You're logged in as |

Architecture

The Architecture concentration introduces students to a broad understanding of concepts and methods for the planning and design of buildings and urban environments. It connects architectural education firmly to the humanities and provides a greater awareness of historical, global, environmental, social and economic issues in the built environment. This approach to the education of architects and urban planners aims to provide them with the tools needed in today’s fractured urban society. Apart from training careful observation, critical analysis and problem solving, students will acquire skills in sketching, drafting, model-making, and digital rendering. By combining a carefully selected range of classes in architectural design, the humanities, engineering and technology, and urban life and theory, students will acquire necessary proficiency for pursuing a graduate degree in architecture after Brown.

Summary of Concentration Requirements1

1 Introduction to Design Studio1
2 Practice Courses2
1 Double-Credit Design Studio2
4 History of Art and Architecture lecture courses bearing the A designation4
1 Pathway Elective in Sciences1
1 Pathway Elective on Social Sciences / Humanities1
1 Capstone Course1
Total Credits12

HIAA 0100Introduction to Architectural Design Studio1
HIAA 0130Architectural Projection1
HIAA 0140Structural and Architectural Analysis1
HIAA 0150Intermediate Architectural Design Studio2
or HIAA 0190 Advanced Design Studio
4 History of Art and Architecture lecture courses bearing the A designation. The courses should engage at least two different geographic regions (Africa, Americas, Asia, Europe) and two different periods (Ancient-Medieval, Early Modern, Modern-Contemporary). Individual courses can be used to fulfill either the geographic or temporal breadth requirement, but not both. Courses tagged as “Multiple Regions” and “Multiple Periods” can be used to fulfill one geographic and one temporal breadth requirement, respectively.4
Temporal Periods:
Ancient/Medieval:
The Art of Enlightenment
Art and Architecture of the Roman Empire
The Arts of Religion and Ritual in the Ancient World
Early Modern:
Dutch and Flemish Art: Visual Culture of the Netherlands in the Seventeenth Century
Painters, Builders, and Bankers in Early Modern Italy
Constructing the Eternal City: Popes and Pilgrims in Early Modern Rome
Cultural History of the Netherlands in a Golden Age and a Global Age
Giotto to Watteau: Introduction to the Art of Europe from Renaissance to French Revolution
Modern/Contemporary:
Introduction to American Art: The 19th Century
Introduction to American Art: The Twentieth Century
Introduction to the History of Art: Modern Photography
Revolutions, Illusions, Impressions: A History of Nineteenth-Century Art
Postwar to Postmodernism: Art Since 1945
Contemporary Art
Contemporary Photography
The Other History of Modern Architecture
Art and Technology from Futurism to Hacktivism
Modern Architecture
Contemporary Architecture
City and Cinema
Multiple Periods:
A Global History of Art and Architecture
South Asian Art and Architecture
The Architectures of Islam
Architecture of the House Through Space and Time
Cathedrals and Castles
Architecture and Urbanism of Africa
Geographic Regions:
Africa:
Architecture and Urbanism of Africa
Americas:
Introduction to American Art: The 19th Century
Introduction to American Art: The Twentieth Century
Contemporary Photography
Asia:
The Art of Enlightenment
South Asian Art and Architecture
Europe:
Art and Architecture of the Roman Empire
Introduction to the History of Art: Modern Photography
Revolutions, Illusions, Impressions: A History of Nineteenth-Century Art
Painters, Builders, and Bankers in Early Modern Italy
Constructing the Eternal City: Popes and Pilgrims in Early Modern Rome
Cultural History of the Netherlands in a Golden Age and a Global Age
Giotto to Watteau: Introduction to the Art of Europe from Renaissance to French Revolution
Multiple Regions:
A Global History of Art and Architecture
The Architectures of Islam
Architecture of the House Through Space and Time
Postwar to Postmodernism: Art Since 1945
Contemporary Art
The Other History of Modern Architecture
The Arts of Religion and Ritual in the Ancient World
Cathedrals and Castles
Art and Technology from Futurism to Hacktivism
Modern Architecture
Contemporary Architecture
City and Cinema
1 Pathway Elective in Sciences 21
1 Pathway Elective in Social Sciences / Humanities 21
1 Capstone course. Capstone projects embrace many possibilities. You can perfect a seminar paper or design project. You can participate in a graduate seminar to which the instructor has admitted you. You can take an additional studio course. You can develop work that you do as an architectural intern or research assistant in the context of an independent study course. You might work on an archaeological excavation. You can participate in the Honors Program. Beyond these opportunities, the Department is open to other approaches. You should work with a faculty sponsor and with your concentration advisor to decide what will work best for you.1
Total Credits12

Self-Assessment

All concentrators are required to write an essay when they file for the concentration that lays out what they expect to gain from the course of study they propose. All second-semester seniors will be required to write a final essay that takes measure of what they have learned from the concentration, including their capstone and other experiences relating to their study of architecture. The self-assessment should be submitted through ASK with a revised list of courses actually taken at least one month prior to graduation.

Honors

During the second semester of the junior year all concentrators will be invited to apply for admission to the Honors Program in Architecture. The honors program is an opportunity for you to mobilize what you have learned to make an original research contribution to the field.

There are two pathways to honors in the Architecture concentration: thesis and project-based.

Those pursuing the thesis option research and write a historical or theoretical essay on a topic of their choice over the course of their senior year. The thesis should be no more than 35 pages in length, plus bibliography and illustrations.

Those pursuing the project option further develop a design project that they initiated in an Advanced Studio either in their junior year or in the first semester of their senior year. They devote a minimum of one additional semester further developing their project in regular consultation with a faculty advisor. (This can mean building an additional, more elaborate model, creating more renderings, refining the concept, and so forth.)

During both fall and spring semesters you will participate in the monthly meetings of the Honors cohort, in which honors students in both HIAA concentrations share their work-in-progress with each other and with the faculty member who supervises the seminar. (These monthly meetings, usually three per semester, are mandatory but do not require a course registration.) You will also enroll in your advisor’s section of HIAA 1990 (Honors Thesis) in both semesters, for thesis students, or at least one semester, for project-based honors.

Theses and projects will be due to the advisor and second reader by March 1 of the Spring semester or by November 1 of the Fall semester if you plan on graduating in December. Comments will be returned to the students for final corrections at that point. There will be a public presentation of Honors work at the end of the Spring semester.

Students wishing to pursue honors should have produced consistently excellent work and maintained a high level of achievement (i.e. a majority of “A” or “S with distinction” grades) in all concentration courses. While acceptance into the Honors program depends on the persuasiveness of the proposal as well as the number of students applying, students may refine their proposals by speaking in advance with potential advisors. No honors student may take more than four courses either semester of their senior year—with the honors seminar being considered one of the four courses. Students interested in honors who are expecting to graduate in the middle of the year should contact the concentration advisor no later than the beginning of their junior year.