source) to be pursued and brought to completion during the term. Format will be seminar with very active participation by all attending. At the beginning of the term each participant will describe their chosen research topic. Subsequent sessions will critically examine issues that are associated with each topic in an iterative fashion, focusing on progress made, problems faced, solutions designed, insights found, and finally completed project. Prerequisites: EEPS 1710 and confirmation with instructor about the project.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920U. Climate Variations.

This course will examine the geologic record of lake basins on decadal to million-year time-scales. Students will gain hands-on experience with techniques in paleolimnology including sediment core acquisition, sediment description, petrography, sedimentology and environmental analysis, geochemistry, basic core scanning, and age determination, modeling, and time series analysis. The biotic content and interpretation of fossils will be stressed. The course will also cover theoretical aspects of paleolimnology and more specialized techniques according to student interests through student-led discussions and a course project on regional lake sediments. Graduate students only; enrollment limited to 20.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920V. Terrestrial Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling.

This course will examine aboveground/ belowground processes in the context of the global nitrogen and carbon cycles, and the impacts of both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. It will include discussion of processes such as (de)nitrification, N-fixation, respiration, photosynthesis, and decomposition and their relationship to soil properties; the coupling of N and C cycles in soils related to climate change and increasing N deposition. It will include emphasis on emerging new techniques to quantify N and C processes in the laboratory, field and through modeling, and field trip investigating current field studies. Prerequisites: BIOL 1480 or EEPS 1130 or equivalent biogeochemistry course. Enrollment limited to 15.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920W. Numerical Climate Change Scenarios for Southern New England.

This seminar will examine regional-scale climate model scenarios for past and future climate change in Southern New England. Reliable estimates of the trajectory and variability of climate change are needed to address specific climate impacts, adaptations, and mitigations. Global climate model simulations, based on a range of IPPC green house gas scenarios, need to be "downscaled" to achieve useful regional resolution. Understanding the generation of these high-resolution "downscaled" climate scenarios and compiling a number of observed and modeled climate variables to assess the trends and reliability of climate scenarios for Southern New England is the goal of the seminar.

Course usage information

EEPS 2920Z. The Evolution of Lacustrine Ecosystems.

Course usage information

EEPS 2980. Research in Geological Sciences.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students only.

Course usage information

EEPS 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.

Fall EEPS2990 S01 15858 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr EEPS2990 S01 24671 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'

Chair

Greg Hirth

Professor

Reid F. Cooper
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Karen M. Fischer
Louis and Elizabeth Scherck Distinguished Professor of the Geological Sciences

Donald W. Forsyth
James Manning Professor Emeritus of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Science; Professor Emeritus of Engineering

Baylor Fox-Kemper
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

L. Peter Gromet
Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences

Meredith K. Hastings
Professor of Environment and Society and Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

James W. Head
Louis and Elizabeth Scherck Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Geological Sciences, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Timothy D. Herbert
Henry L. Doherty Professor of Oceanography, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Professor of Environment and Society

John F. Hermance
Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences

Paul C. Hess
Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences

Greg Hirth
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Yongsong Huang
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Christian Huber
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Yan Liang
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Amanda Lynch
Sloan And George Lindeman Jr. Distinguished Professor of Environmental Studies, Professor of Environment and Society and Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

John F. Mustard
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences; Professor of Environment and Society

Edgar M. Parmentier
Professor Emeritus of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Carle M. Pieters
Professor Emerita of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Warren L. Prell
Henry L. Doherty Professor Emeritus of Oceanography

James M. Russell
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Malcolm J. Rutherford
Professor Emeritus of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Alberto Saal
Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Peter H. Schultz
Professor Emeritus of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Laurence C. Smith
John Atwater and Diana Nelson University Professor of Environmental Studies

Jan Tullis
Professor Emerita of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Adjunct Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Terry E. Tullis
Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences

Thompson Webb
Professor Emeritus of Geological Sciences

Associate Professor

Colleen A. Dalton
Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Jung-Eun Lee
Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Ralph E. Milliken
Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Stephen Parman
Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Victor Tsai
Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Associate Professor Research

Steven C. Clemens
Associate Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Assistant Professor

Karianne Bergen
Assistant Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences and Data Science; Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Gerrit Budde
Assistant Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Alex J. Evans
Assistant Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Daniel Enrique Ibarra
Assistant Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences and Environment and Society

Assistant Professor Research

Ingrid Daubar
Assistant Professor of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences (Research)

Visiting Scientist

Marcelo Da Rosa Alexandre
Visiting Scientist in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Brendan Hermalyn
Visiting Scientist in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Kira T. Lawrence
Visiting Scientist in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Calvin Mako
Visiting Scientist in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Lucan Mameri
Visiting Scientist in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Senior Research Associate

Mikhail Kreslavsky
Senior Research Associate in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences

Geological Sciences

Geosciences is a highly interdisciplinary concentration employing principles from physics, chemistry, and biology to understand the structure of the Earth and other planetary bodies.  Concentrators can study Earth and planetary interiors, including the formation of rocks and minerals, movement of the Earth’s tectonic plates, and the circulation of the planets’ core and mantle.  Other areas emphasize surface processes, such as the movement and storage of water.  This concentration is a good choice for students who seek a broad scientific understanding of the processes that shape the physical world around us.

Both AB and ScB degrees are offered; the ScB requires more (19) courses, including a research course. DEEPS provides a highly collaborative learning environment that emphasizes process-oriented, hands-on approaches in the classroom, in labs and on field trips.  There are many opportunities for students to do research working with faculty, graduate students, and researchers. The degree builds students’ skills in critical thinking, written and oral communication, data analysis and modeling, and applying systems approaches to problem solving, which prepare students for a wide variety of careers.

Standard program for the A.B. degree

This program provides a broad introduction to the geological sciences. Recommended for students seeking a liberal education and a general understanding of Earth processes and Earth history. Especially attractive for double concentrations, such as geology and economics as a career path to law or business, or geology and English as a career path to journalism or technical writing.

Basic supporting science courses
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure (or advanced placement)1
Three courses to build quantitative skills: 3
Methods of Applied Mathematics I (or higher)
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction (or higher)
Dynamics and Vibrations (or higher)
Introductory Calculus, Part I (or higher)
Foundations of Mechanics (or higher)
Nine Concentration courses
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
EEPS 0240Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet1
Select three of the following:3
Stratigraphy and Sedimentation
Mineralogy
Petrology
Structural Geology
Two additional upper level EEPS courses or an approved substitute such as a field course2
One additional upper level science or math course with approval from the concentration advisor. 1
Total Credits13

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

This program is recommended for students interested in graduate study and careers in the geosciences and related fields.

Basic supporting science courses
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure (or advanced placement)1
Four courses to build quantitative skills: 4
Methods of Applied Mathematics I (or higher)
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction (or higher)
Dynamics and Vibrations (or higher)
Introductory Calculus, Part I (or higher)
Foundations of Mechanics (or higher)
Fourteen Concentration courses
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
EEPS 0240Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet1
Three of the following: 3
Stratigraphy and Sedimentation
Mineralogy
Petrology
Structural Geology
Three additional upper level EEPS courses or an approved substitute such as a field course3
Four upper level science or math courses with approval from the concentration advisor4
EEPS 1970Individual Study of Geologic Problems (Senior Research Thesis)1
Total Credits19

Geology-Biology

Students in Geology-Biology apply principles from geology, biology, chemistry, and physics to understand how major components of the Earth, such as its atmosphere and oceans, interact with and sustain life in the past, present, and into the future.  Many courses emphasize climate change, environmental pollution, and biogeochemistry, so this concentration is a good one for students interested in studying the environment. Other areas emphasize Earth history, including climate change, extinction events, and using the Earth’s sedimentary record to investigate environmental change. 

Both AB and ScB degrees are offered; the ScB requires more (19) courses, including a research course. DEEPS provides a highly collaborative learning environment that emphasizes process-oriented, hands-on approaches in the classroom, in labs and on field trips.  There are many opportunities for students to do research working with faculty, graduate students, and researchers. The degree builds students’ skills in critical thinking, written and oral communication, data analysis and modeling, and applying systems approaches to problem solving, which prepare students for a wide variety of careers. 

Standard program for the A.B. degree

This program provides a broad introduction to the geologic and biologic processes that shape the Earth and our environment. It is recommended for students seeking a liberal education and a general understanding of Earth processes, including the evolution of climate and the environment, global environmental change and Earth history. The program prepares students for careers in environmental science, geology, ecology, oceanography, and global change.

Basic supporting science courses
BIOL 0200The Foundation of Living Systems (or equivalent)1
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure (or equivalent)1
Two courses to build quantitative skills: 2
Methods of Applied Mathematics I (or higher)
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction (or higher)
Dynamics and Vibrations (or higher)
Introductory Calculus, Part I (or higher)
Foundations of Mechanics (or higher)
Ten Concentration courses
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0240Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet1
EEPS 1240Stratigraphy and Sedimentation1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
or EEPS 0250 Computational Approaches to Modelling and Quantitative Analysis in Natural Sciences: An Introduction
Select three upper level Biology courses such as: 3
Invertebrate Zoology
Principles of Ecology
The Evolution of Plant Diversity
Evolutionary Biology
Conservation Biology
Terrestrial Biogeochemistry and the Functioning of Ecosystems
Three upper level EEPS courses such as: 3
Weather and Climate
Paleoceanography
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Limnology: The Study of Lakes
Global Water Cycle
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
Environmental Geochemistry
The Environmental Policy Process
Individual Study of Geologic Problems
Total Credits14

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

This program is recommended for students interested in graduate study and careers in the Earth, Environmental, or Biological Sciences. It is relevant for students interested in environmental science, paleoclimate, Earth systems science, biogeochemistry, oceanography, or paleobiology.

Five basic supporting science courses
BIOL 0200The Foundation of Living Systems (or equivalent)1
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure (or equivalent)1
Three courses to build quantitative skills: 3
Methods of Applied Mathematics I (or higher)
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction (or higher)
Dynamics and Vibrations (or higher)
Introductory Calculus, Part I (or higher)
Foundations of Mechanics (or higher)
Fourteen (14) concentration courses
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0240Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet1
EEPS 1240Stratigraphy and Sedimentation1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
or EEPS 0250 Computational Approaches to Modelling and Quantitative Analysis in Natural Sciences: An Introduction
Three upper level BIOL courses such as: 3
Invertebrate Zoology
Principles of Ecology
The Evolution of Plant Diversity
Evolutionary Biology
Conservation Biology
Terrestrial Biogeochemistry and the Functioning of Ecosystems
Three upper level EEPS courses such as: 3
Weather and Climate
Paleoceanography
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Limnology: The Study of Lakes
Global Water Cycle
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
Global Environmental Remote Sensing
Environmental Geochemistry
Principles of Planetary Climate
The Environmental Policy Process
Three upper level science or math courses with approval from the concentration advisor3
EEPS 1970Individual Study of Geologic Problems (Senior Research Thesis)1
Total Credits19

Geology-Chemistry

Geochemistry involves two different emphases. Low-temperature geochemistry involves study of chemical and biochemical processes on and near Earth’s surface, including land, oceans and freshwater bodies, and how the geochemical record reflects climate conditions. High-temperature geochemistry includes study of formation and evolution of the Earth and other planets, magma formation and properties, volcanic activity, and metamorphism. The AB degree requires a total of 14 courses, including 5 geoscience courses and 4 chemistry courses, and a few supporting math and physics courses. The ScB degree requires a total of 20 courses, including 7 geoscience courses and 4 chemistry courses, either with an organic or an inorganic focus, plus some supporting math and physics courses and one research course. Geoscience courses emphasize a process-oriented approach, with hands-on experiences in labs and on field trips. There is a strong emphasis on active and collaborative learning, and on practice in communication. There are many opportunities for students to do research work for pay during the academic year or in the summer, in areas such as experimental studies of magma formation, and analyzing lunar rock samples for water content.

Standard program for the A.B. degree

Recommended for students seeking a liberal education and interested in applying physical and chemical principles toward an understanding of Earth history, Earth processes, and environmental and resource issues.

Four basic supporting science courses
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
Three courses to build quantitative skills: 3
Methods of Applied Mathematics I (or higher)
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction (or higher)
Dynamics and Vibrations (or higher)
Introductory Calculus, Part I (or higher)
Foundations of Mechanics (or higher)
Ten Concentration courses
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
EEPS 0240Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet1
Three additional chemistry courses such as: 3
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
Biochemistry
Two courses from the following: 2
Mineralogy
Petrology
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Environmental Geochemistry
Two additional upper-level EEPS courses or substitutes with approval from the concentration advisor. 2
Total Credits14

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

This program is recommended for students interested in graduate study and careers in geochemistry and related fields.

Basic Supporting Science Courses:
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
Four courses to build quantitative skills: 4
Methods of Applied Mathematics I (or higher)
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction (or higher)
Dynamics and Vibrations (or higher)
Introductory Calculus, Part I (or higher)
Foundations of Mechanics (or higher)
Fourteen Concentration Courses
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
EEPS 0240Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet1
EEPS 1370Environmental Geochemistry1
EEPS 1410Mineralogy1
Three additional chemistry courses such as:3
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
Biochemistry
Two upper level courses from EEPS2
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Stratigraphy and Sedimentation
Environmental Stable Isotopes
Petrology
Three additional upper-level science or math courses with approval from the concentration advisor3
EEPS 1970Individual Study of Geologic Problems1
Total Credits19

Geology-Physics/Mathematics

Geophysics involves the application of physics and mathematics to the study of processes that operate on and within the Earth and other planets, over short and long timescales. The AB degree requires a total of 14 courses, including 6 geoscience courses, 3 physics or engineering courses, and 3 math and applied math courses. The ScB degree requires a total of 20 courses, including 8 geoscience courses, 4 physics or engineering courses, and 3 math and applied courses; students can choose courses from both solid Earth geophysics and climate science themes. Geoscience courses emphasize an analytical and process-oriented approach, with hands-on experiences in labs and on field trips. Active and collaborative learning is encouraged, as is practice in written and oral communication. There are many opportunities for students to engage in research (typically in paid positions) during the academic year or in the summer, in areas such as analysis of seismic waves in subduction zones, theoretical modeling of convection in the Earth’s mantle, modeling the effects of the warming climate in the oceans and atmosphere, and remote sensing of how climate change affects vegetation.

Standard program for the A.B. degree

Recommended for students seeking a liberal education and interested in applying physical and mathematical principles toward an understanding of the processes affecting planets, Earth, and the environment and how they are modeled.  Some course requirements may be flexible based on consultation with concentration advisor.

Five supporting science courses:
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
A course involving mechanics such as:1
Foundations of Mechanics
Analytical Mechanics
Dynamics and Vibrations
or equivalent
Three courses in APMA or MATH, one of which must be APMA 0330, APMA 0350, or equivalent3
Nine concentration courses:
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
or EEPS 0240 Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet
EEPS 0250Computational Approaches to Modelling and Quantitative Analysis in Natural Sciences: An Introduction1
or EEPS 0350 Mathematical Methods of Fluid
EEPS 1430Principles of Planetary Climate1
or EEPS 1610 Solid Earth Geophysics
Two upper level courses from: 2
Weather and Climate
Global Water Cycle
Mineralogy
Petrology
Principles of Planetary Climate
Structural Geology
Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics
Ocean Circulation and Climate
Solid Earth Geophysics
Continuum Physics of the Solid Earth
One additional EEPS course such as:1
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Global Environmental Remote Sensing
Global Tectonics
Earthquake Seismology
Physics of Planetary Evolution
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Rotating, Stratified Turbulence Edition
Individual Study of Geologic Problems
a field or sea course
or any EEPS course listed above
Two courses in physics or engineering such as:2
Foundations of Electromagnetism and Modern Physics
Electricity and Magnetism
Advanced Classical Mechanics
Computational Physics
Mechanics of Solids and Structures
Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering
Electricity and Magnetism
Fluid Mechanics
Advanced Engineering Mechanics
Total Credits14

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

This program is recommended for students interested in graduate study and careers in geophysics, climate science and related fields.  Students will be prepared to understand and use models, make measurements, and use theories of the processes studied in these fields.  Some course requirements may be flexible based on consultation with concentration advisor.

Five supporting science courses:
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
A course involving mechanics such as: 1
Foundations of Mechanics
Analytical Mechanics
Dynamics and Vibrations
or equivalent
Three courses in APMA or MATH, one of which must be APMA 0330, APMA 0350, or equivalent3
Fourteen Concentration Courses:
EEPS 0220Earth Processes1
EEPS 0230Geochemistry: Earth and Planetary Materials and Processes1
or EEPS 0240 Earth: Evolution of a Habitable Planet
EEPS 0250Computational Approaches to Modelling and Quantitative Analysis in Natural Sciences: An Introduction1
or EEPS 0350 Mathematical Methods of Fluid
EEPS 1430Principles of Planetary Climate1
EEPS 1610Solid Earth Geophysics1
Three upper level EEPS courses from: 3
Global Water Cycle
Mineralogy
Petrology
Structural Geology
Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics
Ocean Circulation and Climate
Continuum Physics of the Solid Earth
One additional EEPS course such as: 1
Weather and Climate
Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
Global Environmental Remote Sensing
Global Tectonics
Earthquake Seismology
Physics of Planetary Evolution
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Rotating, Stratified Turbulence Edition
a field or sea course
or any EEPS course listed above
Three courses in physics or engineering such as: 3
Foundations of Electromagnetism and Modern Physics
Electricity and Magnetism
Advanced Classical Mechanics
Computational Physics
Mechanics of Solids and Structures
Fundamentals of Environmental Engineering
Electricity and Magnetism
Fluid Mechanics
Advanced Engineering Mechanics
One additional upper-level science or math course with approval from the concentration advisor1
EEPS 1970Individual Study of Geologic Problems1
Total Credits19

Geological Sciences

The department of Geological Sciences offers a graduate program leading to the Doctor of Philosphy (Ph.D.) degree.

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following website:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/geological-sciences