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Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry maintains pedagogical and research strengths in organic, inorganic, theoretical and experimental physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, chemical biology and nanochemistry. Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students collaboratively pursue interdisciplinary research within the department, enhanced by the partnerships with colleagues in the medicine, biology, geology, physics and engineering.

For additional information, please visit the department's website: http://www.brown.edu/academics/chemistry/

Course usage information

CHEM 0080A. First Year Seminar- Energy.

An introductory study of the scientific foundation of energy, fundamental physical, chemical, and thermodynamic aspects of common (fossil, nuclear) as well as novel (fuel cells, solar, wind, etc.) energy sources. Concentrates on scientific principles, but includes discussion on resources and reserves, environmental impact, current usage, and future needs. For students of all disciplines who are interested in obtaining an understanding of scientific principles of energy. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students.

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CHEM 0080B. Molecular Structures in Chemistry and Biology.

This course will consist of a survey of historical developments and concepts of three dimensional structures of molecules. The course will conclude with a survey of the current state of the art of structure determination and 3D structure motifs for small molecules, nanomaterials and biological macromolecules. This freshman only seminar will be strictly limited to a maximum of 19 students.

Fall CHEM0080B S01 18385 TTh 1:00-2:20(06) (P. Williard)
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CHEM 0080C. Drug Discoveries in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

A Freshman seminar that provides a survey of past and current approaches that enable the discovery and development of therapeutic agents. Topics ranging from target validation to the development of therapeutics (small molecules, biologics, and stem cells) will be discussed. Enrollment limited to 19 first-year students.

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CHEM 0080F. Kitchen Chemistry.

Have you ever wondered why olive oil is a liquid but butter is solid? Or why bread and cookies rise when baked? This Kitchen Chemistry course is an experimental approach to chemistry, as seen in cooking. We will examine topics such as trans fats, baking soda as a leavening agent in baking, ripening of fruit, artificial sweeteners, GMOs, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning of foods. Edible experiments will be used to discuss the science behind recipes. Enrollment limited to 14 first year students. Instructor permission is required.

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CHEM 0090. Kitchen Chemistry.

Kitchen Chemistry is a course that highlights the chemistry underlying food and cooking. We will examine topics such as trans fats, baking soda as a leavening agent in baking, chemical basis for ripening of fruit, pectin as a cellular glue, artificial sweeteners, GMOs, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning of foods. In-class demonstrations and edible experiments will be used to discuss the science behind cooking. Content will be discussed using a variety of contexts including primary scientific literature, public policy reports, mainstream media, and food blogs. This class is appropriate for all students interested in chemistry.

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CHEM 0100. Introductory Chemistry.

Explores stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, solutions, gases, chemical reactions, equilibria, thermochemistry. S/NC.

Fall CHEM0100 S01 16784 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (E. Victor)
Fall CHEM0100 C01 17703 T 4:00-5:10 (C. Morton)
Fall CHEM0100 C02 17704 T 5:20-6:30 (C. Morton)
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CHEM 0330. Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure.

Explores the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, thermodynamics, solution equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and reaction mechanisms. Course includes lecture and laboratory sections. Laboratory cannot be taken without the lecture. To successfully register for this course , please include all three components: lecture, lab, and conference. Students who previously passed 0330 lab may be excused from repeating the lab portion of the course, please register for L11. Required background: CHEM 0100 or AP Chemistry 4 or CHEM Placement Test 8 or IBC Chemistry.

Fall CHEM0330 S01 17616 MW 8:30-9:50(09) (V. Colvin)
Fall CHEM0330 S02 17618 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (C. Rose-Petruck)
Fall CHEM0330 C01 17662 T 1:00-1:50 (E. Victor)
Fall CHEM0330 C02 17663 T 2:00-2:50 (E. Victor)
Fall CHEM0330 C03 17664 T 3:00-3:50 (E. Victor)
Fall CHEM0330 C04 17665 Th 1:00-1:50 (E. Victor)
Fall CHEM0330 C05 17666 Th 2:00-2:50 (E. Victor)
Fall CHEM0330 C06 17667 Th 3:00-3:50 (E. Victor)
Spr CHEM0330 S01 26101 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (O. Chen)
Spr CHEM0330 C01 26102 T 1:00-1:50 (C. Morton)
Spr CHEM0330 C02 26103 T 2:00-2:50 (C. Morton)
Spr CHEM0330 C03 26104 T 3:00-3:50 (C. Morton)
Spr CHEM0330 C04 26105 Th 1:00-1:50 (C. Morton)
Spr CHEM0330 C05 26106 Th 2:00-2:50 (C. Morton)
Spr CHEM0330 C06 26107 Th 3:00-3:50 (C. Morton)
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CHEM 0330L. Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure Lab.

Please see course description for CHEM 0330.

Fall CHEM0330L L01 18054 M 1:00-4:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L02 18055 M 2:00-5:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L03 18056 T 1:00-4:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L04 18057 T 2:30-6:20 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L05 18058 W 1:00-4:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L06 18059 W 2:00-5:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L07 18060 Th 1:00-4:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L08 18061 Th 2:30-6:20 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L09 18062 F 1:00-4:40 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L10 18063 F 2:00-5:50 (M. Lueckheide)
Fall CHEM0330L L11 18064 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L01 26394 M 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L02 26395 M 2:00-5:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L03 26396 T 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L04 26397 T 2:30-6:20 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L05 26398 W 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L06 26399 W 2:00-5:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L07 26400 Th 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L08 26401 Th 2:30-6:20 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L09 26402 F 1:00-4:40 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L10 26403 F 2:00-5:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0330L L11 26404 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHEM 0332. Equilibrium, Rate and Structure - Tutorial.

The CHEM 0332 tutorial program offers students the opportunity to master the concepts taught in the fall semester CHEM 0330: Equilibrium, Rate and Structure course by focusing on active problem solving. Students who struggle in the fall CHEM 0330 course may be invited to join the tutorial program. Students accepted into the tutorial program begin by reviewing compound and reaction stoichiometry at the beginning of the spring semester. Tutorial students enroll in CHEM 0332 during the spring semester to complete their studies of equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, thermodynamics, atomic and molecular structure and kinetics. Students in the CHEM 0332 tutorial program complete weekly problem sets during the spring semester and participate in two mandatory, regularly scheduled problem sessions during each week of the spring semester.
To qualify for consideration, the student must be struggling in the midterm exams and on track to pass the laboratory. Accepted students receive a grade of incomplete for the Fall CHEM 0330 course. Upon successful completion of the CHEM 0332 tutorial program in the spring semester, the incomplete in Fall CHEM 0330 is replaced by the student’s tutorial program grade.
An override by Ms Sheila Quigley is required.

Spr CHEM0332 S01 25301 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (E. Victor)
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CHEM 0350. Organic Chemistry.

Sequel to CHEM 0330. Investigates the constitution and properties of organic compounds, with considerable attention to structural motifs, isomerism and chirality, acid/base chemistry, elementary reaction mechanisms (alkene/alkyne addition, nucleophilic substitutions, eliminations, etc.) and synthetic schemes. The laboratory work comprises microscale preparative and analytical techniques fundamental to the manipulation of representative organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 0330/general chemistry equivalent.
Students must register for the main lecture section and one lab section Brown University students who previously completed the CHEM 0350 laboratory component but received a grade of no credit in the course must register for lab section L11.

Spr CHEM0350 S01 25302 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) (M. Zimmt)
Spr CHEM0350 S02 26115 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (C. Morton)
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CHEM 0350L. Organic Chemistry Lab.

Please see course description for CHEM 0350.

Spr CHEM0350L L01 26406 M 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L02 26407 M 2:00-5:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L03 26408 T 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L04 26409 T 2:30-6:20 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L05 26416 W 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L06 26410 W 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L07 26411 Th 1:00-4:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L08 26412 Th 2:30-6:20 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L09 26413 F 1:00-4:40 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L10 26414 F 2:00-5:50 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM0350L L11 26415 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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CHEM 0360. Organic Chemistry.

Sequel to CHEM 0350. Investigates the constitution and properties of organic compounds at a fundamental level with an introduction to physical organic, bioorganic, and synthetic organic chemistry. Laboratory work is concerned with the identification and characterization of organic compounds, including modern instrumental methods. Three hours of lecture and five hours of prelaboratory and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 0350.
Students MUST register for a lecture section and a lab.
If you previously completed CHEM 0360 laboratory but received a grade of no credit in the course, please register for lab section 11.

Fall CHEM0360 S01 17615 MWF 9:00-9:50(09) (M. Zimmt)
Fall CHEM0360 S02 17702 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (C. Morton)
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CHEM 0360L. Organic Chemistry Lab.

Please see course description for CHEM 0360.

Fall CHEM0360L L01 18070 M 1:00-4:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L02 18071 M 2:00-5:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L03 18072 T 1:00-4:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L04 18073 T 2:30-6:20 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L05 18074 W 1:00-4:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L06 18075 W 2:00-5:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L07 18076 Th 1:00-4:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L08 18077 Th 2:30-6:20 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L09 18078 F 1:00-4:40 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L10 18079 F 2:00-5:50 (J. Morin)
Fall CHEM0360L L11 18080 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
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CHEM 0400. Biophysical and Bioinorganic Chemistry.

Examines aspects of physical and inorganic chemistry relevant to biochemistry: thermodynamics of hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, electrically charged membranes, coordination chemistry, active and passive transport, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, metal-based drugs, and physical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 0360 and MATH 0100 or 0170. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 0040 or 0060.

Spr CHEM0400 S01 25303 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (E. Kim)
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CHEM 0500. Inorganic Chemistry.

Examines the chemistry of main group and transition metal elements with treatment of covalent bonding and molecular structure along with the methods of studying inorganic compounds and reactions. Three hours of lecture and five hours of prelaboratory and laboratory attendance. Prerequisite: CHEM 0360.
Students MUST register for a lecture section and a lab.

Spr CHEM0500 S01 25304 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) 'To Be Arranged'
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CHEM 0600. Preparative Chemistry Lab.

This course is designed to develop advanced skills in chemical synthesis and analysis as preparation for work in a modern synthetic chemistry research environment. Students will perform synthesis of new chemical compounds using advanced techniques including air-free Schlenk and glovebox techniques, microwave synthesis, photocatalytic methods, and others. Students will also learn how to characterize their synthesized compounds using 2D NMR, ESI mass spectrometry, EPR spectroscopy, and other methods. The course consists of 1 hour of lecture per week discussing various techniques and applications and 4 hours of laboratory time. This course counts for 0.5 credits.

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CHEM 0970. Undergraduate Research.

Prerequisite: permission of the staff. Permission should be requested before the end of the preceding semester. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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CHEM 0980. Undergraduate Research.

See Undergraduate Research (CHEM 0970) for course description. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

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CHEM 0980S. Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated and Mandatory S/NC.

Students in this independent undergraduate research course will be expected to work on several scaffolded writing assignments throughout the semester. As with all writing-designated courses, students will receive feedback on their writing that they can incorporate into a revised version of the assignment or a future submission. Students who will not be engaged in this level of scientific writing should enroll in the traditional undergraduate research course, CHEM 0970/0980. This independent study is Mandatory S/NC.

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CHEM 0981. Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated.

Students in this independent undergraduate research course will be expected to work on several scaffolded writing assignments throughout the semester. As with all writing-designated courses, students will receive feedback on their writing that they can incorporate into a revised version of the assignment or a future submission. Students who will not be engaged in this level of scientific writing should enroll in the traditional undergraduate research course, CHEM 0970/0980.

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CHEM 0999. Chemistry and Art.

“Chemistry and Art” is an interdisciplinary course that explores different chemical concepts and techniques through the lenses of art and art history. The topics covered include paint and painting, stained glass; pottery and porcelains; gemstones and jewelry; color and art conservation. Drawing from early artistic texts, we will take a historically informed approach, connecting medieval stained-glass techniques, early pigmentation sourcing, and Qin dynasty pottery work to modern chemical explanations. Throughout the course, lectures, discussions, hands-on activities, and writing are totally integrated and the chemistry principles and techniques behind art objects and art-making are introduced through a series of case studies.

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CHEM 1060. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

Covers the physical and chemical properties of transition metal compounds as well as current research topics in inorganic chemistry. Laboratory is designed for the practice of modern inorganic chemistry through the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of air-sensitive transition metal compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 0500.

Fall CHEM1060 S01 16792 MW 8:30-9:50(09) (O. Chen)
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CHEM 1140. Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry.

An introduction to the quantum theory of chemical systems. Elements of quantum mechanics; electronic structure of atoms and molecules; study of molecular structure and behavior by spectroscopy; chemical bonding are all explored. Prerequisites: CHEM 0330, MATH 0180 or equivalent, PHYS 0030 and PHYS 0040 or PHYS 0050 and PHYS 0060 or PHYS 0070 and PHYS 0470 or ENGN 0030 and ENGN 0040.

Fall CHEM1140 S01 16793 MWF 10:00-10:50(14) (R. Stratt)
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CHEM 1150. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.

Examines the question: Where does chemical equilibrium come from? Focuses on macroscopic perspectives on chemical systems and the molecular origins of macroscopic behavior along with elements of statistical mechanics, the laws of thermodynamics, and the relationships between the two. Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or written permission of the instructor.

Spr CHEM1150 S01 25305 MWF 10:00-10:50(03) (R. Stratt)
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CHEM 1160. Physical Chemistry Laboratory.

An introduction to modern instrumentation and experimental techniques as applied to physical chemistry. Experiments will emphasize application of the ideas of spectroscopy, kinetics, statistical mechanics, and thermodynamics to systems of chemical and biochemical interest. Required course for concentrators in chemistry. One to two afternoons of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1140 or permission of the instructor.

Spr CHEM1160 S01 25306 MW 1:00-4:50 (C. Rose-Petruck)
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CHEM 1170. Environmental Chemistry.

A laboratory course using analytical methods to help in the study and description of several realistic environmental problems. Illustrates scientific methodology and measurement techniques as they apply to these important problems. A problem-solving course employing a kind of environmental chemical detective work. Two laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: MATH 0100 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 8. Instructor permission required.

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CHEM 1220. Computational Tools in Biochemistry and Chemical Biology.

Introduction to computational tools used to analyze protein sequences and structures, DNA sequence analysis, RNA structure, biochemical pathways and the analysis of microarray data. Extensive use of programs such as AMBER, BLAST, PSIBLAST and a discussion of their limitations.

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CHEM 1230. Chemical Biology.

This course covers topics at the interface of chemistry and biology and, specifically, the use of chemical tools to probe biological systems. Using examples from the recent literature, we will discuss using the central methods of chemistry, namely the ability to design and synthesize compounds with a particular set of properties, to analyze biological problems. Specific topics include molecular recognition of DNA, artificial enzymes, small molecule sensors, and in vivo imaging of proteins, nucleic acids, and cell-surface carbohydrates. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360 and BIOL 0280. If enrollment exceeds the limit, permission to enroll will be allotted in the order: 1) first year graduate students, 2) senior concentrators in Chemistry or Biochemistry 3) junior concentrators 4) other students. Students who have registered or have permission to enroll must attend the first three classes or risk losing their places to someone on the waiting list.

Spr CHEM1230 S01 25307 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (S. Delaney)
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CHEM 1240. Biochemistry.

Examines the chemical, mechanistic, and structural basis for enzymatic catalysis. Uses examples from the recent literature to examine how the experimental and conceptual tools of chemical synthesis, isotopic labeling, stereochemistry, enzymology, kinetics, and protein structure can be brought to bear to unravel the chemical and physical principles underlying the enormous catalytic acceleration and exquisite structural specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Prerequisites: Strong background in organic chemistry (CHEM 0360, A or B performance preferable) plus at least one semester of Biochemistry (BIOL 0280). Enrollment limited to: 25 students, written permission required.

Fall CHEM1240 S02 17896 TTh 9:00-10:20(05) (J. Morin)
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CHEM 1450. Advanced Organic Chemistry.

Lectures cover topics of current interest in organic reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and structure determination. Laboratory emphasizes spectroscopic and separation techniques and modern synthetic methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 0360. Students MUST register for a lecture section, conference and a lab.

Spr CHEM1450 S01 25308 MW 8:30-9:50(02) (B. McDonald)
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CHEM 1560A. Molecular Modeling.

No description available.

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CHEM 1560C. Advanced Spectroscopy.

No description available.

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CHEM 1560E. Biological Mass Spectrometry.

This seminar course will survey the instrumentation, methods, and applications of modern biological mass spectrometry. Through lecture and interactive discussions, we will explore the fundamentals of mass spectrometry. We will then proceed to cover a series of topics relevant to protein and peptides analysis. The seminar will conclude with an exploration of recent developments in instrumentation or applications of particular interest to the participants. Recommended pre-requisites: CHEM 0360, BIOL 0280, PHYS 0040. Enrollment limited to 20.

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CHEM 1560F. Organic Structure Analysis.

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CHEM 1560G. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

These special topics courses cover the basics of modern NMR spectroscopy. Topics to be included are as follows: modern Fourier transform methodology, modern NMR instrumentation, and a comprehensive discussion of one and two dimensional experiments that are routinely performed. Topics such as coherence transfer and pulsed field gradients will also be included. Experimental methods covered in detail include COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOSEY, ROSEY, EXSY and DOSY methodology. This course will not focus on structure determination or spectral interpretation but rather on experimental methodology.

Spr CHEM1560G S01 25309 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (P. Williard)
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CHEM 1560H. Chemical Glycobiology.

This course examines the chemistry and biology of carbohydrates in living systems. Topics to be covered may include - principles of carbohydrate recognition, enzymes involved in synthesis and modification of carbohydrates, carbohydrates in bacterial/viral and other cellular interactions, glycomics, carbohydrate synthesis. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360 and BIOL 0280. Instructor permission required. Attendance at the first class meeting is required for enrollment.

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CHEM 1560I. DNA Damage and Repair.

This course analyzes the chemistry of DNA damaging agents and the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and DNA repair. We will also analyze the mutagenic and toxic consequences of modifications to DNA structure. Specific topics include the reactions of alkylating agents, ultraviolet radiation, and oxidizing radicals with DNA; additionally, chemotherapeutics that modify DNA will be discussed. Multiple cellular repair pathways will be covered including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and direct reversal. Prerequisites: CHEM 0350, CHEM 0360, BIOL 0280, BIOL 1270, or by permission.

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CHEM 1560J. Topics in Bioinorganic Chemistry.

Covers current topics of bioinorganic chemistry with review of fundamental inorganic and biological chemistry. Topics include metal ion transport and storage, oxygen metabolism, electron transfer, respiration and photosynthesis, metal ion receptors and signaling, hydrolytic chemistry, metallo-neurochemistry, and medicinal bioinorganic chemistry. Students are strongly urged to complete both CHEM 0500 and CHEM 0360 prior to this special topics course.

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CHEM 1560K. Computational Chemistry: Accelerating Chemical Discovery via Computation and Data Science.

Introduction to computational tools for studying the structure of molecules, chemical bonding and chemical reactions. A survey of computational approaches for calculating electron distribution such as molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and ab initio methods (Hartree-Fock, configuration interaction, perturbation theory and density functional theory) will be given. Methods for calculating dynamics of atoms in molecular vibration and chemical reactions will be covered. The course is intended for seniors and graduate students in all subdivisions of chemistry. The goal is to make students capable of using research level tools and carry out simple calculations related to their research interests.

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CHEM 1560M. Applied Materials Chemistry.

Materials chemistry is the study of the synthesis, structure, properties, and application of solid materials. Our technology-driven world is fueled by advances in materials chemistry with examples of application in areas such as microelectronics, polymers, and energy technology. This course will explain the application of materials chemistry through the materials properties and characterization, detailing how the crystalline and molecular structure of materials can be related to electronic, optical, thermal, and mechanical properties.

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CHEM 1560N. Organometallic Chemistry.

Modern organometallic chemistry continues to find unique applications including next generation lighting displays, therapeutics and imaging, energy science, and green chemical synthesis. In this course we will briefly review fundamentals of inorganic chemistry (MO theory, ligand field theory, Pearson’s HSAB theory), and then delve into the structure, bonding, synthesis, reactivity, and mechanisms associated with organometallic complexes and their associated applications. Significant emphasis will be placed on effective oral and written communication skills, with frequent peer and instructor feedback provided. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360, CHEM 0500. PLEASE NOTE: This class is WRIT designated for Undergraduates Only. Graduate students should register for CHEM 2310. Undergraduates should register for CHEM 1560N.

Fall CHEM1560N S01 16795 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (J. Robinson)
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CHEM 1560P. Applications of Modern Physical Methods in Synthesis.

The modern synthetic chemist leverages a wide range of physical methods to answer research questions in diverse application areas ranging from renewable energy, medicine, materials, complex molecule synthesis, and others. Students will develop a working knowledge of modern techniques applied to synthesis, learning fundamental principles, experimental limitations, and interpretation of experimental results. Selected techniques may include: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), Fluorimetry, Absorption Spectroscopy (UV-Vis, IR, X-ray), Diffraction (X-ray), Magnetometry, Electrochemistry, and Mass-Spectrometry. Emphasis will be placed on how techniques are relevant in current research areas, and the instrumental capabilities available at Brown University.

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CHEM 1560S. The Chemistry of Polymeric Organic Materials.

The 21st century has seen the transition of carbon-based polymers from commodity bulk materials to sophisticated and intricately engineered materials with applications in biotechnology, energy harvesting and storage, separations, and sensing schemes. At the heart of these thrusts have been developments in the synthesis of organic polymers and methods for their fabrication into materials and devices. The aim of this course is to build a fundamental knowledge of polymer chemistry and survey their application to functional materials and devices. Topics covered in this course can be broken into three major categories: 1. Synthesis and characterization of polymers; 2. Processing and characterization of polymeric materials; 3. Applications of organic materials to modern challenges.

Fall CHEM1560S S01 18372 MWF 1:00-1:50(08) (B. McDonald)
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CHEM 1620B. Spectroscopy.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1140 or equivalent.

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CHEM 1620C. Topics in Modern Physical Chemistry.

No description available.

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CHEM 1660. Instrumental Analysis with Environmental Applications.

This course covers the principles and practical applications of important analytical chemistry tools used to study environmental problems, including discussions of method selection and statistical treatment of data. Students will strategize and implement a study of a field site. Includes lab sessions with hands-on experience of instrumental analysis using atomic and molecular spectroscopic techniques, separations by gas and liquid chromatography, and electrochemical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 0330 or GEOL 1370. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.

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CHEM 1700. Nanoscale Materials: Synthesis and Applications.

Focuses on synthesis, properties, and applications of nanoscale materials. It begins with the introduction to size-dependent properties and to general characterization methods of nanomaterials. It then outlines the synthesis, surface chemistry and self-assembly of nanomaterials. It further reviews catalytic, optical and magnetic properties of nanomateirals. Finally, the course highlights the applications of nanomaterials in information storage, energy conversion, and biomedicine. Prerequisites : CHEM0350, PHYS 0030 or 0050, BIOL0280 recommended.

Fall CHEM1700 S01 16803 MWF 11:00-11:50(16) (S. Sun)
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CHEM 2010. Advanced Thermodynamics.

Fundamental principles of macroscopic equilibrium thermodynamics. The three laws of thermodynamics, the thermodynamic potentials, temperature scales, heat engines and refrigerators, entropy, kinetic theory, and transport phenomena. Applications to solids, fluids, and magnetic systems; Gibbs relations, first and second order phase traditions, thermal radiation, gas expansions.

Fall CHEM2010 S01 16796 TTh 1:00-2:20(06) (B. Rubenstein)
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CHEM 2020. Statistical Mechanics.

Introduction to modern equilibrium statistical mechanics, including the classical and quantum descriptions of ideal gases, the molecular basis of thermodynamics, the concepts of ensembles and fluctuations, and the implications of quantum mechanical indistinguishability. Applications include chemical and phase equilibria, the transition-state theory of chemical reaction rates, and the theory of liquids.

Spr CHEM2020 S01 25311 MWF 9:00-9:50(02) 'To Be Arranged'
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CHEM 2210. Chemical Crystallography.

Introduces the principles of crystallography (plane groups, point groups, space groups, Bravais lattice, crystal classes), crystallographic methods (single-crystal, powder XRD, macromolecular), strategies for data collection, methods for data reduction, and structure interpretation; reviews modern crystal structure databases (CSD, ICSD) and search engines; reviews the historical development of crystallography and the scope, potential and application of X-ray analysis.

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CHEM 2310. Organometallic Chemistry.

Modern organometallic chemistry continues to find unique applications including next generation lighting displays, therapeutics and imaging, energy science, and green chemical synthesis. In this course we will briefly review fundamentals of inorganic chemistry (MO theory, ligand field theory, Pearson’s HSAB theory), and then delve into the structure, bonding, synthesis, reactivity, and mechanisms associated with organometallic complexes and their associated applications. Significant emphasis will be placed on effective oral and written communication skills, with frequent peer and instructor feedback provided. Prerequisites: CHEM 0360, CHEM 0500. PLEASE NOTE: This class is WRIT designated for Undergraduates Only. Graduate students should register for CHEM 2310. Undergraduates should register for CHEM 1560N.

Fall CHEM2310 S01 16798 Arranged (J. Robinson)
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CHEM 2320. Solid State Chemistry.

This course focuses on descriptive understanding of structures and properties of inorganic materials. It covers symmetry operations in crystals, crystal structure, physical properties of inorganic materials, materials phase diagram and preparation, and solid state electrochemistry for battery, fuel cell and supercapacitor applications. Prerequisites: CHEM 0500 and 1060 or equivalents or written permission. Recommended for seniors and first-year graduate students.

Spr CHEM2320 S01 25312 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (S. Sun)
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CHEM 2410. Organic Mechanisms.

This course examines methods for deteremining organic reaction mechanisms. Types of experiments introduced may include kinetics, free energy relationships, isotope effects, molecular orbital theory, spectroscopy, and product distribution analysis. Reactions typically covered inlcude pericyclic reactions, reactive intermediates, organometallic reactions, and substituion/addltion/elimination. The course makes extensive use of the primary literature, with a strong emphasis on the development of effective communication strategies. Completion of CHEM0500, and CHEM1140 is strongly recommended.

Fall CHEM2410 S01 16799 TTh 1:00-2:20(06) (M. Xian)
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CHEM 2420. Organic Reactions.

Study of organic reactions and reaction mechanisms. Discussion and analysis of organic transformations. Topics can include arrow pushing strategies and synthetic methods.

Fall CHEM2420 S01 16800 MW 8:30-9:50(09) (A. Basu)
Course usage information

CHEM 2430. Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

Methods, strategies, and mechanisms. Topics may include the chemistry of anions, cations, and radicals, concerted reactions, conformational analysis, and stereochemistry.

Spr CHEM2430 S01 26116 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (M. Xian)
Course usage information

CHEM 2770. Quantum Mechanics.

The course discusses the foundations of quantum mechanics and applications to chemical systems and phenomena. Using a rigorous mathematical treatment and Dirac notation, important time-independent model systems include two-level systems, one- and three-dimensional problems and angular momentum. Elements of time-dependent quantum mechanics focus on wavepacket motions. The semester will close out with a discussion of the spin and symmetry postulates.

Fall CHEM2770 S01 16804 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (P. Weber)
Course usage information

CHEM 2780. Quantum Mechanics.

The semester will start with a discussion of the spin and the symmetry postulates of quantum mechanics, followed by applications to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, including angular momenta, the nature of chemical bonds, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, conical intersections. The semester will close out with a discussion of scattering theory.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2770.

Spr CHEM2780 S01 26117 TTh 10:30-11:50(09) (P. Weber)
Course usage information

CHEM 2810. Departmental Seminars.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2820. Departmental Seminars.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2870. Departmental Colloquia.

Open to first year chemistry graduate students only.

Fall CHEM2870 S01 16805 F 4:00-5:30 (E. Kim)
Fall CHEM2870 C01 16807 F 2:30-4:00 (E. Kim)
Course usage information

CHEM 2880. Departmental Colloquia.

No description available. Open to graduate students only.

Course usage information

CHEM 2920C. Topics in Modern Spectroscopy.

No description available.

Course usage information

CHEM 2970. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.

Fall CHEM2970 S01 15839 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM2970 S01 24655 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHEM 2980. Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

Course usage information

CHEM 2981. Research.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. CHEM 2981 is mandatory S/NC.

Course usage information

CHEM 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.

Fall CHEM2990 S01 15840 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Spr CHEM2990 S01 24656 Arranged 'To Be Arranged'
Course usage information

CHEM XLIST. Courses of Interest to Students wishing to Study Chemistry.

Chair

Lai-Sheng Wang

Professor

James C. Baird
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

David E. Cane
Vernon K. Krieble Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry

Vicki L. Colvin
Vernon K. Krieble Professor of Chemistry and Engineering

Sarah Delaney
Professor of Chemistry

Gerald J. Diebold
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Ronald G. Lawler
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

G. Tayhas R. Palmore
Elaine I. Savage Professor of Engineering, Professor of Chemistry

William M. Risen Jr
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Christoph Rose-Petruck
Professor of Chemistry

Arthur R. Salomon
Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry; Professor of Chemistry

Richard Mark Stratt
Newport Rogers Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Physics

J. William Suggs
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Shouheng Sun
Vernon K. Krieble Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Engineering

Lai-Sheng Wang
Jesse H. and Louisa D. Sharp Metcalf Professor of Chemistry

Harold R. Ward
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Professor Emeritus of Environment and Society

Peter M. Weber
University Professor of Chemistry

Paul Gregory Williard
Professor of Chemistry

Ming Xian
Professor of Chemistry

Matthew B. Zimmt
Professor of Chemistry

Associate Professor

Amit Basu
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Eunsuk Kim
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Joan E. Lusk
Associate Professor Emerita of Chemistry

Brenda M. Rubenstein
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Christopher Takakazu Seto
Associate Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

Assistant Professor

Ou Chen
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Benjamin R. McDonald
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Jerome R. Robinson
Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Senior Lecturer

Li-Qiong Wang
Senior Lecturer in Chemistry

Lecturer

Charles I. Morton
Lecturer in Chemistry

Eric Victor
Lecturer in Chemistry

Visiting Lecturer

Jesse B. Morin
Visiting Lecturer in Chemistry

Visiting Scientist

Vlastimil Fidler
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Maricris Lodriguito Mayes
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Myung Hwan Park
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Ayse Uzgoren Baran
Visiting Scientist in Chemistry

Chemistry

The Chemistry concentration offers courses and research opportunities that range from fundamental studies involving the characterization and preparation of synthetic and naturally occurring molecules, to interdisciplinary studies at the interfaces of chemistry with biology, medicine, physics, engineering, and nanoscience. As early as their first year, undergraduates are able to work one-on-one or in small groups with faculty members on cutting edge research projects. The Sc.B. degree provides a thorough foundation for further graduate study or for entry-level technical positions in each area. Students seeking the Sc.B. may either pursue the standard Chemistry concentration or one of the two optional tracks: Chemical Biology or Materials Chemistry. Students may also pursue the A.B. degree in Chemistry, which provides a core education in the discipline.

Standard program for the A.B. degree

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry 11
CHEM 1150Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 11
CHEM 1160Physical Chemistry Laboratory 11
Two advanced science/math electives. 22
Total Credits9

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

The Chemistry Department offers three tracks for the Sc.B. Chemistry Concentration – a Chemistry track, a Chemical Biology track and a Materials Chemistry track. These tracks are not separate concentrations – your degree will still be an Sc.B. in Chemistry. The Chemical Biology track is designed for students who have a strong interest in the interface of chemistry with biology. The Materials Chemistry track is designed for students who have a strong interest in the interface of chemistry with nanoscience and materials science.  The expectation is that courses required for the concentration will be taken for a letter grade.

Concentrating in Chemistry – Three tracks
The required/recommended courses for the three tracks are given below.

Chemistry Track:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 0970Undergraduate Research1
or CHEM 0981 Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated
CHEM 0980Undergraduate Research1
or CHEM 0981 Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
CHEM 1150Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics1
CHEM 1160Physical Chemistry Laboratory1
MATH 0180 or equivalent 31
Two Physics courses2
Seven electives (at least three must be in Chemistry) 17
Total Credits19

Chemical Biology Track:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 0970Undergraduate Research1
or CHEM 0981 Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated
CHEM 0980Undergraduate Research1
or CHEM 0981 Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
CHEM 1230Chemical Biology1
CHEM 1240Biochemistry1
BIOL 0280Biochemistry1
MATH 0180 or equivalent 31
Two Physics courses2
Select three of the following: 43
Genetics
Cell and Molecular Biology
Introductory Microbiology
Principles of Immunology
Principles of Physiology
Principles of Neurobiology
Three other electives 13
Total Credits19

Materials Chemistry Track:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0360Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 0970Undergraduate Research1
or CHEM 0981 Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated
CHEM 0980Undergraduate Research1
or CHEM 0981 Undergraduate Research - Writing Designated
CHEM 1060Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 21
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
CHEM 1150Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 21
CHEM 1700Nanoscale Materials: Synthesis and Applications1
MATH 0180 or equivalent 31
Two Physics courses 22
One of the following courses1
Polymer Science for Biomaterials (or)
Biomaterials (or)
Tissue Engineering (or)
Composite Materials (or)
Biomaterials (or)
Five electives, at least two must be chemistry courses. 15
Total Credits19

In each of these cases, CHEM 0970/CHEM 0980 /CHEM 0981 should be carried out with a faculty member with an appointment in the Chemistry Department. Research with faculty advisors outside Chemistry may be allowed in some special cases. In this event, the student should speak with a concentration advisor to discuss this possibility.

Honors Requirements for Chemistry

 

All Chemistry concentrators who have grades of A or S with distinction in a majority of their concentration courses will be considered  for Honors; no separate application is necessary.

The requirements for Honors in Chemistry are:

* Grades of A or S with distinction in a majority of courses taken for the concentration.

* Two semesters of Independent Study (CHEM 0970, CHEM 0980, CHEM 0981 or equivalent. Guidelines and requirements associated with Independent Study are in the Undergraduate Concentration Handbook which can be found at the department website.

* A Thesis in a form approved  and recommended by the research advisor.  Additional information about thesis guidelines will be provided to seniors  by the Concentration Advisor.

* A Poster presentation at the chemistry department's spring undergraduate poster session.

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

How does life work at the molecular level? This question is at the core of the concentration program Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In earlier years of this discipline, the focus was on structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates and small molecules such as vitamins. Today the logical approach and tools of biochemical science are being expanded to new areas in neuroscience, developmental biology, immunology, pharmacology and synthetic biology (the design of analogs of biological systems). Training in biochemistry begins with a foundation in mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology. Some courses offered in other departments, including engineering, geology and computer science, are also useful. A key component of this program is the year of hands-on research carried out in collaboration with a faculty member here at Brown. Faculty sponsors are drawn from both the Chemistry Department and the Division of Biology and Medicine, and include basic science and clinical faculty.

 

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

Students must take twenty courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics, including the following core requirements, some of these may be fulfilled with AP credits.

Three courses in mathematics including two courses in MATH 0090/0100 or MATH 0170/0180 with a third class in statistics, math, or computer science 13
Two courses in physics, typically: 12
Basic Physics A
Foundations of Mechanics
Introduction to Engineering
Basic Physics B
Foundations of Electromagnetism and Modern Physics
Dynamics and Vibrations
Three courses in physical and organic chemistry:3
Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure
Organic Chemistry
One course in biophysical chemistry:1
Biophysical and Bioinorganic Chemistry
Four courses in biochemistry:4
Biochemistry
Inquiry in Biochemistry: From Gene to Protein Function
Plus two of three upper level biochemistry courses:
Advanced Biochemistry
Chemical Biology
Biochemistry
The two semester research requirement may be satisfied by any two of the following. Students should discuss alternative arrangements or special situations directly with their concentration advisor to obtain prior approval.2
Directed Research/Independent Study
Directed Research/Independent Study
Undergraduate Research
Undergraduate Research
Select biology or chemistry COEX courses (BIOL 0190R, BIOL 0190S, BIOL 0440, BIOL 0600, BIOL 0940G, CHEM 0500)
A summer research experience with faculty in Biology or Chemistry at Brown equivalent or greater in scope and scale to work the student would pursue in a Biology or Chemistry independent study course to satisfy one semester of the research requirement.
Suggested Elective Courses:
Students are required to take five courses from the chart below or, with approval from a concentration advisor, from any science or mathematics course relevant to biochemistry, cell and molecular biology. 5
Applied Mathematics Electives:
Methods of Applied Mathematics I
Mathematical Methods in the Brain Sciences
Essential Statistics
Biology Electives:
Principles of Nutrition
Techniques in Regenerative Medicine: Cells, Scaffolds and Staining
Biotechnology in Medicine
Phage Hunters, Part I
Phage Hunters, Part II
The Foundation of Living Systems
The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease
Microbes in the Environment
Inquiry in Plant Biology: Analysis of Plant Growth, Reproduction and Adaptive Responses
Genetics
Cell and Molecular Biology
Introductory Microbiology
Principles of Immunology
Principles of Physiology
Biology of the Eukaryotic Cell
Polymer Science for Biomaterials
Cell Physiology and Biophysics
Topics in Signal Transduction
Biomaterials
Stem Cell Engineering
Protein Biophysics and Structure
Synthetic Biological Systems
Physiological Pharmacology
Cancer Biology
Biomolecular Interactions: Health, Disease and Drug Design
Developmental Biology
Biology of Reproduction
Innate Immunity
Molecular Genetics
Virology
Development of Vaccines to Infectious Diseases
Drug and Gene Delivery
The Biology of Aging
Chemistry Electives:
Inorganic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
Computational Tools in Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
Chemical Biology
Biochemistry
Advanced Organic Chemistry
Organic Reactions
Computer Science Electives:
A First Byte of Computer Science
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming and Computer Science
Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction
Computer Science: An Integrated Introduction
Computational Molecular Biology
Engineering Electives:
Materials Science
Neuroscience Electives: 2
The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience
Biology of Hearing
Principles of Neurobiology
Neural Systems
Introduction to Neurogenetics
Neuropharmacology and Synaptic Transmission
The Diseased Brain: Mechanisms of Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders
Physics Electives:
Introduction to Relativity, Waves and Quantum Physics
Public Health Electives:
Essentials of Data Analysis
Total Credits20

Honors Requirements for Biochemistry

All ScB Biochemistry concentrators are candidates for Honors; no separate application is necessary.

The requirements for Honors in Biochemistry are:

* Students must have a majority of either As or S with distinction grades in concentration courses. 

* Two semesters of Independent Study (CHEM 0970, CHEM 0980 or BIOL 1950, BIOL 1960). Guidelines and requirements associated with Independent Study are in the Undergraduate Concentration Handbook which can be found at the department website.

* A Thesis in a form approved by the research advisor, and recommended by the research advisor.  Additional information about thesis guidelines will be provided by the Concentration Advisor in the first half of the fall semester.

Chemical Physics

Chemical Physics is an interdisciplinary field at the crossroads of chemistry and physics and is administered jointly by the two departments. The concentration provides students with a broad-based understanding in fundamental molecular sciences, as well as a background for graduate studies in physical chemistry, chemical physics, or molecular engineering. Concentrators are required to take twenty courses in chemistry, physics, and mathematics, although approved courses in applied mathematics, biology, computer science, geological sciences, or engineering may be substitutes. Chemical Physics concentrators are also advised to take at least six courses in the humanities and social sciences. Chemical Physics concentrators at all levels (first-year through seniors) are actively involved in research with faculty members in both departments.

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

Twenty-one semester courses1 in chemistry, physics, and mathematics, with a minimum of four semester courses in mathematics.  The expectation is that courses required for a concentration in Chemical Physics will be taken for a letter grade.   Core courses are:

CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
CHEM 0500Inorganic Chemistry1
CHEM 1140Physical Chemistry: Quantum Chemistry1
PHYS 0070Analytical Mechanics1
PHYS 0160Introduction to Relativity, Waves and Quantum Physics1
PHYS 0470Electricity and Magnetism1
Select one of the following laboratory courses:1
Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Experiments in Modern Physics
Modern Physics Laboratory
Select one course in statistical mechanics:1
Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
MATH 0190Advanced Placement Calculus (Physics/Engineering)1
MATH 0200Intermediate Calculus (Physics/Engineering)1
MATH 0520Linear Algebra1
Seven courses, primarily at the 1000 or 2000 level, in chemistry or physics.7
Select two semesters of independent study:2
Undergraduate Research
Senior Conference Course
Total Credits21

Honors Requirements for Chemical Physics

All Chemical Physics concentrators who have grades of A or S with distinction in a majority of their concentration courses will be considered  for Honors; no separate application is necessary.

The requirements for Honors in Chemical Physics are:

* Grades of A or S with distinction in a majority of courses taken for the concentration.

* Two semesters of Independent Study (CHEM 0970CHEM 0980 or equivalent. Guidelines and requirements associated with Independent Study are in the Undergraduate Concentration Handbook which can be found at the department website.

* A Thesis in a form approved  and recommended by the research advisor.  Additional information about thesis guidelines will be provided to seniors  by the Concentration Advisor.

* A Poster presentation at the chemistry department's spring undergraduate poster session.

Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts (A.M.); the Master of Science (Sc.M.); a the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree.

Research in Chemistry stretches from the exploration of physical phenomena of individual molecules, to the creation of new molecules, to material science, and indeed to the foundations of life.  The Department of Chemistry reflects this profound importance and diversity by offering excellent research opportunities in areas including organic and inorganic chemistry, chemical biology, analytical chemistry, nanochemistry and theoretical and experimental physical chemistry.  In addition, graduate students have the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary research in molecular biology, chemical engineering and the Institute for Molecular and Nanoscale Innovation.  The faculty student ratio is approximately 3:1 with most research groups numbering no more than six graduate students. 

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit the following websites:

http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/chemistry