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Neuroscience

Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system, including its development, functions, and pathologies.  It is an interdisciplinary field that  encompasses neurobiology (anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics),  elements of psychology and cognitive science, and mathematical and physical principles involved in modeling neural systems.

The Department of Neuroscience offers an undergraduate concentration leading to the Sc.B. degree and a graduate program leading to the Ph.D. degree. These programs include courses offered by the department and by several allied departments. The Department of Neuroscience has modern facilities for conducting research in a broad range of areas from molecular mechanisms to behavior and undergraduate students are encouraged to pursue research projects.

For additional information, please visit: http://neuroscience.brown.edu/

Course usage information

NEUR 0010. The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience.

Introduction to the mammalian nervous system with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement and speech, learning and memory, emotion, and diseases of the brain. No prerequisites, but knowledge of biology and chemistry at the high school level is assumed.

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NEUR 0650. Biology of Hearing.

Examines the sensory and perceptual system for hearing: the external, middle, and inner ears; the active processes of the cochlea; sound transduction and neural coding; neural information processing by the auditory system; and the nature of auditory perception and its biological substrate. Prerequisite: an introductory course in Neuroscience, Cognitive Science, Physics, Engineering or Psychology.

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NEUR 0680. Introduction to Computational Neuroscience.

An introductory class to computational neuroscience. Students will learn the main tools of the trade, namely differential equations, probability theory and computer programming, as well as some of the main modern neural-modeling techniques. Assignments will include the writing of simple Matlab code.

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NEUR 0700. Psychoactive Drugs and Society.

Will examine psychoactive drugs from two perspectives: (1) biological mechanisms of drug action and (2) the impact of psychoactive drug use on society and society attitudes towards psychoactive drug usage. Drugs to be discussed will include alcohol, opiates, cocaine, marijuana, LSD, nicotine and caffeine, as well as drugs used therapeutically to treat psychiatric disorders. This course will benefit students who are interested in exploring both the biological and social aspects of psychoactive drug use. Prerequisite: NEUR 0010 or equivalent.

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NEUR 1020. Principles of Neurobiology.

A lecture course covering fundamental concepts of cellular and molecular neurobiology. Topics include structure of ion channels, synaptic transmission, synaptic development, molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and neurological diseases. Prerequisite: NEUR 0010. Strongly recommended: BIOL 0200 or equivalent.

Spr NEUR1020 S01 25426 TTh 9:00-10:20(01) (C. Aizenman)
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NEUR 1030. Neural Systems.

This lecture course examines key principles that underlie the function of neural systems ranging in complexity from peripheral receptors to central mechanisms of behavioral control. Prerequisite: NEUR 0010 or the equivalent. First year and Graduate students require instructor approval.

Fall NEUR1030 S01 15856 TTh 10:30-11:50(13) (M. Linden)
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NEUR 1040. Introduction to Neurogenetics.

Recent advances in molecular biology and molecular genetics have allowed researchers to test specific hypotheses concerning the genetic control of behavior and neurological disease. This course will familiarize you with the relatively new and exciting field of neurogenetics. We will cover basic topics, new ideas, and unsolved problems in neurogenetics primarily through the two assigned texts. However, neurogenetics is essentially a “frontier” area in neuroscience, and the best way to approach this topic is by scientific literature, which will be covered in some lectures.

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NEUR 1440. Mechanisms and Meaning of Neural Dynamics.

We humans can shift our attention, perceive new objects, make complex motions, and adjust each of these behaviors within factions of a second. Neurons and systems of neurons vary in their activity patterns on millisecond to second time scales, commonly referred to as "neural dynamics." This course addresses mechanisms underlying this flexibility and its potential meaning for information processing in the brain. The course integrates biophysical, computational, single neuron and human studies. In addition to lectures and readings, students will learn how to build computational models to simulate neural dynamics at various scales from single neurons to networks, using Matlab and the Human Neocortical Neurosolver. Computational modeling will be taught hands-on in an interactive lab session each week. Please request override through Courses@Brown.

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NEUR 1500. From Neurons to Consciousness.

NEUR 1500 is an introductory neuroscience course designed for students in the joint Brown-Pfizer Master of Arts Program. It begins with the study of nerve cells: their structure, the propagation of nerve impulses, and synapses. This is followed by lectures on brain anatomy to show how the brain is functionally organized. We then move to the sensory systems such as hearing, vision and touch and discuss how physical energy is converted by each system into neural signals, where these signals travel in the brain, and how they are processed. Next we study the control of voluntary movement. In the last portion of the course we discuss brain mechanisms involved in coordinated brain functions and behavior, including functions of the autonomic functions, motivated behaviors (e.g. eating, drinking), learning and memory, attention and consciousness, and mental illness.

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NEUR 1520. Exploring Neural Data.

While a large part of being a neuroscientist involves performing experiments to collect data, the reality of studying the brain is that you can often collect way more data than you know what to do with! In this course, we will discuss data analytic challenges in neuroscience. We will provide real data sets for hands-on student activities. By the end of the course, students will have the basic tools and techniques to begin to work with neuroscience data themselves. Topics will include spike train, EEG and behavioral analyses. The course will emphasize basic computer programming skills in Python.

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NEUR 1530. Communication In the Brain: What We Know and How We Know It.

Neurons communicate through the thousands of synapses they form. In this seminar-style course, we will explore the cellular and molecular underpinnings of synaptic transmission. We will then examine how synapse number and function can be modulated to shape circuit function during development, learning & memory formation, and in response to perturbations. We will develop scientific thinking skills and an understanding of experimental approaches in modern neuroscience by focusing on how the field investigates synaptic transmission and plasticity. All readings are from primary literature. Please request override through C@B.

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NEUR 1540. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

Exploration of learning and memory from the molecular to the behavioral level. Topics will include declarative and procedural memory formation and storage, associative and non-associative learning, cellular and molecular mechanisms for learning, and disorders affecting learning and memory. Examples will be drawn from numerous brain areas and a variety of model systems, including humans. Students will gain experience interpreting experiments from primary literature. Prerequisite: NEUR 1020.

Spr NEUR1540 S01 25428 MWF 11:00-11:50(04) (M. Linden)
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NEUR 1560. Developmental Neurobiology.

The course will explore core concepts of developmental biology in the context of the developing nervous system. Topics will include: neuronal specification, cell migration, axon guidance, synapse formation, and neural plasticity. Students will gain experience with the primary literature and learn about cellular and molecular mechanisms of brain development and the tools and model organisms used to study them. Request override through C@B. The decision will be made based on a variety of factors including: seniority, concentration requirement, etc.

Spr NEUR1560 S01 25429 W 3:00-5:30(10) (A. Jaworski)
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NEUR 1600. Experimental Neurobiology.

Intensive laboratory experience in neuroscience appropriate for students with basic background in Neurobiology. Learn and employ the classical neurophysiological techniques of extracellular recording, intracellular recording and receptive field mapping using a variety of animal species. Experiments will include recording of sensory signals in the cockroach leg; frog sciatic nerve and sciatic nerve/muscle preparation and intracellular recording of neurons in Aplysia. Instruction on and practice of effective science writing is another component to this course. Labs are supplemented by informal lectures. Please request override through C@B. Overrides will not be given until after the first course meeting.

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NEUR 1630. Big Data Neuroscience Lab.

Recent technological developments have transformed neuroscience research, enabling us to generate comprehensive 'big data' sets that are often shared freely amongst the neuroscience community. This lab course will explore strategies to effectively use such open-sourced neuroscience data sets. Students will identify fundamental open questions in brain science and develop strategies to mine open-source sequencing, imaging and connectivity data to address their research questions.

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NEUR 1650. Structure of the Nervous System.

Combined lecture and laboratory course on the anatomy of the central nervous system. Lectures survey the circuitry of the major neural systems for sensation, movement, cognition, and emotion. Laboratory exercises (Mon. 10:30-12:30) include brain dissections, microscopy of neural tissue, and discussion of clinical cases. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010, NEUR 1020, and NEUR 1030. Please request an override through C@B. Please keep in mind that decisions on overrides may not be made until the first meeting of the course.

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NEUR 1660. Neural Computation in Learning and Decision-Making.

Your brain is constantly making decisions, receiving feedback about those decisions, and learning from that feedback. In this course we will examine the neuroscience underlying these processes from a computational perspective. The course will involve reading scientific papers from cognitive neuroscience, building and testing the computational models that have been developed to synthesize this literature, and, as a final project, extending an existing model of learning or decision making and characterizing its behavior. A primary goal for the course is to develop the tools and motivation to translate verbal theories of behavior into formal and testable computational models.

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NEUR 1670. Neuropharmacology and Synaptic Transmission.

Synaptic transmission will be studied from a biochemical and pharmacological point of view. We will explore the factors regulating neurotransmitter synthesis, storage, release, receptor interaction, and termination of action. Proposed mechanisms of psychoactive drugs and biochemical theories of psychiatric disorders will be examined. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010 and BIOL 0200 or the equivalent.

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NEUR 1680. Computational Neuroscience.

A lecture and computing lab course focused on computational models of neurons and neural systems, and emphasizing Matlab-based computer simulation. The course is open to all undergraduate and graduate students in any of the Brain-Sciences-related departments. It includes two parallel tracks: an intro track for students with little background in math and computation, and an advanced track for students with substantial background in probability, differential equations, and computing. The intro track is the equivalent of NEUR 0680, last taught in 2018. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010, or NEUR 1020, or NEUR 1030. MA 0100 or equivalent. Maximum enrollment: 16.

Fall NEUR1680 S02 16820 TTh 2:30-3:50(12) (L. Bienenstock)
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NEUR 1740. The Diseased Brain: Mechanisms of Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders.

The goals of this course are to illustrate what basic science can teach us about neurological disorders and how these pathologies illuminate the functioning of the normal nervous system. Consideration will be given to monoallelic diseases (e.g. Fragile X Syndrome, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Tuberous Sclerosis) as well as genetically complex disorders, such as Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's Disease. Emphasis will be on the cellular and molecular basis of these disorders and how insights at these levels might lead to the development of therapies. Prerequisites: NEUR 1020. BIOL 0470 suggested.

Fall NEUR1740 S01 15854 MW 8:30-9:50(09) (J. Fallon)
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NEUR 1750. Brain Rhythms in Cognition, Mental Health and Epilepsy.

“Everything in the universe has a rhythm, everything dances.” – Maya Angelou.

The brain, too, dances. Its rhythms are the result of millions of neurons coordinating each other’s activity. This course will explore how these rhythms are generated, how they relate to our perception and cognition, and how they can be used to better understand and diagnose psychiatric and neurological disorders. Our readings in this seminar will range from historical reviews of brain rhythms to modern primary literature employing cutting-edge experimental neuroscience techniques. Prerequisite: NEUR 0010 or the equivalent.

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NEUR 1930A. Cognitive Neuroscience: Motor Learning.

This critical reading course will investigate the behavioral and neural mechanisms of motor learning. Readings will focus on work done with neuroimaging, neural recording and neuropsychological approaches that have addressed how the brain organizes and controls different forms of motor learning including simple conditional, practice-related changes and sensory-motor associations. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010, NEUR 1020, and NEUR 1030, or equivalent.

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NEUR 1930B. From Neurophysiology to Perception.

This seminar will use readings from the research literature to explore the neural basis of perception. There will be an emphasis on vision, though other sensory modalities may be discussed. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010, NEUR 1020, and NEUR 1030, or equivalent.

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NEUR 1930C. Development of the Nervous System.

The course will explore core concepts of developmental biology in the context of the developing nervous system. Topics will include: neuronal specification, cell migration, axon guidance, synapse formation, and neural plasticity. Students will gain experience with the primary literature and learn about cellular and molecular mechanisms of brain development and the tools and model organisms used to study them. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 1930D. Cells and Circuits of the Nervous System.

Selected topics on the biology of neurons and neuronal networks emphasizing original research literature about the membrane physiology, transmitter function, synaptic plasticity, and neural interactions of different vertebrate central nervous systems. Appropriate for graduates and undergraduates with strong neuroscience background. Offered alternate years. Previously offered as NEUR 2150.

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NEUR 1930E. Great Controversies in Neurobiology.

This upper-level course examines some of the great controversies in the history of neurobiology. Reading material is drawn primarily from the primary scientific literature, so students are expected to already be familiar with reading scientific papers. Each theme will focus on a particular controversy, examining experimental evidence supporting both sides of the issue. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010 and NEUR 1020. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration. Instructor permission required.

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NEUR 1930F. Brain Interfaces for Humans.

Seminar course will cover developing and existing neurotechnology to restore lost human neurological functions. It will cover stimulation technologies to restore hearing, vision and touch, recording technologies to return function for persons with paralysis. The course will also cover devices to modulate brain function (e.g. deep brain stimulators). We will discuss early brain technologies, the present state neural sensors and decoders and future technology developments (e.g. brain-machine hybrids, human augmentation), as well as ethical implications. A final paper will be required. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010, NEUR 1020, and NEUR 1030; 1 year of physics, calculus. Enrollment restricted to 20 Neuroscience Concentrators and Graduate Students. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 1930G. Disease, Mechanism, Therapy: Harnessing Basic Biology for Therapeutic Development.

The recent surge in understanding the cellular and molecular basis of neurological disease has opened the way for highly targeted drug discovery and development. In this course we will use several case studies to illuminate how mechanistic insights are being translated into novel therapeutic approaches. Please request an override through C@B. Please keep in mind that decisions on overrides may not be made until the first meeting of the course.

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NEUR 1930H. Neurological Disorders: Neural Dynamics + Neurotechnology.

A seminar course on neural dynamics and therapeutic approaches based on open-/closed-loop Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) and neuromodulation for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Topics include: (1) Disorders of consciousness: loss-of-consciousness in generalized epileptic and psychogenic seizures; closed-loop seizure control; Coma, medically induced coma and general anesthesia; Neuromonitoring of consciousness; (2) BCIs for auditory/visual/somatosensory disorders; (3) Movement disorders: BCIs for restoring movement/communication; adaptive-DBS for Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. (4) Neuropsychiatric disorders: DBS for major depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. To sign up, add this course to your cart. Enrollment is based on a variety of factors such as: seniority, concentration requirement.

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NEUR 1930I. Neural Correlates of Consciousness.

This couse will consider the neuroscience of consciousness from a variety of perspectives, using examples from behavior, neurophysiology, neuroimaging and neurology. The course content will focus on primary literature, using review articles for background. Students will lead discussions. Sign-up required by Google Docs (link below). Please keep in mind that overrides may not be given until after the first meeting. Overrides are given based on seniority, concentration requirements, etc. Strongly Recommended: NEUR 1030. Enrollment limited to 15.

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NEUR 1930J. C2S Neurotech: From Concept to Startup- Translating Neurotechnology.

To provide an understanding of the process of translating neurotechnology concepts into applications that can benefit people with nervous system disorders. Emphasizing principles useful to (1) recognize viable neuroscience concepts that can be applied to human nervous system disorders and (2) implement the essential engineering and clinical steps to translate concepts into real world, useful solutions. This is for students interested in translational neuroscience research in academia or in entrepreneurship and commercialization of neurotech innovations. Please request override via Courses@Brown.

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NEUR 1930L. Neurobiology of Love.

The goal of this course is to explore the underlying neurobiological principles of love and attachment. Topics include the relevant brain areas, the role of sensation and perception in love and attachment; how love and attachment influence action and behavior; plasticity and learning in these systems; and relevant neurodiversity related to love and attachment. You will gain a deeper understanding of concepts and principles that apply throughout the brain. You will gain experience with primary literature and learn about the relevant experimental techniques. There will be an emphasis on how the neurobiology of love is portrayed in the popular press.

Spr NEUR1930L S01 25433 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (M. Linden)
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NEUR 1930N. Region of Interest: Amygdala.

An in-depth exploration of one region of the brain. Topics will include: cell types and properties; synaptic properties; plasticity; connections to other brain areas; sub-divisions within the area; the region's role in sensation and perception; the region's role in action and behavior; the region's role in learning and memory; and diseases and disorders. Students will gain a deeper understanding of concepts and principles that apply throughout the brain. Students will gain experience with primary literature and learn about techniques for studying the area. Topic Fall 2021: Amygdala. Please request the override during pre-registration. Students will not match with this course during the initial match phase, but students who request overrides will get additional information about how to gain a spot in this course by the end of August.

Fall NEUR1930N S01 15870 TTh 1:00-2:20(08) (M. Linden)
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NEUR 1930Z. Cells and Circuits of the Nervous System.

Selected topics on the biology of neurons and neuronal networks emphasizing primary research literature about neuronal excitability, synaptic mechanisms and plasticity, and diverse sensory, motor, and cognitive functions of neural circuits in vertebrate brains. Offered alternate years. Limit 15. To sign up, add this course to your primary cart. Enrollment decision will be made based on seniority, concentration requirement, etc.

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NEUR 1940B. Deep Learning in Neuroethology.

Critical readings class will examine neural mechanisms for natural behavior (neuroethology) through reading classic studies and following current research. The course will emphasize the application of deep learning methods to movement patterns, spatial orientation, and social communication. DeepLabCut is one of several new programs that empower students and researches to take advantage of deep learning methods for behavioral neuroscience. The course will teach how to replace single-parameter data analysis with deep learning methods to identify underlying patterns Prerequisites are Introductory Neuroscience (NEUR0010) and prior training in Matlab or computer programming languages. Request override through C@B.

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NEUR 1940C. Topics in Visual Physiology.

Selected topics in visual physiology are examined through a close and critical reading of original research articles. Emphasizes the anatomical and physiological bases of visual function. Appropriate for graduate students and undergraduates with a strong neuroscience background. Offered in alternate years. (Previously offered as NEUR 2120.)

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NEUR 1940D. Higher Cortical Function.

This reading course examines a series of high-level neurocognitive deficits from the perspectives of popular science and basic neuroscience. Prerequisite: NEUR 1030. Instructor permission required. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 1940E. Molecular Neurobiology: Genes, Circuits and Behavior.

In this seminar course, we will discuss primary research articles, both recent and classical, covering topics ranging from the generation of neuronal diversity to the control of behavior by specific neural circuits. Instructor permission required; enrollment limited to 15. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 1940G. Drugs and the Brain.

This is a seminar course devoted to the reading and analyzing of original research articles dealing with the interaction between drugs and the brain. This will include drugs used to analyze normal brain function, as well as drugs of abuse and drugs used for therapeutic purposes. This course is intended for undergraduate and graduate students with a strong background in neuropharmacology. To express interest, please add this course to your primary cart. The decision will be made based on a variety of factors including, but not limited to seniority, concentration requirement. Limited to 15.

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NEUR 1940I. Neural Correlates of Consciousness.

This couse will consider the neuroscience of consciousness from a variety of perspectives, using examples from behavior, neurophysiology, neuroimaging and neurology. The course content will focus on primary literature, using review articles for background. Students will lead discussions. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration. Prerequisite: NEUR 0010, 1020, and 1030. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission required.

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NEUR 1970. Independent Study.

Laboratory-oriented research in neuroscience, supervised by staff members. A student, under the guidance of a neuroscience faculty member, proposes a topic for research, develops the procedures for its investigation, and writes a report of the results of his or her study. Independent study may replace only one required course in the neuroscience concentration. Prerequisites include NEUR 0010, 1020 and 1030. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Permission must be obtained from the Neuroscience Department.

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NEUR 2010. Graduate Proseminar in Neuroscience.

A study of selected topics in experimental and theoretical neuroscience. Presented by neuroscience faculty, students, and outside speakers. A required course for all students in the neuroscience graduate program.

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NEUR 2020. Graduate Proseminar in Neuroscience.

See Graduate Pro-Seminar In Neuroscience (NEUR 2010) for course description.

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NEUR 2030. Advanced Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology I.

Focuses on molecular and cellular approaches used to study the CNS at the level of single molecules, individual cells and single synapses by concentrating on fundamental mechanisms of CNS information transfer, integration, and storage. Topics include biophysics of single channels, neural transmission and synaptic function. Enrollment limited to graduate students.

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NEUR 2040. Advanced Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology II.

This course continues the investigation of molecular and cellular approaches used to study the CNS from the level of individual genes to the control of behavior. Topics include patterning of the nervous system, generation of neuronal diversity, axonal guidance, synapse formation, the control of behavior by specific neural circuits and neurodegenerative diseases. Enrollment is limited to graduate students.

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NEUR 2050. Advanced Systems Neuroscience.

Focuses on systems approaches to study nervous system function. Lectures and discussions focus on neurophysiology, neuroimaging and lesion analysis in mammals, including humans. Cognitive neuroscience approaches will become integrated into the material. Topics include the major sensory, regulatory, and motor systems. Enrollment limited to graduate students.

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NEUR 2060. Advanced Systems Neuroscience.

Focuses on cognitive approaches to study nervous system function. Lectures and discussions focus on neurophysiology, neuroimaging and lesion analysis in mammals, including humans. Computational approaches will become integrated into the material. Topics include the major cognitive systems, including perception, decisions, learning and memory, emotion and reward, language, and higher cortical function. Instructor permission required.

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NEUR 2110. Statistical Neuroscience.

A lecture and computing lab course for senior undergraduate and graduate students with background in either systems neuroscience or applied math/biomedical engineering on the statistical analysis and modeling of neural data, with hands-on Matlab(Octave)/Python-based applications to real and simulated data. Topics will include signal processing, hypothesis testing and statistical inference, modeling of multivariate time series and stochastic processes in neuroscience and neuroengineering, neural point processes, time and spectral domain analyses, and state-space models. Example datasets include neuronal spike trains, local field potentials, ECoG/EEG, and fMRI. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration. Instructor permission required.

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NEUR 2120. Topics in Visual Physiology.

Selected topics in visual physiology are examined through a close and critical reading of original research articles. Emphasizes the anatomical and physiological bases of visual function. Primarily for graduate students with a strong background in neuroscience and a working knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian visual system. Offered in alternate years. Instructor permission required.

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NEUR 2160. Neurochemistry and Behavior.

Examines behavior from a neurochemical perspective via readings and discussions based on original research articles. Intended primarily for graduate students with a strong background in neurochemistry and neuropharmacology and advanced undergraduates with an appropriate background. Offered alternate years. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 2920. Behavior: A Genetic and Molecular Perspective.

Many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie behavior are conserved across species. This seminar course draws on work in invertebrate and vertebrate species to examine the genes and molecules that have been implicated in diverse behaviors. Topics to be discussed include circadian rhythms, pair bonding, migration, and aggression. Each week, students will read two to three papers from the primary literature and actively participate in class discussion. Prerequisites: NEUR 0010 and NEUR 1020 (undergraduate students) or NEUR 2030 (graduate students). Enrollment limited to 13. Instructor permission required.

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NEUR 2930C. Historical Foundations of the Neurosciences.

Two year sequence starting Fall 2010; students register for one year at a time. The first year (2010-2011) will examine the history of basic neuroscientific concepts from the late Greeks (Galen) to the later 19th century, up to Cajal (neuron doctrine) and Sherrington (reflexes and integration). Since the seminar meets only monthly, it must be taken in the Fall and Spring semesters to receive a semester's credit. For credit, a substantial paper (approximately 15 pages) is required at the end of the Spring semester. Primarily for graduate students in neuroscience, cognitive science, and psychology. Others may be admitted after discussion with the instructor. Auditors are welcome if they share in the rotating duty of presenting seminars. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 2930E. Bench to Bedside: Unraveling Diseases of the Nervous System.

Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

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NEUR 2930F. Disease, Mechanism, Therapy: Harnessing Basic Biology for Therapeutic Development.

The recent surge in understanding the cellular and molecular basis of neurological disease has opened the way for highly targeted drug discovery and development. In this course we will use several case studies to illuminate how mechanistic insights are being translated into novel therapeutic approaches. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 15 Graduate students. Sign-up sheet in Sidney Frank Hall, Room 315 beginning on the first day of registration.

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NEUR 2940A. Advanced Molecular Neurobiology.

No description available.

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NEUR 2940G. Historical Foundations of the Neurosciences II.

Continuation of a two year sequence focusing on the conceptual foundations in the history of neuroscience, from the late nineteenth century to the present. Primarily for graduate students in neuroscience, cognitive science, and psychology, but senior undergraduates may be admitted with written permission from the instructor. Seminar meets monthly, and must be taken for the full year to receive one semester credit.

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NEUR 2940H. Ethics and Skills Workshop.

The ethics and skills workshops will be lead by faculty trainers in the Neuroscience Graduate Program. We will cover the following or similar topics over a two year period: Plagiarism, scientific accuracy, data ownership, expectations of advisory committees and mentors, authorship disagreements, and conflicts among lab members. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.

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NEUR 2940I. Neural Correlates of Consciousness.

Will consider the neuroscience of consciousness from a variety of perspectives, using examples from behavior, neurophysiology, neuroimaging and neurology. The course content will focus on primary literature, using review articles for background. Students will lead the discussions. Primarily for graduate students. Senior undergraduates neuroscience concentrators and others may be admitted after discussion with the instructor. Instructor permission required. S/NC

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NEUR 2970. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.

Fall NEUR2970 S01 15739 Arranged (D. Sheinberg)
Spr NEUR2970 S01 24615 Arranged (D. Sheinberg)
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NEUR 2980. Graduate Independent Study.

Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. S/NC

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NEUR 2990. Thesis Preparation.

For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.

Fall NEUR2990 S01 15740 Arranged (D. Lipscombe)
Spr NEUR2990 S01 24616 Arranged (D. Lipscombe)

Chair

Anne C. Hart

Professor

Carlos Aizenman
Professor of Neuroscience

David M. Berson
Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science

Barry William Connors
L. Herbert Ballou University Professor of Neuroscience

John P. Donoghue
Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of Neuroscience, Professor of Engineering

Justin R. Fallon
Professor of Medical Science; Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Anne C. Hart
Professor of Neuroscience

Diane Lipscombe
Thomas J. Watson, Sr. Professor of Science, Professor of Neuroscience

Christopher I. Moore
Professor of Neuroscience

Michael A. Paradiso
Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Professor of Neuroscience

Jerome Sanes
Professor of Neuroscience

David Sheinberg
Professor of Neuroscience

James A. Simmons
Professor of Biology

Professor Research

Carl Saab
Professor of Neurosurgery (Research); Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Associate Professor

Wael Asaad
Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Gilad Barnea
Sidney A. Fox and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Lucien J. E. Bienenstock
Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics; Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Alexander Fleischmann
Provost's Associate Professor of Brain Science

Stephanie R. Jones
Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Karla Renea Kaun
Associate Professor of Neuroscience

Eric M. Morrow
Mencoff Family Associate Professor of Biology, Associate Professor of Neuroscience, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Kate O'Connor-Giles
Provost's Associate Professor of Brain Science

Robert L. Patrick
Associate Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience

Wilson Truccolo
Pablo J. Salame Goldman Sachs Associate Professor of Computational Neuroscience

Assistant Professor

Ahmed Abdelfattah
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

Theresa M. Desrochers
Rosenberg Family Assistant Professor of Brain Science, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Alexander Jaworski
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

Matt Nassar
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

Assistant Professor Research

Jason Ritt
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Simona Temereanca Ibanescu
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Carlos E. Vargas-Irwin
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Edward G. Walsh
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Michael S. Worden
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Weifeng Xu
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience (Research)

Senior Lecturer

Monica Linden
Senior Lecturer in Neuroscience

John J. Stein
Senior Lecturer in Neuroscience

Investigator

Jacqueline Hynes
Investigator in Neuroscience

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Kristin M. Scaplen
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Neuroscience

Senior Research Associate

Frederic Pouille
Senior Research Associate in Neuroscience

Research Associate

Keeley Baker
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Christopher A. Deister
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Scott J. Gratz
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Eunjeong Lee
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Eduardo Javier Lopez Soto
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Seyedamin Moosavi
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Andrea Pierre
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Altar Sorkac
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Kristin M. Webster
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Meet Zandawala
Research Associate in Neuroscience

Neuroscience

Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to understand the functions and diseases of the nervous system. It draws on knowledge from neurobiology as well as elements of psychology and cognitive science, and mathematical and physical principles involved in modeling neural systems. Through the Neuroscience concentration, students develop foundational knowledge through courses in biology, chemistry, and mathematics as well as three core courses in neuroscience. They are also required to develop facility with research methodologies (through courses in statistics and laboratory methods) before moving into specific topics in the field (e.g., visual physiology, neurochemistry and behavior, and synaptic transmission and plasticity). Members of the Neuroscience faculty are affiliated with the Brown Institute for Brain Science, a multidisciplinary program that promotes collaborative research about the brain. Prospective concentrators should contact Elyse_Netto@brown.edu in order to have a faculty advisor assigned to them.

Standard program for the Sc.B. degree

The concentration combines a general science background with a number of specific courses devoted to the cellular, molecular, and integrative functions of the nervous system. The concentration allows considerable flexibility for students to tailor a program to their individual interests. Elective courses focus on a variety of areas including molecular mechanisms, cellular function, sensory and motor systems, neuropharmacology, learning and memory, animal behavior, cognitive function, bioengineering, theoretical neuroscience and computer modeling. 

The concentration in neuroscience leads to an Sc.B. degree. The following background courses, or their equivalent, are required for the degree:

Background Courses:
MATH 0090Introductory Calculus, Part I1
MATH 0100Introductory Calculus, Part II1
PHYS 0030Basic Physics A1
PHYS 0040Basic Physics B1
BIOL 0200The Foundation of Living Systems1
CHEM 0330Equilibrium, Rate, and Structure1
CHEM 0350Organic Chemistry1
Core Concentration Courses:
NEUR 0010The Brain: An Introduction to Neuroscience1
NEUR 1020Principles of Neurobiology1
NEUR 1030Neural Systems1
One critical reading course1
Mechanisms and Meaning of Neural Dynamics
Communication In the Brain: What We Know and How We Know It
Developmental Neurobiology
Independent Study
The Moral Brain
The Craving Mind
1930/40 Topics in Neuroscience
One statistics course1
Essentials of Data Analysis
Principles of Biostatistics and Data Analysis
Principles of Biostatistics and Data Analysis
Essential Statistics
Statistical Inference I
Statistical Methods
Introductory Statistics for Social Research
Statistical Analysis of Biological Data
One lab method1
Introduction to Computational Neuroscience
Experimental Neurobiology
Big Data Neuroscience Lab
Structure of the Nervous System
Neural Computation in Learning and Decision-Making
Neuropharmacology and Synaptic Transmission
Computational Neuroscience
Independent Study
Sleep and Chronobiology Research
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Theory and Practice
Neural Modeling Laboratory
Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
Principles of Physiology
Comparative Biology of the Vertebrates
Four electives related to neuroscience 14
Four courses that will enhance your understanding of the field of neuroscience. While electives need not be from the neuroscience department, the following list are common courses taught by Neuroscience and other departments that are often used as electives. We encourage students to explore the broader course catalog and consult with their concentration advisor to explore the full range of electives, rather than limiting themselves to this list:
Biology of Hearing
Introduction to Computational Neuroscience
Introduction to Neurogenetics
Mechanisms and Meaning of Neural Dynamics
Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Developmental Neurobiology
Experimental Neurobiology
Big Data Neuroscience Lab
Experimental Neurobiology
Big Data Neuroscience Lab
Structure of the Nervous System
Neural Computation in Learning and Decision-Making
Neuropharmacology and Synaptic Transmission
The Diseased Brain: Mechanisms of Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders
Independent Study
Statistical Neuroscience
All NEUR 1930/1940 Seminar Course
Introduction to Sleep
Memory and the Brain
Laboratory in Genes and Behavior
The Neural Bases of Cognition
Translational Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorder
Cognitive Control Functions of the Prefrontal Cortex
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Theory and Practice
Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
Affective Neuroscience
The Nature of Attention
Perception, Attention, and Consciousness
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
The Moral Brain
Cell Physiology and Biophysics
Cell Physiology and Biophysics
Physiological Pharmacology
Neuroengineering
The Craving Mind
Human Genetics and Genomics
Cognitive Neuroscience of Meditation
Total Credits17

Neuroscience

The program in Neuroscience offers graduate study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D)  degree. The program is designed to educate and train scientists who will become leaders in the field and contribute to society through research, teaching and professional service.  The core of the training involves close interaction with faculty to develop expertise in biological, behavioral, and theoretical aspects of neuroscience. Graduate research and training are carried out in the laboratories of the program’s faculty. These faculty trainers lead outstanding well-funded research programs that use cutting edge technology to explore the nervous system.

For more information on admission and program requirements, please visit: http://www.brown.edu/academics/gradschool/programs/biomed-neuroscience